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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Ferengi*, Deep Space 9

Ferengi*, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Antilles, Kem. Highest Score (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 13. [Nog, a young Ferengi, is one of book's main characters.] Pg. 13: "'Isn't that one of the Rules of Acquisition, to learn the customer's weaknesses so you can better take advantage of him?'

'Rule Number 87,' Quark answered automatically. ";

Pg. 25: "Quark leaned closer. 'I want you to find out everything you can about this mining operation and report back to me... Who they're selling to and at what price--that kind of thing. This could be a great opportunity.'

Nog crossed his thin arms over his chest. 'Rule Number 29. What's in it for me?'

Quark upped his hands together. 'A small pay raise when you get back.'

'Hah! You want me to do your dirty work for that? Not good enough!' ";

Pg. 49: "'Besides,' Jake said... 'doesn't one of the Rules of Acquisition say something about getting to know your customer?'

'Rule Number 87,' said Nog... ";

Pg. 82: "Didn't Rule of Acquisition Number 92 say there were many paths to profit? "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Cox, Greg & John Gregory Betancourt. Devil in the Sky (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 78. [Ferengi] Pg. 78: "Still, this incident only confirmed his [Quark's] faith in one of the oldest and most sacred of the Rules of Acquisition:

Always get payment in advance. ";

Pg. 278: "'You can always turn into a gaming table,' Quark said. 'I'll put you to good use. The two hundred and forty-third Rule of Acquisition clearly states--' "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Gallagher, Diana G. Arcade (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 11. "'But it's free!' the Ferengi's eyes widened in near-panic.

'Free?' Jake started, suddenly nervous. 'How come?'

Bokat blinked, his mind racing. 'As a reward, my boy. Uh, in keeping with the fifty-first Rule of Acquisition.'

'Which is?'

'Reward anyone who adds to your profits so they will continue to do so.' " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB. Nog (a Ferengi) is one of the two main characters.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Gilden, Mel. Cardassian Imps (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 10. [Nog, a young Ferengi, is one of book's main characters.] Pg. 10: "' 'Wise men can hear profit in the wind.' '

'Rule of Acquisition?' Jake asked.

'Number twenty-two,' Nog replied. ";

Pg. 17: "'Could be an opportunity.'

'Opportunity?' Nog said.

Jake knew that opportunity was a magic word as far as Nog and many other Ferengi were concerned. " [Many other refs. throughout book, not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Pedersen, Ted. Gypsy World (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996) [Nog, a young Ferengi, is one of book's main characters.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Pedersen, Ted. Space Camp (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 2. "'Making a profit while having fun is the best way to spend your vacation.'

'Is that another one of your Ferengi Rules of Acquisition?'

'No. I just made it up,' Nog said, adding, 'but it should be.' " [Other Ferengi refs. throughout book. Nog, a Ferengi, is one of 2 main characters. Other major fictional cultures in book include Betazoid, Rijarian, Klingon.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Peel, John. Field Trip (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995) [Nog, a young Ferengi, is one of book's main characters.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2370 Schofield, Sandy. The Big Game (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 196. "'I thought you gave up hu-mon ways, boy!'

Nog's eyes had grown wider. 'I have. I was going to teach him the First Rule of Acquisition.' Then he snatched the sensor from Jake's hand. ' 'Once you have their money, you never give it back!' ' " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2371 Sheckley, Robert. The Laertian Gamble (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 7. "'I believe what the lady is saying,' Quark said, with every indication of sincerity, 'but it's not a matter for me to decide. 'Never gamble with a telepath' is the two hundred and sixteenth Rule of Acquisition. I have no choice in the matter. I am as bound by the rule as she is. Otherwise I'd be happy to take her word that she can't read the minds of the other players.' "
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2371 Sheckley, Robert. The Laertian Gamble (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 53. "'The two men... looked down at the Ferengi priest. One of them seemed to recognize the robes the Ferengi wore. 'Are you a priest, sir?'

'Oh, indeed I am,' the little Ferengi said. 'Olix is my name. I belong to the order of the Charismatic Fathers of Profit and Loss.'

He beamed at them. Although his features were typically Ferengi, he had none of the aura of double-dealing about him that Quark and the others on DS9 exhibited. In fact, this Ferengi in his embroidered red cloak and three-peaked headdress looked like the embodiment of innocent goodwill.'

One of the traders said, 'Quark can be found up there on the Promenade.' He hesitated. 'Father, do you know Quark personally.'

'I have not had that pleasure,' Olix said. 'My order has sent me out to visit the many Ferengi scattered far from their home world and bring them the consolation of their religion.'

'Quark? Religion?' the first man said, then coughed... " [Many other Ferengi religious refs., not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2371 Sheckley, Robert. The Laertian Gamble (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 68. "'Ultab must have visited you,' Rom said, invoking the name of the ancient Ferengi deity of self-doubt.

'That's idle speculation,' Quark said.

'How else do you explain your going broke?' Rom asked.

The Ferengi had never been known as an especially spiritual race. They were not like Bajorans, who had a long tradition of visions and spirituality. Ferengi didn't flaunt their religious side. But this didn't mean they didn't have one. For Ferengi, Gain was a sacred matter, and Loss was a device of the devil. The very concept of loss was inescapably tinged with the idea of supernatural retribution, which few Ferengi believed in any longer but all feared. "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Vengeance (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 2. "'Still carrying around that ridiculous, obscene billboard?' growled the constable.

'No, I died about three hours ago, Odo; this is my ghost you're talking to.'

'I thought Ferengi went to the Divine Treasury when they died. Weren't you greedy enough?'

Quark stiffened and stopped, glaring at the tall, austere, and now thoroughly solid constable--a fancy term for cop. 'Greed is never enough, Odo. A true Ferengi combines greed with pure corruption and a passion for staying out of other people's business unless there's a profit to be made. I'm pleased to note that you fail all three tests of Ferengi character.' " [Many other refs. to fictional religions and cultures throughout novel, not in DB. Others include Klingon, Bajoran, Trill, Cardassian, etc.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 David, Peter; Michael Jan Friedman & Robert Greenberger. Wrath of the Prophets (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 135. "The Ferengi made a face. 'Well, me, too,' he said. 'Quark is my brother, after all. But you know the Sixth Rule of Acquisition.'

It took the Trill a moment to recall the specific rule--never easy with 285 of them to sift through--but given the circumstances, she was able to figure it out. 'Never allow family to stand in the way of opportunity.'

Rom snorted in nervous laughter and bobbed his head, grinning wider than before. 'You see my point, then.' " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 Friedman, Michael Jan. Saratoga (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 120. "'You heard me,' the Ferengi replied. 'If you can't recite the Rules of Acquisition as the occasion demands, you'll never get Jangor to believe you're my brother.'

Odo cursed out loud--though it wasn't difficult to see the sense in Rom's advice. 'Very well, then. Rule Sixteen. A deal is a deal until a better one comes along.'

The Ferengi grinned. 'Very good, Constable. Very good indeed. And Rule One hundred thirty-nine?'

The changeling sighed. 'Wives serve, brothers inherit.'

Quark's brother rubbed his hands together eagerly. 'Yes, perfect. That's one of my favorites.'

'I'm not surprised,' Odo commented.

'Rule Fifty-nine?' Rom prodded.

'Free advice is seldom cheap,' the constable responded.

'Forty-eight?'

'The bigger the smile, the sharper the knife.'

'Thirty-three?'

'It never hurts to suck up to the boss,' Odo answered, at the end of his rope. "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 Friedman, Michael Jan. Saratoga (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 120. "'And then there's Rule Six, of course. You know that one, don't you? Never allow family to stand in the way of opportunity.'

The Ferengi's smile faded quickly. 'I never saw the wisdom in that one myself, I must admit. But it's good to have it at your disposal.' " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 Pedersen, Ted. Trapped in Time (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998) [Nog, a young Ferengi, is one of book's main characters.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 Shimerman, Armin & David George. The 34th Rule (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1999) [A novel by Armin Shimerman and David George. Based on the story by Armin Shimerman and David George and Eric Stillwell.] [As indicated by the cover and by the title, this novel focuses on the Ferengi culture and religion. The titular '34th Rule' refers to the 34th Rule of Acquisition, the set of rules from the Ferengi religion. The main characters are Quark and Nog, and the novel's author is the actor who portrayed Quark in the TV series.] Back cover: "For once, business is going well for Quark, not that anyone on [DS9]... appreciates his genius for finding profit in the most unlikely of circumstances. Quark is even looking forward to making the deal of a lifetime--when he suddenly finds himself... in the middle of a major dispute between Bajor and the Ferengi Alliance. It seems that the Grand Nagus is refusing to sell one of the lost Orbs... banning all Ferengi activity in Bajoran space. With diplomatic relations between the two cultures rapidly breaking down... "
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2372 Shimerman, Armin & David George. The 34th Rule (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 45. "'Major, would you ever attempt to get Kai Winn to change her beliefs?'

'I've argued loudly and often with the kai.'

'Would you try to change her religious beliefs?'

'What I'm asking you has nothing to do with religious beliefs.'

'You're wrong. What you're talking about concerns the tenets of business, and business is the most important thing to the Ferengi. The acquisition of profit is as meaningful to us as the spiritual life is to the Bajorans.'

...'...What goal drives business?'

'Profit?'

'Profit. This is true in business in general, but it is true most especially for Grand Nagus Zek. The nagus is not merely a businessman; he is also a symbol, virtually a religious symbol--' Kira opened her mouth, apparently to protest Quark's use of the word religious, but he continued to speak, not allowing her to interrupt. '--of financial acumen for the Ferengi...' "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2373 Wright, Susan. The Badlands, Book Two (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 143. "Quark pulled himself up to his full height. 'That's why you interrupted a business deal? Role of Acquisition No. 30: A wise man knows that confidentiality equals profit.' "
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2373 Wright, Susan. The Tempest (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 121. "Then he caught sight of Morn, precariously perched on a stool in the corner below the stairs and looking very unhappy. Apparently loyalty to your regular customers wasn't high on the list of the Ferengi Rules of Acquisition. " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2374 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. Inferno (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 3 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 20. [1] "For his part, Quark was almost blinded by the shocking radiance of pure latinum as the doors to the Divine Treasury opened before him. Here at the celestial source of the Great Material River, there was no need for that oh-so-precious metal to be debased by being pressed with gold. The stairs he ascended, the coins he used to bribe his way to the head of the line, even the robes he wore, all were pure latinum, gleaming, somehow liquidly solid, and endlessly beguiling.

A choir of accountants burst into song as Relk, the Chief Auditor, opened both sets of books in which Quark's life was recorded.

Quark waited as he faced his final audit. He told himself he had nothing to fear. that the ledgers of his life would balance and the threat of spending eternity in the Debtor's Dungeon was nothing to be concerned about.

And it wasn't. "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2374 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. Inferno (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 3 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 21. [2] "Relk shut his books with a double thump as he congratulated Quark, informed him he had shown a most admirable return on investment and would be admitted to the Head Office to take his place at the Counting Board of the Divine Nagus himself.

Quark felt as if he were floating, every care of his past life lifting away from him. Dimly, he now remembered something about being beamed aboard the Boreth...

But why should he have to be concerned about the universe ending when he was this close to his final dividend?

The Junior Assistants in their latinum robes hovered around him as he stepped onto the executive floor.

He followed the latinum-paneled corridor until he came to the solid latinum door that awaited him.

Overwhelmed, Quark gazed at the shining door before him. Every childhood fantasy he had had about the Divine Treasury was turning out to be true. " [More, not in DB.]

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2374 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. The Fall of Terok Nor (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 10. "...and Quark felt himself flooded with shock that he was not ascending to the Divine Treasury but apparently on his way to the Debtors' Dungeon. How could that be possible? He had lived a life of greed and self-absorption. How could he not be rewarded with eternal dividends? He wanted to speak to someone in charge. He wanted to renegotiate the deal. " [Many other Ferengi refs., not in DB.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2374 Reeves-Stevens, Judith & Garfield. The Fall of Terok Nor (Star Trek: DS9 / Millennium Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 157. Pg. 157: "Who am I fooling? Quark suddenly thought. It was one thing to sit back and hope for disaster to strike others in order to save him. But the 236th Rule said it best: You can't buy fate.

...If there were any other result, he wouldn't know it until he was on the steps of the Divine Treasury bribing the Nagul Doorman. "; Pg. 286-287: "Even though he was resigned to his fate and determined to face it as a rational being, Quark instinctively reached back to his childhood lessons from the weekly Celestial Market classes his loving parents had forced him to attend. Trying not to breathe in any more of the noxious fumes that [sic] he had to, he reflexively mumbled the Ferengi prayer that was his people's traditional ward against impending disaster. 'All right, this is my final offer. . . .' "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2375 Perry, S. D. Avatar, Book One (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 177. Pg. 174: "She was still smiling... he scrambled to salvage what he could, the 285th Rule of Acquisition running through the back of his mind like a curse. 'No good deed ever goes unpunished.' It was always the 285th that got him, he could have it tattooed on his forehead and he'd still forget it. ";

Pg. 177: "Quark walked slowly back to the bar, his heart full, his lopes tingling, Rules battling through his mind. The 94h Rule, 'Females and finances don't mix,' was one he'd ignored to his own disadvantage on more than one occasion . . . but the 62nd Rule was louder, drowning out his concerns by this simple, love-friendly truth:

'The riskier the road, the greater the profit.'

Oh, yes; quite a woman. "

Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2376 George III, David R. Twilight (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #1 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 223. "Quark... and he realized that he actually missed Dr. Bashir and Chief O'Brien. Of course, the 57th Rule of Acquisition--'Good customers are as rare as latinum; treasure them'--never proved more true than when good customers abandoned you... The 109th Rule of Acquisition said about dignity what might just as well have been said about hope: that 'and an empty sack is worth the sack.' " [Other Ferengi refs. not in DB, but not much about Ferengi religion. Quark is a significant character in novel, and is pictured on the cover.]
Ferengi* Deep Space 9 2376 Jarman, Heather. This Gray Spirit (Star Trek: DS9; "Mission: Gamma " #2 of 4). New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 26. "His steadfast belief in the 229th Rule of Acquisition, 'Latinum lasts longer than lust,' assured that. " [Other Ferengi refs., not in DB. Quark is a major character.]
Ferengi* galaxy 2370 ab Hugh, Dafydd. Balance of Power (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 79. "A yin yang symbol assembled from obsidian ivory dominated the front of the desk. On the opposite side of the cabin lurked a jade statue of the chubby, laughing Ferengi-god Roqadox, fully four meters tall. Every wall of the cabin was hung with tapestries, menaced by martial weapons and shields... " [Many other Ferengi refs, not in DB, including refs. to Rules of Acquisition. Other major races/cultures in novel include Cardassian, Klingon and Romulan.]
Ferengi* galaxy 2372 ab Hugh, Daffyd. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Conquered (Book 1 of 3 in "Rebels " trilogy). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 155. "...Odo would find a way to harass Quark for giving so generously of his knowledge of profitable capitalism. No good deed ever goes unpunished, he quoted to himself; it was the very last Rule of Acquisition, number 285, to be exact, and truer words were never spoken. "
Ferengi* galaxy 2372 Betancourt, John Gregory. The Heart of the Warrior (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 231. "...Quark. He was concerned himself, but most important, he wondered how he could possibly turn things to his own advantage. After all, as the Ninth Rule of Acquisition said, 'Opportunity plus instinct equals profit.' And his every instinct said he was looking at a latinum-plated opportunity. "
Ferengi* galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 187. "'The grand nagus.'...

'It's my business! I give dispensations. In case you're unaware, in addition to being ruler of the entire Ferengi Alliance, I am also the central religious official.'

'You have a religion?' said a surprised Picard. 'I thought the only thing Ferengi worshiped was money.'

The grand nagus stared at him blankly. 'What's your point?'

'Nothing. None at all.'

'Good. In any event, I,' and he thumped his chest in a rather smug manner, 'am the main--and only--religious figure in this entire bazaar. Fortunately, however, I am schooled in the religions o over three hundred thousand different races. And what I don't know, I make up.'

'But what does that have to do with . . . dispensations?'

...'I absolve people of their sins. They come to me, one at a time or in small groups, and ask for absolution...' " [More about Ferengi religion, pg. 187-194.]

Ferengi* galaxy 2374 de Lancie, John & Peter David. I, Q (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 188. "'And each time, they pay you a fee.' Picard laughed bitterly. 'Nagus . . . haven't you ever heard that you can't take it with you?'

'Rule of Acquisition Number Ninety-seven: 'If you can't take it with you, don't go,' ' the nagus replied. "

Ferengi* galaxy 2376 DeCandido, Keith R. A. Demons of Air and Darkness (Star Trek: DS9 / Gateways: Book 4 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "True, the war had upset much of that, but one needed only to remember the Thirty-Fourth Rule of Acquisition: 'War is good for business.' ";

Pg. 70: "'Well, I'm not a Bajoran, and I wasn't raised in that religious tradition, so no, but it's an interesting hypothesis.'

'So there's no way I'm going to convince you that you need to live a profitable life so you can go to the Divine Treasury when you die?' [Ferengi afterlife]

Shar said in all seriousness. 'Probably not, no...' ";

Pg. 171: "How could Gaila, of all people, forget the Sixth Rule of Acquisition? 'Never allow family to stand in the way of opportunity.' " [Many Ferengi refs. throughout novel. Two Ferengi, Nog and Quark, are major characters in the novel. There is also frequent mention of Nog, the new Grand Nagus, and the sweeping reforms in Ferengi culture that he is instituting, at the request of retired Nagus Zek. Quark's cousin Gaila is another major character.]

Ferengi* galaxy 2376 Greenberger, Robert. Doors into Chaos (Star Trek: TNG / Gateways: Book 3 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "'Grand Nagus!' The voice was urgent...

'Yes,' said Grand Nagus Rom of the Ferengi Alliance. There were still mornings he woke up convinced this was the longest dream he had ever had. But no, he was really the Grand Nagus. He still remembered the day it happened, with vivid clarity: Zek, gnarled and cackling as usual, telling him it was time he and Ishka--Rom's mother--settled down into retirement. Since Rom shared Zek's vision for long-term changes in Ferengi society to insure its viability in an ever-shifting universe, the outgoing Grand Nagus asked Rom to succeed him...

Rom... heard the warning properly. Orions! They had no respect for the Rules of Acquisition, just plunder. "; Pg. 106: "The Ferengi could be devious, even dangerous on occasion, but the current ruler, Rom, was reported to be a different sort of man... Certainly some of the attitudes had been altered, including the role for women... " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Findhorn Community USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 327. "Pam--I'm coming out there. The minute we get back from Findhorn. "
Fire-Baptized Holiness Church of God North America 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 58. "Members of the Apostolic Overcoming Holy Church of God, the Pentecostal Fire Baptized Holiness Church and numerous other groups gave away most or all of their worldly possessions... "
First Baptist Church (Dallas) Texas: Dallas 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 111. "In conspiratorial tones, Barclay outlined his committee's plan. Under the cover of night, a small subset of the [Englightenment] League, a kind of atheist commando unit, would crawl across the luxurious lawn of the First Baptist Church of Dallas--'the Pentagon of Christianity,' as Barclay put it--and jimmy open a basement window. They would sneak into the church. Infiltrate the nave. Secure the pews. And then, unholstering their Swingline staples, they would take up each Bible in turn and, before replacing it, neatly affix a thirty-page precis of On the Origin of Species between the table of contents and Genesis.

Equal time for Darwin.

... Sylvia Endicott: skepticism's oldest living warrior... 'You know my views on scientific creationism... You know where I stand on Dallas Baptists. But come on, people. This so-called 'counterattack' is really just a prank. We're the children of... Voltaire... We aren't the... Marx Brothers.' "

First Church of Wintermute world 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 71. "He passed her a paper napkin with W I N T E R M U T E printed in red feltpen in his neat, laborious capitals. "; Pg. 73: "'Wintermute is the recognition code for an AI. I've got the Turing Registry numbers. Artificial intelligence.' " [This is the first appearance of the term 'Wintermute', after which the 'First Church of Wintermute' is named.]
Fleming Europe 1500 C.E. Moorcock, Michael. Gloriana. New York: Warner Books (1986; c 1978); pg. 176. "There were rumours out of Tatary, rumous from the German and Flemish States, from Iberia... "
framling galaxy 5248 Card, Orson Scott. Speaker for the Dead. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 38. Demosthenian Hierarchy of Exclusion described: "...Demosthenes' History of Wutan in Trondheim... The Nordic language recognizes four orders of foreignness. The first is the otherlander, or utlanning, the stranger that we recognize as being a human of our world, but of another city or country. The second is the framling--Demosthenes merely drops the accept from the Nordic framling. This is the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another world. The third is the raman, the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another species. The fourth is the true alien, the varelse, which includes all the animals, for with them no conversation is possible. They live, but we cannot guess what purposes or causes make them act. "
framling galaxy 5275 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 35. "'...Hierarchy of Foreignness. Utlannings are strangers from our own world. Framlings are strangers of our own species, but from another world...?' "
framling galaxy 5298 Card, Orson Scott. Xenocide. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 269. "Some strangers... Demosthenes had said, were framlings--humans from another world. "
Freemasonry California 1959 Knight, Damon. A For Anything. New York: Tor (1990; 1959); pg. 8. Pg. 7-8: "By the time he got the man on the line, he had remembered. 'Underwood, this is Gilbert Wall speaking.' (If the operator was listening in, let her.) 'Perhaps you remember me. We met at the Masonic convention two years ago--Norm Hodge introduced us, do you recall?'

'Why, yes, sure I do, Mr. Wall,' said Underwood's voice. (The old memory never failed; Wall could see the man's face clearly in his mind's eye...) 'How are you anyway!'

'I'm just fine, and yourself?'

'Well, not too bad, I can't complain. What can I do for you?'

...'Underwood--what do the call you, uh--' (what was the man's name)--'Ed?'

'Ed, that's right.'

'And you'll cal me Gil, won't you? Ed, here's my little problem. I'm in Clearwater for the day on some confidential work... I've got to make an urgent call to L.A. and it happens the trunks are busy...So if you would call the head operator... and more or less vouch for me...' " [A significant character is a Mason.]

Freemasonry California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 141. "...You won't find it in any reference book, even the ones that are fairly replete with information about Freemasons and the Bavarian Illuminati and other smaltime conspiracies...' "
Freemasonry California: San Francisco 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 363. "nearly a third of the Richmond district of San Francisco, from Golden Gate Park north to Geary and from Park Presidio east to Masonic Avenue... "
Freemasonry California: San Francisco 2053 Rucker, Rudy. Freeware. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1997); pg. 167. "Stahn stepped out of his fine Victorian mansion on Masonic Avenue above Haight Street in San Francisco. "
Freemasonry Egypt 1987 Shiner, Lewis. "Zero Hour " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 308. "It was the day a man named the Astronomer chose to get even with the aces who had hounded him and broken his secret society of Egyptian Masons. "
Freemasonry France: Paris 1738 Suskind, Patrick. Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. New York: Alfred A. Knopf (1986; c. 1985); pg. 195. "People suspected the gypsies... There were, however, no gypsies around at the time, not a one near or far... For lack of gypsies, people decided to suspect the Italian migrant workers. But there weren't any Italians around either... Then it was the Jews who were suspect, then the monks of the Benedictine cloister... then the Cistercians, then the Freemasons... "
Freemasonry France: Paris 1896 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 333. [Discussing a holodeck recreation.] "'Paris Opera,' Worf said to him as the overture began, 'June 1896. Apparently there was another resurgence of anti-Masonic feeling.' "
Freemasonry galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 333. [Discussing a holodeck recreation.] "'Paris Opera,' Worf said to him as the overture began, 'June 1896. Apparently there was another resurgence of anti-Masonic feeling.' "
Freemasonry Idaho 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 39. "Gibson could hardly miss the rumors shared by his illegal contacts. In Idaho Falls, now near the Canadian border, 'justice' had caught up with a thirty-third-degree Mason whose lodge formed a nucleus of dissent. "
Freemasonry Nevada 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 204. "The unconscious rover was moved twice; first to Elko, Nevada under the false bed of a truckload of corn where he was treated for days in a LockLever warehouse. He would have died there without the aid of Dr. Keyhoe--the man who had seen Sanger die, who had abandoned Streamlined America upon seeing the implications of her death. Fellow Masonics in LockLever's employ had helped make their escape possible. "
Freemasonry New Jersey 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 30. "...a large crucifix dangled from the string of beads attached to it. He wore necklases from which were suspended a seal of Solomon, a crescent, a tiny African idol, a fou-leaved clover, a four-armed, fierce-faced figurine, and a symbolic eye on top of a pyramid. Jewish, Muslim, Voodoo, Irish, Hindu and Freemasonic. "
Freemasonry New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 15. "He'd covered the five-pointed star on his floor with tatami, and on them he'd laid the Mirror of Hathor... For months he'd been increasingly unable to think of anything but his enemy, the one who called himself the Astronomer, who'd commanded a vast network of Egyptian Masons until Fortunato and the others had destroyed the nest he'd made at the Cloisters...

The Bornless Ritual, the Acrostics of Abramelin, the Spheres of the Qabalah, all of Western Magick had let him down. He had to use the Astronomer's own Magick against him...

The trick to Egyptian Magick--the real thing, not the Astronomer's warped and bloody version--was to go at it from their reverence for animals... " [More. Also pg. 326, 334-335.]

Freemasonry New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 45. "...in May when the aces of New York had stormed the Cloisters, killing a number of [Egyptian] Masons and destroying the Shakti device... "
Freemasonry New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 323. "Sometime after everything he read, from particle physics to Masonic ritual to the Bhagavad Gita, told him the same thing, over and over: all is one. Nothing mattered. Everything mattered. "
Freemasonry New York: New York City 1986 Martin, George R. R.; Melinda Snodgrass, et al. Wild Cards III: Jokers Wild. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 335. "Cagliostro who had founded the Order, to protect the knowledge of TIAMAT--the Dark Sister--and the Shakti device.

Until Balsam had nothing left to teach the little man, and it was time for the little man to become the Astronomer, and remove Balsam, with the unwitting help of a bumbling magician named Fortunato. To take control of the Order. To realize their destiny. To found a religious tyranny of Egyptian Masons that would rule the world. A world that would come begging to be ruled out of awe and gratitude. "

Freemasonry New York: New York City 1987 Cadigan, Pat. "Addicted to Love " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 317. "...she'd needed a hero very badly after all the nastiness with the [Egyptian] Masons... "
Freemasonry New York: New York City 1987 Williams, Walter Jon. "Mortality " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 434. "'...In a big fight at Aces High with the Astronomer and the Egyptian Masons...' "
Freemasonry New York: New York City 1991 Williams, Walter Jon. "While Night's Black Agents to Their Preys Do Rouse " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 208. "'He was around a few years ago. I knew him slightly when I joined the Egyptian Masons.'

Her eyes widened. 'The Egyptian Masons? You mean--the ones who--'

'Yeah. Those guys. I'd only just joined, then somebody blew up their temple with me in it. I barely got out, and I didn't know there were any other survivors until they started trying to toss people off Aces High.' "

Freemasonry New York: New York City 1991 Williams, Walter Jon. "While Night's Black Agents to Their Preys Do Rouse " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 339. "'There aren't any Egyptian Masons anymore! You know that as well as anyone...' "
Freemasonry North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 166. "'...Now. . . they're more of a. . . something like the Masons in Columbia.'

According to Jerome's briefing papers, they were far more than a fratern order... " ['Columbia' in this alternative history refers to the Dutch-settled nation in eastern North America.]

Freemasonry Ohio 1960 Davidson, Avram. "The Sources of the Nile " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1960); pg. 280. "...and he asked about funeral arrangements. But it seems that the Masonic order was taking care of that: the late Peter Martens was already on his way back to his native town of Marietta, Ohio, where his lodge brothers would give him a formal farewell: aprons, springs of acacia, and all the ritual appurtenances. And Bob thought, why not? "
Freemasonry Tarot 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 84. "The man to the Reverend's right spoke: 'Janson, Adventist.' And, in turn, the others: 'Bonly, Mason.' 'Appermet, Yoga.' 'Smith, Swedenborgian.' 'Miller, Vegan Vegetarian.' "
Freemasonry United Kingdom 1870 Tiedemann, Mark W. "Links " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 247. [Year estimated.] "Fox had seen a pouter pigeon with exquisite toe feathers go for seven hundred pounds at auction to a member of the Philoperisteron Club during a show at the Freemason's Tavern... "


Freemasonry, continued

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