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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Greco-Roman classical religion, world

Greco-Roman classical religion, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1968 Delany, Samuel R. "High Weir " (published 1968) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 185. "'--across a structure as big as the Parthenon! Hell, bigger than the Temple of Zeus!' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1968 Ellison, Harlan. "The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1968); pg. 802. "He had the seven-headed dog faces of an ancient Cerberus. Each head watched, waiting hungry, insane. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1972 Wolfe, Gene. "The Fifth Head of Cerberus " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1972); pg. 332-396. [The title of this story, of course, is taken from the figure in Greco-Roman myth which guards the underworld.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 78. Pg. 78-79, 104-105, 119.
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1973 Watson, Ian. The Embedding. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1973); pg. 135. Pg. 135: "...when the trans-Plutonian planet Janus had been found at last and named after the two-faced Roman god of doorways--doorway to the Solar System and doorway to the Stars. "; Pg. 146: "Prometheans who had mastered the secrets of nuclear fire... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 159. "The Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans originated our civilization, populated it with their gods, and formed, in their chthonic wisdom, a heaven underfoot. Some heretical Jews inherited that civilization, changed its gods to demons, and called heaven hell. Oh, they tried to pretend there was a new heaven somewhere up in the attic, but it was a most unconvincing deceit... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 51. "a new insight about the relationship between the black Virgin of Guadalupe, the Greek goddess Persephone, and his own sexual proclivities... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 81. "...from my peyote visions and Osiris and enormous female breasts and Spider Man and the Tarot Magus and Good Old Charlie Brown and Bugs Bunny with a Tommy gun and Jughead and Archie and Captain America and Hermes Thrice-Blessed and Zeus and Athene and Zagreus and his lynxes and panthers and Micky [sic] Mouse and Superman and Santa Claus and Laughing Buddha Jesus and a million million birds... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 98. "I'd been in the densest part of the earth's aura he told me, an aqueous region which was the source of myths about the waters of Lethe, the River Styx. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1979 Ing, Dean. "Vehicles for Future Wars " in Firefight 2000. New York: Baen (1987; c. 1979); pg. 168. Poseidon [missile]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1980 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 77. "'The Sumerians, the Egyptians, the Minoans, the Eblans, the Hittites, the Greeks, the Megalithic society--all the ancient peoples who know so much more than history has credited them with...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1980 Benford, Gregory. Jupiter Project. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1980) [Frontispiece, a reference to Jupiter.] "Father of all! in every age
In every clime ador'd,
By saint, by savage, and by sage,
Jehovah, Jove, or Lord!

--ALEXANDER POPE "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1980 Knight, Damon. Beyond the Barrier. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1980; c. 1964); pg. 131. "...Naismith could not help thinking again of lost spirits, wandering forever under the Earth. The Greeks had imagined a Hell like that; the Egyptians, too. A phrase from some chance reading came back to him: 'the chthonic ourobouros.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "Always there have been heroes.

Achilles single-handedly drove the army of Troy back behind their walls under a sun that was cried across the sky in Apollo's chariot. "; Pg. 94: Pandora; Pg. 100: Achilles

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 110. "at the site of McAfee's home near Gibraltar in Spain... This impulse would cause the western Mediterranean to pulse and roil until it constructed a levee of earth and rock across the Gates of Hercules, damming the sea from its principal tributary, the Atlantic Ocean... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1981 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 308. "Josephson pulled his lip. 'Hmm. How did the name 'Apollo' come about? That was before my time--'

Michaels said, 'It was picked out by Abe Silverstein in 1960. Now Abe was the head of the Office of Manned Spaceflight at the time--or rather, its predecessor. Silverstein kind of dabbled in the classical myths. He'd picked the name 'Mercury' a year earlier, because he liked the idea of a messenger in the sky. And then von Braun's people called their new launch vehicle 'Saturn,' and so another classic god seemed a natural choice to Silverstein.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1981 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 308. "'Maybe so,' Josephson said with half smile, 'but that's rather muddled. Isn't it true that von Braun was actually naming his rockets after planets? There was the 'Jupiter,' and then the 'Saturn'--'

'Give me a break,' Michael said good-humoredly. 'Silverstein was a research engineer; what did he know? Anyhow, Silverstein remembered from his schooldays the story of the god who rode the chariot of the sun drawn by four winged horses: Apollo, the son of Zeus. So Silverstein did a bit of checking to make sure Apollo hadn't done anything that would be too inappropriate for the American public, such as screwing his mother, and found he hadn't--and so Apollo it was.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1981 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 308. "Josephson studied his drink and thought about it. 'Well, maybe we ought to follow the same tradition. I know a little mythology too. Apollo had a half brother. Another great Olympian god. He had his own mythology; it was only later that he was identified with the Romans' war-god . . . Only battle and bloodshed gave him any pleasure; his twin children Phobos and Deimos--Panic and Fear--accompanied him onto the battlefield . . .' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1981 Wolfe, Gene. The Claw of the Conciliator. New York: Timescape Books (1981); pg. 298. "'Appendixes: Social Relationships in the Commonwealth "; "The religious are almost as enigmatic as the god they serve, a god that appears fundamentally solar, but not Apollonian. (Because the Conciliator is given a Claw, one is tempted to make the easy association of the eagle of Jove with the sun; it is perhaps too pat). "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1982 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in Dragon Tales. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 11. "The Greek god Apollo slew one [a dragon] in establishing his temple at Delphi... The sea monster that threatened the beautiful Andromeda and was slain by Perseus in the Greek myths is sometimes spoken of as a dragon... The sea monster that threatened the beautiful Andromeda and was slain by Perseus in the Greek myths is sometimes spoken of as a dragon. So is Leviathan, the great sea monster mentioned in the Bible.

Some dragons were abnormally monstrous, such as the manly-headed Hydra, slain by Hercules, or the six-headed Scylla, whose gauntlet Odysseus had to run. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1984 Bear, Greg. "Book One: The Infinity Concerto " (c. 1984, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 145. "'...There is a section in Hudibras by Samuel Butler--if I can remember . . .'...

A Babylonish dialect
...Th' had heard three labourers of Babel;
Or Cerberus himself pronounce
A leash of languages at once.' ' "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 102. "...back of a miniature temple to Diana, the Roman Goddess of the hunt. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1988 Tepper, Sheri S. The Gate to Women's Country. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 75. "ACHILLES: Is that Polyxena?

IPHIGENIA: That is Cassandra, great Achilles. Look closely. That one is still alive.

CASSANDRA: Ghosts! Who are these ghosts?

ANDROMACHE: You see them too?

CASSANDRA: Is that Achilles? And the child--Andromache, is that your son?

ANDROMACHE: It was my son. Odysseus had him slain. " [Many other similar refs., not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1989 Kress, Nancy. "Renaissance " in The Aliens of Earth. Sauk City, Wisconsin: Arkham House Publishers (1993; 1st pub Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, mid-December 1989); pg. 227. [1989 is year of story publication.] "The Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, Egyptians, Mycenaeans, Indo-Iranians, Syrians, Scythians, and Greeks all had griffins. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1992 Anthony, Piers and Philip Jose Farmer. The Caterpillar's Question. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 190. "They were six-limbed beings, quadrupeds with two arms. Centaurs, he thought, though not resembling much the half-man, half-horse of the Greek myths. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1992 Snodgrass, Melinda M. Wild Cards X: Double Solitaire. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 174. "The seven old crones stared down from their curving dais at Tisianne. They should be passing an eye back and forth, Mark thought, for their gray hair and cold expressions reminded Mark of the Greek legend of the Graeae. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1993 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 72. "A few of the telescopes, the duty officer could see, were devoted to picking up some missed data in Hercules. The remainder were aiming, boresighted, at an adjacent patch of sky, the next constellation east of Hercules... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 249. "According to Rachel, everyone started fresh at Contact. Basically, they entered a new state of being. It's not the Last Judgment--no sins are punished. It's not the Judeo-Christian paradise at all. More like the ancient Greek idea of the Golden Age, when men were so pious they socialized with the gods. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1995 Bradbury, Ray. "Dorian in Excelsus " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1995); pg. 128. "I gazed upon a tapestry of beauty, a golden phalanx freshly out of the Elysian fields and hills. The gates of mythology swung wide and Apollo and his demi-Apollos glided forth, each more beautiful than the last. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1995 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "The forms take shape, grow solid all around her. In the way dreams have of being simultaneously different and familiar, it seems longer this time. She is walking deeper into the area defined by these phantom shapes. She wants to call it a temple, though she does not know why. There is nothing holy here, she is sure, and yet the impression of columns, of the smooth floor, the vaulted ceiling, makes her think of ancient Greece, of the Parthenon in all its unbroken splendor, of statues of Zeus, Athena, Apollo. All the false gods who ruled the minds of men before the Truth was laid bare to them. "; Pg. 3: "indeed in a temple built very much in the style of Athens in its glory. " [Other refs. not in DB, as certain elements or Wonder Woman's Paradise Island home are sometimes compared to classical Greek religion/culture/mythology. Also, Diana's abilities are directly derived from the ancient Greek gods.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1995 Hawke, Simon. The Whims of Creation. New York: Warner Books (1995) [Frontispiece] "'They made fast all the running tackle of the swift dark hull and got out the drinking bowls. These they filled with wine, brim-full, and poured out a offerings to the Immortal Gods that are for ever and ever: honoring especially the clear-eyed Daughter of Zeus: while the ship cleft through the long night towards the dawn.'

The Odyssey
Homer "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "Exchange " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 214. "'...Here's more you read a dozen times. Greek myths, Roman, Egyptian. Norse myths, Chinese...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "The Ghost in the Machine " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 172. "'The only place in the world with roads like future roads, paths like tomorrow's paths, boulevards without cobbles, pure as Aphrodite's cheeks! Smooth as Apollo's rump!' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1996 Feeley, Gregory. "The Crab Lice " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 308-309. "...would remind Dionysos that he was also born of the simple nymph Semele, who was cruelly tricked unto death by Hera for having been seduced by Zeus. but the demagogue's ill-schooling undoes him... 'Apollo oversaw your city's law-making...' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 290. "'...The water of Brunau was to be used, in the Fuhrer's words, 'to cleanse the Reich, as Hercules had cleansed the Augean stables. All the filth of Europe will be washed away...' ' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 170-171. "Finckley: I'm curious. As a super hero yourself, who are your heroes?

Worthington: Oooh, tough question. Captain America, certainly. He was willing to take a chance on two mutants who wanted to do good when nobody else would, Quicksilver and the Scarlet Witch... Hercules once told me that on Olympus the gods measured wisdom against Athena, speed against Hermes, and power against Zeus--but they measured courage against Captain America. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 19. "Helena shook her head... 'The early Christians accepted the existence of the gods their faith supplanted,' she said, lapsing for a moment into the tone of voice Cassie thought of as her mother's 'lecture mode.' As the chief curator of the Gateway City Museum of Cultural Antiquities, Helena had an unfortunate habit--in the eyes of her teenaged daughter--of turning everything into some reference to her work. 'They accepted the existence of the Greco-Roman gods,' Helena said. 'They simply chose not to worship them. Eventually, they even turned some of them into the prototypes for their images of demons and goblins. Pan in particular seemed to hold a special fear and fascination for them. He became the blueprint for less sophisticated pictures of the Devil, and even gave us the word panic.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 34. "'Perhaps you would understand better if I took you to Olympus. Is there a time when such a trip would be convenient to you?'

Rebecca felt her knees weaken... 'Take . . . me . . . to . . . Olympus?'

'Yes. I can arrange an audience. Not with Zeus, I suspect, but certainly with Athena. She can explain all this better than I, though I am said to be blessed with her wisdom.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 91. "Rebecca was surprised again, for a moment. She did not think, in all the times she had given thought to such things, that she had ever before given the old gods, the Greco-Roman gods, the credit inherent in referring to them as 'beings.' To do that would be to give them a kind of life, to acknowledge them as something that existed, that was real.

This was something Rebecca had never considered, never allowed into her thoughts. Even as a girl, watching reruns of Star Trek, she had been deeply offended--though she had not been sure why, then--by the episode that proposed the Greek gods to have been space travelers...

They were never real, she thought, feeling strength returning to her in a sense of renewed purpose. They might have been some half-guessed shadows, hints of the greater Truth that Humankind was still struggling to comprehend--after all, they did prefigure some significant portions of Judeo-Christian lore... "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 142. "'...The destruction of the One World sent energy spilling in all directions into the Universe... scattered through the cosmos. It planted seeds, so that mortals who evolved there were invested with the power of the old gods and rose themselves to godhead. Here on Earth it struck in many places and spawned the gods of Olympus, the Norse gods, the Aztec and other gods. All much more than mortal, all touched by something we might call divine.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1997 Sheffield, Charles. Tomorrow and Tomorrow. New York: Bantam (1998; c. 1997); pg. 207. [Frontispiece] Pg. 207: "'I know more than Apollo,
or oft when he lies sleeping
I see the stars at bloody wars
In the wounded welkin weeping.' "

Pg. 275: "...the transmission link was an Achilles' heel. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 277. "...people like Hercules, the Smithville Thunderbolt, Silver Sable, and the Valkyrie. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 76. Pg. 76: "Two days before the Zeus IV landed, NASA announced that three major Hollywood studios would collaborate on the most expensive film of all time... " [From J. G. Ballard's 'The Message from Mars'.]; Pg. 88: Cassandra; Promethean fire; Pg. 96: Pandora's box
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 91. "But the Spaniards were pressing at the western border, and the news was not as rosy as the radio made it seem, and the Republic was worth preserving--for all its faults... it was at least a place where the two races, the French and the English, had achieved a modus vivendi; it was more liberal than the European monarchies, with their nationalist heresies or Romish paganisms. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 206. "He had been especially fascinated by the wild cosmogonies of the early Christian Gnostics, creation myths cobbled together from fragments of Judaism, Hellenic paganism, eastern mystery religions. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1998 Wilson, Robert Charles. Mysterium. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 117-118. "'Well, it's not exactly the Oxford History of the World. You want a summary? It starts with the Garden of Eden. Adam gets a human body from the Archons--'

'The which?'

'Archons. Minor gods. Adam is psyche and Eve is spirit and the serpent isn't necessarily the bad guy, but after that it's fairly straight Genesis all the way to Moses and the pharaohs. Egypt, Greece, and Rome are presented as fairy tales--Romulus and Remus and the genius of Plato and so on, but at least it's recognizable... It starts to go wrong around the second century. Valentinus is the Great Christian; Irenaeus is the persecutor of the faithful. The conversion of Constantine never happened. Rome was a seat of classical paganism until at least the 800s, and there are hints that Hellenic paganism is a vital religion even today--at least, in certain unenlightened foreign countries. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 71. "With some difficulty, Jarvis had persuaded the surly giant to trade his damp purple pants for a pair of Hercules's old brown trousers. Even wearing hand-me-downs from the mighty Son of Zeus, the Hulk's trunk-like legs... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 102. "Even though the quinjet had been designed to accommodate the likes of Hercules and Thor, he [the Hulk] still had to hunch over... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2001 Aldiss, Brian. "Marvells of Utopia " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 191. "'You could add to that long list all the world's false gods and goddesses, the Greek gods, who gave their names to the constellations, the Baals and Isises and Roman soldier gods...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2002 Bear, Greg. Vitalis. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 33. Pg. 33-34: Hades; Pg. 95: Promethean conference; Pg. 313: Cyclops's cave; Pg. 314: "Our camouflaged Marines stood out like muddy smears in a Greek temple. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2005 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 179. "I play around at fist. Find somebody there have been thousands of biographies of--Hitler. There's a huge, almost day-to-day account, tons of film, all flat and almost all black and white. Zeus shows up with a note that not all the stories fit together and he probably is entirely mythical. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 262. "...the men in the belly of the wooden horse waiting to be born and wreak destruction, and the pai of parturition, and Athena was born of the head of Zeus, and Time ate his children, as though he were not only in the wooden horse of the express but was it about to deliver the city to its enemy... Approaching them, the helpless stupid Odysseus of the twenty-first century, who must also be Odin blind in one eye so as not to let his right hand know what his left was doing. Odinzeus, wielder of thunderbolts, how could he aim correctly without parallax? "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2010 Clarke, Arthur C. 2010: Odyssey Two. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 21. Achilles; Phoenix
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 148. "And it [the ocean] has always had its gods: Dagon, Nun, Nodens, Ran, Rigi, Neptune, Poseidon... The harp of the seas, which Diana the moon goddess strums with rapt solemnity, is strung with bands of salt water miles thick... the little tides--far-distant Apollo plucking feebler than Diana... But now the harp of the seas had been torn from Dianna's and Apollo's hands and was being twanged by fingers eighty times stronger... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 252. "'I'm sure Charles Fulby was referring to hubris--the sort of high optimism some of the great Greek heroes had that made the gods jealous, so that they destroyed them.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986) [Frontispiece] "Zeus now addressed the immortals: 'What a lamentable thing it is that men should blame the gods and regard us as the source of their troubles when it is their own wickedness that brings them sufferings worse than any which Destiny allots them.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 272. "'Your beauty outshines the sun,' Markov continued in French. 'Aphrodite herself would be jealous of you.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 16. "The woman knew the truth, lived with it, yet it did not kill her. But when she uttered it--he thought of Cassandra and of the female Oracle at Delphi. And felt afraid. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 221. "'This is my circle, Norman McCay,' the Spectre told me. 'The Quintessence... These are Highfather... and the Phantom Stranger... This is Ganthet, survivor of the Guardians of the Universe... and Zeus, of whom you have no doubt heard.'

'The real Zeus?' I asked. 'Lightning bolts and Mount Olympus Zeus?' So far, this trip was only a confirmation of the dearest of my beliefs. Was I now to go through some sort of painstaking reevaluation? Was there something to paganism?

'Well, of course there was something to paganism,' the thunderer thundered, certainly hearing my thoughts as clearly as my outward wonder. 'Why would that involve reevaluating your beliefs? You mortals still have such narrow intellectual passageways. Do you still feel the need to dismiss an old notion every time you consider a new one?' " [Other refs., not in DB. Zeus is prominently featured. See also pg. 223-224, 230, 264, 276, 298.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 221-222. "Shazam the wizard was the one, I learned, who had given Captain Marvel his power. The age-old wizard was the synthesis of the particular talents of many of the greatest of Earth's sentient creatures--physical and supernatural alike. Shazam took the power to import Solomon's wisdom, Hercules' strength, Atlas' stamina, Zeus' power, Achilles' courage, and Mercury's speed. A generation ago, Shazam found a boy pure of heart and bestowed all these magic powers on the child, making him Captain Marvel. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 212. Pg. 212: "Fiberoptic filaments powered by microchain-mail writhed like snakes atop Medusa's head. "; Pg. 216: "Like Zeus and Hera from the heights of Olympus, they watched a small Scott standing in Theobolinda's bedroom... "; Pg. 255: "For this she used Cerberus, a commercially proven security interface. "; Pg. 256: Cerberus, Elysian Fields [More, pg. 256-260.];

Pg. 305: "...and coordinating with Air Force and Army deploying units of similar magnitude, was a job for Hercules. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 2025 Leiber, Fritz. "Gonna Roll the Bones " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 688. "The ace, with its single spot off center toward a side, still somehow looked like a skull--maybe of a Lilliputian Cyclops. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 110. "'Yeah. Every year, the Greeks had to pony up a few virgins and send them to Crete as tribute. Then the king put them into the labyrinth, and the minotaur ate them. I used to read that story when I was a kid and wonder who the hell these guys were, on Crete, that everyone else was so scared of them that they would meekly give up their children to be eaten every year...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 192. "'...speaking in tongues?'...'glossolalia'...Pagan Greeks did it--Plato called it theomania. The Oriental cults of the Roman Empire did it...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 289. "'...He was a very good boy for thousands of years. Make no mistake, you can't have a dozen gods running a world. The Greeks knew what they were talking about.' "


Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

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