Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to goddess worship, United Kingdom: England

goddess worship, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
goddess worship United Kingdom: England 1944 Holdstock, Robert. Mythago Wood. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1984); pg. 41. "'She was my father's mythago, a girl from Roman times, a manifestation of the Earth Goddess, the young warrior princess who, through her own suffering, can unite the tribes.' "
goddess worship United Kingdom: England 1955 Lewis, C.S. The Magician's Nephew (Narnia #6). New York: Macmillan (1970; c. 1955); pg. 117. "Out of the trees wild people stepped forth, gods and goddesses of the wood; with them came Fauns and Satyrs and Dwarfs. "
goddess worship United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 69. "'I am the Mother, the Protector, the Goddess, the Perfect Monarch.' She lay back and their fur was coarse against her flesh. She laughed as they stroked her. 'I am History's Noblest Queen! The most powerful Empress the world has ever known.' "
goddess worship United Kingdom: London 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 96. Pg. 96: "They used the High Speech for this ceremony. Fork-bearded Arabia spoke first.

'Gloriana, who is Ishtar upon Earth, Goddess of Us All, Whose Name is Honoured in the World's Four Corners and Whose Fame is Feared, Who is the Sun to Light our Days and the Moon to Illuminate our Nights, whose Splendour Dulls the Stars...' "; pg. 98: "...the Queen [Gloriana] received the rest of her guests:... the Aztec ambassador, Prince Comius Sha-T'Lee of Chlaksahloo (who believed himself a demi-god and Gloriana a goddess) in golden feathers and feathered cloak... "

goddess worship United Kingdom: Scotland 1993 Katz, Welwyn Wilton. Come Like Shadows. Regina, Saskatchewan: Coteau Books (2001; 1993); pg. 313. Pg. 295: "...his beautiful Alba with its Goddess Ring that didn't belong in Macbeth's orderly world... "; Pg. 299: "'Find through this glass a past for thy future, that the name of the Goddess be not forgotten.' "; Pg. 302: "A thousand years of Goddess Power and only the Hag to administer it, the one Sister of the Three whose role was utter destruction. "; Pg. 313: "'The Hag was already in the mirror,' Dana said... 'The Mother and the Maiden joined her there... Things are done if they must be done. The Goddess does not die, and her power is the power of Three, not One.' " [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 1-21, 126-128.]
goddess worship United Kingdom: Scotland 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 25. Pg. 25: "Storm touched down gently seconds after her tamed tornado evaporated back into the cool Scottish air. Miles overhead, the seething mushroom cloud had yet to dissipate entirely, 'Praise the Goddess!' Storm exclaimed... "; Pg. 26: "Thank you, Bright Lady, Storm thought. "
goddess worship USA 1972 Blish, James & Judith Ann Lawrence. "Getting Along " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 570. Pg. 571: "though I found later that there were many others among the worshipers of the Goddess " [Much more pg. 570-571]
goddess worship USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 235. "There was a strong occult slant to all of this, with the Goddess (whom Angelica called Othiym) standing in for that ubiquitous Greater Power favored by adherents of AA and its ilk. And, unlike any Twelve-Step program or women's self-help group that I'd ever heard of, there were some genuinely disturbing elements in Angelica's Goddess-worship. The emphasis on the division between the sexes, rather than their union; a certain disregard for the importance of family or any other ties except for those between the Goddess and her followers. In the little I'd read of other, similar female gurus--Shirley MacLaine, Lynn Andrews, Marianne Williamson--there was always an emphasis on the powers of love and forgiveness, or the importance of loving yourself so that you could love someone else. But Angelica didn't buy it.

'That's condescending to women.' "

goddess worship USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 245. "'How bad can it be, for women to learn how to stick up for themselves, to be assertive and all that stuff? I think your friend Angelica is onto something--I mean, there really is this dark aspect to goddess-worship that everyone has ignored for all these centuries. It's like being a Christian and refusing to acknowledge the Inquisition.' "
goddess worship USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 173. [Radio interview with Warren Worthington III, a.k.a. 'Angel' of the X-Men.]

"Finckley: In light of that last caller, and with the nom-de-guerre Angel, I have to ask: are you religious? Do you follow a particular faith?

Worthington: [pause] I've known women who believed they were goddesses, beings who have been called gods for centuries... "

goddess worship USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 153. "The willow is in full plumage and is no help, with its insinuating whispers... The summer dress rustles against the flesh of my thighs, the grass grows underfoot... feathers; flittings, grace notes, tree into bird, metamorphosis run wild. Goddesses are possible now and the air suffuses with desire.
goddess worship USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 230. "'We have friends, though, like Astarte, the Goddess, who is the sister of Big Wheel and who is going to help us out and stuff...' "
goddess worship USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 261. "Moving along quietly, they paused by each door: the Outing Club...; the Nonsocietal Assemblage of Noncoercively Systematized Liberterian Individuals; Let's Understand Animals, Not Torture Them...

'Looks like the Goddess worshipers got here first,' said Sarah. 'I guess I can live with that, if they can live with someone who shaves her pits.'...

'Well, we're women, this is the Women's Center.'

'Not all women can enter the Women's Center.'

'Oh.'

'Some have more man than woman in them. No manhood can be allowed here, for this place is sacred to the Goddess.'

'Who says?'

'Astarte, the Goddess. Athena. Mary. Vesta. The Goddess of Many Names.'

'Have you been talking to her a lot lately?'

asked Hyacinth.

'Since I offered her my womb-blood at the Equinox last week, we have been in constant contact.'

'Well, look,' said Hyacinth, 'we didn't come to play Dungeons and Dragons, we're here for safety, okay?' "

goddess worship USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 262. "'Then you must purify yourself in the sight of the Goddess,' said Yllas, opening the door. She and the two dozen others in the [Women's] Center were all naked. All the partitions that had formerly divided the place into many rooms had been knocked down to unify the Center into a single room. They couldn't see much in the candlelight, except that there was a lot of silver and many daggers and wands. The women were chanting in perfect unison.

'You cannot touch our lives in any way until you have been made one with us,' continued Yllas.

Sarah and company declined the invitation with their feet. Before they got far, Yllas started bellowing, 'Man-women! Heteros! Traitors! Impurities! Stop them!' "

goddess worship USA 2030 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 308. [Academic symposium in Nanavit, year 2195.] "So popular and effective did this practice become that it was regularized in the middle period, when it took place four times a year, on solstices and equinoxes. There are echoes here of the fertility rites of early Earth-goddess cults. As we heard at the panel discussion yesterday afternoon, Gilead [U.S.] was, although undoubtedly patriarchal in form, occasionally matriarchal in consent, like some sectors of the social fabric that gave rise to it... "
goddess worship USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 113-114. "Prayer. She used to get into arguments with Erzulie over prayer. Maggie could never bring herself to pray in the Christian sense of asking for this or that. If she prayed to anything, it was to something larger, more amorphous, and certainly less gender-bound than either the old-guy-in-the-sky of the Judeo-Christian tradition or the Goddess that Erzulie prayed to. "
goddess worship Virginia 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 133. "'And yet I thought Virginia the loyalest nation in Albion!' wife... turned rounded, pretty eyes on Lord Kansas.

'So we are, ma'am. The Queen is worshipped there almost as a goddess. No question.'

'And yet . . .?'

'They're republicans, not anti-monarchists...' "

goddess worship Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 15. Pg. 15: "An eyeless, mouthless face; twin inverted triangles for breasts; a slit to indicate the vulva. A Goddess image, precious as the Venus of Willendorf or the Paphian Aphrodite. The Benandanti called it the Tahor Venus. "; Pg. 53: "Othiym, a minor lunar goddess with possible links to the great female deities of Knossos and Boeotia and Nippur in Sumeria ";

Pg. 59: "...a sheen of blood staining her cheeks and lip and chin: Artemis, Durga, Cybele, Hecate, Inachus, Kali, Hel . . .

The Great Mother, lover and slayer of Her faithful son.

Othiym Lunarsa. The Woman in the Moon. "; Pg. 115: "DE SEA SYRIA/THE SYRIAN GODDESS: Evocative contemporaneous account of the ancient rites associated with the worship of Aphrodite/Astarte and the cult of Adonis in Phoenicia . . . " [Extensive Goddess refs. throughout novel, e.g., pg. 44-46, 53, 80, 87. A major theme.]

goddess worship Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 160. Pg. 160: "I am eldest daughter of Kronos.
I am wife and sister of Osiris.
I am she who findeth fruit for men.
I am mother of Horus.
I am she that riseth in the Dog Star.
I am she that is called Goddess by women.
";

Pg. 165: "'Normal people don't try to cut their dicks off with a Swiss Army knife.'

'Okay, okay.'

...'You know, that's what they used to do.'

'Who? The Bendandanti?'

'No. Your goddess-worshipers. In Iran or someplace. Turkey, maybe. The priests would go into some kind of ecstatic frenzy and castrate themselves... We read about it in Warnick's class. You can see who church attendance might drop of after a while.' "; Pg. 237: "The great female archaeologists of our time, June Harrington and Magda Kurtz and Marijta Gimbutas, women who discovered so much about the Goddess cultures of ancient Europe, and who inspired people like me to go searching for more answers. "

goddess worship Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 207. [1] "'...Or you have this whole way of looking at women as either nurturers or as children who need constant protection. Many of the world's ancient Goddess religions represent the Goddess as having three faces: those of the Mother, Daughter, and Crone or Destroyer. And a number of recent books help women focus on two of those aspects: Gaea, the nurturing Mother, and her daughter Kore. And that's wonderful. I truly think these books are wonderful and I think that they've helped women a great deal; but it's not enough... Because we can't just ignore that other face of the Goddess. For thousands of years we've pretended that She doesn't exist, that human history begins and ends with the Old Testament. But now, for the first time in millennia, women are starting to embrace Her again. And that's marvelous, but we can't just pick and choose which of Her aspects to honor. We have to deal with all of them...' "
goddess worship Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 207. [2] "'...With the Full Moon and the New Moon but also with the Dark of the Moon, Hecate's realm. We have to acknowledge the Mother and the Avenger. We must embrace She Who Mourns and She Who Creates, but also we must honor She Who Destroys. Because otherwise we will never be whole. In traditional patriarchal societies, men have always acknowledged their own aggressive tendencies... But until we as women acknowledge our own personal need for power and our own capabilities for aggression and independence, we will never be whole. We'll continue to be good mothers & daughters, we'll continue to be muses, we'll continue to be victims--but we won't be whole and strong. We won't be the Supreme Goddess that we can be. We need to acknowledge all the aspects of the Goddess within us; we need to embrace the chthonic darkness, to welcome and awaken the Moon... then we will be hole again. Then we will be strong, unconquerable, sovereigns of the Sacred Earth' "
goddess worship Women's Country 1988 Tepper, Sheri S. The Gate to Women's Country. New York: Doubleday (1988); pg. 2. "...the street began its downhill slope from the Temple of the Lady to the ceremonial plaza and the northern city wall. " [Other refs., not all in DB.]
goddess worship world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 4. "In a time past memory, the goddess Takhisis, Queen of Darkness, laid in the southern end of the valley, a foundation stone, rescued from the blasted temple of the Kingpriest of Istar. The foundation stone began to grow, drawing upon the evil in the world to give it life. The stone grew into a temple, vast and awful; a temple of magnificent, hideous darkness.

Takhisis planned to use this temple to return to the world from which she'd been driven by Huma Dragonbane, but her way was blocked by love and self-sacrifice. Nevertheless she had great power, and she launched a war upon the world that came near to destroying it. Her evil commanders, like a pack of wild dogs, fell to fighting among themselves. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 23. "The storm shook the Peak of Malys, lair of Malystrx, the enormous red dragon who now fashioned herself the Queen of Ansalon, soon to become Goddess of Ansalon, if she had her way. Th rain formed rushing rivers that invaded Malys's volcanic home... "
goddess worship world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 120. "The time came when Takhisis, Queen of Darkness [the dark goddess], tried to return to the world. She raised up armies to conquer Ansalon in her name. Ariakas, general of those armies, recognized the strategic value of Sanction to the Queen's holy city of Neraka and the military outpost of Khur. Lord Ariakas marched his troops into Sanction, conquered the city, which put up little resistance. He built temples to his Queen in Sanction and made his headquarters.

The Lords of Doom, the volcanoes that ringed Sanction, felt the heat of the Queen's ambition stirring beneath them and came again to life. Streams of lava flowed from the volcanoes, lighting Sanction with a lurid glow by night. The ground shook and shivered from tremors... The air was poisonous, thick with sulphurous fumes. Black-robed wizards worked constantly to keep the city fit for habitation. "

goddess worship world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragons of a Fallen Sun. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast (2000); pg. 121. "Takhisis [dark goddess] set out to conquer the world, but in the end she could not overcome herself. Her generals quarreled, turned on each other. Love and self-sacrifice, loyalty and honor won the day. They stones of Neraka lay blasted and cursed in the shadowed valley leading to Sanction... When the Knights of Takhisis began to accumulate power, some twenty years later, Sanction was high on the list of priorities. "
goddess worship world -3003 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. Atlan. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977; c. 1965); pg. 31. Pg. 31: "'Chilly, Goddess--' he stated. He has never been able to get used to call me Empress. 'Here's my cloak, if you're going to insist on standing here.' "; Pg. 32: "He turned and recognized me. 'Goddess!' he stammered, and tried to fall to his knees. I put my hands on his shoulders and kept him standing. 'Your mother,' he said, 'is aged in the months since you saw her. The priests have incited the religious populace to anger at the way she and your husband allied to put the High Priest in prison...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
goddess worship world -3002 B.C.E. Gaskell, Jane. Some Summer Lands. New York: St. Martin's Press (1979; c. 1977); pg. 20. Pg. 20: "'You are drowsy, Goddess?' the cloaked figure crooned, handling her in an accustomed manner. 'My clever salve, Goddess. It will make the fine General's nostrils widen.' ";

Pg. 49: "'she found in a basket with swaddle-clothes, milk, embroidered coverlets (and a Priest's ransom in Temple coin) under a shady rhubarb in her garden. Being a good church-goer, she took the hint, so Smahil has told me, that this was not a baby to be thrown out with bath-water. And sure enough regular contributions of Temple coin, anonymously delivered, followed...' ";

Pg. 84: "They looked from the captain to my mother to me, and back to Zerd, and then as one they fell upon their right knees. 'Goddess,' they said, a low multiple hum, 'Goddess,' as they touched their foreheads to the maps on the ground. " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world -1500 B.C.E. Brust, Steven. Five Hundred Years After. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 77. "...such as the recent contention of the Baroness Fernway that Aliera had been held 'loosely in space, but tightly in time' by a benevolent Goddess (naming, it should be added, a Goddess not known for benevolence). "
goddess worship world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 65. "The distraction might have been ordained by the Goddess' infant Son in prankish kindliness, as Erissa suggested with an unsteady small laugh. "
goddess worship world -1400 B.C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "Dagonas had made that image of the Goddess and the Labrys above, with his own clever hands. Cradling Her Son in Her arms, Our Lady of the Ax seemed by the uncertain light to stand alive, stirring, as if Her niche were a window that opened upon enormous reaches.

Religious duties performed, Erissa made ready to travel... ";

Pg. 16: "It widened into a pool where she could have handcaught a fish to eat, were she not bound for a shrine of the Goddess and therefore prohibited from killing. "

goddess worship world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 197. Pg. 197: "She can't hear me, no more than the Mother Above. The Mother was merciful, all the septons agreed, but the Seven had no power beyond the Wall. This was where the old gods ruled... ";

Pg. 717: "Septon Cellador began to sing as well, his voice tremulous and thick with wine.

Gentle Mother, font of mercy,
     save our sons from war, we pray,
stay the swords and stay the arrows,
     let them know . . .
"

goddess worship world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 144. Pg. 141: "This was not even a style of worship she had encountered before. It was as if the chant was in the room, and if you were in the room... you were part of the chant. Or maybe it was part of you.

'Meret, Thou Lady of the Southern Peak, have mercy upon us.' ";

Pg. 144: "'You're carrying on as if you were a royal virgin!'

'I am!' Mikayla snarled back.

'Of course you are,' he snapped sarcastically, 'and I'm the Husband of the Goddess Meret!' ";

Pg. 145: "The Husband of the Goddess regarded her thoughtful.

...There's not point in running away quite yet, she told herself. and I don't think the Husband of the Goddess Meret means me any harm. Actually, he seems nice. Maybe he'll be willing to help me. "; Pg. 150: "'You will be housed with the Daughters of the Goddess,' she explained. 'We do not use personal names here. I assume that you do know that true names have power...' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]

goddess worship world -800 B.C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of the Trillium. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 144. Pg. 141: "This was not even a style of worship she had encountered before. It was as if the chant was in the room, and if you were in the room... you were part of the chant. Or maybe it was part of you.

'Meret, Thou Lady of the Southern Peak, have mercy upon us.' ";

Pg. 144: "'You're carrying on as if you were a royal virgin!'

'I am!' Mikayla snarled back.

'Of course you are,' he snapped sarcastically, 'and I'm the Husband of the Goddess Meret!' ";

Pg. 145: "The Husband of the Goddess regarded her thoughtful.

...There's not point in running away quite yet, she told herself. and I don't think the Husband of the Goddess Meret means me any harm. Actually, he seems nice. Maybe he'll be willing to help me. "; Pg. 150: "'You will be housed with the Daughters of the Goddess,' she explained. 'We do not use personal names here. I assume that you do know that true names have power...' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]

goddess worship world -500 B.C.E. Duane, Diane. The Door Into Sunset. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 11. [Fantasy: actual year indeterminate or immaterial.] "What then shall be done to save Thy people? saith Healhra. Canst Thou not put forth Thy power?

Nay, saith the Goddess: in this I am bound by My own law: this is My creatures' world. My creatures must themselves preserve and master it.

A hard saying, Healhra saith. Yet shall we do so. How shall it be done?

In the time of thy need, the Goddess saith, shalt thou be overshadowed by My power: thou shalt be filled with My Fire, that hath been long lost to man, and kingship and master of the land shall be given thee. A god's power shalt thou have, and with it strike down thine enemy and Mine: great shall by thy glory.

Then when this thing is done shall we go north and found a realm, saith Healhra in joy: and all things shall go well.

Thou shalt not go, saith the Goddess. For all this there is a price: godhead once so assumed may not be put off. " [Other refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

goddess worship world -500 B.C.E. Duane, Diane. The Door Into Sunset. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 25. Pg. 25: "The Shadow, the darkness cast sideways from the Goddess's light, was surely annoyed with them all... "; Pg. 45: "'Take your crown, Eftgan datheln Arienn ie kyr'Bort tai-Earnesti, and wear it well, and bear it well; for like the Goddess our Mother, you have wrought your own burden.' "; Pg. 50: "Consider well your choice; and the Goddess guide it for Arlen's sake, and yours. "; Pg. 59: "...for of course that was the spot he had picked to cry on: the holiest of altars of those Precincts where no word is ever spoken by the Rodmistresses who train there... "
goddess worship world -500 B.C.E. Duane, Diane. The Door Into Sunset. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 157. [1] [From The Goddess and the Atheist, imagined book referred to as a frontispiece.] "The Goddess folded Her arms and looked at the atheist with bemusement tinged with annoyance. 'This is getting us nowhere,' She said. 'I do godly things right here in front of you, one after another, and you say they're mere sorcerer's work, hedge-magic. What work is going to be big enough to convince you?' "
goddess worship world -500 B.C.E. Duane, Diane. The Door Into Sunset. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 157. [2] "The atheist looked dour. 'You could appear in your full glory,' he said.

'It would kill you,' the Goddess said.

'Hah,' said the atheist. 'All that means is you can't do it.'

'Won't,' the Goddess said. 'I've heard that line before, and I know What put it into your head. It's the Shadow's counsel. Do you think I started being self-existent yesterday? Glory has its uses, and that's not one of them. No, you're just going to have to accept Me as I am . . . as you do your fellow human beings.'

'As you are,' the atheist said, looking Her up and down, 'I don't believe you. Nor believe in you.'

'Or in them either,' the Goddess said, smiling a crooked smile. 'And I think I know how they feel.'

--The Goddess and the Atheist, 5 "

goddess worship world -500 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Dragonshadow. New York: Ballantine (1999); pg. 48. Pg. 48: "Jenny sighed. Sister Illis as the southern name they gave to the Many-Colored Goddess. "; Pg. 69: "The girl, thank God, didn't ask her if she was insane, or if she meant what she said. 'Uh--Florrie. Goddess. Ginger. You want me to point out which is which...' "; Pg. 79: "Muffle, for the love of Goddess, knock some sense into his head! " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
goddess worship world 500 C.E. Shea, Michael. Nifft the Lean. New York: DAW Books (1982); pg. 240. Pg. 241: "The Goddess-in-Glass--for this she was called as often as Flockwarden by the mercenaries--had, through the oracle, declared that her aid in this crisis could be procured, but first the Aristarchs must, in pledge of earnest allegiance on their part, procure for the Goddess this sizable expeditionary force of first-quality professionals. " [More. Part 4 is titled "The Goddess in Glass ", and runs pg. 236-304 (the end of the novel). Many refs. to the Goddess throughout this part of the novel.]
goddess worship world 875 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. King and Emperor. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 155. "...would cheerfully have dropped Svandis overside as a sacrifice to Ran, goddess of the deeps. "
goddess worship world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. Domes of Fire. New York: Ballantine (1993); pg. 227. "'Does Emban know that you're praying to a Styric Goddess?'

'More than likely. The Church chooses to ignore the fact, though--for practical reasons.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world 1000 C.E. Eddings, David. The Diamond Throne. New York: Ballantine (1989); pg. 6. "Then the Goddess stole away on silent feet, bearing with her the rings which were the keys to the power of Bhellion... The rage of Ghwerig was beyond measure, and he went up and down in the land seeking the Goddess Aphrael that he might wrest his rings from her, but he found her not, though for centuries she searched... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
goddess worship world 1000 C.E. Williams, Tad. To Green Angel Tower: Part 1. New York: DAW Books (1993); pg. 31. [Otherworldly fantasy novel. Actual year indeterminate.] Pg. 31: "Mother of God! Has the Hayholt caught fire? "; Pg. 176: "'Elysia, Mother of God, this is wonderful medicine for someone suffering form nightmares!' "
goddess worship world 1000 C.E. Yolen, Jane. White Jenna. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "The centuries passed and the Hames were left alone. Eventually there were seventeen such separated communities filled with women, worshipers of Great Alta, the Goddess who had once been the ruling deity of all the Dales before being supplanted by the Garunian pantheon of gods. As the population regained its balance, the Hames became sanctuaries for dissident women. "; Pg. 6: "There the story of their adventures was told and Jenna lay claim to the title of White Goddess, nor because she believed in it, but because she felt it would help the cause... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
goddess worship world 1001 C.E. Eddings, David. The Shining Ones. New York: Ballantine (1993) [Otherwordly fantasy. Actual year/place indeterminate or immaterial.] "Years past, the Child-Goddess Aphrael had hidden Bhellion, the Stone of Power. It rested at the very bottom of the deepest ocean, that nevermore should its awesome power sing temptation to mortal men... Sparhawk's journey to recover Bhellion would be fraught with peril. Only with Goddess' help could he hope to recover the stone. And that would only begin his quest, for the forces of evil sought to capture the gem for their own diabolical ends. " [Many refs., not in DB.]
goddess worship world 1002 C.E. Eddings, David. The Hidden City. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 37. Pg. 37: "The presence of the Child-Goddess was having a peculiar effect on Emperor Sarabian. The brilliant, erratic ruler of the continent seemed dumbfounded by her presence and he sat gazing wide-eyed at her. His face was pale, and he was obviously not hearing a word Lord Vanion was saying...

'Forgive me, Goddess Aphrael,' the emperor apologized. 'I seldom have divine visitors.' He looked at her rather closely. 'I hope you don't mind me saying so, but you rather resemble Prince Sparhawk's daughter. Have you ever met her Royal Highness?' ";

Pg. 62: "'Try to keep an open mind, Khalad. Aphrael's a Goddess. She can do anything.'

'I'm sure she can, but why would she want to.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world 1002 C.E. Eddings, David. The Ruby Knight. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 30. Pg. 30: "'How did you get the rings?'

'My Goddess Aphrael gave them to me--along with certain instructions. She told me where I'd find your ancestor and King Antor, and she told me to deliver the rings to them.' ";

Pg. 30: "'You too, your Grace? Dolmant's been trying to convert me for years now. No, Ortzel. I'll remain faithful to my Goddess. I'm far too old to change religions at this stage in my life.' ";

Pg. 279: "'I will ssspare thy life if thou wilt fall down and worssship me.'

'No, Azash. Never. I will remain faithful to my Goddess.' "

goddess worship world 1004 C.E. Eddings, David. The Secret of the Stone. New York: Ballantine (1991); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "'...of the Troll-Dwarf's cave as if the Child-Goddess Aphrael could somehow protect him from the jewel he had labored so long to gain... but she had been rewarded with that joyful moment of epiphany when she had looked full into the face of her Goddess. "; Pg. 13: "'A goddess revealed herself to us here...'

'Your Goddess was very convincing, Sephrenia,' he replied wryly. 'She'd have shaken the certainty of the Hierocracy of the Elene Church itself...' ";

Pg. 62: "'...Would your God accept me, Sephrenia?'

'Goddess, your majesty,' Sephrenia corrected. 'I serve a Goddess.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 4. "Gloriana the First, Queen of Albion [England], Empress of Asia and Virginia, is a Sovereign loved and worshipped as a goddess by many millions of subjects, admired and respected by many more millions throughout the Globe. To the theologian (save for the most radical) she is the only representative of the gods on Earth... " [The novel, of course, is about this selfsame Queen -- Gloriana. Many other refs. to the degree to which she is revered, even worshipped. Not all refs. in DB, though we've tried to include mention of places where the specific term 'goddess' is used.]
goddess worship world 1957 Knight, Damon. "The Dying Man " in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1957); pg. 187. "'It wouldn't do, Claire. Dear, I love you for it, but you see . . . you see, you're a goddess. an immortal goddess--and I'm a man.' "
goddess worship world 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 1. [Frontispiece.] "'You hit the nail on the head,' I told him. 'She was here, once, before either of you l . . she's my Great Mother, Doctor Nisea says. My life is devoted to worshiping Pris as if she were a goddess. I've projected her archetype onto the universe; I see nothing but her. Everything else to me is unreal. This trip we're taking, you two, Doctor Nisea, the whole Kansas City Clinic -- it's all just shadows.'

Louis Rosen,
in WE CAN BUILD YOU,
a novel by Philip K. Dick "

goddess worship world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 42. "...and Goddess only knows what karate or yoga or magic would be the response. "; Pg. 47: "'...bring the Nazi legion back to life, it will call for nothing less than the appearance on the field of battle of the goddess Eris Herself to save the day.'

...'...It is quite profitable then to regard the gods and goddesses and demons as projections of...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

goddess worship world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 194. "The Illuminati associate this with Iris, and also with other goddesses from Isis to Ishtar and from Kwannon to Kali--with the Female Principle, yin, in general. "
goddess worship world 1977 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 283. "The Goddess of Fertility was popular in spring. Primitive peoples believed in sympathetic magic... "
goddess worship world 1985 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 1: The Invaders Plan. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1985); pg. 103. Pg. 103: "Fooling about with equipment here was not something one did. I looked quickly at the Countess Krak. She was just standing there, watching him. There was no expression on her face at all. There never was. This female was as beautiful as a Goddess on the alter of a church, but every bit as cold as that carved stone. More so. "; Pg. 364: "See our special features, today and tomorrow: HIGHTEE HELLER, HUMAN OR GODDESS? "
goddess worship world 1997 Anthony, Patricia. "Two-Bag Goddess " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997); pg. 328. "There'd been a mere suggestion of spreading thighs, grotesque stomach, and bloated breasts, a form more like the ancient Neolithic goddess than the Goddess Crete had known. He had smelled Her, too: the low-tide reek of Her sex and stench of sour milk. No, Mama Astarte hadn't been keeping her health spa membership up, and she hadn't bathed in, oh, maybe millennia... The Minoans had cleaned Her up, made Her presentable, made Her nice. They'd given Her a wasp waist, a couple of bazooma hooters, and a passable face... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
goddess worship world 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 146. "Storm took a deep breath, and said, 'Goddess! Just look at those trees! The way they link together, like a great sculpture...' "
goddess worship world 2000 Cox, Greg. X-Men & the Avengers: Gamma Quest: Book 3: Friend or Foe?. New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 101. Pg. 101: "An unnerving jolt rattled Storm's bones when the quinjet's landing gear first came into contact... Praise the Goddess, she devoutly gave thanks, before unfastening her seatbelt... "; Pg. 107: "'What in the Goddess's name?' Storm exclaimed. "; Pg. 112: "Thank you, Bright Lady, for this small mercy, Storm thought, grateful that she need not be confined within an enclosed spacesuit. "; Pg. 123: "May the Goddess grant that this real-life excursion into space ends more happily! "; Pg. 126: "Blessed by the Goddess! she thought ardently. "; Pg. 249: "'The Goddess be praised,' she murmured. "; Pg. 249: "'Goddess!' she gasped, comprehending in an instant what had happened. "
goddess worship world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 269. "An Linh stirred in her sleep beside him. He looked up from the volume of Vedic hymns that a grateful Colonel Bahadur had pressed into his hands when they had left Nairobi. After a long night of reading from the lovingly crafted, elaborately printed pages, one verse from the ancient songs stuck in Stoner's memory:

'Harness the plows, fit on the yokes, now that the womb of the earth is ready to sow the seed therein. . . .'

The relationship between sex and agriculture had never impressed him before, but now he saw how miraculous it must have seemed to early men that food crops would grow from tiny seeds, and babies would grow from the seed of their own bodies. To early men. Stoner leaned back in the plane's chair and wondered how early women felt about it. What power they must have had, he realized. And they still have it! No wonder almost every religion pays lip service to male gods but really reveres goddesses. " [Also, pg. 335.]

goddess worship world 2025 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 174. "When he played solitaire, he thought of how one combination of cards, the initial condition the computer dealt, started out with very little possibility of solution, which would be, perhaps, the occasional creation of life in one-billionth of all the constantly forming and dissolving universes. The elements--the suits, the numbers--were all there, but the building sequence had to happen as the game progressed. Often there was complete failure, game over. Sometimes as he played, Jason tried to envision a universe in which a Goddess, such as his mother seemed to believe in, existed. Surely in all possible universes there must be a fair percentage in which Goddess did exist. Why not this one? Then again, he had also been struck by the realization that the next card turned up could spell the end of the game. And that his own situation--and all of humanity's--might be at the next to the last play just before the cards were all swept together... "
goddess worship world 2025 Goonan, Kathleen Ann. Crescent City Rhapsody. New York: Tor (2001; c. 2000); pg. 178. "'Most of these--organizations... want everything you own. I mean, look around. Every one of them is like a religion. Worse than a religion. A cult. You have to pledge all. Your property, your life, all your time. Instead of worshipping Goddess, they worship . . . a way out.' "
goddess worship world 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 306-307. "'Before then, it was sacred to the triple goddess,' Alex says. 'You'll find a grove of laurel further along, the tree sacred to Daphne.'

'You're interested in the old stories,' Mrs. Powell waves at the midges that dance around her head. 'Very few are, these days.'

Alex is pleased to show off the results of her research. 'Her real name was Daphoene, the bloody one. The Maenads, her priestesses, were supposed to chew laurel leaves to help them achieve an orgiastic frenzy. In Africa they called her Ngame; in Libya, Neith. She is also Hecate, and Grave's White Goddess of Pelion, Keats's Belle Dame sans Merci, the Mab, Thomas the Rhymer's Fairy Queen. Apollo tried to rape her, and when she turned into a laurel, he made a wreath of her leaves as consolation. We still remember that, every four years; but perhaps we forget that she never died.' " [More, not in DB.]

goddess worship world 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 308-309. "'...At the end of the twentieth century it was thought that a new goddess was raised up: Gaia, the Earth herself. But Gaia is the world, not the meaning of the world. Gaia existed before us, and will exist after. She needs no worship, for we are already part of her. It is the triple goddess who interceded with Gaia on our behalf. It was she who ordered the lives of our ancestors. Without her there was no sacrifice of the temporary kings; without her no seasons, no harvest...' "
goddess worship world 2036 Besher, Alexander. Mir: A Novel of Virtual Reality. New York: Simon & Schuster (1998); pg. 64. "Tara had the power of the goddess in her, and together with Dorje she performed magical rituals to cleanse the earth of its evil pulses of magic energy, which was definitely everywhere: Tibetan zombies and gdons and ogres and hungry ghosts and other assorted vampires of the net. Now Tara was working magic with Trevor's dad. 'Keeping the night marchers at bay,' as she liked to tell Trevor... " [more.]


goddess worship, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.