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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Greco-Roman classical religion, Germany

Greco-Roman classical religion, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greco-Roman classical religion Germany 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 304. The poor human Prometheuses who brought fire to their fellows.

Nobel.

Einstein. Poor Einstein and his letter to Roosevelt. Paraphrase: "I have loosed the demons of Hell and now you must sign a pact with the devil or someone else will. Someone even nastier. "

Curie, for experimenting with radium; how responsible was she for Slotin, ove four decades later?

Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -479 B.C.E. Wolfe, Gene. Soldier of the Mist. New York: Tor (1986); pg. xiv. "...Latro reports Greece as it was reported by the Greeks themselves. The runner sent from Athens to ask Spartan help before the battle of Marathon met the god Pan on the road and conscientiously... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -479 B.C.E. Wolfe, Gene. Soldier of the Mist. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 10. "Thus we were taken into one of the finest buildings, with columns and many wide steps, where I was made to kneel before the prophetess, who sat upon a bronze tripod. There was much talk between the men with rings and a lean priest, who said many times and in many different ways that the prophetess would not speak for their god until an offering was made. " [Entire novel takes place in ancient Greece. Many other refs. to religion, but, interestingly enough, not to any actual names of ancient Greek gods. Refs. are to a generic God, gods or goddess, the Great Mother, and the Black God (pg. 126), Grain Goddess (pg. 140-143), Shining God, etc.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -479 B.C.E. Wolfe, Gene. Soldier of the Mist. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 258. "'...But though Io says I once swept floors for a woman in Thought, I don't believe I eve swept the hall of Olympus.'

'Then we'll begin with speculations humbler still. You acknowledge that there are many gods?'

I sipped my wine. 'All men do, I suppose.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 11. "Callias described yet again the battle of Marathon. I am very tired of the Greek version of this incident. Needless to say, Callias fought with the bravery of Hercules. 'Not that I was obliged to. I mean, I'm hereditary torchbearer. I serve the mysteries of Demeter, the Great Goddess. At Eleusis. But you know all about that, don't you?' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 15. "The old religion maintains that the two largest celestial shapes are deities called, respectively, Apollo and Diana. Whenever Anaxagoras suggests that the sun and moon are simply great fiery stones rotating in the heavens, he runs a very real risk of being denounced for impiety.... "; Pg. 16: "'This is a lot harder to believe than the passion of holy Demeter after her daughter went down into Hades... taking the spring and the summer with her, an observable fact.' Callias then muttered a prayer, as befitted a high priest of the Eleusinian mysteries. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 54. "Hippias was close to Apollo's priests at Delphi. He also helped preside over those mysteries at Eleusis where Callias bears his hereditary torch. He is said to have known more about oracles than any Greek. He could also predict the future. Once, in my green and insolent youth, I asked the tyrant if he had foreseen his own downfall.

'Yes,' he said.

I waited for details. He offered none. "

Greco-Roman classical religion Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 11. "After awhile she began humming. It was a sad song, centuries old. A ballad. It told the story of a young wrestler named Themocles, a wrestler who had never been beaten... [This story is related at some length for 1 page]... Simpler than Aeschylus, but then we're a simpler people than we once were...

'I am thinking of the picture on Achilleus' shield,' I said, 'and of what a terrible thing it is to be an educated beast...' " [Many other refs. to Greek/Roman classical myths in book, most refs. not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 13. "And I got into the Skimmer and jumped into the sky, breathing a prayer to Aphrodite... From Kos to Port-au-Prince was four hours... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "He described the virtues of the Nymph whom Poseidon had reached for but lost to his brother Hades. He called for a general mourning among the elements. And as he spoke my mind went time-traveling back to those two happy months in Kos... "; Pg. 91: "...even the mountain walls of the home of the gods itself, Olympus... "; Pg. 97: "'Well, I remember one cloudy day when he stood in the theater of Dionysius and read a hymn to Pan which he had written. There was an audience of two or three hundred--and only the gods know why they showed up--but he began to read...' "; Pg. 98: "There was Hermes, presenting the infant god to Zeus, while the Corybantes tripped the Pyrrhic fantastic on either side of the throne; then there was Ikaron, whom Dionysius had taught to cultivate the wine--he was preparing to sacrifice a goat, while his daughter was offering cakes to the god... Atlas... and I spotted Hestia, Theseus, and Eirene with a horn of plenty... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 121. "Oh, Zeus, of the hot red lightnings, I prayed, give it to me that I may break the Powers in the Sky! " [See also pg. 156-157, 163, 166.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 5-6. "Knowing some of the things one occasionally meets in he Old Places, the Hot Places, you can almost believe in myths without extra effort--such as the story of those Pan-like sprites who gather together every spring to spend ten days sawing at the Tree of the World, only to be dispersed by the ringing of the Easter bells... Cassandra and I were not in the habit of discussing religion, politics, or Aegean folklore... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Greece: Crete 1997 Preuss, Paul. Secret Passages. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "...pausing at a discreet distance to admire the afternoon sun on the columns of the temple of Poseidon. "; Pg. 42: "...onto the stone terrace that overlooked the ruin field of Apollo's sanctuary. "; Pg. 66: "Yesterday the sky above Limnakaros had spit multiple lightning bolts, as if dead Zeus were returning to the mountains of his birth... "; Pg. 105: "...had uncovered the Minotaur's lair. "; Pg. 125: "'...to excavate a cave in Lasithi, near Tzermiado. The home of Zeus's parents, they say--Rhea and ghastly old Kronos, Father of Time, who ate his children...' "; pg. 155: "'...I was in the presence of the gods, and they were English. Pendlebury was my Apollo. Evans was my Zeus.' "; Pg. 156: Herakles; Pg. 192: length passage about the birthplace of Zeus [Many refs., not in DB. Novel takes place mainly in Greece, on the island of Crete, and deals extensively with archaeology. Also pg. 227.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Hawaii 1994 Simmons, Dan. Fires of Eden. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1994); pg. 174. "He discussed the hierarchy of Hawaiian animism: the aumakua, or important family gods; the kapua, or children of the gods, who dwelt among the mortals much as had Hercules and the other Greek demigods... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Helliconia 4901 Aldiss, Brian W. Helliconia Winter. New York: Atheneum (1985); pg. 249. "The two men contemplated the distance without speaking. Then Trockern said, 'Have you ever thought, master, how phagors vaguely resemble the demons and devils which used to haunt the imagination of Christians?'

'That had not occurred to me. I have always thought of an even older allusion, the minotaur of ancient Greek myth, a creature stuck between human and animal, lost in the labyrinths of its own lusts.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Illinois 1960 Simmons, Dan. Summer of Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 191. Pg. 191: "On Saturday, the Free Show of the summer featured Hercules, an older movie... " [More, pg. 196.]; Pg. 200: "...but the gray foliage and the gray sky made him think of Hades, of the shades of the dead waiting there in gray nothingness... " [More.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Illinois 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 177. Medusa
Greco-Roman classical religion India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 167. "Incidentally, one Vedic narrative about a young king named Rama may well be the longest hymn ever written. I am told that it takes at least ten years for an intelligent Brahman to learn every line. After having listened to a day or two of this hymn, I think that one can say with some justice that the narrative is even more boring than Homer's story. To me, the only interesting thing about either of these old Aryan stories is the fact that the gods are simply superheroes. There is no sense of true deity anywhere in either story. The Aryan gods are exactly like ordinary men and women except that they live forever; they also have exaggerated appetites which they overindulge, usually at the expense of human beings.
Greco-Roman classical religion India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 167. "Democritus tells me that the intelligent Greeks have never taken the Homeric gods seriously. That may be. But the huge temple to Athena that is now being built just behind us on the Acropolis is an incredibly expensive memorial to a goddess that is obviously taken very seriously not only by the people but by the rulers of a city that has been named for her. Also, it is still a capital offense in Athens to mock or deny the Homeric gods--in public, at least. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Italy -1000 B.C.E. Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 124. "He might even have been acquainted with Romulus, supposed founder of Roma. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Italy 1500 C.E. McAuley, Paul J. Pasquale's Angel. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1994); pg. 14. "...chief amongst them Michelangelo Buonarroti, towering over all by sheer force of personality, clad in a white tunic so long it was almost a robe--to hide his knock-knees, Rosso said, adding that, even so, had he possessed a thunderbolt, he would have made a passable Zeus. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Italy 2000 Leavitt, David. "The Term Paper Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1997); pg. 219. "...Statues: the imitation David, Neptune, Hercules, and Cacus... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Kansas 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 127. "...the diary entry Mother wrote October 21:...They sent Mikey to Vietnam last month, but maybe if we can do this thing, they will bring him back and he won't be killed. In the name of ancient Atlantis, in the name of Zeus and Poseidon, in the name of the star creatures who visit in their ships of light, we command you, arise. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Louisiana 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 247. "...an innocent-looking sort with close-set eyes and a Cupid's mouth... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Louisiana: New Orleans 1990 Rice, Anne. The Witching Hour. New York: Ballantine (1993; c. 1990); pg. 690. Pg. 690: "'Seventy-five year ago, my mother told me he could have made the Greek gods weep with envy, so beautiful was he, when he came into her bedroom.' "; Pg. 873: "Hercules, the Haitian servant... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Luna 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 388. "As they lay in bed in the darkness, warm and pleasantly tired, Doug whispered to Edith, 'By the way, Merry Christmas.'

'And to you, sweetheart.'

'We've got a new year coming in a week. A new era, really.'

'Hey, now that you're an independent nation, what're y'all gonna call yourselves? You can't call a whole nation Moonbase.'

'No,' Doug said. 'We're going to call ourselves Selene.'

'Selene?'

A Greek moon goddess, from ancient times.'

'Selene,' Edith repeated. 'Sounds neat. Where'd you find it?'

'I read it in a book, when I was a kid.'

'I like it.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Mars 2050 Bova, Ben. "Mount Olympus " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 286-317. [Despite the title this sorry is not about Greco-Roman classical religion, but about mountain climbers scaling Olympus Mons, on Mars.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Mars 2089 Anthony, Piers. Total Recall. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1989); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "Two moons hung in the dark red sky... The big one was Phobos, named after the personification of fear... The small one was Deimos, the personification of terror. This was appropriate, for these were the companions of the ancient Roman god of war and agriculture, Mars. "; Pg. 241: "Quail, sucked halfway toward the hole, made a Herculean effort to crawl down against the wind to reach the mandala. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Mars 2101 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Green Mars. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 104. "Only on Mars did they walk about in a horrendous mishmash of the dreams of the past, causing who knew what disastrous misapprehensions of the real terrain: the Lake of the Sun, the Plain of Gold... the Lake of the Phoenix, Cimmeria, Arcadia, the Gulf of Pearls, the Gordian Knot, Styx, Hades, Utopia... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Massachusetts 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 16: "Away Game! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1984); pg. 18. Magma/Amara's thoughts: "Sam! I--killed you! I couldn't help myself--that fiend [Empath] made me--but I sear he will not live to enjoy his triumph. Let my flames be a pale harbinger, butcher... of what awaits you in Tartarus! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Massachusetts 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 40: "Avengers Assemble! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1986); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "Be assured, Black Knight--the Son of Zeus . . . shall ne'er be found wanting! "; Pg. 10: Hercules: "What price your bold words now, braggart? Not even the fabled Titans can break this grip! " [Hercules is one of the main characters in this issue. Other refs. not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Massachusetts: Nantucket -1250 B.C.E. Sterling, S. M. Island in the Sea of Time. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 129. "He raised it to the setting sun and pronounced something long and sonorous; she caught Diawas Pithair, the name of their chief god. Sky Father; cognate with Zeus and Jupiter and Tiwaz and the old Norse Tyr, according to Arnstein. Others, a list of them--Mirutha... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Mexico 1998 Ing, Dean. The Skins of Dead Men. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1998); pg. 13. "She caught the man against the back of his ankle, and the tendon felled him, Achilles redux. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Minnesota 1998 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 140. "They are giving out free figures of gods of the underworld along with Happy Meals at McDonald's. Driving up to the window, I get Hades, a sinister blue guy with skinny arms, and Mama gets two plastic halves of the three-headed dog Cerberus who makes me wonder immediately whether, if Hades went into a pet parlor to get the dog clipped for the summer, he'd have to pay triple. " [More, pg. 140.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Nevada 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "A dog was barking a block or two away... In spite of himself, Leon thought about the dog that appeared on the Fool card in the Tarot deck and the dogs that in Greek mythology accompanied Artemis, the goddess of the moon. And of course, the picture on the Moon card generally showed rain falling. "; Pg. 15: "...a bizarrely reminiscent-of-Cupid bow... "; Pg. 24: Pluto was also the god of wealth, he had told himself. " [Other refs., incl. pg. 248.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New Jersey 1974 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "Aberrant or not, this was the child that was his, no other, this one, whether she came from a cabbage patch, the Overmind, or the brow of Zeus. ";

Pg. 39: "'What's your opinion of Phoebe?'

'Sure.'

'You really like it? Phoebe was a Titaness.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion New Jersey 2012 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 208. "Beware the stars, Howard had warned her. Babylonian astrology, Greek mythology, Aristotle's crystalline spheres... "
Greco-Roman classical religion New Jersey 2012 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 231. "Phoebe Sparks slammed her plastic Pluto the Dog cup onto the Formica tabletop and told the bartender to fill it up again. Reverse God and you got Dog, she thought; Pluto, Lord of the Underworld. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New Mexico 1993 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 61. "On the high mountain road, she glanced at the southern horizon and caught a glimpse of the constellation Centaurus. In that pattern of stars the ancient Greeks had seen a chimerical creature, half man, half horse, who had taught Zeus wisdom. But Ellie could never make out any pattern remotely like a centaur. It was Alpha Centauri... "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York 1886 Irving, Washington. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1886); pg. 26. "From his Herculean frame and great powers of limb, he had received the nickname of BROM BONES... " [This adjective has not always been indexed from other books.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York 2064 Knight, Damon. Natural State in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1951); pg. 82. "The most promising young realie actor in Greater New York, everyone agreed, was a beetle-browed Apollo named Alvah Gustad. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York 2075 Kress, Nancy. Beggars in Spain. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 327. Pg. 327: "Hera and Io. Othello and Desdemona. "; Pg. 328: "...an Achilles whose Agamemnon was fighting her own stupid war... "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1953 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 20. "'...they fear that we will overthrow their gods. Not necessarily through any deliberate act, but in a subtler fashion. Science can destroy religion by ignoring it as well as by disproving its tenets. No one ever demonstrated, so far as I am aware, the non-existence of Zeus or Thor, but they have few followers now...' " [More.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1956 Knight, Damon. "A Likely Story " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 218. "The Medusa Club is, loosely speaking, an association of professional science fiction writers. " [Much more about this club.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1968 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 74. "Can we then assume that Sophocles, had Zeus given him a chance retroactively to alter the entire coarse of his days, would have opted for lifelong impotence? "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 103. "She is seated, naked to the waist, an outsized female figure as awful as Zeus, her dead eyes staring into nothing. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1976 Silverberg, Robert. Dying Inside. New York: Ballantine (1976; c. 1972); pg. 94. "Aeschylus, in short, was not overly concerned with the credibility of his play's action. His purpose in the Oresteia trilogy was a theological one: to examine the actions of the gods in placing a curse upon a house, a curse stemming from murder and leading to further murder. The keynote of his philosophy is perhaps the line, ' 'Tis Zeus alone who knows that perfect way of knowledge: He hath ruled, men shall learn wisdom, by affliction schooled.' Aeschylus sacrifices dramatic technique, or at least holds it in secondary importance, in order to focus attention on the religious and psychological aspects of the matricide. " [Also pg. 172.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 40: "Avengers Assemble! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (June 1986); pg. 1. Hercules: "By Zeus--The call to battle will ever sound . . . at the most inconvenient of times. "; Black Knight: "Not to worry, Hercules... "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 46: "Bloody Sunday ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec. 1986); pg. 19. Magma: "In the commentaries of the divine Julius, Caesar writes of the carnage of war . . . but the most eloquent words . . . pale . . . "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 6: Death Quest. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 22. "'Aphrodite!' snapped Miss Pinch acidly. 'The goddess of love, you lunkhead. The sea, the undulant waves, repeating in sensuous curves, the phallic symbols stabbing nobly upward, the foam. Haven't you heard of Greek mythology? Where in hell were you educated?'

...'You get so emotional where the story of Uranus is concerned. I'll tell him.'

...'Aphrodite... is the ancient Greek goddess of sexual love and beauty. The Greek word aphros means 'foam.' You see, there was an earlier God named Uranus, which means 'heaven,' and he had a son called Cronus. Now, apparently this son Cronus got pretty mad at his old man. He grabbed a knife and cut his father's (bleeps) off and threw them into the sea.' " [More, not in DB, pg. 23, 226.]

Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 170. "There were other figures in the background of the scene, subordinate to the Christ figure. One was a slight, lean figure dressed in gaudy clothes... But like the Roman god Janus this Tachyon had two faces... "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 1987 Williams, Walter Jon. "Mortality " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 482. "'Are you all right? Now that you've fallen from Olympus and are living among the mortals?' " [Said to an android.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 25. "Zeus flung noisy handfuls of hail at our impervious widow. We laughed. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2000 Silverberg, Robert. The Stochastic Man. New York: Harper & Row (1975); pg. 206. "And then came thunder, like the anger of Zeus, majestic and unanswerable. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2002 Friesner, Esther M. Men in Black II. New York: Ballantine (2002); pg. 182. "Jay wondered whether Cupid ever had second thoughts about setting up matches that seemed like a good idea at the time. "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2008 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 261. Pg. 261: "'There used to be a statue of some Roman god in the Metropolitan that was the same way, only it was his...' "; Pg. 267: constellation Hercules
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2013 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 48: "Ashes of the Heart ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb. 1987); pg. 11. [Hercules is pictured in one panel, in a picture of him and his fellow Avengers.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 140. "Even in his nakedness, his pose held the relaxed confidence of a statue of a Roman god. I laughed nervously at the thought. Michael's association with divinity was hardly in the small 'g' category, I reminded myself . . . or was it? "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: New York City 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 154. "Gorgons were possibly the ugliest by-product of the Medusa bomb. Once human, they had lived too long in contact with the glass city. The Medusa bomb worked by beginning an organic-like chain reaction of crystallization that moved through physical objects. Even though the blast had occurred twenty-one years ago, the reaction was still 'hot' inside the transformed glass, and anything or anything that touched it was infected. That residue 'radiation' caused tissue damage and mutation. Gorgons were that mutation... " [Many other refs. to the Medusa bomb, not in novel.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 13: "School Daysze ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Mar 1984); pg. 2. Pg. 2: Xavier: "This is your room. "; Amara: "Minerva! It is my room, exact in every detail. "; Pg. 3: Amara's thoughts: "What--?!! That faint rumble--the house is shaking! " [she is pictured praying] "Blessed Tellus, Mother of the World, was that my doing?! Let it not be so! "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 15: "Scaredy Cat! ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (May 1984); pg. 8. Amara: "Hecate! A Demon! "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 19: "Siege ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Sep. 1984); pg. 7. Magma/Amara: "By Hecate! "
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 21: "Slumber Party ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov. 1984); pg. 7. Pg. 7: Amara's thoughts: "Minerva! The Professor warned me against losing my temper! "; Pg. 8: "Thank the gods it was only a minor tremor. "; Pg. 25: Amara's thoughts: "No creature out of legend--not even a denizen of the deepest pits of Tartarus--could be as foul and horrible as this. " [Referring to Warlock, as she sees him for the first time.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 37: "If I Should Die ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Mar. 1986); pg. 3. [Danielle sees images of each New Mutant's personified concept of death, or the being that accompanies them to the afterlife.] Danielle's thoughts: "...I see an angel over Shan... and, by Amara--Pluto, Lord of the Olympian underworld! " [Amara is from Nova Roma, a culture which worshipped ancient Roman gods.]
Greco-Roman classical religion New York: Westchester County 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 37: "If I Should Die ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Mar. 1986); pg. 14. Amara/Magma: "Butcher! Murderer! [addressing the Beyonder] Let Magma's flames consign you to the cruelest pits of Tartarus--FOREVER! "


Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

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