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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to artificial intelligence, galaxy

artificial intelligence, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
artificial intelligence galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 209. "The great machine Vejur was hardly aware of the insignificance which had touched its mind. However, the Creator had commanded that all experiences large and small be recorded, and so Vejur dutifully examined the tiny presence which had entered its memory banks. On realizing that it was one of the carbon-based devices, the great machine came near destroying it instantly. But it had hesitated because it was still puzzled by these tiny, fragile things--and this gave time enough for Vejur to realize that this was the Spock-unit whose thought fragments had been found to be somewhat orderly compared to the other carbon-based units. Vejur decided to let the Spock-unit continue functioning until the purpose of these tiny things was understood and their form patterned. "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2287 Bonanno, Margaret Wander. Probe (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 1. "In its five millennia of existence, the entity had been given many names. Some had called it Probe; some, Messenger or Wanderer... But its creators had not named it. They did not name machines, even one of this magnitude and complexity, one whose centuries-long building had consumed all their energies and half their world. Instead, they had described it: Seeker, they had called it, for that was its function, to seek another race like their own. " [More. The 'Probe' that the book is named after is a gigantic, powerful space-going artificial intelligence, the mysterious object that approached Earth in the film Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2300 Dick, Philip K. "Chains of Air, Web of Aether " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1980); pg. 132. "Later, back at his own dome, gratefully back, he put a plan into operation. The large AI System--Artificial Intelligence Plasma--which handled the major problem-solving for star systems in their area of the galaxy had some available time which could be bought for private use. Accordingly, he punched in an application and posted the total sum of financial credits he had saved up during the last few months.

From Formalhaut, where the Plasma drifted, he received back a positive response. The team which handled traffic for the Plasma was agreeing to sell him fifteen minutes of the Plasma's time. " [More.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2300 Dick, Philip K. "Sales Pitch " in The Golden Man. New York: Berkley (1980; c. 1954); pg. 247. "Robot-salesman were everywhere, gesturing, pleading, shrilling. One started after him and he quickened his pace. It scurried along, chanting its pitch and trying to attract his attention, all the way up the hill to his living-unit. It didn't give up until he stooped over, snatched up a rock, and hurled it futilely. He scrambled in the house and slammed the doorlock after him. The robot hesitated, then turned and raced after a woman with an armload of packages toiling up the hill. " [Many more refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2341 Friedman, Michael Jan. Mystery of the Missing Crew (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995) [Book jacket] "An android is found in the ruins of a colony on Omicron Theta. The crew of the Tripoli reactivate the android and discover his name is Data, a name that suits his incredible curiosity. With the encouragement of his new friends, Data applies to Starfleet Academy and is accepted.

Cadet Data begins his journey to Starfleet Academy aboard the science vessel, Yosemite. Even as he looks forward to the Academy, he struggles to find his own identity and to fit in with the other cadets.

But Data's worries are cut short when the Yosemite is suddenly attacked by an unknown vessel and suffers severe damage. When power is restored, Data discovers that the adult crew has mysteriously disappeared, and only Data and the other Academy-bound cadets are left to face the wrath of a new alien race . . . who are demanding that Data and his cadet crew surrender their ship, or be destroyed! " [Novel focuses on Data.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2341 Friedman, Michael Jan. Secret of the Lizard People (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1995) [Book jacket] "Cadet Data is among a handful of first-year cadets selected to observe a super-Jovian planet ignition--the collision of two huge gas-giant planets resulting in the formation of a new star. They will watch this occurrence from a safe distance aboard the Republic. But a distress call from an alien space station draws their starship off course to an asteroid belt near the colliding planets. The rescue team soon finds itself under siege by deadly attackers, and Data and his group are separated from the main team. Now, with time running out, Data must defeat the invaders and rescue the aliens before the collision destroys the space station . . . and the Republic! " [Novel focuses on Data.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2350 Dick, Philip K. "I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1980); pg. 161. Pg. 161: "He liked the colors; they reminded him of a child's paint box, the semianimated kind, an artificial life-form. He had used them in school, two hundred years ago. "; Pg. 172-173: robot doctor
artificial intelligence galaxy 2365 Krider, Dylan Otto. "What Went Through Data's Mind 0.68 Seconds Before the Satellite Hit " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 87. "I am an android and, as such, capable of performing multiple tasks, using a variety of techniques drawn from my data banks. I must admit that in my quest to become more human, I have found this to be my greatest barrier to my understanding of human psychology. In the time it takes a representative human to say a word of an average length of 1.27 syllables, I have chosen, researched, and performed anywhere from 5 to 2,172,763 mental assignments, depending on their varying degrees of involvement and complexity. " [This entire story focuses on Data's mental processes. There are other stories with Data in this anthology, hence many other stories with references to artificial intelligence. Not all in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 6. "Unlike most humans, Riker did not have to understand before he accepted; he had accepted Data from the moment they first met.

Irony was one human emotion that Data understood; it was ironic that the first person to whom the android had confided his desire to be human was the very person forced to argue that he was mere equipment, Starfleet property. Riker had lost the case but won the resentment of Data's friends.

Even those he had not considered close friends, for Kate Pulaski told Riker, 'You claim to understand Data, yet you called none of us to testify at the hearing.'

'Did you think I wanted to win, Doctor?' Riker replied.

...'Do you think I would have wanted you to? Commander, the disagreements I have with Mr. Data have nothing to do with his autonomy. He is unique in all history--and no experiment should ever be permitted to threaten that uniqueness.' " [Many other refs. to Data throughout novel. He is the main character.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2365 Lorrah, Jean. Metamorphosis (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1990); pg. 6. "'Then you think no more Datas should be built?' Geordi asked...

'I have no objection to other androids being built,' Pulaski replied. 'As briefly as I've known Data, I know that his particular set of positronic circuits and heuristic algorithms have a distinct and individual personality. So, I assume, would another android, even if built in his image. Each would be a different person, as unique as any human. No, my differences with our friend have to do solely with his desire to be something else, instead of exploring the possibilities of what he is.' "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2366 David, Peter. Q-in-Law (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 43. "'This man is a Tizarin?' said Nistral uncertainly. 'Of the house of Shinbum?'

'No, sir,' Data politely informed him. 'I am an android. Data. Of the Enterprise.'

'Remarkable resemblance. Especially the gold skin--a sure sign,' said Nistral.

'That was the choice of my creator,' said Data.

Graziunas nodded. 'So it was with us all.' " [Many other refs. to Data, not in DB, but he is a relatively minor character in this novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2366 Gilden, Mel. Boogeymen (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1991); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "What about Data? Being a machine, he has no intuition. At least, that's what he tells me. But he is a very complex machine, and the vast number of circuits in his positronic brain--a number that approaches the number of synapses in a human brain--allows him to manifest behavior that sometimes looks like intuitive thinking. Are appearance and reality ever the same thing? Not Mom or Riker or Geordi or even Data can give me a satisfactory answer. "; Pg. 7: "Data was an android, but he had been around humans for so long he could not help acquiring their habits. As a matter of fact, he worked hard at learning them. Like Pinocchio, Data wanted to be a real boy. " [Other refs., not in DB. Data is pictured on the cover and is a major character.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2366 Smith, Dean Wesley & Kristine Kathryn Rusch. Vectors (Star Trek: TNG / Double Helix: Book 2 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 68. "Her hardcopy books stood on a single shelf, including the first edition of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories that Data had given her upon her departure. It was a sentimental gift, and it had surprised her coming from Data. Apparently that surprise had shown on her face because he had tilted his head in that slightly robotic way he had, and asked, 'Is the giving of parting gifts not a human custom, especially when the recipient will be missed?'

'It is Data,' she had said, and then hugged him, to his surprise and (she had to admit) to her own. "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2367 Duane, Diane. Dark Mirror (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 5. "Data looked at it and said, 'Ah. Ladoga camilla. Or Limenitis camilla, in the old Linnaean classification.' " [Many refs. to Data, an android, not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2367 Thatcher, Franklin. "Of Cabbages and Kings " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 193. "It happened fast. Fast even in the trillionth-of-a-second universe within Enterprise-D's main computer. Warnings from nearby internal sensors were the first to arrive. Other warnings, from more remote parts of the ship, crawling at lightspeed along the optical data lines, would not arrive for over a million computer cycles.

The first warnings were ambiguous: anomalous subspace field detected. Following its programming, the computer issued an audio warning to the main bridge, but an eternity of computer time would pass before the crew would respond. " [The entire story is about the starship Enterprise, and told from its perspective, or rather, the perspective of the ship computer. Many refs. throughout, not in DB. In the story the ship achieves sentience.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2367 Thatcher, Franklin. "Of Cabbages and Kings " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 204-205. "Enterprise analyzed the command. 'This vessel lacks intellectual resources sufficient to that task.'

'Computer, I realize that your creativity is limited--that is the nature of your design. But if you are to return to our universe, the only means of doing so is by changing that nature.'

'Please provide algorithm.'

'Computer, I don't know the process any more than you do. Perhaps it is a matter of intuition.'

'Please provide algorithm to simulate intuition.'

'If I knew that, I'd be lecturing at the Daytstrom Institute, rather than commanding a starship. But any valid simulation of intuition would, by definition, be intuition. And intuition may be just what you need. It is, after all, a skill unique to sentient beings.

'Computer, you must develop a functional model of sentience that conforms to the resources at hand. And you must implement it.' " [The Enterprise computer does so in the remainder of the story.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2368 Carter, Carmen. The Devil's Heart (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993); pg. 184. "The android sat down. 'Sorry, Data,' said Riker. 'You know how the brass loves to guard its secrets...' " [Many refs. to Lieutenant Commander Data, an android, not in DB. The novel does not focus on him, however.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2368 David, Peter. Imzadi (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 21. "Data looked around the table that served as the communal eating place for the scientists. In every locale on the Enterprise that was designed for food consumption, Data had always been struck by the steady stream of chatter that had accompanied the act... " [Other refs. to Data, an android, not in DB. But he is not at all a focal character.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2369 Friedman, Michael Jan. Relics (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 115. "'Why did ye nae tell me ye had a tavern on board?' he asked the android.

Data looked at him. 'You did not ask,' he replied.

That brought a flood of laughter from Scott. 'Ah, Mr. Data, I had my doubts about ye, I must admit--but ye're nothing like the androids I used to know.' He slapped Data on the back. 'Lay on, Macduff.'

The android looked at him. It took his positronic brain a moment to find the reference. And even after it had, he didn't quite grasp the connection.

'Macduff was a character in William Shakespeare's Macbeth,' he noted. 'What does that have to do with--'

'It's only an expression, lad, only an expression...' " [Some more with Data, but he is not a major character in this novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2369 Galanter, Dave & Greg Brodeur. Foreign Foes (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 30. "Beyond his pale hand was the finest, brightest computer Valhalla that Barbara had ever seen. She was impressed not only by the bank of computers and equipment that was not at her fingertips, but that things, like the android next to her, were possible. " [Data, an android, is a significant character, but not the focus of the novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2370 David, Peter. Q-Squared (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 391. "The android Data... " [Many refs. to Data, but he is not at all prominent in novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2370 DeWeese, Gene. Into the Nebula (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 260. "'Geordi,' Data broke in. Listening to Geordi had somehow prompted an unexpected idea to emerge from the positronic storehouse that was the android's mind. To a human, it would have seemed like a sudden inspiration. To Data, it was only logic, a matter of making an association between two separate bits of information. " [Other refs. to Data. He is a semi-significant character in this novel, but not central.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2370 Dillard, J. M. & Kathleen O'Malley. Possession (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 21. "Now Data, being an android, could recalibrate the conduits, discuss philosophy and the mortal condition, and learn an entirely new violin sonata at the same time--but Geordi was a mere human and, as such, needed to concentrate. " [Data is a significant character in novel, but not the focus.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2370 Friedman, Michael Jan. All Good Things . . . (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1994); pg. 121. "Lwaxana looked at her. 'The android?' She considered the question. 'Actually, he doesn't seem to change much, does--' She stopped herself. 'No, I take that back. He doesn't change physically. But now that I think about it, his personality has developed quite a bit. He's become more socially adept. More . . . human, I'd say, for lack of a better word.' "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2371 Betancourt, John Gregory. Incident at Arbuk (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 76. [NOTE: John Gregory Betancourt's name is misspelled on the cover of this book as "Greggory ".] "'How long until we know if it worked?' she asked softly.

'We already do,' the doctor said gently. We had a few seconds of elevated brain activity, but then it fell back to normal. We can't expect anything more than that.'

'Is an increased dose potentially helpful?'

'No,' he said bluntly, 'and I'm not even going to try. I stretched to the limits of my programming to give him that much. In time he may recover on his own--and I'm afraid that's his best hope, unless my study of his anatomy turns up something grotesquely wrong that I missed in my preliminary examinations.'

'And what are the odds of that,' she whispered, already knowing the answer.

'Almost none.' " [Other refs. to the Doctor/EMH, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2371 David, Peter. Triangle: Imzadi II (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 44. "'I envy Data. In order to develop his personality, he merely has to place a new chip in his head and he immediately has the entire range of human emotions.' " [Data is a very minor character in this novel, hardly mentioned, and there are no other artificial intelligences other than rudimentary ship's computers. More on Data, pg. 61-62.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2371 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Generations. New York: Pocket Books (1994) [A major character in the novel is Data, the android.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2371 Friedman, Michael Jan. Dujonian's Hoard (Star Trek: TNG / The Captain's Table: Book 2 of 6). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 191. "One of them in particular kept turning up in my thoughts. His name was Data and he was my second officer. He was also an android--that is, an artificial being created in the mold of a man--who was discovered by Starfleet on a world called Omicron Theta in the year 2338.

Data was the superior of any human in almost every way one could name. For one thing, he was eminently more durable than any man or woman. For another, he could survive indefinitely without food or air.

Data could exercise superhuman strength and incredible quickness when the need arose. His mind could race at computer-like speeds. But since the day I met him, he had aspired to only one thing--the single aspect of the human condition denied to him.

In short, he wished to experience emotions. Human emotions. " [More.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2371 Wright, Susan. Violations (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 177. "Zimmerman [the Doctor/EMH] wasn't satisfied by Kim's apologetic glance. Actually, there was nothing satisfying about the current situation. His self-maintenance program had attempted to compensate for the system errors by creating multiple backup memory files, updating them continuously, while his decision tracks were routed through logic-error routines for triple redundancy. In fact, he had done everything that could be considered reasonable in order to prevent malfunction, but the performance errors continued to occur. And that . . . bothered him. " [Many other refs. throughout novel to the Doctor, a artificial intelligence hologram.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2372 Lewitt, S. N. Cybersong (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 5. "No, she thought as she put on her rust-colored tunic, she would talk to The Doctor about this. He had been programmed with the entire history of psychological inquiry. He had access to the records of Betazoid healers who understood empathic gifts.

...While The Doctor might have the information to test her and even train her, she was not Betazoid... But she could tell The Doctor everything, and perhaps one of them could determine whether it was just a particularly bad nightmare she had had, or whether it was something more. " [Other refs. to the Doctor, a hologram, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2372 Lewitt, S. N. Cybersong (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1996); pg. 23. "'Their cordas are group minds linked up somehow with an AI.'

'Like the Borg?' Janeway asked, her attention riveted.

'Borg?' Neelix asked.

'They're also a linked group mind with an AI,' the captain said. 'We've been at war...' " [Many other refs., not in DB. A powerful AI is prominently featured in the novel, especially towards the end.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2373 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: First Contact. New York: Pocket Books (1996). Based on the movie; story by Rick Berman, Brannon Braga & Ronald D. Moore. Screenplay by Braga & Moore.; pg. 17. "...Picard spoke, 'Commander Data, put Starfleet subspace frequency...'

...'Aye, sir,' the android replied, his long, golden fingers moving with an artist's sill over the panel. " [Many other refs. to Data, an android, throughout novel. Other refs. not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2373 Smith, Dean Wesley; Kristine Kathryn Rusch & Nina Kiriki Hoffman. Echoes (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 115. "'I tripped over a robot,' said Paris.

'A robot?'

'A little robot about the size of a dinner plate,' he said. 'It was in the road, and after I tripped over it, it squeaked and ran under a curb.'

'Curious,' said Torres. She adjusted her tricorder, walked back to the road, and knelt to scan under the curbs. 'Hey,' she said. 'You're right! There's all kinds of concealed machinery here!... Janitor bot.' "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2374 Cox, Greg. Q-Space (Star Trek: TNG / The Q Continuum: Book 1 of 3). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 55. "'Robot!' the child chirped happily. 'Robot!'

'I am an android,' Data volunteered. 'And you are?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2374 Golden, Christie. Seven of Nine (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 110. "What was he? A machine? He hazarded a guess. 'I am told,' he lied, 'that you are an artificial intelligence of some sort. I am curious. Please tell me more.'

'I am an Emergency Medical Hologram. I was activated shortly after Voyager entered the Delta Quadrant...' " [Some other refs. to the Doctor, not in DB, but not a major focus of novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2374 Vornholt, John. Gemworld: Book One (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2000); pg. 61. "'Data! What happened?' shouted Deanna Troi...

The android's fingers were a blur as he worked his console. 'An unknown singularity has disrupted all of our systems...' " [Many other refs. to Data throughout the novel. He is the one character featured on the novel, although the novel does not seem to have a particular focus on him.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2375 Galanter, Dave & Greg Brodeur. Maximum Warp: Book One: Dead Zone (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001) [Data, the android, is a significant character in novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2375 Galanter, Dave & Greg Brodeur. Maximum Warp: Book Two: Forever Dark (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2001) [Data, the android, is a significant character in novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2375 Lang, Jeffrey. Immortal Coil (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (2002) [Book jacket] "He is perhaps the ultimate human achievement: a sentient artificial lifeform -- self-aware, self-determining, possessing a mind and body far surpassing that of his makers, and imbued with the potential to evolve beyond the scope of his programming. Created by one of the most brilliant and eccentric intellects the Federation has ever known, the android Data has always believed he was unique, the one true fulfillment of a dream to create children of the mind.

But is he?

Investigating the mysterious destruction of a new android created by Starfleet, Data and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise uncover startling secrets stretching back to the galaxy's dim past. That knowledge is coveted by beings who will stop at nothing to control it, and will force Data to redefine himself as he learns the hidden history of artificial intelligence. " [A.I. is the central theme of novel. Refs. throughout, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2375 Ruteshouser, E. Cristy & Lynda Martinez Foley. "The Healing Arts " in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds II (Dean Wesley Smith, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 346. "The EMH... The doctor... " [Many references to the Doctor throughout story, apparently as a main character. Other refs. to the Doctor in other stories, as well as references to Data. Both Data and the Doctor are advanced artificial intelligences.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2375 Shatner, William; Judith Reeves-Stevens & Garfield Reeves-Stevens. Dark Victory (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2000; c. 1999) [Many refs. to the EMH, the Emergency Medical Hologram.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2376 Greenberger, Robert. Doors into Chaos (Star Trek: TNG / Gateways: Book 3 of 7). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 34. "'Opinion, Mr. Data.'

The gold-skinned android turned his head slightly and frowned. 'Sensors have detected identical readings in this system...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2378 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Nemesis. New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 22. "'...but I could not help wondering about the human capacity for expressing both pleasure and sadness simultaneously.'

'I understand why it would seem confusing,' Picard replied. To some, perhaps, Data's ingenuous yet perplexing questions might be cause for irritation, yet the captain had always been grateful them; they served to crystallize his own feelings, to make what was often unconscious conscious. 'Certain human rituals--like weddings, birthdays, or funerals--evoke strong and very complex emotions because they mark important transitions in our lives.'

Data tilted his head ever so slightly, a gesture that always accompanied his attempt to fathom humankind. 'They denote the passage of time.'

'More than that,' Picard elaborated... " [Data, an android, is a major character in the novel, as is B-4, his 'brother' -- an android of similar make.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2378 Dillard, J. M. Star Trek: Nemesis. New York: Pocket Books (2002); pg. 182. "As for his own loss of existence, Data [an artificial intelligence] felt no regret. Death held no mystery for him; he had been deactivated before, and knew it was simply nothingness. Unlike a living being, he needed fear no pain. Nor did he have any questions about an afterlife. For him, there would be none. "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2400 Felice, Cynthia. Double Nocturne. New York: Bluejay (1986), book jacket. [Year estimated.] "It was on the night of Double Nocturne that Tom Hark piloted his shuttle craft to an emergency landing during a storm... In the murk and swirl of that dark night he was trying to locate his crewmates... whose lander was already downed on the planet Islands under circumstances both mysterious and alarming. They had all been sent on what seemed a routine mission to replace the Artificial Intelligence left on the planet seventy-five years earlier. Decades ago the AI had failed; but war back on Homeworlds had delayed this mission until now. In the intervening time the colonies on this world, Islands, had become insular societies, unencumbered by the rational plan of governance and cultural development the defunct AI had carried. No one knew what strange influence the AI might have had on the colonies in the years of the machine's descent from intelligence to eventual brain death. " [Refs. throughout DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2450 Kato, Ken. Yamato II: The Way of the Warrior, Part 2. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 167. "The original solution to this problem was the nonbiosystem approach, giving rise to multitasking electromechanical ROBOTS. "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2500 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 205. Pg. 205: "...the headphones ordered Ranson as her AI found the frequency on which the major was broadcasting. "; Pg. 219: "...the display where holograms spelled words decoded by the vehicle's AI. " [Some other simple, utilitarian refs.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2500 Gardner, James Alan. Expendable. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 225. "'...You're a simulation, right? Probably the interface projection for an artificial intelligence that oversees this town. Computer-controlled and designed to relate to the first people who came here. To them, you must have looked like a wise old man . . . someone they'd naturally respect. But to me, you're evidence of the AI's imminent breakdown. Trying to reach me with language four millennia old...' "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2500 Leigh, Stephen. Dark Water's Embrace. New York: Avon (1998); pg. 10. Pg. 10: "'What?' Ghost asked. 'I'm a blind AI, remember?' "; Pg. 11: "'And she was your lead programmer, right? That explains a lot about you.' "; Pg. 135: "That uncertainty sent shivers through the matrix of fuzzy logic parameters that determined Ghost's personality. Gabriela's programming made him moderately contentious himself, so he could extract the maximum amount of information from those with whom he interacted, but try anger would cause dampers to engage, closing down relays. Ghost could feel those dampers fluctuating on the edge of activation now. " [Many refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2555 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 56. Pg. 56: "Sometime later, I realized the spacesuit must have picked up on what I'd said, giving instructions to the house AI, blending the re-creation of Philadelphia with something called Bringing Up Baby... "; Pg. 179: "One hundred twenty-two point-six-two-five years, said the library AI. " [More. Other refs., not in DB. AI does not appear to be prominent, or have personality in this novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2555 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 358. "Pasardeng said, 'Ah! Here's my little Reiko now!'

I turned, expecting a woman, maybe a little girl, translator AI whispering a reminder that rei-ko meant 'polite child' I Japanese, a very popular female name among the American colonials who'd built this world.

Yes, and you already told me that Pasardeng was a Filipino name, thought this blond, blue-eyed Viking who calls himself... " [More about Reiko, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 14. "'Do you know why people are leery of cybrids?' Hunt asked.

'Yes,' I said. 'Frankenstein monster syndrome. Fear of anything in human form that is not completely human. It's the real reason androids were outlawed, I suppose.' "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 77. "FORCE prided itself on using its own artificial intelligences, its own dataspheres and computing sources. he ostensible reason lay in the requirement to operate in the great spaces between Web worlds... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 45. Pg. 45: "'A freelance combat team from Zion made the insertion. Rongor battle robots, controlled from orbit. No chance the sybil could infect a sentient form. The expedition was under the guise of an archaeological mapping expedition. If the expedition had been compromised, the trail would have led back to Zion fundamentalists, seeking new weapons.' "
artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Burkett Jr., William R. Blood Lines. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 67. "'Ball the cynical observer. Do you know there are those among your admirers who consider you the very epitome of the ancient Japanese concept of the Zen robot? The sacred tool of civilization. The samurai's blade, the poet's quill. Of course you are much more. You are a sentient being--a consciousness. We modestly aspire here to one day raise our machines to that estate. In the endeavor, we adhere to Hasegawa's seven rules of robots, more complex and comprehensive than Asimov's three.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Egan, Greg. "Wang's Carpets " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 356. [Year estimated.] "The last flesh human had died long before Paolo was contructed, and aprt from the communities of Gleisner robots, Carter-Zimmmerman was about as conservative as a transhuman society could be. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Harrison, Harry. "Survival Planet " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 189. "'The Mosaic torpedo is a weapon of space war, in reality a robot-controlled spaceship. once directed it seeks out its target, defends itself if necessary, then destroys itself and the ship it has been launched against by starting the uncontrollable cycle of binding-energy breakdown.'

'I never realized that they were robot-operated,' Dall said. 'I thought robots had an ingrained resistance to killing people.'

'In-built rather than ingrained would be more accurate,' Stane said judiciously. 'Robotic brains are just highly developed machines with no inherent moral sense. That is added afterward. It has been a long time since we built man0shaped robots with human-type brains. This is the age of the specialist, and robots can specialize far better than man ever could. The Mosaic torpedo brains have no moral sense--if anything they are psychotic, overwhelmed by a death wish...' " [More.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Harrison, Harry. "The Mothballed Spaceship " in Stainless Steel Visions. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 64. [Year unknown.] "There was the miniature-flying-robot fiasco, where smaller and smaller robots were sent and blasted out of existence, right down to the smallest, about the size of a small coin. "
artificial intelligence galaxy 3000 Nagata, Linda. Deception Well. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 107. robot
artificial intelligence galaxy 3010 McDevitt, Jack. Infinity Beach. New York: HarperCollins (2000); pg. 62. "'Hello, Kim,' said her house AI. 'Can I be of assistance?'

'Yes. Have you heard anything this morning from Sheyel Tolliver?'

'No. Do you want me to alert you if something comes in?'

'Yes,' she said. 'Please do.'

'Anything else?' " [More. Other AI refs., not in DB, but not a major focus of novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "The androids removed the bisque bowls and returned with plates of carved fowl... "; Pg. 115: "'The Shrike?' It was the android who spoke. 'To my knowledge, in legend and the old records... "; Pg. 240: "I looked at her. 'Do you know a lot about androids?' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 241. "'Did Uncle Martin's poem explain the motivations of the Stables, Volatiles, and Ultimates?'

'More or less,' I said. 'It's hard to follow--the poem has Ummon and the other Core AIs speaking in Zen koans.'

Aenea nodded. 'That's about right.'

'According to the Cantos... the group of Core AIs known as the Stables wanted to keep being parasites on our human brains when we used the Web. The Volatiles wanted to wipe us out. And I guess the Ultimates didn't give much of a damn as long as they could keep working on the evolution of their own machine god . . . what'd they call it?'

'The UI,' said Aenea... 'The Ultimate Intelligence.' " [More.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 23. Pg. 23: "The android had baked a chocolate cake. Aenea's favorite... "; Pg. 24: "The autosurgeon on the dropship that had carried us through the farcaster from God's Grove had kept the android alive, but his chemistry had been sufficiently different to prevent the ship from growing him a new arm. " [Other refs., not in DB. Not a focus of the novel.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 60. "Cognani nodded. She understood the implicit suggestion: the illicit, Core-class AIs that the Mercantilus was developing could find the dataplume avenue and follow it to the Core. For almost three hundred years, the prime commandment enforced by the Church and Pax had been--Thou shalt not build a thinking machine equal or superior to humankind. 'AIs' in use within the Pax were more 'All-purpose Instruments' than 'Artificial Intelligences' of the kind that had evolved away from humanity almost a millennium earlier: idiot thinking machines like Isozaki's office AI or the cretinous ship computer on the de Soya's old ship... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 3300 Brin, David. Heaven's Reach. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. x. [Year is estimated.] "CAST OF CHARACTERS...

Niss--pseudosapient computer lent to Streaker by a Tymbrimi spy. " [At least one of the novel's characters is an artificial intelligence. Many refs. not in DB.]



artificial intelligence, continued

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