Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Greco-Roman classical religion, California

Greco-Roman classical religion, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1974 Dick, Philip K. Radio Free Albemuth. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 91. Pg. 91: "When he thought, in the long hypnagogic states preceding sleep, about erotic topics, the patches of fog-like color turned red. Once he thought he saw Aphrodite, naked and lovely and huge-breasted. When he thought about holy topics, the colored patches turned pure pale white. "; Pg. 137: "Perhaps ancient accounts of theolepsy--possession by a god, such as Dionysos or Apollo--described the identical event. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1975 Dick, Philip K. "Man, Android and Machine " in The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1975); pg. 228. Pg. 228: "Studying the Bible, along with this Qumran personality, Brady finds that the New Testament is in cypher. The Qumran personality can read it. 'Jesus' is really Zagreus-Zeus, taking two forms, one mind, the other utterly powerful, on which his followers can draw when in need. "; Pg. 229: "...which the early Christians sought for, and hid from the hated Romans. Dionysos-Zagreus-Orpheus-Jesus was always pitted against the City of Iron, be it Rome or Washington D.C... " [More, not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 42. Pg. 42: Cassandra; Pg. 71-72: Prometheus; Pandora; Zeus; Epimetheus; Hercules; Pg. 76: "'...Fate would not be regarded as inevitable but as something a person allowed. Do you see my point? To the Greeks, fate was ananke, a force absolutely predetermined and impersonal; they equated it with Nemesis, which is retributive, punishing fate. "; Pg. 91: "Some of the very early statues of the god Apollo reveal that sweet smile. "; Pg. 141: Saturn; Apollo; Cumaen Sibyl's chant; Pg. 158: "...the ancient sibyl--I could not remember which sibyl it had been, the one at Delphi or at Cumae--who had asked for immortality but had neglected that she remain young; whereupon she lived forever but got so old that eventually her friends hung her up on the wall in a bag. "; Pg. 194: Apollo; Pg. 207: Prometheus
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 191. "The ancient world had seen the coming into existence of the Greco-Roman Mystery Religions, which were dedicated to overcoming fate by patching the worshipper into a god beyond the planetary spheres, a god capable of short-circuiting the 'astral influences,' as it had been called in those days. We ourselves, now, speak of the DNA death-strip and the psychological-script leaned from, modeled on, other, previous people, friends and parents. It is the same thing; it is determinism killing you no matter what you do. Some power outside of you must enter and alter the situation... "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1977 Koontz, Dean R. Lightning. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1988); pg. 122. "...perhaps the voices of the three sisters of Greek myth, the Fates, mocking him for his desperate attempt to prevent what they had ordained. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1994 Dick, Philip K. A Scanner Darkly. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1977); pg. 185. "He was sure it was Greece, ancient Greece... 'There was a woman on the island. Not exactly--more a statue. He said it was of the Cyrenaican Aphrodite. Standing there in the moonlight, pale and cold and made out of marble.' " [More.]
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1994 Goldstein, Lisa. "Rites of Spring " in Isaac Asimov's Detectives (Gardner Dozois and Sheila Williams, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1994); pg. 158. Kore, Persephone, Demeter, Hermes, Mercury
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 143. Pg. 143: "...and they're assuming too the role of the Cretan Kouretes, who hid the vulnerable infant Zeus from his murderous father Kronos by performing their Sword Dance around the baby... ";

Pg. 154: "'...is those three merciless ladies in Greek mythology who measure out life and... cut it off.'

'Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropine,' said Plumtree blandly... " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 222. "'...It looks like an old ruined Greek or Roman temple...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 2049 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 236. Pg. 76: "The largest picture was Bocklin's Triton and Nereid, which showed a hairy guy--Triton--sitting on a rock in the sea and blowing a conch shell... " [More]; Pg. 236: "Apparently they were eager to fit in. Looking at them, it was like being in a fantasy viddy about the Greek gods on Mount Olympus... "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "The speed of Hermes, swiftest of all the Greek gods, drove Diana as she accelerated above the jarring scene... "; Pg. 11: "Diana slowed her descent and once again the speed and power of flight vested in her by Hermes himself set aside the rough embrace of gravity. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 19. "'I mean, it's not air, is it? Rebecca Chandler preaches all the time about God and Jesus and everything she believes, and Diana never really says anything about her gods. And, like, she's actually met Zeus and Athena and Hermes and all of them, but she doesn't go around telling everybody they should worship them or something.'

Helena leaned against the frame of the door... 'That's difficult for some people to understand,' she said. 'I don' agree with Rebecca Chandler, and I certainly don't approve of her attacking Diana, but I understand how she must feel. It's perplexing for modern people to be told those old gods really exist.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Gateway City 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 78. "'All the gods?' Esther swallowed. Her mouth was dry, her chest heavy. 'Diana, you know I can't believe such a thing. You know I can't believe that my God is just one god out of hundreds or thousands or millions.'

'No,' Diana said, lowering her eyes, feeling a weight press down upon her broad, strong shoulders. 'No, I see now that you cannot. And, perhaps, no one raised in this country, in this culture, truly can... I was raised to accept the concept of a plurality of gods,' Diana said. 'I was raised to believe in gods who were physical, who walked among us, talked with us. I have been to Olympus, seen them in their homes, seen them in their daily lives. I comprehend my gods, Esther, but I see now that the very core of so many faiths in this land is the incomprehensibility of their god.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1985 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 30: "The Singer & Her Song ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Aug. 1985); pg. 21. [Upon seeing a huge monster they must now fight in the Gladiator ring.] Roberto: "Blessed Madonna! "; Amara: "Father Jove defend us! "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 40. "On the south side of the street stood a new McDonald's restaurant that looked like an incongruously space-age Grecian temple... "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 43. "'...And I don't think you're a mental case for believing that gods can literally die. Zeus is dead, after all.'

'I thought he was simply doing time for rape.'

She smiled at that and took a sip of her drink. 'His worshippers are gone. Where does a god go then?'

'I think that was dealt with on a Star Trek episode.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 66. "'No,' he said. 'You begin. You define God.'

'I can't.'

'Come now... Any God will do. Greek, Christian, Moslem, Hindu, Hebrew, African. . . .' "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 71. "'...Even as scandalous a god as Zeus was outmatched...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 240. "'Gracious Goddess and Queen of the Heavens, Eternal Mother and Sister, Maiden Diana, Queen Isis, Mighty Hecate--bless these tools of your once and future Craft. Bless this circle and all inside it.' "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 69-70. "'...The theft from the Romans and the Greeks was even more obvious--they just changed the names a bit. Jove became Je-ho-vah, Zeus became Ya-Zeus, the goddess Ma and Rhea became Ma-ria.'

That was too much....

Golding seemed to be warming up again. He began to spit out snippets of historicity as if they were theological watermelon seeds. The outcome was about as intellectually tidy.

...'They made this composite God of theirs an incomprehensible mishmash of conflicting traits. He was as rational as Apollo and as murderous as Typon...' "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Los Angeles 2040 Willis, Connie. Remake. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 83. "The Ten Commandments,' I said, back in my room again.

There was drinking in the golden-calf scene and assorted references to 'the wine of violence,... I.. went to work playing Charlton Heston--deleting vineyards and calling a halt to Roman orgies. Vengeance is mine, saith the Lord. "

Greco-Roman classical religion California: Orange County 2027 Robinson, Kim Stanley. The Gold Coast. New York: Tor (1995; c. 1988); pg. 203. "Not in OC [Orange County], of course. OC sprang Athena-like, full blown from the forehead of Zeus Los Angeles. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: San Francisco 1906 Baker, Kage. "Son Observe the Time " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 588. "Ah, but this wasn't enough for San Francisco! The entrance, on the hill above, was as near a Greek temple as modern artisans could produce; through the shrine one wandered along the museum gallery... exercise in the gymnasium or attend a theater performance... "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: San Francisco 1906 Baker, Kage. "Son Observe the Time " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 590. "Aquae Sulis, it was then, Lewis informed me. The public baths there.

Of course. I remember now! You were rescued from the temple. Intercepted child sacrifice, I imagine? Oh, good heavens, no! The Romans never did that sort of thing. No, I was just somebody's little unwanted holiday souvenir left in a blanket by the statue of Apollo. "
[Some other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion California: San Francisco 1906 Baker, Kage. "Son Observe the Time " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 602. "I was sinking to my knees, clutching my cut throat as my blood fountained out over the starched front of my dress shirt and stained the diamond stud so it winked like Mars. Ares, God of War. Thor. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California: San Francisco 1977 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 106. "'...and your beloved Arthur Machen--you know, Franz, I've always thought that in his The Great God Pan the sexually sinister femme fatale Helen Vaughan...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion Colorado 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 125. "'COME ON, GODS, SHOW ME SOMETHING!' screamed Tommy. 'YOUR TURN, ZEUS. DO IT!' He held the tent pole. " [In a lightning storm.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Colorado: Denver 2001 Schindler, Solomon. Young West. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times (1971; c. 1894); pg. 148. "...nor did I know at the time that it is Cupid in the disguise of Apollo who inspires us. Poetry at that age, is a sure symptom of the disease commonly known as love-sickness. I was, indeed, in love, though I did not know it. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Darkover 4000 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Hawkmistress! in The Ages of Chaos. New York: Daw Books (2002; c. 1982); pg. 692. "Hali is the constellation of Taurus, and Hali the ancient Terran word for necklace in the Arabic tongue... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Deep Space 9 2371 Sheckley, Robert. The Laertian Gamble (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 187. "'...One legend had it that he tried to talk her into returning home to Menelaus, her husband, and doing it quickly, before Agememmnon and everybody got really bent out of shape and Achilles got into it and people started getting hurt. "'
Greco-Roman classical religion Egypt -500 B.C.E. Morrow, James. "Arms and the Woman " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 218. [Year is estimated.] "Can the gods help? Helen [Helen of Troy] is skeptical, but anything is worth a try. Tomorrow, she resolves, she will go to the temple of Apollo, and beg him to relieve her boredom, perhaps buttressing her appeal with an offering--a ram, a bull, whatever--though an offering strikes her as rather like a deal... "; Pg. 227: "Helen adjusts here greaves. 'I could claim I was bewitched by laughter-loving Aphrodite...' "; Pg. 231: "'Why?' gasps Panthoos. 'Why? Because this is Troy, that's why. Because we're kicking off Western Civilization here, that's why...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Egypt -200 B.C.E. Long, Karawynn. "And Make Death Proud to Take Us " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 59. [Year estimated.] "But oh, to take that sort of chance, knowing that if she [Cleopatra] failed the outcome would be so much worse--her own humiliation and death at the hands of the Romans, and nothing but despair and ruin left for Egypt. Octavious would bleed her country dry to support his own, replace Egyptian laws and gods with Roman ones. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Europe -5998019 B.C.E. May, Julian. The Golden Torc in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1982); pg. 642. "They seemed to stand yet on solid ground, but all around was darkness . . . until there came a pinprick of light that swelled to a sun, to a glowing face, to the face of Apollo. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Europe -5998019 B.C.E. May, Julian. The Golden Torc in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1982); pg. 716. "Why oh why couldn't they simply leave him in peace? Leave him to savor the last of her alone? He had done the sun-god's bidding, explaining to the barbarians why the shutting of the time-gate was good, why the Tanu should wean themselves from their overdependence upon human technology.

Ingenious, the way the Battlemaster had twisted the statistics to his own ends; but of course he had to spare Mercy and the loyal hybrids. Pogroms were so wasteful and Apollo ever a prudent husband-man. "

Greco-Roman classical religion Europe 1478 C.E. Ford, John M. The Dragon Waiting. New York: Timescape Books (1983); pg. 56. Pg. 56: Apollo; Pg. 61: Olympus; Pg. 91: Zeus; Pg. 96: "He always loved Dante's puns on Pluto's cave, and Plato's. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Europe 1964 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 136. "its loincloth slipping coyly down like the tresses of the Botticelli Venus "
Greco-Roman classical religion Florin 1400 C.E. Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 195. "Was it 'Stupid, stupid, go and wait for Vizzini with Cupid'? That rhymed, but where was the Cupid? "
Greco-Roman classical religion France 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 87. "Noise struck her as the voices of thousands of people rose, rejoicing in the reconciliation between Louis and the Church of Rome. The courtyard, set between the wings of the chateau, concentrated and focused the cheers, as if the busts of philosophers and heroes were shouting their acclaim, as if Mars and Hercules on their pediment cried out to celebrate Christianity's ascendance. " [Greek/Roman gods were frequently used during this period as inspiration for names of pets, horses, and inspiration for sculpture, as evidenced by one character's cat Hercules, another character's horse Apollo, and the art in the French royal court.]
Greco-Roman classical religion France 1693 McIntyre, Vonda N. The Moon and the Sun. New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 126. "His Majesty graced many of the scenes, majestic as Apollo, as Zeus, as a Roman emperor himself, Louis le Grand, on his war horse, on his throne. "
Greco-Roman classical religion France 1720 Keyes, J. Gregory. Newton's Cannon. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 18. Pg. 18: Apollo; Pg. 78: "'I danced many times. Once, in The Marriage of Pelleas and Thetis, I danced--let me see--six parts: Apollo, of course, and as Fury, a dryad, an Indian, a courtier, and as War.' "; Pg. 127: "'What if he's French? His Apollonian light? God, John, that doesn't refer to King George but to Louis of France!' ";

Pg. 128: "'...gods and goddesses. You signed as Janus, he wrote as Minerva, called you Prometheus, and so on.'

'No Englishman would call King George Apollo. Zeus or Jove, maybe. Louis XIV, the Sun King--that's what they call him. Oh, God, John, whatever we've done just now, we've done for the enemies of our country!' " [Other refs. to Apollo: pg. 129.]; Pg. 151-152: Athena [Other refs., not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion France 1916 Simmons, Dan. "The Great Lover " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 262. "Then I saw the Medusa-like mass of ropes and cables trailing behind the central mass. "
Greco-Roman classical religion France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 55. Pg. 55: "...or the metamorphosis of grapes into wine by the Greeks. A truly Promethean act! "; Pg. 239: "To hell with admire! Love him! Desire him! Idolize him! He had performed a Promethean feat. He had persevered until, with infinite cunning, he had obtained for himself that divine spark, something laid gratis in the cradle of every other human being but withheld from him alone. And not merely that! He had himself actually struck that spark upon himself. He was even greater than Prometheus. He had created an aura more radiant and more effective than any human being had ever possessed before him. "
Greco-Roman classical religion France: Paris 1929 Ebershoff, David. The Danish Girl. New York: Viking (2000); pg. 138. [Reading about hermaphrodism.] "The next day, the girl behind the bureau located more books for Einar. Books called The Sexes; The Normal and Abnormal Man; A Scientific Study of Sexual Immorality; and Die sexuelle Krise... There was a chapter on the myth of Hermes and Aphrodite. The book explained sexual pathology, and something called sexual intermediacy. Somehow Einar knew he was reading about himself. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "Saturn sat in the middle of the tank, fat and brassy. Eight blue circles were drawn around it, each larger than the last, each in the equatorial plane of the rings. There was a sphere on each circle, like a single pearl on a string, and besides the pears were names and numbers: Mnemosyne, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, and Hyperion. Far beyond those orbits was a tenth one, visibly tilted. That was Iapetus. Phoebe, the most distant, could not be shown on the scale they were using. "; Pg. 8: "Gaby mentions the alleged sighting of (what would have been) a tenth moon of Saturn by William Henry Pickering--discoverer of Phoebe, Saturn's outermost moon--in 1905. He named it Themis, and no one ever saw it again. Calvin pointed out that five of the Saturnian moons are already named after the Titans of Greek myth... and a sixth is called Titan. Themis was a Titan, so Calvin's mind is appeased. " [Other refs. to Greek myth, mostly regarding the moons.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 85. "'Let me guess about the rivers. More mythology?'

'Yeah. I picked the nine largest rivers in Hyperion--which has got a hell of a lot of them, as you can see--and named them after the Muses. Down south over there is Urania, Calliope, Terpsichore, and Euterpe, with Polyhymnia in the twilight zone and feeding into Rhea. And over here on the north slope, starting at the east--is Melpomene. Closer to us are Thalia and Erato, which look like they make a system. And the one you came down is a feeder of the Clio, which is just about below us now.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 108. "'Nevertheless, we've committed ourselves go Greek mythology. This ship should be named the Argo.'

Cirocco looked doubtful. 'Wasn't that tied up with the search for the golden fleece? Oh, yeah, I remember the movie now.'

'We're not searching for anything,' Gaby pointed out. 'We know where we want to go.'

'Then how about . . .' Bill paused, then looked thoughtful. 'I'm thinking of Odysseus. Did his ship have a name?'

'I don't know. We lost our mythologist to that overgrown tire advertisement. But even if it died, I wouldn't want to use it. Odysseus had nothing but trouble.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 143. "The most obvious word for the thing was centaur. It had a lower part shaped like a horse, and an upper half so human it was frightening. Cirocco was not quite sure she believed it.

It was not as Disney had envisioned centaurs, nor did it have much to do with the classical Greek model. It had a lot of hair, yet its dominant feature was pale naked skin... " [Many refs. throughout the rest of the novel, to these centaur-like people. In fact, the inside cover features a color painting of a centaur. Other refs. not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 100-101. Pg. 100: "I've been thinking of a goddess that rules the whole circle of the land. I call her Gaea, for the Greek mother.' "; Pg. 101: "'Captain!' he shouted, just before they disappeared. 'Gaby shouldn't have called this place Themis. Call it Gaea.' "; Pg. 103: "...but Themis-Gaea would not be forgotten. A ship would arrive soon... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Gaea 2025 Varley, John. Titan. New York: Berkley (4th ed. 1981; 1st pub. 1979); pg. 84-85. Pg. 84: "'Titanides?'

He smiled uncertainly, and spread his hands. 'It's a word I substitute for a whistle he uses. I only get a hazy idea of what they're like because I can't do too well with complex descriptions. I gather they're six-legged, and they're all females. I call them Titanides because that's the name in Greek mythology for female Titans.' ";

Pg. 85: "'The only ones that matter right now are Oceanus, Hyperion, and Rhea. Actually, not all the names are Titans. One Titan is Themis, and I thought that would be confusing. And, well. . . .' He looked away, with a sheepish grin. 'I just couldn't recall the names of two Titans. I used Metis, which is wisdom, and Dione.'

Cirocco did not really care. The name [sic] were handy, and in their own way, systematic. "

Greco-Roman classical religion Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 25. Pg. 21: "and columns and steps of the abandoned akropolis. From the bright expanse of the porch of the sanctuary of Athene Lindia... "Pg. 25: "Aphrodite dazzled and shimmered over the sea like a hole in a dark silk lamp shade. "; Pg. 65: "'Her petition states she wishes the assistance of your mekhanikos Zeus Ammon Demetrios...' "; Pg. 155: "The sky was cloudless and pure, the blue of Athene's hemline spread over her domain, with a few bright stars or perhaps planets twinkling in the expanse, drops of glitter from Aphrodite's makeup box. "; pg. 239: "These gods I don't really believe in, she thought. They're still inside me, though. Athene and Astarte and Isis and Aser and Aserapis and Zeus . . . and now Typhon. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Gaia 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 390. "Rhita focused on the wise-looking, smiling gray-haired man, feeling more secure in his presence. He did not have the fierce aspect of a Zeus, but more the calm air of Aserapis with his stalks of corn and Plutonian dogs, his ceremonial bulls and festivals of resurrection.

...She felt a mingling of their water, like the mingling of seas so clearly visible along the outermost pillars of Hercules, entering into the broad ocean of Atlantis. "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy -4990 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Elven Star. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 286. "'The vessel needs a new name! Something more appropriate to a starship. Apollo? Gemini? Enterprise. Already taken...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 1943 Lewis, C.S. Perelandra. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 64. Pg. 54: "Circe or Alcina "; Pg. 64: "...or run like Artemis or dance like a Maenad. "; Pg. 201: Mars; Venus; Ares Aphrodite; The Muse; Virgil
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 1997 Duane, Diane. X-Men: Empire's End. New York: Berkley (1998 softcover; 1st ed. 1997); pg. 331. "Around him other gods hung in the darkness, a company of Olympians, though perhaps somewhat preoccupied ones at the moment. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2030 Hogan, James P. Entoverse. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 285. "'You know, I'm getting a feeling that a lot of what we dismiss as myth back on Earth wasn't mythical at all,' Gina said... 'The war with the Titans, the menagerie around Mount Olympus, gods throwing mountains down out of the sky and swallowing up cities . . . those things really happened. Except it was in a different place. The agents they sent to Earth included Ents, and the things the Ents talked about from their own past got mixed up with the real history going on around them.' ";

Pg. 357: "...wearing a Greek chiton turned up and held by a girdle to form a short tunic falling to just above the knee; she was shod with laced buckskin. She looked like representations of Artemis, the virgin huntress. ";

Pg. 394: "'Well, here it is,' she said. 'The world of Earth's mythology, only real, just like we said. But who'd have thought we'd end up in it?'...

...'As you said, it's a mythology become real. Miracles can happen.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2049 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 72. "'...Neither would a Taoist. Neither would a Zoroastrian, presuming that there were still such, or a classical Greek...' "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2050 Blish, James. A Case of Conscience. New York: Ballantine (1979; c. 1958); pg. 87. "...springing like Minerva from the brow of Jove. Out of that unnatural birth, as out of the fabled one... for Minerva was the mistress of Mars... "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2050 Effinger, George Alec. "One " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 312. "'Didn't Apollo have . . . No, I'm wrong. I though--'

Jessica turned away from the port. 'It reminds me of Odin and his two ravens.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2071 Delany, Samuel R. Babel-17. Boston: Gregg Press (1976; first ed. 1966); pg. 92. "...it must take fifty discorporate souls to do all the sensory reading for Tarik and its spider-boats--in Basque again...

'Am I glad to see you!' she said. 'I didn't know whether Tarik had discorporate facilities!'

'Does it!' Came the Basque response. 'We'll treat you on a trip through the Underworld here. Captain. They treat you like the lords of Hades.' "

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2075 Jones, Raymond F. "Intermission Time " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1953); pg. 143. "...Elysian peace of the landscape. " [In well-groomed Alpha Colony, on Planet 7.]
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2084 Disch, Thomas M. "Things Lost " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 596. Pg. 596: "...like an inverse Medusa. "; Pg. 605: Hippolytus; Pg. 608: "...like the Minotaur "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2150 Dickson, Gordon R. The Magnificent Wilf. New York: Baen (1995)

; pg. 286.

"...and it was not long before they were floating up carpet-colored steps into what looked something like a Greek temple from the outside. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2193 Fisher, Stephen C. "Dear Mom " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 179. "Brutus! Of course! That stupid foul-smelling lizard was spoiling for a fight. That pea-brain stood outside in thunderstorms, dripping wet, yelling challenges to Zeus to come down and duke it out. "
Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2200 Drake, David. The Voyage. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 413. "The earliest form of the legend of Jason and the Argonauts can be reconstructed only from literary fragments and vase paintings. In this version, Jason appears to have sailed west, into the Adriatic, rather than east to the ends of the Black Sea. Readers with an interest in Greek myth will notice that I've adapted portions of this Urmythus in the plat of The Voyage. Most significantly, the original Jason doesn't sow the dragon's teeth. Rather, he yokes the bronze bulls to battle the water monster which guards the Golden Fleece.

I don't mean to imply that I ignored the Argonautica of the third century B.C. poet Apollonius Rhodius. On the contrary, Apollonius was my inspiration and main source. " [Two more pages of author's note about his use of ancient Greek sources, an equivalency table, etc.]

Greco-Roman classical religion galaxy 2200 Silverberg, Robert. Starborne. New York: Bantam (1997; co. 1996); pg. 132. Pg. 132: "'Mouth-to-mouth resuscitation? Marcus is really dead and he's going to stay that way. He can't be fixed, not by me, not by Leon if I bring him back up there, not by Jesus Christ himself. Believe me.' There's Jesus Christ again, Huw thinks. The old myths keep surfacing. Something about this planet makes you want to invoke divine aid, it would seem. 'Or Zeus, for that matter,' Huw says, still angry, angry at the year-captain, at Marcus, at himself, at the universe. "; Pg. 175: "His mind had gone at once to all those Greek myths of women who had wanted to be embraced by this or that god in all his might, and had been granted their wish, and had been consumed into ashes by the full glory of the deity. They needed to consider, very carefully indeed, all the consequences of a mental union between... "; Pg. 198-200: Zeus, Greek gods, Dionysus, Semele, Hera, etc. [Also pg. 208, 211]


Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.