Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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goddess worship, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
goddess worship world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 10. "Emanations of sorrow, rage, and fear filled the dying ship. Questions and reproaches threatened to stifle the mind of Thagdal until he touched the golden torc around his neck and forced them all to be silent.

'In the Name of the Goddess, hold! Our venture was a great gamble, with all minds turned against us. Brede is concerned that this place may not be the perfect refuge we had hoped for. Nevertheless...' "

goddess worship world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 218. "'Imagine me as fairy godmother,' Elizabeth murmured. 'What a world! Are you going to name her after me as well?'

'She already has a name. It is traditional among us to give anew the name of one who has recently passed on to Tana's peace. The baby will be called Epone--and the Goddess grant that she be more fortunate than the last who bore that name.' " [Some other refs., not in DB. Also pg. 299, 363, 366, 370.]

goddess worship world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 265. Pg. 265: "'May the Good Goddess smile on you,' the little man said. 'I'm Fitharn. But you can call me Pegleg.' "; Pg. 268: "'...And thus the votive offerings of Man and Blade were chosen for the consecration of the Grave. We marched away, the voices of our minds up in Song for one last time in honor of the Ship and also him who there was offered up to captain it upon its voyage to the leading dark. There, comforted within the Goddess's womb, they wait the coming of the light . . .' "
goddess worship world 2198 Conner, Miguel. The Queen of Darkness. New York: Warner Books (1998); pg. 18. Book jacket: "...Byron, a rebellious young Stargazer, is assigned to investigate the 'Warm Ones'--in other words, to destroy any threat. But when a beautiful human shaman shows him unbelievable truths about his past, his origin, and his destiny, a vampire will discover that his mortal enemy is his living Goddess, the MoonQueen. "; Pg. 18: "The MoonQueen creates us in variety to create oneness. You do not question the motives of the Goddess. Our traits are shared by the Warm Ones, for we coexisted together long ago, but we are the natural step in evolution. " [Many refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
goddess worship world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "'Thank the Mother of Mothers I have no sons...' "; Pg. 38: "'O Mother of Mothers, take care of me,' she whispered.

Overhead the branches moved. Leaves rustled--a loud noise, unlike the soft whish of vegetation moving on the plain.

She prayed to the Mistress of the Forge. 'Bring me safely home, O holy one.' " [Other refs., not in DB. For example, pg. 293-295.]

goddess worship world 2400 Anderson, Poul. Genesis. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 66. "...wearing their canonicals and bearing the symbols according to their orders: of God the Dreamer of the Universe, God the Mother, God the Summoner (black cassock and impaled skull), God the Lover (rainbow hues and wreathed staff). "
Goth California 1975 Dick, Philip K. The Transmigration of Timothy Archer. New York: Timescape Books (1982); pg. 180. -
Goth California: San Diego 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 218. Pg. 219: "The self-styled 'Prophetess of Doom'--and former editor of a Marilyn Manson magazine--predicted that a fourth creature, also numerologically a six, was yet to come, forming the 'Number of the Beast,' 666. This final monster, called 'King Ghidorah,' would come from the depths of space, the prophetess announced, and would end all life on Earth.

Her followers moved into their spiritual leader's recently purchased San Diego mansion to await the end. An MTV film crew joined them, and soon weekly sessions were aired on the music channel in which the Prophetess--in full Goth regalia--spoke at length about 'King Ghidorah.' "

Goth Europe 1470 C.E. Gentle, Mary. A Secret History. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 136. "Text uncertain here. Charles Mallory Maximillian has 'Visigoth,' the 'noble Goths.' Although it is couched in terms of mediaeval legend, I believe the mention of 'Visigoths' to have aspects we would do well to consider. "
Goth Greece 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 91. "It is our country. The Goths, the Huns, the Bulgars, the Serbs, the Franks, the Turks, and lately the Vegans have never made it go away from us... Mainland Greece, though, is mainland Greece, and it does not change for me. "
Goth Italy 1943 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 79. -
Goth Italy: Rome 1968 Ellison, Harlan. "The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1968); pg. 806. "...452... forty years before Attila raided Italy, Rome had been taken and sacked by Alaric the Goth... "
Goth Roman Empire 271 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 147. "'I was born in Dacia Repensis. Strange to think that it will become the frontier. I suppose the Goths will be fighting what's left of the Carpi, the Bastarnians, and the Vandals for it now.' " [Also pg. 166-167.]
Goth Ukraine 375 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "Uldin's followers numbered only half a dozen, including two unarmed slaves. The East Goths had fled into a Roman realm which would not likely prove hospitable. Some stayed, of course, the slain and those who were captured and beaten into meekness... 'What, afraid of wolf-scattered Gothic skeletons?...' "; Pg. 13: "...hence the West Goths and others would at least be raided pretty often... "
Goth Ukraine 375 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 43. "Uldin, vaguer, had spoken of recently taking over the land of the East Goths, after having first crushed the Alans, and of greedy speculations about the Roman Empire to the west. From his dippings into history... Reid could delimit the Hun's scene of departure: the Ukraine, one or two hundred miles from the Crimea in a more or less northwesterly direction; time, the later fourth century A.D. "
Goth United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 2. "The Elder Isles had known the coming and going of many peoples: Pharesmians, blue-eyed Evadnioi, Pelasgians and their maenad priestesses, Danaans, Lydians, Phoenicians, Etruscans, Greeks, Celts from Gaul, Ska from Norway by way of Ireland, Romans, Celts from Ireland and a few Sea Goths. "
Goth world 650 C.E. Silverberg, Robert. "A Hero of the Empire " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 353. "As in the time of Maximilianus III, for example, when the Greeks helped us put an end to the disturbances that the Goths and Vandals and Huns and other barbarians were creating along our northern frontier. "
Goth world 875 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. King and Emperor. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 25. "Most of his army now were the descendants of Berbers, converted Spaniards, even Goths. " [Also, pg. 30.]
Goth world 1476 C.E. Gentle, Mary. Lost Burgundy. New York: HarperCollins (2000); pg. 17. "'...Because if you were dead, the Goths were going to show your body off...' " [Also pg. 94.]
Goth world 1956 de Camp, L. Sprague. "Aristotle and the Gun " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1956); pg. 56. "Still, classical history followed the same general courses that it had in my world, even though the actors bore other names. The Roman Empire broke up, as it did in my world, though the details are all different, with a Hunnish emperor ruling in Rome and a Gothic one in Antioch. "
Goth world 1959 Frank, Pat. Alas, Babylon. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co. (1959); pg. 84. "With the use of the hydrogen bomb, the Christian era was dead, and with it must die the tradition of the good Samaritan. " [Some other refs. not in DB.]
Goth world 1984 Bear, Greg. "Book One: The Infinity Concerto " (c. 1984, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 56. "'...Your words are Anglo-Saxon and Norman and mixes from the misty north and the warm south. Ah, I knew those tongues once, at their very roots . . . affrighted many a Goth and Frank and Jute . . .' "
Goth world 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 268. -
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 156. [1] [Year estimated.] "The Master had come to Earth amid the chaos of the Transition Centuries, when the Galactic Empire was crumbling but the lines of communication among the stars had not yet completely broken. He had been of human origin, though his home was a planet circling one of the Seven Suns. While still a young man, he had been forced to leave his native world, and its memory had haunted him all his life. His expulsion he blamed on vindictive enemies, but the fact was that he suffered from an incurable malady which, it seemed, attacked only Homo sapiens among all the intelligent races of the Universe. That disease was religious mania. "
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 157. [2] "The Master, even if he was expelled from his own world, did not leave it unprovided. The Seven Suns had been the center of galactic power and science, and he must have possessed influential friends. He had made his hegira in a small but speedy ship, reputed to be one of the fastest ever built. With him into exile he had taken another of the ultimate products of galactic science--the robot that was looking at Alvin and Hilvar even now.

No one had ever known the full talents and functions of this machine. To some extent, indeed, it had become the Master's alter ego; without it, the religion of the Great Ones would probably have collapsed after the Master's death. Together they had roved among the star clouds in a zigzag trail which led at last, certainly not by accident, back to the world from which the Master's ancestors had sprung. "

Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 158. [3] "Entire libraries had been written about that saga, each work therein inspiring a host of commentaries until, by a kind of chain reaction, the original volumes were lost beneath mountains of exegesis and annotation. The Master had stopped at many worlds, and made disciples among many races. His personality must have been an immensely powerful one for it to have inspired humans and nonhumans alike, and there was no doubt that a religion of such wide appeal must have contained much that was fine and noble. Probably the Master was the most successful--as he was also the last--of all mankind's messiahs. None of his predecessors could have won so many converts or had their teachings carried across such gulfs of time and space. "
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 158. [4] "What those teachers were... Alvin... could ever discover with any accuracy. The great polyp did its desperate best to convey them, but many of the words it used were meaningless and it had a habit of repeating sentences or whole speeches with a kind of swift mechanical delivery that made them very hard to follow. After a while [tried] steer the conversation away from these... morasses of theology in order to concentrate on ascertainable facts.

The Master and a band of his most faithful followers had arrived on Earth in the days before the cities had passed away, and while the Port of Diaspar was still open to the stars. They must have come in ships of many kinds; the polyps, for example, in one filled with the waters of the sea which was their natural home. Whether the movement was well received on Earth was not certain; but at least it met no violent opposition, and after further wanderings it set up its final retreat among the forests and mountains of Lys.'

Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 159. [5] "At the close of his long life, the Master's thoughts had turned once more toward the home from which he had been exiled, and he had asked his friends to carry him out into the open so that he could watch the stars. He had waited, his strength waning, until the culmination of the Seven Suns, and toward the end he babbled many things which were to inspire yet more libraries of interpretation in future ages. Again and again he spoke of the 'Great Ones' who had now left this universe of space and matter but who would surely one day return, and he charged his followers to remain to greet them when they came. Those were his last rational words. He was never again conscious of his surroundings, but just before the end he uttered one phrase that had come down the ages to haunt the minds of all who heard it: 'It is lovely to watch the colored shadows of the planets of eternal light.' Then he died. "
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 20000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 159. [6] "At the Master's death, many of his followers broke away, but others remained faithful to his teachings, which they slowly elaborated through the ages. At first they believed that the Great Ones, whoever they were, would soon return, but that hope faded with the passing centuries. The story here grew very confused, and it seemed that truth and legend were inextricably intertwined. Alvin had only a vague picture of generations of fanatics, waiting for some great event which they did not understand to take place at some unknown future date. "
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 159. [7] "The Great Ones never returned. Slowly the power of the movement failed as death and disillusion robbed it of its disciples. The short-lived human followers were the first to go, and there was something supremely ironic in the fact that the very last adherent of a human prophet was a creature utterly unlike Man.

The great polyp had become the Master's last disciple for a very simple reason. It was immortal. The billions of individual cells from which its body was built would die, but before that happened they would have reproduced themselves... Perhaps no other form of life could have kept faith so long to a creed other wise forgotten for a billion years. In a sense, the great polyp was a helpless victim of its biological nature. Because of its immortality, it could not change, but was forced to repeat eternally the same invariant pattern. "

Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 160. [8] "The religion of the Great Ones, in its later stages, had become identified with a veneration of the Seven Suns. When the Great Ones stubbornly refused to appear, attempts were made to signal their distant home. Long ago the signaling had become no more than a meaningless ritual, now maintained by an animal that had forgotten how to learn and a robot that had never known how to forget.

As the immeasurably ancient voice died away into the still air, Alvin found himself overwhelmed by a surge of pity. The misplaced devotion, the loyalty that had held to its futile course while suns and planets passed away--he could never have believed such a tale had he not seen the evidence before his eyes. More than ever before the extent of his ignorance saddened him. A tiny fragment of the past had been illuminated for a little while, but now the darkness had closed over it again. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 161. [9] "The history of the Universe must be a mass of such disconnected threads, and no one could say which were important and which were trivial. This fantastic tale of the Master and the Great Ones seemed like another of the countless legends that had somehow survived from the civilizations of Dawn. Yet the very existence of the huge polyp, and of the silently watching robot, made it impossible for Alvin to dismiss the whole story as a fable built of self-delusion upon a foundation of madness.

What was the relationship, he wondered, between these two entities, which though so different in every possible way had maintained their extraordinary partnership over such aeons of time? He was somehow certain that the robot was much the more important of the two. It had been the confidant of the Master and must still know all his secrets. "

Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 241. "'The planet they were approaching was now only a few million miles away, a beautiful sphere of multicolored light. There could be no darkness anywhere upon its surface, for as it turned beneath the Central Sun, the other stars would march one by one across its skies. Alvin now saw very clearly the meaning of the Master's dying words: 'It is lovely to watch the colored shadows on the planets of eternal light.' "
Great Ones/The Master* galaxy 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 243. "'Why did you bring us to this spot?' asked Alvin...

'The Master left from here,' replied the robot.

'I thought that would be the explanation,' said Hilvar. 'Don't you see the irony of all this? He fled from this world in disgrace--now look at the memorial they built for him!'

The great column of stone was perhaps a hundred times the height of a man, and was set in a circle of metal slightly raised above the level of the plain. It was featureless and bore no inscription. For how many thousands of years, wondered Alvin, had the Master's disciples gathered here to do him honor? And had they ever known that he died in exile on distant Earth?

It made no difference now. The Master and his disciples alike were buried in oblivion. "

Great Ones/The Master* Lys: Shalmirane 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 228. "Some day--perhaps years, perhaps centuries in the future,--these mindless jellies would reassemble and the great polyp would be reborn as its memories linked together and its consciousness flashed into existence once again. Alvin wondered how it would receive the discoveries he had made; it might not be pleased to learn the truth about the Master. Indeed, it might refuse to admit that all its ages of patient waiting had been in vain.

Yet had they? Deluded though these creatures might have been, their long vigil had at last brought its reward. As if by a miracle, they had saved from the past knowledge that else might have been lost forever. Now they could rest at last, and their creed could go the way of a million other faiths that had once thought themselves eternal. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 199. "Many minutes later, the hollow, anechoic voice of the Central Computer spoke again.

'I have established partial contact,' it said. 'At least I know the nature of the block, and I think I know why it was imposed. There is only one way in which it can be broken. Not until the Great Ones come to Earth will this robot speak again.'

'But that is nonsense!' protested Alvin. 'The Master's other disciple believed in them, too, and tried to explain what they were like to us. Most of the time it was talking gibberish. The Great Ones never existed, and never will exist.'

It seemed a complete impasse, and Alvin felt a sense of bitter, helpless disappointment. He was barred from the truth by the wishes of a man who had been insane, and who had died a billion years ago. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 200. [1] "'You may be correct,' said the Central Computer, 'in saying that the Great Ones never existed. But that does not mean that they never will exist.'

There was another long silence while Alvin considered the meaning of this remark, and while the minds of the two robots made their delicate contact again. And then, without warning, he was in Shalmirane. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 201. [2] "It was just as he had last seen it, the great ebon bowl drinking the sunlight and reflecting none of it back to the eye. He stood among the ruins of the fortress, looking out across the lake, whose motionless waters showed that the giant polyp was now a dispersed cloud of animalcules and no longer an organized, sentient being.

The robot was still beside him, but of Hilvar there was no sight. He had no time to wonder what that meant... for almost at once there occurred something so fantastic that all other thoughts were banished from his mind. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 201. [3] "The sky began to crack in two. A thin wedge of darkness reached from horizon to zenith, and slowly widened as if night and chaos were breaking in upon the Universe. Inexorably the wedge expanded until it embraced a quarter of the sky. For all his knowledge of the real facts of astronomy, Alvin could not fight against the overwhelming impression that he and his world lay beneath a great blue dome--and that something was no breaking through that dome from outside.

The wedge of night had ceased to grow. The powers that made it were peering down into the toy universe they had discovered, perhaps conferring among themselves as to whether it was worth their attention. Underneath that cosmic scrutiny, Alvin felt no alarm, no terror. He knew that he was face to face with power and wisdom, before which a man might feel awe but never fear. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 202. [4] "And now they had decided--they would waste some fragments of Eternity upon Earth and its peoples. They were coming through the window they had broken in the sky.

Like sparks from some celestial forge, they drifted down to Earth. Thicker and thicker they came, until a waterfall of fire was streaming down from heaven and splashing in pools of liquid light as it reached the ground. Alvin did not need the words that sounded in his ears like a benediction:

'The Great Ones have arrived.' "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 202. [5] "The fire reached him, and it did not burn. It was everywhere, filling the great bowl of Shalmirane with its golden glow. As he watched in wonder, Alvin saw that it was not a featureless flood of light, but that it had form and structure. It began to resolve itself into distinct shapes, to gather into separate fiery whirlpools. The whirlpools spun more and more swiftly on their axes, their centers rising to form columns within which Alvin could glimpse mysterious evanescent shapes. From these glowing totem poles came a faint musical note, infinitely distant and hauntingly sweet.

'The Great Ones have come.'

This time there was a reply. As Alvin heard the words: 'The servants of the Master greet you. We have been waiting for your coming,' he knew that the barriers were down. And in that moment, Shalmirane and its strange visitors were gone, and he was standing once more before the Central Computer in the depths of Diaspar.

It had all been illusion... "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 204. "Then he remembered the warning that the Central Computer had given him, and asked anxiously: 'What about the moral objections you had to overriding the Master's orders?'

'I have discovered why they were imposed. When you examine his life in detail, as you can now do, you will see that he claimed to have produced many miracles. His disciples believed him, and their conviction added to his power. But, of course, all those miracles had some simple explanation--when indeed they occurred at all. I find it surprising that otherwise intelligent men should have let themselves be deceived in such a manner.'

'So the Master was a fraud?'

'No; it is not as simple as that. If he had been a mere imposter, he would never have achieved such success, and his movement would not have lasted so long. He was a good man, and much of what he taught was true and wise.. In the end, he believed in his own miracles, but he knew that there was one witness who could refute them...' "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 204. "'...The robot knew all his secrets; it was his mouthpiece and his colleague, yet if it was ever questioned too closely it could destroy the foundations of his power. So he ordered it never to reveal its memories until the last day of the Universe, when the Great Ones would come. It is hard to believe that such a mixture of deception and sincerity could exist in the same man, but such was the case.'

Alvin wondered what the robot felt about his escape from its ancient bondage. It was, surely, a sufficiently complex machine to understand such emotions as resentment. It might be angry with the Master for having enslaved it--and equally angry with Alvin and the Central Computer for having tricked it back into sanity.

...Alvin... turned to the robot, and asked it the question that had haunted him ever since he had heard the story of the Master's saga.

And the robot replied. "

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 211. "'As I told the Council, I brought this robot home from Lys in the hope that the Central Computer would be able to break the block that had been imposed on its memories by the man known as the Master. By a trick which I still don't fully understand, the Computer did that. Now I have access to all the memories of this machine, as well as to the special skills that had been designed into it. I'm going to use one of those skills now. Watch.'

...the glittering speck soared away from the desert and came to rest a thousand feet above the ground. At the same moment, Alvin gave an explosive sigh of satisfaction and relief. He glanced quickly at Jeserac, as if to say: 'This is it!' " [The Master's spaceship.]

Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 212. "'This robot was designed to be the Master's companion and servant--and, above all, the pilot of his ship. Before he came to Lys, he landed at the Port of Diaspar, which now lies out there beneath the sands. Even in his day, it must have been largely deserted; I think that the Master's ship was one of the last ever to reach Earth. He lived for a while in Diaspar before he went to Shalmirane; the way must still have been open in those days. But he never needed the ship again, and all the ages it has been waiting out there beneath the sands. Like Diaspar itself, like this robot--like everything that the builders of the past considered really important...' "
Great Ones/The Master* world 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 215. "Even in Diaspar, Alvin had seldom seen such luxury as that which lay before him when the inner door of the air lock slid aside. Whatever else he had been, at least the Master was no ascetic. Not until some time later did it occur to Alvin that all this comfort might be no extravagance; this little world [the Master's spaceship] must have been the Master's only home on many long journeys among the stars.

There were no visible controls of any kind, but the large, oval screen which completely covered the far wall showed that this was no ordinary room. Ranged in a half circle before it were three low couches; the rest of the cabin was occupied by two small tables and a number of padded chairs--some of them obviously not designed for human occupants. "

Greco-Roman classical religion Argo 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 4. "On either side of the hangar were twenty-four rows of silver boomerang-shaped landing craft, the nose of one ship tucked neatly into the angle of the next. Names mostly associated with the Argonauts of myth were painted on their hulls. " [The ship's AI is named JASON. The ship is named Argo. Some other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Arizona 1941 Henderson, Zenna. Pilgrimage: The Book of the People. New York: Avon (1961); pg. 26. "...and they turned in a flurry of leaves and grinned up at me for all the world like pictures of Pan in the mythology book at home. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil 1973 Watson, Ian. The Embedding. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1973); pg. 211. "Taking part in a discussion with him on these terms was rather like inviting an ancient Roman priest of Jupiter to discuss salvation with a couple of Jesuits! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 1. "For as far as the eye can see the streets are full of people--the air resounding with their cheers--as the triumphal procession makes its way across the senatorial plaza of Nova Roma--New Rome!

The cause of this rejoicing? A 13-year-old Scots werewolf... acclaimed, much to her surprise, as the lineal descendant both of Julius Caesar (because of his red hair) and the sacred she-wolf who suckled Romulus and Remus, legendary founders of ancient Rome.

Twenty-four hours ago, Rahne Sinclair and her fellow mutants were in the arena, facing death or a life of slavery. Today, they're living gods. " [Many other refs., not in DB. The entire issue takes place in Nova Roma, a hidden city founded by settlers from 1st Century Rome, where people still adhere to classical Greco-Roman religion.]

Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 3. Danielle: "Enjoy the parade, Rahne? "; Rahne: "It was verra exciting. but they should na' call me a goddess... 'tis na' proper. "; Senator Gallio: "But to my people, child, that is precisely what you are. And who is to say they are not right? Perhaps the gods were beings like yourselves... mutants--people gifted with extraordinary powers and abilities. "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 8. Roberto: "Forgive me, decurion. I was upset. I did not mean to lose my temper. It won't happen again "; Guard/decurion, frightened after seeing Roberto transform into Sunspot, speaks under his breath in Latin: "Thank Jupiter for that! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 10: "Betrayal ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Dec 1983); pg. 12. centurion guard: "We heard cries of alarm, Senator--Hounds of Hecate! " [He is startled when he enters the room and sees Rahne in her wolf form.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 9: "Arena ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov 1983); pg. 8. Marcus: "Pluto take that fat old man's soul! Wine! Bring me wine!... Plebian pig! Even now, I'll wager he's laughing at me--and at how easily he thwarted my plans! By all the gods, I swear he'll pay for that! " [Other refs., not in DB, incl. pg. 12.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 9: "Arena ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov 1983); pg. 11. Amara: "Listen to me! Do you have any idea of your fate once you're sold?! A lifetime in the fields, or someone's household--and Minerva protect you if your master finds you attractive! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1983 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 9: "Arena ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Nov 1983); pg. 22. Gallio: "Citizens of Nova Roma, this is not a time for fear--but for rejoicing! Our most ancient prophecy has been fulfilled. And as editor of these most sacred games, I bestow on these children... the Laurel Wreath of Triumph! Behold, citizens, the one whose hair marks her as a descendent of our divine patron, Gaius Julius Caesar! And whose miraculous transformation reveals her to be of the same blood... as the she-wolf who suckled Romulus and Remus, founders of Mother Rome herself! These are not children of men, but of the immortal Gods--and I welcome them among us! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 11: "Magma ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Jan 1984); pg. 12. Senator Gallio, upon seeing Magma erupt from the ground: "By all the blessed gods! " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 8. Amara: "You haven't heard the talk in the marketplace. I'm a freak, a monster, a demon changeling left in place of your true daughter by the Black Priestess-- " [She accidentally causes a small volcano to erupt.] "I'm sorry, I didn't mean it, I don't know what I did, it just happened, oh please gods have mercy-- forgive me! " [The 'Black Priestess' (Selene) is also referred to on pg. 12, 17.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 9. Amara: "Father, I'm so afraid I'll never see you again. "; Amara's father: "That, child, is in the hands of the Fates. But if not on Earth, then surely in Elysium... "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Nova Roma 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 43: "Getting Even ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Sep. 1986); pg. 4. Doug/Cypher: "Nova Roma's that lost Roman city up by the headwaters of the Amazon where you met Amara, right? Classical Roman society--and Incan as well--still existing today! Wow! Hey Bobby, you can't leave till you tell me all about it! "
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 9. Amara: "I am no strumpet, dog! Unhand me, or-- Blessed Minerva, no! " [Amara accidentally causes a volcano to erupt when a rude man on the beach tries to kiss her.]
Greco-Roman classical religion Brazil: Rio de Janiero 1984 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 12: "Sunstroke ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (Feb 1984); pg. 16. Pg. 16: Amara, suffering from sunstroke: "Oh, Helios, Lord of the Sun, torment me no longer! Let my inner fire be joined with thy celestial glory! Let us be one forever. "; Narration: "Her wish is granted... her humanity instantly consumed. There is pain... but such is to be expected when a mortal joins with a god. Amara's blood burns in her veins like molten lava within the Earth, her very life bound to that of the planet beneath her feet. It's strength and vitality are hers. Nothing, she marvels, is beyond her capability. She can lay waste to a city--and, beholding Rio, does so. She sees nothing wrong or evil in this--for a goddess should have her sacrifices, and besides, it's fun. "; Pg. 17: Amara's thoughts: "Great gods... revered ancestors-- I pray you... give me... strength... or let... me... die... "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1954 Dick, Philip K. "Small Town " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1954); pg. 293. "The city hall was lit by recessed, hidden illumination. A low, simple building, a square of glowing white. Like a marble Greek temple. "
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 34. Pg. 34: "I thought about that part in the Greek myths where they row you over to Hades. "; Pg. 42: "...and the peculiar statues--was that Artemis-Diana, huge white marble to my right... " (also pg. 44); Pg. 110: "My bias against the Jason story, all that stuff about Hera and so forth, was that it was real--I mean, it was an actual myth. Hercules getting stranded because Zeus had something better for him to do and the clashing rocks and Neptune and all of that. You couldn't enjoy the story because it was preordained. " [More.]
Greco-Roman classical religion California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 90. Pg. 90: Apollo (also pg. 109-111, 144, 169, 199, 215-216); Pg. 110: "The great mystery of Eleusis, of the Orphics, of the early Christians, of Sarapis, of the Greco-Roman mystery religions, of Hermes Trismegistos, of the Renaissance Hermetic alchemists... "; Pg. 122: "Zeus had a Kyklopes slay him with a thunderbolt. "; Pg. 207-208: Hermes; Pg. 222: Zeus [Also pg. 163, 166.]


Greco-Roman classical religion, continued

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