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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Greco-Roman classical religion, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2235 Asimov, Isaac. Nemesis. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "A small star, pinkish-red, the color of blood and destruction, and named appropriately.

Nemesis!

Nemesis, the Goddess of Divine Retribution. ";

Pg. 74: "'In that case, since you named Nemesis, and one of your people named Megas, I'll take the privilege of naming the satellite. Call it Erythro, which if I recall correctly, is related to the Greek word for 'red.' ' " [The planets in the star system, Megas, Erythro, Rotor, may also come from Greco-Roman mythology.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2267 Friedman, Michael Jan. "James T. Kirk " in War Dragons (Star Trek; "The Captain's Table " Book 1 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 268. "The captain also encountered a being who called himself Apollo, a member of a band of space travelers who lived on Mount Olympus, on old Earth. Though Apollo declared the Enterprise crew to be his children, Kirk and his officers refused to stay and worship him--and destroyed Apollo's temple, the source of his amazing powers. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2268 Vardeman, Robert E. Mutiny on the Enterprise (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1983); pg. 143. "Kirk looked up to see McCoy and Neal returning. McCoy smiled, holding aloft a large ball of the soft, pliant wax.

'Here's our ticket back to Mount Olympus.'

'Please, Doctor, your classical allusions fall on deaf ears.'

Leonard McCoy stopped and stared, mouth open. 'If I didn't know better, I'd think Spock had made a joke.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 52. "Was she like a lovely woman? No; at this moment she was more than that to him. A fable? A myth come alive? Yes, that was it! She was as Aphrodite must have been when Zeus first raised her up from the sea, naked and shockingly beautiful.

'Raised up who, sir?' It was Scott giving him a puzzled look. Kirk realized he must have said some part of it aloud. "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2275 Robinson, Peg. "The Hero of My Own Life " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 81. "message from the U.S.S. Hermes... " [A starship named after the Greek god. Many refs. to this ship throughout story, not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2293 Carey, Diane. Best Destiny (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 4. "Because of the young Spock, the impertinent radical who had shunned his race's Olympian seclusion, Vulcans no longer prided themselves on inaccessibility. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2357 Friedman, Michael Jan & Christie Golden. The First Virtue (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 6 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 70. "'Now you have some idea of the obstacles that confront me here.'

'Indeed I do,' Picard replied sincerely. He shook his head. 'I doubt that Hercules had a more difficult time.'

'Hercules?' Culunnh echoed. He cocked his head, obviously curious about the captain's reference.

' Great hero from one of my world's mythologies,' Picard explained. 'He was charged with seven supposedly impossible tasks. But in the end, he managed to complete them all.'

Understanding flitted over the Benniari's furred face... 'Your Hercules,' he said dryly, 'never had to get a Melacron and a Cordracite to stop arguing. Otherwise, he might still be at it.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2357 Taylor, Jeri. Mosaic (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 189. [Kathryn Janeway, as an ensign, is stationed on a starship named Icarus, mentioned throughout the rest of chapter 16.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2364 Dvorkin, David & Daniel Dvorkin. The Captains' Honor (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1989); pg. 26. "After the briefing, she'd made a quick study of the library files on Magna Roma, and was amazed at the astounding similarity between Magna Roma's history and that of Earth. Except on Magna Roma, the Roman Empire never fell. There were scientific theories, she knew, that said such incredible parallels were to be expected, but to actually see evidence of this . . .

It made her wonder if she was looking at a reception detail or a troupe of historical actors... At the captain's command, the door rose slowly, revealing the full glory of the scene before them. What looked like a time-warped Roman legion was there in full array, with two especially impressive soldiers standing next to the shuttle.

Both wore ceremonial gold armor, apparently made to fit the contours of their bodies. One... held a long staff, on top of which was a golden eagle resting on a crossbar reading SPQR. " [Entire novel takes place on an ancient Roman-like planet. Roman refs. throughout.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2364 Dvorkin, David & Daniel Dvorkin. The Captains' Honor (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1989); pg. 41. "Marcus went on. 'Their very organization--or lack of organization, I should say--makes it impossible for them to organize in their own defense. The gods help those who help themselves. So do Magni Romani.' " [Entire novel takes place on a planet patterned after ancient Rome, but there is very, very little said about actual ancient Roman religion or mythology. Gods are mentioned only here.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 49. "Drahanna stepped forward and began: 'We welcome you, oh beloved of the gods. Feast with us in praise of the gods who have suffered you to brave the perils of the swamp, an honor few Elysians are granted. Tell us, blessed ones, of your journey to the sacred mountain.'

Riker frowned, clearly trying to decide how best to respond. Troi spoke up for him. 'We have not reached the sacred mountain, Drahanna. We have not come near to it.'

'The gods must have further tests for you then,' said the Speaker. 'May you prove worthy, and some among you be allowed the challenge when you have completed your arduous journey across the Great Swamp.'

If Drahanna was to be believed, Thralen had guessed right: The gods of Elysia wanted no one attempting to climb their sacred mountain without permission. " [Many refs. to Elysia (a planet) and 'gods' throughout novel, but not to other Greco-Roman names.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Once Burned (Star Trek: New Frontier; "The Captain's Table " Book 5 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 198. "James Kirk wrote an autobiography, you know. Much of it was dismissed by critics as a collection of tall tales. Some believed that Kirk had a penchant for exaggerating. Outrageous stories of planets of sorcery, or confrontations with Greek gods or Abraham Lincoln... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2368 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 3. "Her shoulders drooped as she leaned back against the wall and closed her eyes. For a few, brief moments, the slender frame of Deanna Troi bore a resemblance to Atlas, bowed beneath the weight of the world. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2369 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Soldiers of Fear (Star Trek: TNG/Invasion! #2). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 59. Pg. 59: "A woman whose head was covered with snakes. "; Pg. 74: "I swear by Apollo the physician, by Aesculapius, Hygeia, and Panacea... and I take to witness all the gods, all the goddesses, to keep according to my ability and my judgment the following Oath:.... I will prescribe regimen for the good of my patients... according to my ability and my judgment and never to do harm to anyone.

...the Hippocratic oath, that had saved her. Hippocrates, Father of medicine, a Greek physician who came from a famous family of priest physicians, and who wrote more than seventy treatises on medicine . . . ";

Pg. 136: "'The Vulcans wrote only of the terror... Humans, on the other hand, had several reactions to their protectors. The ancient Greeks made them into gods, Moors and the ancient pagans agreed with the Klingons. Their graphic representations of these 'saviors' was grotesque. Over time they became stylized in garden statuary.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2370 Thompson, W.R. Infiltrator (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 15. Pg. 2: Olympus Spaceport; Pg. 15: "In Greek mythology, Temenus had served the goddess Hera, and that was enough to tell Astrid Kemal that the ship was from the planet Hera. " [Many refs. to the planet Hera and the starship Temenus.]; Pg. 145: "'...A short while ago they launched three couriers--Heraclidae, Arcadia and Pelasgus...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2370 York, Christina F. "Calculated Risk " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 176. "With her past, she figured she was immune to love potions, Cupid's arrows, or whatever it was that brought people together. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 25. "...Troi's decidedly unsteady hand at the helm, skipping across the planet's surface like a huge discus hurled by a gigantic Greek Olympian. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Daffyd. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Liberated (Book 3 of 3 in "Rebels " trilogy). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 19. "Now, under the stress of having to fend for their own lives, the native intellectual capacity was bursting forth like the human war goddess Athena erupting from the head of Zeus in Worf's favorite human myth, taught him by his foster father. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2372 Carey, Diane. Ship of the Line (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 103. "The Enterprise-E. There she was. Olympian and stunning as it rested in the welcoming arms of open space... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2372 Taylor, Jeri. Mosaic (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 302. "The memory must be neutralized. This wasn't a conscious thought so much as a fully formed intuition that sprang from her mind like Athena from Zeus. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2373 David, Peter. Fire on High (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 192. Pg. 192-194 (and elsewhere): Prometheans [Also, see similar story pg. 128.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2373 David, Peter. Martyr (novel excerpt; New Frontier #5) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 445. "'If that is the case, Admiral,' Calhoun replied, 'if you truly think that running into a figure of mythology or history such as the Great Bird of the Galaxy is too preposterous, then I take it you will not want to hear about it should we happen to encounter . . . oh, I don't know . . . Apollo?' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2373 David, Peter. Martyr (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 49. "'If that is the case, Admiral,' Calhoun replied, 'if you truly think that running into a figure of mythology or history such as the Great Bird of the Galaxy is too preposterous, then I take it you will not want to hear about it should we happen to encounter . . . oh, I don't know . . Apollo?'

'Or Zephram Cochrane?' Shelby added. 'Or--what was his name--the knife murderer . . . ?' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2373 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. The Mist (Star Trek: DS9 / The Captain's Table: Book 3 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 57. "'I only know the Mist as a legend,' I said. 'Like the ancient Greek gods from Earth, or the bottle creatures from the lost worlds of Ythi Four.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 227. "...be one of any of a dozen such sites discovered since Kirk first encountered 'Apollo' close to a century ago... The last thing he wanted to do was give Q credit for any of the foundations of human civilization. If I had to pick Q out of the Greco-Roman pantheon, though, he thought, I'd bet a Ferengi's ransom that he was Bacchus or maybe Pan. " [Some other refs. to ancient Greek culture and architecture, not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 80. "Picard still seemed incredulous. 'So am I to believe . . . that you were the basis of the myth of Prometheus?'

'In short, yes. Norsemen, on the other hand, embellished the incident in other directions and called me Loki, claiming I was chained to a rock with a snake dripping acid on me. Loki, the son of giants; Prometheus, the Titan. I suppose I seemed big to your ancestors. Then again, people were shorter back then.'

'Loki, the trickster god. Perhaps the Norse knew you better than you suspected,' said Picard. 'Q, do you really expect me to believe your . . . outlandish tales?' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 78. [Q claims to be Prometheus. 1] Pg. 78-79: "'You know the Greek legend about Prometheus?'

'The Titan. Yes, of course,' said Picard. 'He brought fire to mankind, and for his transgression, the angered gods chained him to a rock and left him there for birds to eat his innards. Why?'

'Well . . . if you must know . . . I was Prometheus.'

Picard stared at me... 'What do you mean, you were Prometheus? How could there be a--?'

'I assume you've heard of racial memory, Picard. Events so cataclysmic, so monumental that they inform us as to 'who' and 'what' we are... fire, well... You were such a pathetic little race when you first started out... And there was a group of you, barely recognizable as human, siting about and staring forlornly at the forest primeval where eyes stared back at you and prehistoric bestial lips smacked, anxious to dine on a late-evening snack of cold human. You seemed ready for a little 'pick-me-up.' So I gave you fire...' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 79. [Q claims to be Prometheus. 2] "'...I wanted to see what you'd do with it. Not surprisingly, the first human to see fire thought it was something to put it on his head. It was hilarious to watch. With that inauspicious beginning, I wasn't sure if you people would ever manage to harness its power.

'Of course, the other Q weren't happy with me. I was supposed to have observed your race from a purely scientific point of view, and they felt I had gone too far. It was their belief that humans would have died off without my interference, and the planet Earth would have had cockroaches as its dominant species, as it was supposed to. They were very disappointed with me. So, to show their displeasure, they chained me to the side of a mountain, and assorted beasts of the wild came along and chewed on me. My body regenerated itself, of course, because this isn't really a body so much as it is a conceptualization for the convenience of whoever's looking at me...' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 80. [Q claims to be Prometheus. 3] "'...Every so often, some daring human would climb up to where I was chained, poke a stock at my liver, and run off, squealing with delight. I can't begin to tell you how thrilled I was to provide entertainment for the first generations of humanity. There was only one channel and I was the only thing on...'

...Picard still seemed incredulous. 'So am I to believe . . . that you were the basis of the myth of Prometheus?'

'In short, yes. Norsemen, on the other hand, embellished the incident in other directions and called me Loki, claiming I was chained to a rock with a snake dripping acid on me. Loki, the son of giants; Prometheus, the Titan. I suppose I seemed big to your ancestors. Then again, people were shorter back then.'

'Loki, the trickster god. Perhaps the Norse knew you better than you suspected,' said Picard. 'Q, do you really expect me to believe your . . . outlandish tales?' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2375 David, Peter. Excalibur: Requiem (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 57. "...and she pulled her fingers out of her hair as if, like the legendary Gorgon, she had sprouted snakes in her hair and one of them had bitten her hand. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2375 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Insurrection. New York: Pocket Books (1998). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman & Michael Piller; screenplay by Michael Piller.; pg. 56. "But the glaring Medusa clearly did not believe; in the face of her implacable glare, Riker surrendered and left. He and Deanna had finished their mission there, and he was in a panic to head for the safety of the bridge... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2375 Pellegrino, Charles & George Zebrowski. Dyson Sphere (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 129. "As the Klingon climbed into the cockpit of the Feynman, something on 'those islands' beckoned to Picard like the Sirens of Greek mythology. The still air brought strangeness, and he thought of how death had been prophesied to Odysseus--'It shall come to you out of the sea, death in his gentlest guise.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2375 Perry, S. D. Avatar, Book One (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 283. Pg. 147: "The disappearance of the U.S.S. Hera, on which Geordi's mother was captain... "; Pg. 283: "Ross had asked more than once in the past day since the U.S.S. Cerberus, Prometheus-class, had led the Federation fleet to the rendezvous in the Gentariat system. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2377 David, Peter. Being Human (ST: New Frontier). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 3. Pg. 3: "...reading a text about his new favorite obsession: ancient mythologies. This particular text had been produced by a twentieth-century scholar, Joseph Campbell... and George considered the text far more sweeping and interesting than, say, Bullfinch's Mythology. " [More.]; Pg. 100: "'Chimera,' she muttered.

...'Isn't that a beast from Greek myth?' asked Morgan... 'With a lion's head and a goat's body?'

'And a serpent's tail, yes.'

'We're chasing a mythological beast?' asked a confused Burgoyne. " [More.]; Pg. 134-136: James T. Kirk's encounter with Apollo is recounted [Extensive refs. to Apollo through much of the rest of the novel]; Pg. 136: Zeus; Pg. 137-138: Pan; Artemis [the goddess Artemis is a major character through rest of novel]; Pg. 146: Zeus, Hera, Titans Chronus and Rhea [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2378 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Nemesis. New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 29. "'But the bird of prey holds two planets,' Shinzon continued. 'Romulus and Remus. Their destinies conjoined. Yet for generations one of those planets has been without a voice . . . We will be silent no longer.' " [The two Romulan planets which are central to this entire story are named for the legendary founders of Rome.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2450 Kato, Ken. Yamato II: The Way of the Warrior, Part 2. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 114. "...from stars and bars, through Hercules of the North and Aquarius of the South to the Eagle of Aquila. " [Also pg. 229.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2500 Dickson, Gordon R. Other. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 36. "I am Antaeus, he thought--wrestler and son of ancient Greek gods, Poseidon, of the sea and Gaea, goddess of Earth. The wrestler Antaeus, whose strength was renewed each time he touched his mother, the Earth. But, unlike Antaeus, I draw my strength fresh and fresh again, not like him from the earth under me, but from each time I see the stars. The stars, and the whole human race renew my strength--over and over again, without limit. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. 136. "But they were too powerful linked that way, and Zeus cut each pair apart. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2530 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Mirror Dance. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1994); pg. 61. [Actual year unknown.] "Every variation of height and racial mix and build was represented, much more motley than the Greek-god look one might have anticipated from their garden-and-fountain setting. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2530 Bujold, Lois McMaster. Mirror Dance. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1994); pg. 115. [Actual year unknown.] "'...Think of a Great House as the hydra of mythology. Chop off its head, and seven more arise on the stump of neck--and begin biting each other. Eventually, only one will survive..' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2634 Forstchen, William R. Action Stations (Wing Commander). New York: Baen (1998); pg. 308. "'We lost Hermes!' a voice crackled on the radio. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "'...including the carriers Olympus Shadow and Neptune Station...' "; Pg. 112: "Olympus Command School " [on Mars]; [Also pg. 52. A few other things named after Greco-Roman figures/places.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 168. "...Cantos. The poem dealt with the death and displacement of the Titans by their offspring, the Hellenic gods. It dealt with the Olympian struggle which followed the Titans' refusal to be displaced--the boiling of great seas as Oceanus struggled with Neptune, his usurper, the extinction of suns as Hyperion struggled with Apollo for control of the light, and the trembling of the universe itself as Saturn struggled with Jupiter for control of the throne of the gods. What was at stake was not the mere passage of one set of deities to be replaced by another, but the end of a golden age and the beginning of dark times which must spell doom for all things mortal.

The Hyperion Cantos made no secret of the multiple identities of these gods: the Titans were easily understood to be the heroes of humankind's short history, the Olympian usurpers were the TechnoCore AIs, and their battlefield stretched across... all the worlds in the Web. "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 169. "Silenus had come to the most difficult and exciting part of the poem, the scenes where conflict has raged across a thousand landscapes, entire civilizations have been laid waste, and representatives of the Titans call pause to meet and negotiate with the Olympians' humorless heroes. On this broad landscape of his imagination strode Saturn, Hyperion, Cottus, Iapetus, Oceanus, Briareus, Mimus, Porphyrion, Enceladus, Rhoetus and others--their equally titanic sisters Tethys, Phoebe, Theia, and Clymene--and opposite them the doleful countenances of Jupiter, Apollo, and their ilk. " [More about this poem, pg. 168-170. See also pg. 419, 421-422.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 80. "'Raven was the ancient shape-changer and trickster for Indian tribes in the American Pacific Northwest on Old Earth. One of the legends says Raven stole a ball of fire from the gods to give to humanity--a kind of Salish Prometheus...' " [Same thing mentioned pg. 119.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3000 Foster, Alan Dean. The Howling Stones. New York: Ballantine (1998; c. 1997); pg. 24. Pg. 24: "A full head taller than himself, well over the ancient six feet in height, she was a physical amalgam of Hera, several vit heroines, and the female bull dancers of ancient Crete. "; Pg. 92: "Alien constellations teased his contemplation with suggestions of fantastical shapes that would have delighted the ancient Greeks. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3000 Gardner, James Alan. "The Children of Creche " in L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future (Algis Budrys, ed.) Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000; c. 1990); pg. 175. "...he hails from the hinterlands of a world named after some bottom-of-the-barrel Greek god who wouldn't have rated a pico-asteroid in the old Sol System... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3000 Rocklynne, Ross. "Ching Witch! " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 23. "'Surely you remember the Greek god Zephyrus who was jealous of Hyacinthus and caused his death. Zephrans think of Earth as Hyacinthus.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3000 Saberhagen, Fred. Berserkers: The Beginning. New York: Baen (1998; c. 1967, 1979); pg. 174. "'The three temples are those of Mars, Diana, and Venus,' said the intercom... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 628. "The frescoes showed Christian images--doves carrying olive branches, women drawing water... but were next to older grottoes, cremation urns, and graves offering pre-Christian images of Isis and Apollo, bacchus welcoming the dead to the afterlife with great, overflowing flagons of wine... [more]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 635. "Oh, Jesus God, God of Moses, Allah, dear Buddha, Zeus, Muir, Elvis, Christ . . . if any of you exist or ever existed or retain a shred of power in your dead gray hands . . please let me die now. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3502 Drake, David. Through the Breach. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 286. "'What?' Rodrigo said. 'Nothing, only food. Ah--we took back the Hercules, this ship, on Corpus Christ...' " [Other refs. to this ship, pg. 287-291, 306.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 3509 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 231. "'When the vocal line begins, it's as if I'm seeing something that really exists. I'm standing in a great city square almost as large as St. Marks or St. Peters. All around are half-ruined buildings, like Greek temples, and overturned statues draped with seaweeds, green fronts waving slowly back and forth...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 4000 The Conqueror's Child. Charnas, Suzy McKee. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 108. Hera
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 4100 Weber, David. Echoes of Honor. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1998); pg. 180. "...and helping him plan and execute Operation Icarus. Personally, he would have preferred to call it Operation Daedalus, since at least Daedalus had survived mankind's first flight, but no one had asked him. " [Some other names of planets, ships, etc. come from Greco-Roman classical mythology. Other refs. not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 4500 Herbert, Brian & Kevin J. Anderson. Dune: House Atreides. New York: Bantam (1999) [Front/back inside cover: Map of "Arrakis: South Polar Region " includes "Tartarus Depression " and "Cliffs of Hades "]; Pg. 21: "The dark-skinned Lady Helena, dressed in her fine gown, took seriously the ponderous words of the Greek chorus... The Dukes had made an annual tradition of performing the classic tragedy of Agamemnon, the most famous son of Atreus and one of the generals who had conquered Troy. "; Pg. 22: Cassandra; "'...Our enemy's shrines lie in ruins, nevermore comforting their gods, and their soils are barren.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 4600 Weber, David & Steve White. In Death Ground. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 189. "A task, she reflected, not unlike that of a gentleman named Hercules and a certain stable. Or Sisyphus, perhaps. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 7000 Allen, Roger MacBride. Inferno. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 0. [This novel is named Inferno, apparently after Dante's work. Inferno is a planet where most of the novel takes place. The map on page zero shows the 'Island of Purgatory', with a city named Limbo, a river named Styx, on which sits a city named Hades, and another river named Lethe.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 11850 Smith, Cordwainer. "Mother Hitton's Littul Kittons " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1961); pg. 101. Pg. 101: "'I wish I could go further than this trip. I wish that I could go to Olympia. You can buy anything in Olympia.'

'I've heard of it,' said Bozart. 'It's sort of a funny trading planet with not much chance for businessmen, isn't it?' "; Pg. 102: "'...what I could do in a year in that place! Everybody is blind except me and a couple of tourists. And there's all the wealth that everybody thought he's mislaid, half the wrecked ships, the forgotten colonies... and bang! it all goes to Olympia.'

Olympia wasn't really that good and Liverant didn't know why it was his business to guide the killer there... " [More pg. 102-106.] [No real connection to Greco-Roman classical mythology except this planet's name. Story has no apparent references to other specific contemporary or historical religions. Fictional groups or nationalities mentioned in the story are Norstrilians, the Guild of Thieves and Old North Australians, all of which are mentioned throughout.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 23000 Engh, M. J. Rainbow Man. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 54. "'So what gods do you recommend?'

...'Doesn't matter much. Doesn't matter at all, in principle. You can personify any old aspect of the world that takes your fancy--or that worries you--and you can worship it however strikes you as appropriate. Me, I'm an antiquarian by preference. I've dug up some of the old gods from Earth. I say prayers generally to Athena and Hermes and Rab.'

'I think I've heard of Athena,' I said doubtfully.

'So you should have, if you know any Earth history. She was the patron of the city of Athens and pretty much the inventor of civilization. Goddess of wisdom is what she is--wisdom meaning how to do things, not any metaphysical stuff. Which is why I like her. She's a tough goddess. In the old Greek system. Ares was the dumb war god, the one who always said, 'Oh, boy--a fight!' But Athena handled the strategy and tactics. And a very protective deity. She takes care of me.' A serious note in her voice there... "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 23000 Engh, M. J. Rainbow Man. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 55. "'Hermes is the god of travelers--a natural for a starshipper. Also the god of luck and double-dealing and all the stuff that Athena wouldn't stoop to. And a trickster--the only Greek god with a real sense of humor. The god of quantum mechanics, in my opinion. Remember quantum?' She laughed her wide-open laugh. 'Now, Rab's not Greek. I picked Rab up on--what was the name of that planet? I didn't think I could ever forget it... Well, never mind...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion Georgia: Atlanta 2067 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 328. "The Awakening of the Buddha, Prometheus on the Rock, Christ in His Passion--those are galvanizing mythopoeic images. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Georgia: Atlanta 2067 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 328. "'...Or like the Struldbrugs in Gulliver's Travels, who continued to age even though they couldn't die.'

'Fit topics for a gerontologist,' Margot said. 'The ancients invented Tithonus, and Swift his Struldbrugs, as antidotes to the vanity of striving for physical immortality.' " [Tithonus a figure from Greco-Roman myth?]

Greco-Roman classical religion Germany 1942 Lee, Stan & Stan Timmons. The Alien Factor. New York: ibooks, inc. (2002; c. 2001); pg. 39. "Anthony had read weirder messages than this one. The Big Nazis were in love with the occult, so he even checked if there had been an oracle in that cave in ancient times, but that was so implausible that even as he checked it, he knew he was wasting time. They had found a Roman god? Yeah, right. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Germany 1944 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 52. "Fevre argued that the picture was fine art, and that his intention was to make Greek mythology come alive. he said the columns and the potted palms proved that. "


Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

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