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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Freud, Tennessee

Freud, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Freud Tennyson 2200 Anthony, Patricia. Conscience of the Beagle. New York: Ace Books (1995; co. 1993); pg. 78. "'What a delightful Freudian slip. God, Major. Don't look at me like that. We use a heating coil, lubricant and Smart Plastic. I put the device over the man and let it go. Oral sex is a misdemeanor here...' "
Freud United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 131. "'I should think these would be good times, with any number of Scrooges you could reform.'

'And so there are,' he said, 'but they are praised and rewarded for their greed, and much admired. And... they do not believe in spirits. They lay their visions to Freud and hormonal imbalance, and their therapists tell them they should feel no guilt, and advise them to focus further on themselves.' "

Freud United Kingdom: England 1963 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 181. [Afterward, by Stanley Edgar Hyman.] "Alex has no interest in women except as objects of violence and rape (the term for the sex act in his vocabulary is characteristically mechanical, 'the old in-out in-out'). No part of the female body is mentioned except the size of the breasts (it would also interest a Freudian to know that the hoodlums' drink is doped milk). "
Freud United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 188. Pg. 188, 466.
Freud USA 1937 Dunn, J. R. "Long Knives " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 166. "'That's the attraction this era has for our people, the ones who desert. Singh wanted to work with Einstein, somebody else wants to be analyzed by Freud.' He shrugged. 'I can't see it, myself.' "
Freud USA 1973 Goldman, William. The Princess Bride. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 15. "Never argue with your wife about hostility when she's a certified Freudian. "
Freud USA 1979 Willis, Connie. "Daisy, in the Sun " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 194. "She had told the dream as she remembered it, with the little secret smile of memory... He looked as if he didn't know it was there. 'Boy, my psych teacher would have a ball with that one! Who would think a kid like you could have a sexy dream like that? Wow! Talk about Freudian! My psych teacher says--'

'You think you know everything, don't you?' Daisy said. "

Freud USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 153. "...began to wonder why Grace Rinehart... would show up in Warm Springs looking for help from a no-name practitioner when she could easily afford the services of any high-powered shrink in the world, from a Viennese Freudian to a Manhattan pharmacotherapist. "
Freud USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 229. "Grace Rinehard was a megalomaniacal superpatriot with an Electra complex. Her daddy had given her phallic control of an Air Force trainer during her toddlerhood. Later, when she was building ascreen career that would have secured his everlasting admiration, he had perished over the Soviet heartland... These disparate episodes had shaped the woman's psyche in ways that would probably resist a decade of conscientious therapy, and Lia could not imagine sessioning with her another week or two, much less ten years. "
Freud USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 315. "Right. This is a dream of the id. A Freudian nightmare. If Lia were here, shed wake me from it. "
Freud USA 1990 Rice, Anne. The Witching Hour. New York: Ballantine (1993; c. 1990); pg. 86. -
Freud USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 322. "Moses, Gandhi, Jesus, and Newton, offered Gail, sorting out his jumble of thoughts. Einstein and Freud and Buddha.

...'Jacob thought that there were a few people in history--he called them ultimate perceptives--a few people whose new vision of physical laws, or moral laws, or whatever was so comprehensive and powerful that they essentially caused a paradigm shift for the entire human race.' "

Freud USA 1995 Rosenblum, Mary. "Elegy " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 18. "'I had a weird dream last night.' Closeted in her non-sterile cubicle, Amanda watched Doctor Ahmed nod on the main screen. 'I think I was . . . a fish...'

'Fish are Freudian... I dream about gardens. And spiders. Spiders signify mothers, I believe.' "

Freud USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 33. "He had an interest in psycho-analysis; Freudian jargon cropped up in his conversation, a sign of his being familiar with cultural questions. 'A reversion to infancy due to stress. Your feeling ill. The tension of the sub-conscious impulses to your brain warning you that something was amiss internally. Many adults revert to infancy during illness.'

'What rubbish,' Vic said. "

Freud USA 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 66. "'Evidently so,' Lars agreed, still shaken. 'But I didn't know it. I don't see any psychoanalysts--I hate them. They're frauds, too, Siegmund Fraud.' "
Freud USA 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 38. "'Like I said, he's my brother, and he's a good kid. I like him.'

'How come?'

'Oh, hell! We've been through a lot together, that's all! What are you trying to do? Psychoanalyze me?'

'I was just curious.' "

Freud USA 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 133. [A robot contemplates how to commit murder.] "It seemed that she was a champion swimmer, tipped for the next Olympics, and so allowed to practice alone each morning in the college pool. At first I entertained the idea of electric eels, but these would seem too unlikely for an accident, also too Freudian. "
Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 46. "'Tell Jeff here what you were saying to me about Freud.' Broun said eagerly.

Dr. Stone leaned back into the depths of the leather chair, his hands resting easily on the padded arms, and smiled. 'As I was telling Mr. Broun, dream interpretation is now a science, although Freud attempted to make his colleagues believe it was one. He claimed that dreams were a stage on which people sybolically act out the traumas and emotions that were too frightening to deal with when they were awake. A Freudian would say Lincoln's dream was a symbolic enactment of Lincoln's secret wishes and fears, that not only the coffin but the stairs, the guard, everything in the dream has a symbol hiding the real meaning of the dream.'

I went over the chair, shooed th cat off, and started stacking the books on the floor beside the chair...

'Which is?' I asked.

'I'm a scientist, not a psychiatrist. I don't believe dreams have a 'real' meaning...' "

Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 46. "'I'm a scientist, not a psychiatrist. I don't believe dreams have a 'real' meaning. Freud made no attempt to understand the physical. He felt the key to understanding dreams lay in content, and came up with an elaborate system of symbols to explain the images in dreams. In Lincoln's dream, for instance, the stairs represent the descent into the subconscious, of which Lincoln is both curiou s and afraid, symbolized by the crying that he hears. The guard and the cloth over the corpse's face are both symbols of Lincoln's unwillingness to find out the secret his unconscious holds.'

I thought of Annie standing in the snow saying, 'Richard says the blank paper pinned to the soldier's sleeve is a symbol for the message my subconscious is trying to send me only I'm too afraid to read it.' "

Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 47. "'Dreams are a symbtom of physical processes,' Dr. Stone was saying. 'They don't 'mean' anything. Lincoln could have been to a funeral that day, or seen a hearse. Or he could have been reminded of someone who had died recently.' "
Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 60. "What made me think she wanted to hear about Special order 191 any more than she wanted to hear about traumas in the sunconscious? She hung up on you, I told myself, and she's still at Richard's. You don't need Freud's Interpretation of Dreams to tell you what that means. She doesn't want to talk to you. "
Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 43-44. "I asked the librarian what she had on dreams. 'Not much,' Kate said. 'Some pseudoscience things and Freud's Interpretation. No, wait, I think that's checked out.' She hit some buttons on her computer and wiated for the book's status to come up. 'Yeah, that's checked out till April ninth. Do you want to reserve it?'

'I was really looking for current research.'...

Kate was right. There wasn't much, and what there was was do-it-yourself dream interpretation: 'To dream aobut a house means you are sexually repressed,' that kind of thing.Cats were a symbol of animal instincts, guns of sex, dead bodies of--surprise!--death. Horses with their front legs shot off weren't mentioned. " [Many other refs. to Freudianism in book, not all in DB.]

Freud Virginia 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 46-47. "'What about the corpse?' I asked. 'And the coffin.'

'Oh, the coffin is the womb, of course. The entire dream's about Lincoln's desire to return to the safety of the womb.' He smiled. 'According to the Freudians.'

'But that's not your interpretation.' Broun said.

'No,' Dr. Stone said. 'In my opinion, dream interpretation as practiced by most Freudian psychiatrists, including some of mine at the Institute, is nothing more than a fancy system of guessing. I think trying to understand the 'real' meaning of a dream without reference to the physical state of the dreamer is as pointless as trying to understand what a fever 'means' without studying the body.'

In spite of the fact that I still though Richard might have sent him, I found myself liking Dr. Stone. He said things like 'I think' and 'in my opinion' and didn't seem to think he automatically knew all the answers where dreams were concerned. "

Freud world 1900 Leiber, Fritz. Our Lady of Darkness. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1977); pg. 98. "In 1900... Freud and Jung were plunging into the limitless darkness of the subconscious. "
Freud world 1932 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 70. "'While the different religions wrangle with one another as to which of them is in possession of the truth, in our view the truth of religion may be altogether disregarded. . . . If one attempts to assign to religion its place in man's evolution, it seems not so much to be a lasting acquisition, as a parallel to the neurosis which the civilized individual must pass through on his way from childhood to maturity.'

Sigmund Freud
New Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis, 1932
"

Freud world 1964 Dick, Philip K. "Oh, to Be a Blobell " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1964); pg. 222. -
Freud world 1967 Chayefsky, Paddy. Altered States. New York: Harper & Row (1978); pg. 43. "'...But it's still a renunciatory technique to achieve a predetermined trancelike state, which the Zen people call an isness, a very pure narcissism, Freud's oceanic feeling...' "
Freud world 1972 Zelazny, Roger. The Guns of Avalon in The Chronicles of Amber, vol. 1. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (c. 1972); pg. 226. "'Very interesting. Go on.'

'The bash on my head provided what even Sigmund Freud had been unable to obtain for me earlier,' I said. 'There returned to me small recollections that grew stronger and stronger...' "

Freud world 1978 MacLean, Katherine. "Night-Rise " (published 1978) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 380. "'Get at that typewriter! We'll make it a series. Never mind about facts for the first part. Just rehash Kali and Beal and Freud...' "; Pg. 383: "They would print my article. It would come out a little neater and more coherent than I had written it, with the statement of the Dark Christ Religion put neatly into quote marks. Someone else would add the Freudian crap, and the sociological crap... "
Freud world 1982 Jeppson, J. O. "A Pestilence of Psychoanalysts " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 280-285. [This story is written by Janet Jeppson (Isaac Asimov's wife), a psychiatrist and a psychoanalyst. The entire story is about psychiatrists, and contains many references to Freudianism and psychoanalysis.] Pg. 280: "'You've got it wrong,' said one of his younger Freudian colleagues who liked to keep up to date. 'and you haven't got a hat anyhow.' "; Pg. 282: "'Then don't ask. Or maybe I should tell you. No, I'll just describe my own symptoms. It began with dreams, and don't try to analyze them the way Siggy would have.'

'You know perfectly well that I'm non-Freudian. Tell me about your dreams.' "

Freud world 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 3. "As Lord Invay points out, Earth does not exist on any astrochart and I have confirmed that. Since Soltan Gris (the narrator of this story) is a confessed criminal and well worthy of doubt (besides, anyone whose heroes are Sigmund Freud and Bugs Bunny also has other problems), I did not rely on his account that... "
Freud world 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 90. "Now, according to the great master, Freud, the unconscious mind can twist words into meanings closer to the intent of the person. These are called 'Freudian slips.' That was what must have happened. No matter that he probably didn't speak Turkish, Jimmy 'The Gutter' Tavilnasty had made a Freudian slip. "
Freud world 1987 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 10: The Doomed Planet. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 291. "Psychology, psychiatry,' said Crobe, 'and all the works of Sigmund Freud. All the basic texts of psychotherapy on Earth. But they won't let me use it here. They are very unenlightened and retarded. I could clean out this whole asylum for them but every day they gag me before they let the cleaning crew in...' "
Freud world 1987 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 10: The Doomed Planet. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 292. Pg. 292: "'Obvious,' he said. 'Sigmund Freud covered it like a blanket. An Oedipus complex! I can get to the bottom of your case at once. It is a classic example of psychopathology. You see, there is the anal passive, followed by the anal erotic. Then there is the oral passive, followed by the oral erotic. There is also the genital stage but no one every really reaches that. These are ALL the mental stages there are...' "; Pg. 295: "'Libido means a desire, craving or love of something. But in Heller's case, it is a deviation since it is NOT confined to sex. As the word libido is used constantly by Freud to describe the gravest of mental conditions, you can begin to see where this is leading us with Heller.' "
Freud world 1989 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 46-47. "...K.D. Thierry... By the late 1980s... Not an uneducated man, he joined the chorus then intent on knocking the last crumbling chunks of Freudian doctrine from its pedestal. He tried to add all the rest of psychology to the scraps; his first wife had been a psychotherapist, and the parting had been memorably cruel to both. "
Freud world 1994 Bradbury, Ray. "Unterderseaboat Doktor " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1994); pg. 8. Pg. 1: "The incredible event occurred during my third visit to Ustav Von Seyfertitz, my foreign psychoanalyst. "; Pg. 8: "'Nuts,' I said, 'You're bored. I could get you a five-million-dollar deal with Amalgamated Fruitcakes Inc. And the Sigmund F. Dreamboats, split three ways!' "; Pg. 15: "What, I often wonder, ever happened to Gustav Von Seyfertitz? Did he move to Vienna, to take up residence, perhaps, in or near dear Sigmund's very own address? " [Many refs. to Freudianism, throughout story, not in DB.]
Freud world 1994 Delany, Samuel R. "Appendix: Closures and Openings " in Return to Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994); pg. 272. "At the same time, I have tried keep a sharp vigil against the muddling results of an existentialist sexuality. As the late Michel Foucault warned us so pointedly in a lecture at Stanford a few years back: 'We must get rid of the Freudian schema . . . the scheme of the interiorization of the law through the medium of sex.' Deeply I feel that in our current social system, almost all claims of such an interiorization are, today, signs of potential terrorism, wherever they are made, even by groups as seemingly diverse as orthodox and radical psychiatry or the Moral Majority... "
Freud world 1994 Delany, Samuel R. "Appendix: Closures and Openings " in Return to Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994); pg. 273. "Lacan, and at this point Lacan's commentators even more so, have led us back to a careful reconsideration of Freud's texts with a focus on language. (Our focus? Freud's? The texts?' Often it is as intriguingly undecidable as...) These rereadings have been scrupulously clarifying, profoundly exciting.

The objection to Freud, however, remains. I do not, of course, mean the problem of 'vulgar Freudianism,' where metonymies are interpreted as metaphors for their ordinary terms and situations. The valid Freudian enterprise is rather to discern the several social and psychological systems (clearly distinguishing which is which) by which metonymies exfoliate. And Freud's discovery of the force of sex as it worked among the psychological systems was a great one. "

Freud world 1994 Delany, Samuel R. "Appendix: Closures and Openings " in Return to Neveryon. Hanover, NH: Wesleyan University Press (1994); pg. 274. "The problem was, however, not that Freud paid too much attention to sex, but that -- paradoxically -- he paid too little attention to it. The nature of his inattention manifested itself as a series of metaphors that exhausted sex by purely social analogues. In the Oedipus Complex, for example, infantile sexuality becomes wholly entailed with the emotions of jealously, aggression, and fear, which, after puberty, sexual feelings can, indeed, sometimes evoke when frustrated -- though by no means necessarily so. Since sex is not an emotion, but an appetite, this entailment wreaks untold confusions in a theory that is supposed to be dealing with 'drives': in short, Freud does not deal with sex as an autonomous function that may (or may not) have its own working rules apart from the shifting emotional calculus in which it is embedded... "
Freud world 1996 Morrow, James. "The Tower " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 77. "'If Freud were here, he might infer my problems have a sexual etiology,' said Nimrod in measured tones. 'He would probably note the phallic implications of my skyscraper. I hope I'm being clear.' "
Freud world 1997 Hogan, James P. The Two Faces of Tomorrow. New York: Baen (1997; c. 1979); pg. -2. [Author's Preface to Baen Books Edition] "Throughout history, the current explanation of mind has always reflected the latest technology. Descartes envisaged it in terms of reflexes and the cuckoo clock. Freud's terminology of obstructed channels, diverted flows, and buildups of pressures was inspired by the complexity of the sewer system of Vienna. "
Freud world 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 53-54. "I refer to the wrongs of religion and psychoanalysis. Mere elimination of the poisonous weed might be harmful to us all.'

...'Psychotherapy could take months,' says Ritchie.

'That's why I'll back my way,' smiles Zoe. 'He may be teetering on the brink of a--'

'A conversion?'

'--well, of. . . a more positive frame of mind...' "

Freud world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 20. "...in Memory Wars: Freud's Legacy in Dispute (1996). Crews contends that there is as little intellectual and evidentiary substance in the theory and practice of psychoanalysis as in the most blatantly fantastical claims of believers in ritual satanic abuse. Indeed, the latter, Crews urges, is the devolved and declasse descendant of the former.

I would agree with Crews, with this further suggestion: that science fiction has been an essential element in the transmission of Freud's original theories and their adaptation to the needs of today's talk show audiences. There were actually two separate SF conduits. The first was the debased Freudianism of SF writer L. Ron Hubbard, who introduced the pseudoscience of Dianetics (aka the 'religion' of Scientology) in the May 1950 issue of Astounding Science Fiction. " [More.]

Freud world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 148. "As a parody of orthodox Freudian doctrine and practice, Dianetics is bang-on, but that, of course, was not its intention. Rather, it was a generic, over-the-counter version of psychoanalysis available, initially, for a fraction of the price. In lieu of oedipal fantasies, it offered simpler ways to lay the blame on dad, and preferably, mom:... "
Freud world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 232. "In hindsight, Marcuse's 'repressive desublimation' seems simply a last-ditch effort to reconcile late Marxist political theory with Freudian doctrine. In the '60s, sexual mores were loosening up, while capitalism exhibited no parallel progressive tendency, to the distress of ideologues. The disjunction needed a theory and a name; Marcuse supplied both. "
Freud world 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 165. "The problem vexed him so much that in the last days he'd even experienced a series of colorful nightmares--featuring a golden dragon with three heads on long, snakelike necks.

Sigmund Freud would have a field day with that image, the astrophysicist thought wryly. "

Freud world 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 379. "'--and you... you get visited by your dearly departed father, who tells you that he and his friends have been busy rebuilding the universe, for crissake. 'Our Father who art in Heaven . . .'? This is straight religion. This is straight cultural anthropology. This is straight Sigmund Freud. Don't you see that?...' "
Freud world 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 66. "'They knew how to live with nature and get along with nature. They didn't try too hard to be men and no animal. That's the mistake we made when Darwin showed up. We embraced him and Huxley and Freud, all smiles. And then we discovered that Darwin and our religions didn't mix. Or at least we didn't think they did. We were fools. we tried to budge Darwin and Huxley and Freud. They wouldn't move very well. So, like idiots, we tried knocking down religion.

'We succeeded pretty well. We lost our faith and went around wondering what life was for. If art was no more than a frustrated outflinging of desire, if religion was no more than self-delusion, what good was life? Faith had always given us answers to things. But it all went down the drain with Freud and Darwin. We were and still are a lost people.' "

Freud world 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 31. "'...look at poor Freud--years of agony before he asked his doctor to kill him. And toward the end, the wound stank so much that even his dog wouldn't go near him.' "
Freud world 2016 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 91. "...steady decline in the moral and intellectual status of Christianity... continued by Copernicus, Galileo, Darwin, Freud... "
Freud world 2025 Clifton, Mark & Frank Riley. The Forever Machine. New York: Carroll & Graf (1992; first ed. 1956); pg. 27. "'Well, Mrs. Carter, to put it bluntly, Joey has been pretending, telling lies, deliberately keeping you worried and fearful so you will give him more attention. He hasn't been able to fool his father so well, so in line with Oedipus complex, he set about to win you away from his father, to come between you...' "
Freud world 2028 Barnes, John. Mother of Storms. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 328. "He is aware of what all the Freudians, Tantrics, hedonists, and sensei would tell him about hating his body. But he doesn't hate physical experience. He hates limited physical experience, he hates being a cripple... "
Freud world 2032 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 191. "'...Wanna see if she's got an Electra complex?'

'What's that?'

'Like a female Oedipus complex. See if she gets hot for guys who look like dear old Dad?' "

Freud world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 258. "It wasn't any form of code-breaking a machine could perform, more like the ancient Freudian art of analyzing free associations... "
Freud world 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 131. "After two years of hypnotherapy the inescapable conclusion is that the primary focus for the subject's neurosis is the morbid fear of losing his mother. Although the Freudian concept of an Oedipus Complex has long been discredited, the subject sees his mother as a symbol of safety and well-being, hence an object of intense desire. While this desire is primarily connected to his fear of loss of maternal protection, there is also a decidedly sexual component involved.

The subject is now thirty-five years old and freely able to admit that he has harbored murderous rages against the men with whom he has forced to share his mother's affection: i.e., his father and his step-father, both of whom are now deceased. Even in deep hypnotherapy sessions he evades any mention of his seven-year-old half-brother who, quite obviously, has also taken a share of his mother's attention and affection. "

Freud world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 104. [Year estimated.] "'You are saying that if it did pull through, it would hate us. That strikes me as an unfair attempt to invoke the spirit of Sigmund Freud: Oedipus and Electra in one being, out to destroy all its parents--the authors of every one of its tensions, anxieties, hang-ups, burned into its impressionable psyche at a young and defenseless age. Even Freud didn't have a name for that one. What should we call it?' "
Freud world 2050 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1975); pg. 193. "'You are saying that if it did pull through, it would hate us. That strikes me as an unfair attempt to invoke the spirit of Sigmund Freud: Oedipus and Electra in one being, out to destroy all its parents--the authors of every one of its tensions, anxieties, hangups, burned into the impressionable psyche at a young and defenseless age. Even Freud didn't have a name for that one. What should we call it?' "
Freud world 2054 Dick, Philip K. & Ray Nelson. The Ganymede Takeover. New York: Ace Books (1967); pg. 99. "'Yes,' Paul said, glancing with approval at the hypnotized men. 'I haven't lost it, the ability.' In the old days, at the beginning of his professional practice, he had gone in a great deal for hypnotherapy . . . as had Freud. Much better, he reflected, to save something of the potency of hypnotism for special occasions.. " [Also, the novel has many references to psychiatry, without mentioning Freud by name.]
Freud world 2075 Herbert, Frank & Brian Herbert. Man of Two Worlds. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1986); pg. 180. "Dreens never blame their mistakes on external entities. All errors are out own making. They originate from subconscious impetus. Your Doctor Freud touched on this.

The Murphy School of Psychology serves me better. Never make the same mistake twice. "
Freud world 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 6. "'Listen. The only reason why you'd be carrying a psychiatrist around with you is that you must have gotten your draft notice. right?'

...'Has it helped? Has he--' She gestured at the suitcase. '--Made you sick enough?'

Turning to the portable extension of Dr. Smile, Barney said, 'Have you?'

The suitcase answered, 'Unfortunately you're still quite viable, Mr. Mayerson; you can handle ten Freuds of stress. Sorry. But we still have several days.' " [Also pg. 38-39 and elsewhere, mentions psychoanalysts.]

Freud world 2100 Pohl, Frederik. Gateway. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977); pg. 282. "'Tell me something, Sigfrid,'I say, 'how nervous am I?'

He is wearing his Sigmund Freud hologram this time, truculent Viennese stare, not a bit gemutlich. "

Freud world 2140 Swanwick, Michael. "Scherzo with Tyrannosaur " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 344. [Time travel story] "'My real name is Philippe de Cherville. I swapped table assignments so I could meet my younger self. But then Melusine--my mother--started hitting on my. So I guess you can understand now'--he laughed embarrassedly--'why I didn't want to go the Oedipus route.' "
Freud world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 269. "'Did the oracle tell you about his dream?'

'Yes. It might mean nothing. He's been through a lot and he's in pain. I wish I could give him aspirin. Sometimes a dream means nothing important. Sometimes a cigar is only a cigar. However . . .' He paused. 'He is an oracle and this is a holy place..'

'Derek, you are a superstitious savage.' "

Freud Zarathustra 2599 Piper, H. Beam. Little Fuzzy in Fuzzy Papers (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1962); pg. 137. "He talked about sensory stimuli and responses, and about conditioned reflexes. He went back to the first century Pre-Atomic, and Pavlov and Korzybski and Freud. "
Freud Zarathustra 2599 Piper, H. Beam. Little Fuzzy in Fuzzy Papers (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1962); pg. 140. "Now his partner had his girl back, and his partner's girl [a psychologist] had a Fuzzy family of her own... What were their names now? Syndrome, Complex, Id and Superego. The things some people name Fuzzies! " [Also pg. 142.]


Freud, continued

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