Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Greco-Roman classical religion, USA

Greco-Roman classical religion, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1976 Le Guin, Ursula K. The Left Hand of Darkness. New York: Ace Books (1976; first pub. 1969), pg. 4 of author's introduction. [Author's introduction] "Apollo, the god of light, of reason, of proportion, harmony, number--Apollo blinds those who press too close in worship. Don't look straight at the sun. Go into a dark bar for a bit and have a beer with Dionysios, every now and then. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1979 Dick, Philip K. "The Exit Door Leads In " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1979); pg. 116. "'...But you'll be getting into that when the College bombards you with early Greek thought. 'Know thyself.' Apollo's motto at Delphi. It sums up half of Greek philosophy.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 84. "He was--like a spirit, like Pan or something. His excitement made us excited. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 177. [Looking at the stars.] "Hercules looked so little like himself that the only way anyone could have found him was if he'd got the news about Hercules being up there, and was told where to look... Daphne... Cassiopeia... "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. -3. [Frontispiece]

"We were going to the stars,
to Mars we'd make round trips.
We swung on vines like Tarzan,
and flashed Zorro's keen blade.
We were James Bond in his Aston,
we were Hercules unchained. "

Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 9. "...had God not had crossed eyes and buck teeth. In the real world I had no power; in my world I was Hercules unchained. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1991 Tepper, Sheri S. Beauty. New York: Doubleday (1991); pg. 175. "'Where did Ambrosius borrow you from?' I asked.

'The Greeks,' he said. 'I am their ferryman.'

'Of course,' I said, remembering things I had read. 'You rowed a boat across the Styx.'

'For the coins on the dead men's eyes,' he said. 'The work has not changed much.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 329. Pg. 329: "The only light comes from the Apollo-like figure above them. "; Pg. 330: "One second Robby is visible only as a fading glow in the white mist, an Apollo child clutching the neck of his teddy bear... "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 170. "With the bench elevated six feet over the well of the court, Crowthers appeared the size of Zeus. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 144. "'...If magic worked, what would be the effect on the development of science? What if the Greeks or Romans had really developed the steam engine instead of considering it a toy? What if Christians really had to be Christians? And so on. It's endless.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1996 Bova, Ben. "The Great Moon Hoax or A Princess of Mars " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998; c. 1996); pg. 72. "I cracked one eye open. There she is [the Venusian], naked as a Greek goddess and just as gorgeous, rummaging through the papers in my drawers. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 71. Homer; Iliad; Olympus; Zeus; Achilles
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 190. "'On Horace?'

'Oh yes. The planet that I find, he is fauceting.'

...'Professor, do you mean Horus the god?'

'Oh yes, very much Horus. You know before, we have Roman pavilion only.'

'The names of the planets. Mars, Venus, Mercury.'

He laughed with delight. 'Jupiter, Saturn, you know them. Yes, very much. But from far, Horus.'

'Egyptian, isn't he?'

'Very much. So I name him not Roman.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 23. "'...and she [Rebecca Chandler, Evangelical preacher] hates you--well, hate may be too strong a word, but she sure doesn't like the fact that you represent another theology. I think if you were a member of some sort of cult, if you followed a David Koresh or Reverend Moon or any other extremist, she wouldn't feel so threatened by you. But your gods, though thought nicely dead and gone, are respected and recognized. And now you come along and now only worship Zeus and Athena and Hera and Apollo and all the rest, but have actually met them. Actually owe your existence to them!'

'Why would that trouble anyone, though?' Diana's tone and the expression in her bright eyes were genuinely troubled. 'I understand that the God of the Christians is more obtuse, less obvious in His manifestations than Zeus. That does not trouble me. I do not dispute His existence.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 24. "'...I guess the analogy that comes to mind is movie stars or baseball players or something. I've never met, oh, Sean Connery, but lots of people have, and I know he exists. It would be pointless for me to dispute that he exists. But for Rebecca Chandler it's like--well, it's like having Sean Connery exist suggests that Mel Gibson doesn't' She paused. 'That doesn't make much sense, does it?'

'A little,' Diana nodded. 'You are saying that to Rebecca Chandler the fact that I have actually met Zeus somehow says Jehovah does not really exist.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 24. "'Yep. And in a way I can almost understand her. Faith is a difficult beast at best. Gods aren't supposed to walk the earth anymore. Maybe having you saying you met Zeus, that you got your powers from Hermes and Athena and Hestia and the rest, maybe that reminds Rebecca Chandler that some of those Old Testament stories are not so very far removed from the myths and legends of the Greco-Roman gods. In fact there is a distinctly Greek feeling to a whole bunch of stuff in the Old and New Testaments. Jesus smiting the fig tree and all that. Very Olympian.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 209. "The designs had been copied from Attic vases. Athena and the owl. Kore rising from the Earth. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 240. "...Lori had knocked on the door of her tiny cabin inside the C-130 Hercules. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 200. "He looked like he had just returned from Mount Olympus, stunned by divinity. "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 345. "A sticker on top said, 'Zeus, Moses, Jesus and Elvis.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 2000 Drake, Robert. "Power " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 106. "...Plato's Symposium that '[The gods] honored Achilles and sent him to the Islands of the Blest...' " [More.]
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 2004 Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 97. [Pg. 97] Now Laurel's profile was gone. In its place, Drina's Medusa curls snaked across every placard...; [Pg. 105] There were certanly many books here, but there were even more artifacts, plunder from a lifetime of travel and collecting and research. Painted leather shadow puppets, carven Garudas, bronze Buddhas and silver Hindu deities; silk kites shaped like butterflies and dragonflies and phoenixes; Bunraku figures and Tibetan prayer flags and Oaxacan skulls of plaster and human hair.
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballantine (1991; c. 1953); pg. 83. "'...Do you know the legend of Hercules and Antaeus, the giant wrestler, whose strength was incredible so long as he stood firmly on the earth? but when he was held, rootless, in midair, by Hercules, he perished easily. If there isn't something in that legend for us today, in this city, in our time, then I am completely insane...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 2040 Dick, Philip K. "Orpheus with Clay Feet " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 292. "daughters of Elysium "
Greco-Roman classical religion USA 2051 Kress, Nancy. Beggars in Spain. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 122. "A new race had always been required to sacrifice its roots to its own survival. Zeus, Jennifer would guess, had mourned neither Cronus nor Rhea. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 20. "'...If perhaps one could believe in a god of death . . . but unfortunately--'

'Maybe there is one,' Lurine said abruptly.

'Pluto?' He laughed. "

Greco-Roman classical religion Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 31. "'...What you saw, that figure holding that large ancient volume, that was an entity of the noosphere, from the Seas of Knowledge, who come down here all the way from Sumerian times... and when they built--they are excellent artificers--they were 'Ptath' to the Egyptians and 'Hephaestus' to the Greeks...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 53. "Dr. Abernathy said, 'I will disclose something more to you which you should know. I came across it in a textbook about the religions of the ancient Greeks. Their god Apollo was a god of constancy, and when tested he always was found to be the same. This was a major quality in him; he was what he was . . . always. In fact, one could define Apollo by this, and the Apollonian personality in humans.' He coughed and went on rapidly, 'But Dionysos, the god of unreason, was the god of metamorphosis.'

'What is 'metamorphosis'?' Tibor asked.

'Change. From one form to another. Thus you see, the God of Wrath, also being a god of unreason, like Dionysos, can be expected to hide, camouflage himself, to conceal, to be what he is not; can you imagine worshiping a god who, rather than is, is what he is not?' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Utah: Salt Lake City 1993 Nicita, Carolyn. "Solitude " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 31. "After examining the arrow, she held it like a javelin and tossed it, watching it fly, imagining herself to be Diana, the huntress, Diana would have to fly on Pegasus to get a better view than this. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Utah: Salt Lake City 2025 Baker, Virginia Ellen. "Songs of Solomon " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 167. "I looked away from the Grandmother-Construct to see that she and I are standing on a plain filled with poppies. The plain is a low bowl at the belly of Mt. Olympus, and the city of Salt lake, as I have come to know it, shimmers beyond us. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Washington, D.C. 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 7. "Or am I to accept the thesis of our neo-Millsians (neo-Machiavellians, rather), who maintain that the electorate is simply practiced upon, the groundlings of this world drama, that their secret masters in the Olympus of Washington mold their opinions as they (admittedly) control the press...

Abandon controversy that I may consecrate my talents exclusively to the Muses... Consider Youngerman's case: He acquiesced, he left well enough alone, he muzzled conscience. Did irony sustain him? Or the Muses? " [More about Muses: pg. 8.]; Pg. 30: Cerberus

Greco-Roman classical religion Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 15. Pg. 15: "A Goddess image, precious as the Venus of Willendorf or the Paphian Aphrodite. The Benandanti called it the Tahor Venus. "; Pg. 54: "Two from Artemis's temple in Boeotia, where the Arktoi danced, bear-virgins sacred to the huntress. ";

Pg. 59: "...a sheen of blood staining her cheeks and lip and chin: Artemis, Durga, Cybele, Hecate, Inachus, Kali, Hel . . .

The Great Mother, lover and slayer of Her faithful son.; Pg. 150: Cerberus; Pg. 160: Kronos; Pg. 190: Artemis and her twin Apollo; Pg. 194: Hermes; Pg. 200: Mount Olympus; Pg. 207: Hecate; Pg. 215: Forum Baths at Herculaneum; Pg. 236: Aphrodite and Hera; Pg. 274: Artemis; Pg. 315: Zeus; Pg. 353: "'...Most of the Greek gods actually started out as Cretan gods...' " [More] [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g.. pg. 129, 354.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world -12000 B.C.E. Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Burning City. New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. xiii, xxi. Pg. xiii: "CAST

Gods

Yangin-Atep (Tep, Firebringer)
Zoosh
Coyote
Behemoth
Loki
Prometheus ";

Pg. xxi: "Twelve thousand years before the birth of Christ, when most of the gods had gone mythical and magic was fading from the world, Yangin-Atep's gift remained. ";

Pg. 463: "Yangin-Atep, Loki, Prometheus, Moloch, Coyote, the hearth fires of the Indo-European tribes, uncountable fire gods were one and many. He, she, they had the aspect/powers of bilocation and shared minds. Pleasure or pain seeped from lands where a lord of fire and mischief might be worshipped or tortured. "

Greco-Roman classical religion world -1500 B.C.E. Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 74. "'Here is Themis, Goddess of Law, signifying Honor.' Strange; Brother Paul remembered Themis as a Roman Goddess, rather than Egyptian. But perhaps it only showed that this sequence of images derived from multiple sources and was not limited to any single mythology. Rome had existed in the period of Egypt's greatness; archaeology had verified the presence of Rome a thousand years before the legendary date of its founding by the wolf-suckled brothers, Romulus and Remus. " [Book has many refs. to Greek/Roman mythology, most not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 53. "Not the Athens he'd loved, he reminded himself. The temples of the Acropolis, the Tower of the Winds, the columns of Olympian Zeus... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 53. Pg. 49: "He clicked his tongue. 'Zeus thunder me, what a weird yarn!... Oh, we could spin many a fine yarn. But what's the use if Poseidon whelms us? And he has a touchy temper, Poseidon does, this time of year; the equinoctial storms'll soon be along.' "; Pg. 53: "'Worse luck,' growled a subordinate officer. 'How long, Father Zeus, must we bear this yoke?' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world -1000 B.C.E. Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 25. "They saw King Ixion, who had lusted after the wife of the Greek God Zeus and in punishment... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 16. [Year estimated.] "I raised my eyes and on the frieze of the temple saw Artemis racing with her dog and Dionysus feasting. I knew then that I had farther to go. The servants tried to stop me but I pulled away into the temple. Through the forecourt, by the giant silver urns, the costly statues and votive offerings I ran. In the innermost chamber I saw the eternal flame at a small altar and beside it the Omphalos, the center of the earth, black from the smoke of the centuries. On that sacred stone I laid my hand and surrendered to divine protection...

'Have you sinned against the gods?' they asked then.

...'I have not sinned against the Hellenic gods. On the contrary, the sacred virgin, the sister of your deity, watches over me.' " [Many other refs. throughout book, not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 19. [Year estimated.] Pg. 19: "He read the question in my eyes and explained, 'I also am a prisoner of the oracle. My uncle, King Cleomenes, had bad dreams about me and sent me away. I am a descendant of Herakles.'

It was in my mind to say that, knowing the character of Herakles and his wanderings throughout the world, there were undoubtedly thousands of his descendants in various lands. But I looked at his rippling muscles and stifled the impulse. ";

Pg. 21: "'...A thunderbolt had torn off my clothes and left a black streak on my loins. But Zeus did not succeed in killing me even though he tried.' "; Pg. 24: Aphrodite; Pg. 25: Delphic priests and temples. {Much more.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world -1000 B.C.E. Waltari, Mika. The Etruscan. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1956); pg. 22. [Year estimated.] "'Artemis of Ephesus is a divine goddess and because she took me under her protection when I arrived in Ephesus I owe her my life. In recent years, however, the black goddess Cybele of Lydia has begun to compete for favor with the Hellenes' Artemis...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 145. "For some time, the original populations of Greece and Persia and India have been trying to overthrow the gods--or devils--of the Aryans. In every country Zeus-Varuna-Brahma is being denied. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world -105 B.C.E. Leiber, Fritz. "Adept's Gambit " in Swords in the Mist in The Three of Swords. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1973; c. 1947); pg. 424. Pg. 424: "the Mouser murmured 'Aphrodite!' "; Pg. 430: "'He may show us Pan, or offer us to the Elder Gods, or whisk us beyond the stars, or send us into the underworld of Quarmall,' the Mouser concluded. "; Pg. 432: "'Mayhap we should choose one at random,' he muttered, 'and seek yet another world. Ahura's not Aphrodite, nor yet Astarte--quite.' "; Pg. 444: "...witnessing the birth of an Aphrodite, not from the foam but the dusk; for it was indeed his dark-haired Ahura of the wine shops... " [Also pg. 455: Pan]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 33 C.E. Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 69. "He had grown up with what he recognized now as a sanitized Christianity... in which a gentle Jesus had redeemed humanity from the adoration of similarly pastel pagan idols--Athena and Dionysus worshiped in a glade. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 325 C.E. Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 68. [At the council of Nicaea, the Christian leaders and scholars were leaning toward Arianism, the original Christian teaching that Jesus was distinct from God the Father, but ended going with Athanasianism, because:] "But wait. There's a problem. The instant you bring a subdeity on the scene, you've blurred the line between your precious Judaic monotheism and Roman paganism. Thus did the council forever fix Jesus as 'very God' through whom 'all things were made.' The Nicene Creed was recited in churches even in 1991. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 650 C.E. Silverberg, Robert. "A Hero of the Empire " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 352. "I think you could have put the thing down in the courtyard of the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus or any of Roma's other great temples and it would utterly disappear from view. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 650 C.E. Silverberg, Robert. "A Hero of the Empire " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 357. "The most interesting thing [the Hebrews] about them is that they believe there is just one god... They have nothing but contempt for the gods of other races, deeming them wholly imaginary, mere creatures of fable and fantasy that possess no true existence. This may very likely be the case, certainly: who among us has ever laid eyes on Apollo or Mercury or Minerva? Most people, however, have the good sense not to make a mockery of the religious practices of others... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 650 C.E. Silverberg, Robert. "A Hero of the Empire " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 362. "...and it is foolishness, as well as blasphemy, to take representations of him the way the ancient Greeks did of such gods of theirs as Zeus and Aphrodite and Poseidon, or we do of Jupiter or Venus or Mars. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 875 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. King and Emperor. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 322. "In the South, Mary was hard to tell from Minerva of ancient Rome or the three nameless Ladies the Celts had worshiped generations before, before the pagani were made to learn their poor and garbled Latin. Nor was the Eastern procession easy to tell from the age-old weeping for Adonis... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1722 Keyes, J. Gregory. A Calculus of Angels. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 202. Pillars of Hercules
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1800 Thatcher, Franklin. "By Other Windings " in Writers of the Future: Volume XV (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1999); pg. 235. [Year of story indeterminate.] Pg. 235: "Thud of pole against wood, rotted hull of Charon's boat. New slaves for Master. No grudge if I can steal one, though. I rise through abyssal depths.

...Charon watches. Punishment for him if he loses one, but not for me. Catch one, and I feed.

Wait. Wait. Match the stroke of Charon's pole... I hear Charon's pole pull free of the mud but he is not quick enough... ";

Pg. 237: "I am still toying with my Little Box when Charon returns, his boat empty. I free her, let her swim closer to the boat. Her nails claw and break against the sodden planks. Charon ignores her screams... " [Other refs to Charon in the beginning pages of this story about a demon who dwells in the river crossing to hell (apparently Styx, but unnamed). Charon also mentioned at end of story, pg. 274-275.]

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1832 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 248. "She regarded Walton's letters as a cabalistic document of Promethean consequence. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1866 Verne, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1953; c. 1870); pg. 71. "Yes, professor, the sea supplies all my needs. Sometimes I cast my nets in our wake, and I pull them up ready to burst. Sometimes I go hunting right in the midst of this element that has long seemed so far out of man's reach, and I corner the game that dwells in my underwater forests. Like the flocks of old Proteus, King Neptune's shepherd, my herds graze without fear on the ocean's immense prairies. There I own vast properties that I harvest myself, and which are forever sown by the hand of the Creator of All Things. "; Pg. 243: "It was indeed that bygone abode of Proteus, the old shepherd of King Neptune's flocks: an island located between Rhodes and Crete, which Greeks now call Karpathos, Italians Scarpanto. " [Some other refs. to Neptune, not in DB, e.g., pg. 77.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1867 Verne, Jules. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1953; c. 1870); pg. 358. Next came swarms of red mullet corseted in gold stripes from head to tail, their shining fins all aquiver, genuine masterpieces of jewelry, formerly sacred to the goddess Diana, much in demand by rich Romans, and about which the old saying goes: "He who catches them doesn't eat them! " Finally, adorned with emerald ribbons and dressed in velvet and silk, golden angelfish passed before our eyes like courtiers in the paintings of Veronese...
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1920 Wilson, Robert Charles. Darwinia. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 35. "Sideboards furnished with Victorian bronzes: Greek wrestlers, Romulus and Remus suckling at the teats of a wolf. Japanese prints obscured by shadows. "; Pg. 153: "We met the night with a mixture of excitement and apprehension, crouched over our fire like Visigoths in a Roman temple. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1921 Scholz, Carter. "The Amount to Carry " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 148. "The dime is still in his hand. The master carving by Adolph Weinman, twelve inches across, rests on their mantelpiece in Hartford. Certainly she is beautiful: Elsie in a Phrygian cap, the Roman symbol of a freed slave. Does he oppress her? Does Weinman think so, is the cap a message? Its wings tempt confusion with Mercury, messenger, god of merchants and thieves, patron of eloquence and fraud. Holder of the caduceus, whose touch makes gold. ON the reverse, a bundle of sticks, Roman faces. He tucks the coin into a vest pocket... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 256. "Thoughts of the Augean stables ran through his mind as he scrubbed filth from himself. He hadn't discovered Greek mythology until his university days. Sometimes the images it evoked were as telling as any in the Bible. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1943 Rand, Ayn. Fountainhead. New York: Penguin (1993; c. 1943); pg. 38. "Etchings of Greek temples adorned the panels, too small to be distinguished, but presenting the unmistakable columns, pediments and crumbling stone. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1943 Rand, Ayn. Fountainhead. New York: Penguin (1993; c. 1943); pg. 342. Pg. 342: "He wrote many clever things about the Tower of Babel that could not reach heaven and about Icarus who flopped on his wax wings. "; Pg. 555: "She was Venus rising out of a submarine hatch. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1947 Waldrop, Howard. "Thirty Minutes Over Broadway! " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 39. "The sky ahead was blue as the background curtain in Bronzino's Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time... "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 245. "I remember awakening from a dream, flinching out of it, running from a memory, three naked women standing by a ditch, pretty girls, Ukrainians I think, maybe Jews, maybe not.

The Three Graces. One so tall and brave. Another, smaller, almost like a child despite the pretty breasts... head down on the other's bosom, eyes closed. A third by her side, looking frightened and cold... "

Greco-Roman classical religion world 1956 de Camp, L. Sprague. "Aristotle and the Gun " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1956); pg. 56. [In an alternative history.] "The Romans still conquered the whole Mediterranean... Two of the chief religions of my world, Christianity and Islam, never appeared at all. Instead we have Mithraism, Odinism, and Soterism, the last an Egypto-Hellenic synthesis founded by that fiery Egyptian prophet whose followers call him by the Greek word for 'savior.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1959 Campbell, Jr., John W. "'What Do You Mean . . . Human?' " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1959); pg. 175. "How do you suppose an Athenian Greek of Pericles's time would have felt threatened with a change of feelings such that he would not feel disturbed of someone denied the reality of the Gods, or suggested that the Latins had a sounder culture? Why--only a nonhuman barbarian could feel that way! "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1963 Benford, Gregory. Timescape. New York: Simon & Schuster (1980); pg. 168. "They switched to a shot of Saul pointing to a speck on a star chart. 'The signals appear to come from the star 99 Hercules, similar to our own sun. 99 Hercules is 51 light years away...' " [Also pg. 266, 348.]
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1963 Knight, Damon. "The Big Pat Boom " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1963); pg. 265. "People called them 'Hurks' because they came from a place called Zeta Herculis. "
Greco-Roman classical religion world 1965 Zelazny, Roger. "But Not the Herald " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1965); pg. 77. "'I will tell you of that box.'

They hesitated. 'Very well, tell us.'

'It was the box of Pandora. She who opened it unleashed upon the world all of the terrible woes which afflict it.'

'Ha! A likely tale!'

'It is said by the gods, who charged me cast it into the sea, that the final curse waiting within the box is worse than all the other ills together.'

'Ha!'

They undid the cord and threw back the lid.

A golden radiance sped forth. It rose into the air like a fountain, and from within it a winged creature cried out, in a voice infinitely delicate and pathetic, 'Free! After all these ages, to be free at last!'

The men fell upon their faces. 'Who are you, oh lovely creature,' they asked, 'you who move us to such strange feelings?'

'I am called Hope,' said the creature. 'I go to travel in all the dark places of the Earth...'

...'Fools!' said the youth... greeting Hercules as he passed him by. " [More.]



Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

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