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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Hinduism, India

Hinduism, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Hinduism India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 73. "He was led to a large-domed temple at the center of the village and through a maze of corridors within. The corridor walls were covered with paintings of the deities, dulled and streaked with age. He saw Vishnu in the proud guise of a lion, and Siva dancing before the figure of a great lingam and yoni. Scalloped eaves were decorated with friezed of fornicating gods, and gilded tableaus from the Hariyana were etched into wooden pillars and baseboards. "
Hinduism India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 73. "He stopped to admire the handsome multistoried sandstone buildings that lined the roadway, adorned with statues of the gods and scenes from the Hindu epics. Too, he paused at the street of the artisans, fascinated to watch them at work: weavers and makers of cloth; workers of metal, ivory, stone, and leather; basket makes, potters, and dyers. "
Hinduism India 1000 C.E. Anthony, Piers & Alfred Tella. The Willing Spirit. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 96. "'...I sentence you to three days in my court library where you will read in their entirety the ancient manuals of love--the Kama Sutra, the Ananga Ranga, and the Koka Shastra--that you may learn something of the skill you obviously lack. "
Hinduism India 1820 Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 209-224. [Pages 209-224 feature a story from Ophelia's book about a devout Hindu woman who obtains powers from a mystical cat. Many religious refs., including Lord Vishnu.]
Hinduism India 1835 Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 526. "'Well, there's always the Sir Charles Napier method of cultural reconciliation,' she said. At his raised eyebrows she went on: 'He was a British governor in India, back... in the 1830s. A delegation of Brahmins came to him and complained that he was oppressing them by forbidding suttee, widow-burning, that it was part of their religion.'

'What did he tell them?' Cofflin asked, curious.

'Roughly... 'It is your custom to burn widows. We also have a custom. When men burn a woman alive, we take those men, tie a rope around their necks, and hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your national custom. And then we will follow ours.' ' "

Hinduism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 37. "It was at about the time of the Spanish Armada... that the iron entered the soul of the Sikhs. Up to that time they had been a peaceful, devout Hindu sect following the teachings of devout gurus. " [Some other refs., not all in DB. But all refs. by name are thought to be in DB.]
Hinduism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 69. "Mackeson could not visualise the General or any of his Peninsular cronies setting out with two or three Hindu clerks to hold court under a tre in a mudhut village. "
Hinduism India 1848 Moore, William. Bayonets in the Sun. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978; first pub. 1974); pg. 167-168. "He had seen houses before carrying a small vermilion handprint by the front door. Although the authorities condemned the practice of suttee, some Hindus still forced widows to follow their husbands to the funeral pyre. They seldom went willingly. But few neglected to dip their hands in a pot of paint and leave a mute symbol of farewell as they left their homes for the last time. "
Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 11. "'But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails,' replied Stuart; 'suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp the passengers!' "
Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 29. "'A curious place, this India?'

'Oh, very curious. Mosques, minarets, temple, fakirs, pagodas, tigers, snakes, elephants! I hope you will have ample time to see the sights.' "

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 42. [Chapter 12] "All this portion of Bundelcund, which is little frequented by travellers, is inhabited by a fanatical population, hardened in the most horrible practices of the Hindoo faith. The English have not been able to secure complete dominion over this territory, which is subjected to the influence of rajahs, whom it is almost impossible to reach in their inaccessible mountain fastnesses. The travellers several times saw bands of ferocious Indians, who, when they perceived the elephant striding across-country, made angry arid threatening motions. The Parsee avoided them as much as possible. Few animals were observed on the route... " [Many other refs. to Hinduism in novel, not all in DB. A significant number of chapters take place in India.]
Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 45. [Chapter 12] [1] The guards who followed the young woman presented a violent contrast to her, armed as they were with naked sabres hung at their waists, and long damascened pistols, and bearing a corpse on a palanquin. It was the body of an old man, gorgeously arrayed in the habiliments of a rajah, wearing, as in life, a turban embroidered with pearls, a robe of tissue of silk and gold, a scarf of cashmere sewed with diamonds, and the magnificent weapons of a Hindoo prince. Next came the musicians and a rearguard of capering fakirs, whose cries sometimes drowned the noise of the instruments; these closed the procession.

Sir Francis watched the procession with a sad countenance, and, turning to the guide, said, "A suttee. "

The Parsee nodded, and put his finger to his lips. The procession slowly wound under the trees, and soon its last ranks disappeared in the depths of the wood.

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 45. [Chapter 12] [2] The songs gradually died away; occasionally cries were heard in the distance, until at last all was silence again.

Phileas Fogg had heard what Sir Francis said, and, as soon as the procession had disappeared, asked: "What is a suttee? "

"A suttee, " returned the general, "is a human sacrifice, but a voluntary one. The woman you have just seen will be burned to-morrow at the dawn of day. "

"Oh, the scoundrels! " cried Passepartout, who could not repress his indignation.

"And the corpse? " asked Mr. Fogg.

"Is that of the prince, her husband, " said the guide; "an independent rajah of Bundelcund. "

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 45. [Chapter 12] [3] "Is it possible, " resumed Phileas Fogg, his voice betraying not the least emotion, "that these barbarous customs still exist in India, and that the English have been unable to put a stop to them? "

"These sacrifices do not occur in the larger portion of India, " replied Sir Francis; "but we have no power over these savage territories, and especially here in Bundelcund. The whole district north of the Vindhias is the theatre of incessant murders and pillage. "

"The poor wretch! " exclaimed Passepartout, "to be burned alive! "

"Yes, " returned Sir Francis, "burned alive. And, if she were not, you cannot conceive what treatment she would be obliged to submit to from her relatives. They would shave off her hair, feed her on a scanty allowance of rice, treat her with contempt; she would be looked upon as an unclean creature, and would die in some corner, like a scurvy dog... "

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 46. [Chapter 12] [4] "...The prospect of so frightful an existence drives these poor creatures to the sacrifice much more than love or religious fanaticism. Sometimes, however, the sacrifice is really voluntary, and it requires the active interference of the Government to prevent it. Several years ago, when I was living at Bombay, a young widow asked permission of the governor to be burned along with her husband's body; but, as you may imagine, he refused. The woman left the town, took refuge with an independent rajah, and there carried out her self-devoted purpose. "

While Sir Francis was speaking, the guide shook his head several times, and now said: "The sacrifice which will take place to-morrow at dawn is not a voluntary one. "

"How do you know? "

"Everybody knows about this affair in Bundelcund. "

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 46. [Chapter 12] [5] "But the wretched creature did not seem to be making any resistance, " observed Sir Francis.

"That was because they had intoxicated her with fumes of hemp and opium. "

"But where are they taking her? "

"To the pagoda of Pillaji, two miles from here; she will pass the night there. "

"And the sacrifice will take place-- "

"To-morrow, at the first light of dawn. "

The guide now led the elephant out of the thicket, and leaped upon his neck. Just at the moment that he was about to urge Kiouni forward with a peculiar whistle, Mr. Fogg stopped him, and, turning to Sir Francis Cromarty, said, "Suppose we save this woman. "

"Save the woman, Mr. Fogg! "

"I have yet twelve hours to spare; I can devote them to that. "

"Why, you are a man of heart! "

"Sometimes, " replied Phileas Fogg, quietly; "when I have the time. "

Hinduism India 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 53. [Chapter 14] The young woman was placed in one of the waiting-rooms of the station, whilst Passepartout was charged with purchasing for her various articles of toilet, a dress, shawl, and some furs; for which his master gave him unlimited credit. Passepartout started off forthwith, and found himself in the streets of Allahabad, that is, the City of God, one of the most venerated in India, being built at the junction of the two sacred rivers, Ganges and Jumna, the waters of which attract pilgrims from every part of the peninsula. The Ganges, according to the legends of the Ramayana, rises in heaven, whence, owing to Brahma's agency, it descends to the earth.
Hinduism India 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 270. "'when you see some Hindu fakir a-sitting in a temple niche, filthy naked with a flower on his hair, who's to say what goes on in that queer headpiece of his?' "
Hinduism India 1932 de Camp, L. Sprague. "Some Curious Effects of Time Travel " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1942); pg. 64. "In the early spring of 1932 we arrived at Swettypore, India, near which town the remains of Vugugus jonesiii had been unearthed. To effect our transition to the Pleistocene, we secured the services of a local Yogin, who asserted that he could send our astral bodies back seven hundred and fifty thousand years by simple contemplation of his coccyx. He agreed to demonstrate his powers by sending his own astral body back for a reconnaissance.

All went well, except that the Yogin's astral body failed to return to the present at the appointed time. Instead, the Yogin received a piece of bark on which was scratched the following message in the Devanagari alphabet:

Dear Shri:
So sorry, but I have met my soul mate. I have fallen in love with a Java woman, and shall never return to your loathsome materialistic century.
A rividerci
Your A.B. # (His Mark)

One receipt of this message the Yogin became much distressed, refused to cooperate any longer... "

Hinduism India 1940 Gormley, Adrienne. "Children of Tears " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "Beyond Father's own duties in the civil service, he and my mother worked with Ritesh's parents in planning the wedding. I remember their long hours consulting with the Brahmin priest, then the astrologer, and finally setting the most propitious date and time for the wedding. "; Pg. 3: "Father contacted Ritesh's father, and they went out once more to the astrologer to see what could be done. So the date and the time were changed, although the priest wailed that the demands of the English augured ill when weighted against the demands of the gods. " [Main characters are Hindus. Hinduism is not the central subject of story, but there are other refs. not in DB.]
Hinduism India 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 227. "No tigers in Africa, Hartmann. The story of little black Sambo comes from Dravidian India.

I remember how Apu laughed when I said that. Little black Hindoo . . . Funny. I expected our workers would be Frenchmen or something, excess labor being run around the ground... " [Other refs. to Indian characters, not in DB.]

Hinduism India 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 230. Pg. 230: "And the British adopted Nigger for the Hindoo, who might well have been lighter than your average Sicilian, long before it was given over to the Guinea Men... "; Pg. 236: [at slave auction] "Arabs and Crackers, Bedwine Hindee... "; Pg. 241: "...beyond the mountains, out over the Hindoo Sea... "
Hinduism India 1950 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 126. "'Birthplace?'

'New Delhi, India.'

...'Someone told me you were Pakistani.'

'I was born in India. My grandparents were killed by Hindus in a riot following the death of dictator Indira Gandhi. My surviving family fled to Rawalpindi, in Pakistan.' "

Hinduism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 114. "Escorted by three looming goondas, Seven followed the portly Englishman into a spacious yet shadowy rotunda lit only by swatches of sunlight that fell from the fractured dome high above onto the bare stone floor. Long stripped of the rich carpeting, jeweled mirrors, and other furnishings that would have decorated the chamber at the height of the palace's glory, the empty rotunda still contained hints of its former elegance. Fluted columns supported the high ceiling, while an ornamental frieze ran along the upper boundaries of the room. Small altars, each housing the idol of a separate Hindu deity, were tucked away in closet-sized alcoves stationed at regular intervals along the perimeter of the chamber. "
Hinduism India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 199. "'It's a conditioned response, triggered by only the most grueling of interrogations.' Beads of sweat dotted his brow, suggesting that Seven had not yet fully recovered from his long ordeal. 'A similar state can be attained by the most skilled yogis of your era...' "
Hinduism India 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 9. "'Was it during the war?' I asked.

'No. Right after. During the Hindu-Muslim partition riots in '47. Britain was pulling out, carving India into two countries and leaving the two religious groups to slaughter each other. That was all before your time...'

'I've read about it, Abe. So you went to Calcutta to report the riots?' "

Hinduism India 1978 MacLean, Katherine. "Night-Rise " (published 1978) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 376. "Beside me in the mirror, clean-cut and almost visible, was the face of an adolescent Hindu boy, dark eyes, full sculptured lips. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Hinduism India 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... Apparitions of Vishnu had been reported in India... "
Hinduism India 1986 Martin, George R. R. "The Science of the Wild Card Virus: Excerpts from the Literature " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 399. "...to contain the ghastly communal violence of August 10-13 in Calcutta, India, in which the Hindu and Muslim communities blamed one another for an outbreak of the virus... "
Hinduism India 1987 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 218. "...India... In this quasi-nation of Hindu and Moslem and Sikh, the vast majority of jokers seem to be Hindu, but given Islam's [anti-joker] attitudes, that can hardly be a surprise. The orthodox Hindu has invented a new caste for the joker, far below even the untouchable, but at least they are allowed to live... today you find Hindu and Muslim and Sikh living side by side on the same street, and jokes and nats and even a few pathetic deuces sharing the same hideous slums. It does not seem to have made them love each other any more, alas.

...Radha O'Reilly... She is Indian royalty herself, it appears, at least on her mother's side... Her people practice a variety of Hinduism built around Gonesh, the elephant god, and the black mother Kali, and to them her wild card ability makes her the destined bride of Gonesh, or something along those lines. " [Other refs. to Hinduism, not in DB, pg. 218-221.]

Hinduism India 1987 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 219. "Instead Braun and I made our way across Calcutta to visit the monument the Indians erected to Earl Sanderson on the site where he saved Mahatma Gandhi from assassination.

The memorial resembles a Hindu temple and the statue inside looks more like some minor Indian deity than an American black who played football for rutgers, but still . . . Sanderson has indeed become some sort of god to these people; various offerings left by worshipers were strewn about the feet of his statue. It was very crowded, and we had to wait for a long time before we were admitted. The Mahatma is still universally revered in India, and some of his popularity seems to have rubbed off on the memory of the American ace who stepped between him and an assassin's bullet. "

Hinduism India 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 21. "They stood on the bank of the Ganges and shared another sunrise. Already crowds were filling the oversized steps that led down into the river. Women rose from the coffee-colored water, wet cotton clinging to their thing forms. Earth brown pots echoed the color of skin. Swastikas adorned a marble-fronted temple. Baedecker could hear the slap, slap, slap of the washer-caste women beating laundry against the flat rocks upstream. The smoke from incense and funeral pyre floated and mingled in the wet morning air.

'The signs say Benares,' said Baedecker... 'The ticket was to Varanasi...'

...A gold-plated temple spire was barely visible.

'This is the holiest spot in the world,' said the guide... 'Holier than Mecca. Holier than Jerusalem. Holier than Bethlehem or Sarnath. It is the holiest of temples where all Hindus . . . after bathing in the holy Ganges . . . wish to visit before they die.' " [Many refs., not in DB. Pg. 1-38 of the novel takes place in India.]

Hinduism India 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 36. "'Yeah. I'll be going back to the Master's farm on Monday but maybe Maggie could show you around Poona before you leave. Kasturba Samadhi, the Parvati Temple, all that good tourist sh--.' "
Hinduism India 1990 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 34. "Underlying India's ills was the central fact that, until recent years, three-quarters of her citizens kept caste restrictions in some form of Hinduism. "
Hinduism India 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Becoming the Full Butterfly " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 194. "Mr Bannerji was a kind of headman of the village... Casper stayed at Mr Bannerji's house, sleeping on a battered charpoy beneath the colourful clay figure of Shiva, god of destruction and personal salvation... Every day he sat on an outcropping rock, looking down along the village street, past the lingam carved from stone, into the distance, shimmering with Indian heat. " [Story takes place partially in India. May be other Hindu refs., especially if the story's central philosophical idea of the 'Great Law Dream' is somehow derived from Hinduism, although Hinduism is not mentioned by name.]
Hinduism India 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Becoming the Full Butterfly " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 201. "'What about sex?' Casper asked.

And Leigh answered calmly, 'Sex and reproduction are Shiva's gift. They are our fortification against decay. Like Shiva, they can also destroy.' "

Hinduism India 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 35. "India was now one-third Moslem; her Hindu majority found it easier to accomodate Islam every day. " [This, after Pakistan attacked India, and India then invaded Pakistan and annexed it as a state.]
Hinduism India 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 28-29. "The year 1997... As the world spun on its course that Easter Day a whole series of manifestations came and went... And on, across South-East Asia and India, avatars Buddhist and Hindu appeared at holy places... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Hinduism India 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 257. "But the dancing boy--he reminded Jack of the Hindi films Leonard dragged him to when they were in Bombay in the late seventies and early eighties, bizarre epics where blue-skinned actors played gods who raped and then embraced weeping ecstatic women, only to be interrupted by sari clad Busby Berkeley chorines on acid, all singing, all dancing, all for the greater glory of the avatars of Vishnu . . .

And suddenly that, too, was oddly familiar.

'. . . fear the phantoms of the Kali Yuga . . .' " [More]

Hinduism India 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 53. Pg. 53: "The passport examiner, a slender Hindu, lay a yard beyond the Sikhs. "; Pg. 66: "For better or worse, we had what we had always said we wanted. Ahimsa. The Age of Reason. The Kingdom of God. "
Hinduism India 2000 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 31. "Or take the next headline, which was about the war between India and Pakistan. In Pakistan they were Moslems, and in India they were mostly Hindus, and the Hindus and the Moslems had loathed each other for centuries. So every now and then the Hindus would try to blow the Moslems away, and to the extent that they succeeded, it would make the Moslems mad, and the next time they would try to blow the Hindus away. That had been going on for generation, and it was no secret; the Hindus knew what would happen if they killed Moslems and the Moslems knew what would happen if they killed Hindus. So they knew it was dumb, but they did it anyway. Nobody said, 'If we kill them they are just going to kill us, and we wind up worse off than before.' What they said was, probably, 'Are we dogs or men? Let us go and avenge the deaths or our relatives...' "
Hinduism India 2002 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 101. "'You are Kalki, come to us to save us from disaster,' said Chandralingam. 'It has happened many times before; it does not come as a surprise to us.'

'Mr. President, I don't think I know what Kalki is.'

'He is an aspect of the Lord Vishnu; he is a horse with white wings who comes to destroy the Earth.'

'I don't feel like I'm an aspect of Vishnu.'

'No, of course not; when we come to Earth you lose all memory of your divine nature, or you could not function as a man, you see. But others can tell. You are Kalki, please believe me, there is no doubt about it.' "

Hinduism India 2002 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Lathe of Heaven. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1971); pg. 129. "'...You and I are the only two men on earth, George, who know that there ever was a racial problem! Can you conceive of that? Nobody was ever outcaste in India--nobody was ever lynched in Alabama--nobody was massacred in Johannesburg!...' "
Hinduism India 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 115. "The Indian subcontinent... In the shadow of the Hyperion Object lay five hundred million lives... The gray disc did not look like the presence of a vast, incomprehensible thing, but the absence. Five hundred million people; their mighty, ancient cities; their gods and avatars that were among the first to rule the dreams of humans... "
Hinduism India 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 194-195. "In India, which had thus far escaped the severer earthquakes and suffered minimal tidal damages, it [the Wanderer planet] was worshipped by large congregations in nightlong rites. Some identified it as the invisible planet Ketu, at last disgorged by the serpent. Brahmins quietlycontemplated it and hinted it might mark the dawn of a new kalpa. "
Hinduism India 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 194-195. "In India, which had thus far escaped the severer earthquakes and suffered minimal tidal damages, it [the Wanderer planet] was worshipped by large congregations in nightlong rites. Some identified it as the invisible planet Ketu, at last disgorged by the serpent. Brahmins quietlycontemplated it and hinted it might mark the dawn of a new kalpa. "
Hinduism India 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 15. "There were bloody riots in Calcutta after an earthquake killed several hundred people, with the Hindus blaming Allah and the Moslems blaming Kali or Rama or any of the other hundreds of Hindu gods and goddesses. "
Hinduism India 2076 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 257. "Think I prefer a place as openly racist as India, where if you aren't Hindu, you're nobody--except that Parsees look down on Hindus and vice versa. "
Hinduism India 2076 Heinlein, Robert A. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1966); pg. 235, 240. Pg. 235: "...nearest to a favorable story in India was editorial in New India Times inquiring whether Authority was risking bread of masses in failing to come to terms with Lunar insurgents. Was suggested that concessions could be made if would insure increased grain deliveries. Was filled with inflated statistics; Luna did not feed 'a hundred million Hindus'--unless you chose to think of our grain as making difference between malnutrition and starvation. "; Pg. 240: "India newspapers and casts were rough that night; 'threat' to stop grain shipments made them froth. Gentlest proposal was to clean out Luna, exterminate us 'criminal troglodytes' and replace us with 'honest Hindu peasants' who understood sacredness of life and would ship grain and more grain. "
Hinduism India 2100 Brunner, John. "The Vitanuls " (first published 1967) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 178. "'He's a Hindu, as are most of our people,' the matron explained. 'Though he tells me this thinking has been much influenced by the teachings of Buddhism--which began, after all, as a Hindu heresy.' "
Hinduism India 2114 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 338. Pg. 338: "The Sufis danced under the clasped hands still wearing their white billowing clothes... looking like Hindus in the Ganges, or Baptists in the Jordan. "; Pg. 422: "...a conventional mountain range, appearing on this afternoon like something out of the Hindu Kush, bare and huge under galloping clouds. "
Hinduism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 204. "'Over and over again, you [in Wahabi's book] show the great achievements of the Indian people, and how they are overshadowed, swallowed up, ignored, despises. The civilization of the Indus is treated as a poor also-ran to Mesopotamia and Egypt and even that latecomer China. The Aryan invaders brought their language and religion and imposed in on the people of India. The Moguls, the British, each with their overlay of beliefs and institutions. I must tell you that your book is regarded with great respect in the highest circles of the Indian government, because of the impartial way you treated the religions brought to India by invaders.'

Petra knew this was not idle flattery. For a Pakistani scholar... to write a history of the subcontinent without praising the Muslim influence and condemning the Hindu religion as primitive and destructive was brave indeed. "

Hinduism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 204. "'I wrote then as a scholar. Now I am the voice of the people. I hope my book has not led you into a quixotic quest for reunification of India. Pakistan is determined to remain pure.'

'Please do not jump to conclusions,' said Achilles. 'I agree with you that reunification is impossible. Indeed, it is a meaningless term. Hindu and Muslim were never united except under an oppressor, so how could they be reunited?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Hinduism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 206. "'...because unlike Hitler and Stalin, you and Chapekar are men of honor--you are of India, and you both serve God faithfully.'

'To say that Chapekar [leader of India, and a Hindu] and I both serve God is blasphemy to one or the other of us, or both,' said Wahabi [leader of Pakistan, a Muslim].

'God loves this land and has given the Indian people greatness,' said Achilles--so passionately that if Petra had not known better, she might have believed he had some kind of faith. 'Do you really think it is the will of God that both Pakistan and India remain in obscurity and weakness, because the people of India have not yet awakened to the will of Allah?' "

Hinduism India 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 206. "'I do not care what atheists and madmen say about the will of Allah.'...

'Nor do I,' said Achilles. 'But I can tell you this. If you and Chapekar signed an agreement, not of unity, but of nonaggression, you could divide Asia between you. And if the decades pass and there is peace between these two great Indian nations, then will the Hindu not be proud of the Muslim, and the Muslim proud of the Hindu? Will it not be possible then for Hindus to hear the teachings of the Quran, not as the book of their deadly enemy, but rather as the book of their fellow Indians, who share with India the leadership of Asia?...' "

Hinduism India 2733 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 182. "And like the Buddha, I was almost grown before I saw my first hint of poverty. I was sixteen standard years old, on my Wanderjahr, and backpacking through India when I saw a beggar. The Hindu Old Families kept them around for religious reasons, but all I knew at the time was that here was a man in rags, ribs showing, holding out a wicker basket with an ancient credit diskey in it, begging for a touch of my universal card. "
Hinduism India: Bombay 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 34. "At last, having seen the Parsee carnival wind away in the distance, he was turning his steps towards the station, when he happened to espy the splendid pagoda on Malabar Hill, and was seized with an irresistible desire to see its interior. He was quite ignorant that it is forbidden to Christians to enter certain Indian temples, and that even the faithful must not go in without first leaving their shoes outside the door. It may be said here that the wise policy of the British Government severely punishes a disregard of the practices of the native religions. "
Hinduism India: Calcutta 1947 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 133. "'What happened/'

'It was during the Hindu-Muslim riots. There had been a poor Muslim family that lived with a local doctor. We were used to their presence. The man was a carpenter and my father had used his services many times. Their children had played with my younger brother. Then, in 1947, they chose the tensest time of the riots to emigrate to East Pakistan.

'I saw them come up the street, five of them counting the youngest child, a babe in her mother's arms. They were in a horse-drawn wagon... A crowd of people had intercepted them. The Muslim argued. He made the mistake of using his braid whip on the leader of the mob. There was a great surge forward... The people used clubs, paving stones, and their bare hands. They may well have used their teeth. When it was over, the Muslim carpenter and his family were stained bundles on the street. Even their horse was dead.' "

Hinduism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 27. "Yet, on every second or third floor there were open-windowed glimpses of humanity inhabiting these druidic shambles: bare bulbs swinging, bobbing heads, peeled walls... garish illustrations of multi-armed deities clipped from magazines and taped crookedly to walls or windowpanes... " [The novel takes place primarily in Calcutta, India. Many refs. to Hinduism, but rarely by name. The title refers to a Hindu deity.]
Hinduism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 38. Pg. 38: "'. . . and so you see, my friend, things change but people do not. I remember the day in July of 1969. It was during the Festival of Shiva...' "; Pg. 39: "'..My father had lived a long and useful life. Every man in his village, Brahman to Harijan, wished to attend his cremation. I had walked through fields which my father had flooded and tilled and recaptured from the vagaries of nature long before I was born...' "; Pg. 57: "'Kali was a goddess, wasn't she?' I said. 'One of Siva's consorts?' Despite my interest in Tagore, it had been many years since I had read any of the Vedas. " [More]; Pg. 64: "'...only enough Sanskrit to recite a few lines of the Ramayana and Mahabharata. "; Pg. 67: "'...Much more to my liking were the rate times when we went to the Lakshmi Hotel Nightclub to see the women dance in their underwear. Such a thing was almost unthinkable to a devout Hindu such as myself, but I confess I found it terrible exciting...' "
Hinduism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 72. "'Sanjay was very agitated all that month. I realized that he did not have the religious upbringing which I had been so fortunate to receive. Like all members of the Communist Party India, Sanjay had to deal with political beliefs which were at war with his deeper heritage as a Hindu. You must understand that to us religion is no more an abstract 'belief' requiring an 'act of faith' than is the process of breathing. Indeed, it would be easier to will one's heart to stop beating than to will away one's perspective as a Hindu. To be a Hindu, especially in Bengal, is to accept all things as aspects of divinity and never to artificially separate the sacred from the profane. Sanjay shared this knowledge, but the thin layer of Western thought which had been grafted over his Indian soul refused to accept it. "
Hinduism India: Calcutta 1977 Simmons, Dan. Song of Kali. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1985); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "'Were these Muslims or Christians?' asked Sanjay. His pencil was poised.

' 'Hindus, most likely, who knows?' the intern spat. 'The crematoria do not wish to have unpaying customers...' ";

Pg. 148: "Then we called down to Room Service and waited an hour for dinner to arrive. When it did show up, it consisted mostly of a lesson to me never to order cold roast-beef sandwiches in a Hindu country. "; Pg. 270: "Soon she would become the property of a man other than her father, and on that day she would receive the traditional Hindu blessing... "

Hinduism Indonesia 1984 Tiptree, Jr., James. "Her Smoke Rises Up Forever " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1974); pg. 433. "Despair takes him as the page opens. Djakarta University for Jesus Christ's sake. And some Hindu's bloody paradigm . . . "
Hinduism Iowa 1996 Rusch, Kristine Kathryn. "Faith " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 210. "Sure I had followed the story--everyone had--wondering why a thin, aging old man in Fairfield, Iowa, (home of the Maharishi, for heaven's sake!) tried to convince the general public... "
Hinduism Italy: Sicily 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 253. "A Tibetan swami from Palermo, Sicily, announced in Beverly Hills a newly discovered, ancient yoga discipline for ripple breathing which increased both pranha and cosmic attraction between sexes. His chelas were required to assume the matsyendra posture... while he read aloud from Rig-Veda... "


Hinduism, continued

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