Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Eastern Orthodox, world

Eastern Orthodox, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Eastern Orthodox world 1054 C.E. Sanders, Winston P. "The Word to Space " (first published 1960) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 97. "As far as that goes, the schism between Catholic and Orthodox Churches in the early Middle Ages turned, in the last analysis, on one word in the Credo, filioque. Does the Holy Ghost proceed from the Father and the Son, or from the Father alone? You may think this is a trival question, but to a person who really believes his religion it is not. "
Eastern Orthodox world 1138 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 302. [An alternate history because the timeline has been changed.] "'Meanwhile, same as in our world, the Fourth Crusade dropped its original objective. It captured Constantinople, and installed a Latin King. The Orthodox Church was forcibly united with the Catholic.' "
Eastern Orthodox world 1838 Stirling, S.M. "The Charge of Lee's Brigade " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 82. "A gunner struck at him with a long ramrod, glaring, an Orthodox cross hanging on his naked hairy chest. "
Eastern Orthodox world 1965 Anderson, Poul. There Will Be Time. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1972); pg. 110. "He drew the sign of the cross, right to left in Orthodox style. 'In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. In the name of the Virgin Mary and every Saint, Come with me, at once, or you die.' "; Pg. 120: "'Hm, apropos religion, did she turn Catholic, or you go through the motions of conversion to Orthodoxy?' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Eastern Orthodox world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 206. "Sinan also made attempts to form an alliance with the Knights Templar, to drive both orthodox Christians and orthodox Moslems out of the arena... "
Eastern Orthodox world 1997 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 173. "...howls of despair--Catholic despair, Protestant despair, Eastern Orthodox, Jewish, Buddhist, atheist--shot from the semitrailers. "
Eastern Orthodox world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 38. "'Another thing,' Sam added. 'You guys have been working for a century or so to heal the rifts among other Christians. Imagine how the Protestants will feel if they see the Vatican getting special treatment from the World Court... how will the Swedes feel about it? Or the Orthodox Catholic in Greece and Russia and so on? Or the Southern Baptists?' "
Eblans world 1980 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 77. "'The Sumerians, the Egyptians, the Minoans, the Eblans, the Hittites, the Greeks, the Megalithic society--all the ancient peoples who know so much more than history has credited them with...' "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 52. [Passage from The Eco-Tech Dialogues] ". . . there being a god, that god must be worshiped. Worship means raising the god above the individual, and liturgies often make the point that the individual is less than nothing compared to the deity. If this is done, then, when the god is invoked, the individual has so little worshi that he or she may be sacrificed for the needs of the god. . .

And who speaks for the god? If all people do, then no one does, and there is no god. If the people accept a priesthood, or the equivalent, then those priests exercise whatever power that god's believers grant that god over them, and that elite may cause an individual to be worth less, to be exiled, or even to die or be killed. Yet such powers do not come from a deity. "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 52. [Passage from The Eco-Tech Dialogues] "In modern history and science, never has there been a verified occasion of a god appearing or demonstrating the powers ascribed throughout history to deities. Always, there is a prophet who speaks for the god. Why cannot the god speak? If a god is omnipotent, then the god can speak. If he cannot, then that god is not omnipotent. Often, the prophet says that a god will only speak to the chosen, the worthy.

Should a people accept a god who is either too powerless to speak, or too devious or too skeptical to appear? Or a god who will only accept those who swallow a faith laid out by a prophet who merely claims that deity exists--without proof? Yet people have done so, and have granted enormous powers to those who speak for god. "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 62. "'Actually, I picked you out before I could see the badge... You're the only one who looks like a rev.'

Trystin shrugged. 'Can't do much about genetics.'

'You from a long-term techie family?'

'Yes. One of the first on Perdya--believe it or not.' He hated explaining that despite his looks, he was a techie through and through with family links that went back to the foundation of the Eco-Tech Coalition.

'I believe it. It also explains why you survived those booby traps the revs sent... "; Pg. 63: "...most of the personnel on Mara had darker complexions than Trystin, not surprisingly, since the Eco-Tech heritage had been genetically mixed, to say the least. While he did not quite tower over the average Eco-Tech, at 195 centimeters he was taller than most... "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 95. "' . . . Desoll, Trystin, Lietenant, Service of the Ecological-Technocracy Coalition...' "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 101. "'You really don't believe in people, Trystin. You're just like the poor revs you killed, except you're better at it. We've made you better. You're an Eco-Tech with blind faith, supreme confidence, and great hard-wired abilities. Just like the revs, nothing shakes your faith. Not rows of bodies, not almost losing your leg, not the real probability of your own death.'...

'That's not fair.'

'It's more than fair. You believe in your ideals more than in people. What comfort will your ideals give you when you're finally broken by time and age, or by the revs--not that that will ever happen. You'll break yourself. No one else could.'

'Ezildya . . .'

'The grand and great [Eco-Tech] Coalition may need you, and your type, but I don't.' "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 112. "'I've run the numbers. Planets are big. But your basic point is valid. We've opted to populate based on an integrated, sustained, ecologically and technologically sound basis--and a lot smaller population... When will Mara be ready for initial air-breathing colonization?' "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 116. "Trystin looked at the carve sign that proclaimed Cambrian Academy.

'Knowledge . . . faith . . . power . . . and understanding.' He read the words on the four-pointed star logo under the name, recalling the words of the years-ago required readings from the original Eco-Tech Dialogues, not the more popular abridged versions.

'Without power, knowledge is useless. without knowledge, faith is tyranny. Without understanding, humanity is blind, and without all four, it is doomed.'

Of course, he reflected, no one had wanted to use such a negative statement publicly. So the Academy had come up with the four words and the four-pointed star--knowledge, faith, power, and understanding.

The polished blond wood of the sign looked the same as when Trystin had left the Academy almost a decade earlier, and probably no different from when his father had graduated. "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 129. "'The Revenants of the Prophet are the declared enemy of the [Eco-Tech] Coalition, but what raised that enmity? That enmity arises from fundamental cultural differences, and those differences arise from religion, from belief systems dating to antiquity . . . even from basic economic precepts . . . and from the Coalition's emphasis on rationality... the fundamental differences in beliefs between the Revenants... and most beliefs within the Coalition lie in two areas... few belief systems within the Coalition are so rigid as to exclude all possibility of entertaining other truths. Exclusivity is one factor . . . the second is the participation of a revealed God in the workings of life and the universe...' "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 212. [Passage from The Eco-Tech Dialogues] "'. . . As cultures advance in knowledge and power, the conflict between reason and faith becomes apparently greater. Not only have people attained through technology the powers of old gods to cast thunderbolts or to heal or to destroy, but they have exercised those powers and they know that divinity is not required. They can determine that sufficient power determines destiny.

The problem with technology is that it rewards the able while also empowering those who are less able. A man who cannot fathom a computer or an infonet can destroy those who can, and who have been rewarded for their skills. "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 212. [Passage from The Eco-Tech Dialogues] "Yet, if each individual obtains and wields the power within his or her scope, few individuals will survive. By placing power in a greater being, a deity, in some force greater than the individual, or even into a beleif that the community is greater than the individual, an individual is expressing a faith in the need for an entity greater than mere personal ambition or appetite. That faith . . . allows the individual to refrain from exercising power, yet it also places such an individual at the mercy of those without such faith.

While it can be and has been argued that all people are created equal, genetics and environmental analyses have verified that such equality ceases at birth, perhaps even earlier. "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 212. [Passage from The Eco-Tech Dialogues] "With unequal power and unequal ability the lot of humanity, religion has sought to establish a common ground by subsuming all to a mightier good, yet reason and technology have conspired to communicate that no such god exists--or that such a god does not interfere--and that some form of might makes right. And no god has, in recent historical times, destroyed the side with the bigger battalions and mightier technology.

So . . . how can a rational individual confront the problem of power? In the same way that all the faithful have throughout history--by sharing a set of ideals and a spirit of community more highly valued than individual application of power. . . . "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 213. "One of the cries of the true believer is that there are moral absolutes that can only be set forth by a deity. Yet if life is sacred, as many deities have proclaimed, how can a deity command people to kill in his name, as most deities have done? How can we even exist, since we must consume, in the natural state, some other organism, and that means killing? Likewise, if life is not sacred, then the injunction to be fruitful and multiply is a military command, not a deistic one. . . .

The Eco-Tech Dialogues
Prologue "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 222. "They were all isolated, when you got right down to it. In a strange way, the connection of the system nets and implants isolated Service officers more than their ancient predecessors. Allowing instant data access reduced the need for conflict, and the politeness and formality of the whole Eco-Tech culture made personal contacts so superficially smooth that most people didn't even see the isolation. "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 237. "...wondering why the Farhkans were asking about value differences between Eco-Techs and the Revenants. That implied they had studied both cultures... "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 255. "'...What's happening?'

...'What always happens. People are looking for someone to blame. Our [Eco-Tech Coalition's] heritage comes from two roups who always denied that they were part of the problem. The early ecologists blamed industrialization for environmental degredation even while they continued to purchase all the goods and services produced by industry. And the forerunners of the parashintos always looked down on and isolated strangers. Under pressure, people often revert to their roots, and the Coalition is under a lot of pressure.' "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 256. [This Eco-Tech character's discussion indicates some of the factions within the Eco-Tech Coalition.] "'No politician wants to admit that horror or our unwillingness to take the fight to them. So it's who hates the revs worse now. The Democratic Capitalists almost took the assembly in last month's election, and Fuseli is pushing for a total conversion to armament production. The Greens have held him off, but they're losing ground. I doubt that the new government will last another three months...' "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 267. "The initial Human Genome Project had been one of the factors leading to the Great Die-off, when the neo-Mahmets, the Revenants, the Eco-Techs, and the Argentis had united in their assaults on Newton and old Earth. "
Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 112-113. "'You're designed [by Eco-Tech] as the ultimate military and killing machine possible. I don't even want to know how many revs you've destroyed. Has it stopped them? We have perhaps ten thousand young people like you, and maybe a quarter of hose have the physiological strength to take full modifications. With our population, and the resources sunk in you, unless each of you kills thousands of revs, we lose every time a single Service member dies...

'You think we should black-glass Orum and every other rev planet?'

'No, that's the problem. What kind of people do we become if we do that? We become our enemies. That's something that goes through the entire Eco-Tech Dialogues, and yet each generation wants to forget it.'

'I don't see that.' Trystin bristled inside at the gentle rebuke. He'd read every page of the Dialogues. 'They haven't nuked us, and we're not considering that kind of barbarism.' "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 275-276. [Eco-Tech's camp for training agents to infiltrate Revenant culture.] "'This seems . . . rather elaborate. . . .'

Khalid shook his head, almost sadly. 'Most of those who are discovered by the Revenants give themselves away. The culture is structured, quietly xenophobic, and comprised of elaborate, sophisticated, and interlocking rituals. So is the Ecofreak [Eco-Tech] culture. Ecofreaks--that's right--Ecofreaks don't recognize that. Most cultures don't. They only recognize outsiders because they don't seem to fit. Our job is to make you fit. Is that clear?' "

Eco-Tech Coalition* galaxy 2800 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Parafaith War. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 52-53. "More ironically, as technologies have advanced, men and women have gained powers once ascribed to deities, yet deistic faiths always claim greater powers for their deities and appear to seek equally great controls over their followers, over those followers' finances, and at times even over their sexual habits and private lives . . . and many people have accepted such controls, even with enthusiasm . . .

The Eco-Tech Dialogues
Prologue "

Egyptian ancient religion California 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 171. Osiris; Horus [More, pg. 174.]
Egyptian ancient religion California 1972 Dick, Philip K. The Dark-Haired Girl. Willimantic, CT: Mark V. Ziesing (1988; c. 1972); pg. 24. "I never knew a hippy chick before who was wound up about science fiction; she rapped to me for hours about philosophy and god and flying saucers and the esoteric wisdom of the ancient Egyptians and into all of it she wove the thread of science fiction. "
Egyptian ancient religion California 1986 Bear, Greg. "Tangents " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1986); pg. 184. "'It would look like one of those Egyptian tings, but with three sides . . or like a box. It would look like a weird-shaped box, too, not square...' "
Egyptian ancient religion California 1995 Bonta, Vanna. Flight. San Diego, CA: Meridian House (1995); pg. 101. "'Onx,' she repeated. 'Where have I heard that?'

Mendle shrugged. 'It's the Egyptian symbol of eternal life,' he kiddingly misinformed her. "

Egyptian ancient religion California 1995 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 224. "'They've painted a big Egyptian Horus eye on the roof,' said her mother, pulling her along by the hand. 'Signaling to the sun god, Ra, he says. All the time Ra Ra Ra! But he blew his big play at Lake Mead on Easter, and nobody can pretend anymore that he's gonna be any kind of king.' "
Egyptian ancient religion California: Los Angeles 1993 Shiner, Lewis. Glimpses. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 205. "'Most of this stuff goes back to the Egyptians. They split the person into nine different 'vehicles'--body, mind, soul, spirit, shadow, heart, so forth and so on. Some of the distinctions are pretty fine. What we care about is the astral body, which is the ka, and the ba, which is the soul. The ba can live in either the physical body, the khat, or the ka. Am I going too fast?' " [More.]
Egyptian ancient religion California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 182. "Kootie's parents had told him all about Rama and Koot Hoomie and Zorro-Aster and Jiddu Krishnamurti... and the doings of various Egyptian holy men. "
Egyptian ancient religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 264. "'...He died as Jesus and as Osiris and as Tammuz and as a dozen others...' "
Egyptian ancient religion California: Los Angeles 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 69-70. "'...The Babylonians still worship Ishtar? Substitute worship of the Virgin Mary. Egyptians believe that Osiris rose from the dead? Have Ya-Zeus do the same.'

Golding seemed to be warming up again. He began to spit out snippets of historicity as if they were theological watermelon seeds. The outcome was about as intellectually tidy.

'...The story of Christ is a slipshod retelling of the Mithras and Osiris legends...' "

Egyptian ancient religion Deep Space 9 2371 Carey, Diane. Station Rage (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 16. "'Are they mummified?'

'You mean like the pharaohs?'

'I mean, has anything been done to the bodies after death, like the blood drained or anything put in there.' "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -2000 B.C.E. Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 29. [Year estimated.] "...Saturn, whose exploits on Earth were legion. Although Saturn had a good many minor failures, failure never came the same way twice; and after all, he had done quite well on occasion.

Saturn got the best of a young Egyptian pharaoh, for example. He promised that if the boy destroyed all records and memory of his monotheist predecessor Ikhnaton, then the boy-king would have gold and treasure beyond his greatest dreams; and that treasure would be with him longer than any other pharaoh. True, the tomb of King Tutankhamen remained free of looters until the year 1911; but the boy had died at nineteen, and Saturn saw to it that the treasure remained with Tut's body, not his soul. "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1647 B.C.E. Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 1-3. [The prologue of the novel is set in an ancient Egyptian temple, and deals extensively with ancient Egyptian religion. There are other reference in the novel to this as well, and the central premise of a woman obtaining the powers of a mystical cat ties back to this.] Pg. 1: Midnight is alive.

Her eyes glow green-gold as emeralds, brilliant as the chips of malachite winking from the eye sockets of the statues in the temple around her. Each one sits as Midnight sits, small pointed ears erect, tail curled. But the statues' tails do not twitch with expectation, as Midnight's tail does, and the statues' eyes to not follow the movements of the young woman in the temple, the priestess who serves Bast; the priestess who serves Midnight. [More.]

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1647 B.C.E. Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 2. ...not disguised by the woman's perfumes, and is not hidden by the supple linen folds of her ritual garment, more a shroud than a robe.

"O Bast, O Akh, O Luminous One, " the womn chants softly. "O grant me refuge when leaving this world I enter yours. O grant me refuge, and safety, and peace, O Bast. "

Midnight watches, and waits.

The priestess knows the cat is there. It is a Mau, the feline most sacred to Bast. Its ancestors are the delicate-featured, sinewy cats that stalk the wild places surrounding the ancient river delta.

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1647 B.C.E. Hand, Elizabeth. Catwoman. New York: Ballantine (2004). Based on screenplay by John Rogers, Mike Ferris, and John Brancato; pg. 3. Do not fear, the goddess says, though the priestess hears only a cat's low, urgent growl. Do not fear, daughter. . . .The embroidered hangings at the entrance to the temple are pulled aside, slowly, respectfully. The acolyte are there; they bow their heads as the priestess passes between them, her head held hight, the cat gazing with glittering green eyes from the woman's arms.

Do not fear, daughter, the goddess says again, as the ebony black cat purrs throatilly, its fur warming the priestess's icy hands. Fear no man, fear no death, not while I am within your grasp. . . .

Outside, the full moon hangs... above the gleaming white expanse of the altar where the high priest awaits. It is midnight now. As a priestess approaches the altar, the avatar of the goddess purring softly in her arms, she is suddenly no longer afraid.

Because Midnight is immortal, as is Bast. And the cat-goddess shares her gifts with those who trust her... and waits to be reborn.

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1500 B.C.E. Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 76. [Year estimated.] "What if the Israelites, captured so long ago by the Assyrian... Like the children of Israel enslaved by Pharaoh. And what if, like the children of Israel, they had managed to engineer a mass exodus under divine guidance? "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1500 B.C.E. Hubbard, L. Ron. "Art vs. Eats " in Writers of the Future: Volume XV (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1999); pg. 37. [Year estimated.] "Not it so happens that this argument started long before two of the Pharaoh's chief poets fanned it into the raging flame which has carried it so far down the ages. On one hand there is the fellow who consoles himself with the thought that his work, unread, is too great; and on the other, the man who says that though his work is not great, it is widely read. "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -1000 B.C.E. Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 259. [Year estimated.] "There was the wonderful story of the Old Earth pharaoh--was it Cheops?--who authorized his huge pyramid, agreed to the burial chamber being deep under the center of the thing, and then lay awake nights for years in a claustrophobic panic, thinking of all those tons of stone above him for all eternity. Eventually the pharaoh ordered the burial chamber repositioned two thirds the way up the great pyramid. Most unorthodox... According to the sensors, the Sphinx had suddenly grown a dozen new chambers... "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -500 B.C.E. Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 25. "'...Perhaps he believed himself a god-king, as the Pharaohs of Egypt had; perhaps that is why he borrowed from them the image of the Sphinx, guarding the entance to his palace.' "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt -200 B.C.E. Long, Karawynn. "And Make Death Proud to Take Us " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 59. [Year estimated.] "But oh, to take that sort of chance, knowing that if she [Cleopatra] failed the outcome would be so much worse--her own humiliation and death at the hands of the Romans, and nothing but despair and ruin left for Egypt. Octavious would bleed her country dry to support his own, replace Egyptian laws and gods with Roman ones. "; Pg. 61: "But then why not just wait until he could get her safely into Rome? He must still believe she was a threat to him. Was it her popularity? Her divinity? No, because Octavius had always been quite vocal in his contempt for Egyptian gods. " [Other refs. not in DB, although focus of story is political, not religious. See also entries under 'Isis worship.']
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 25 C.E. Nelson, Ray. "Time Travel for Pedestrians " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 155. "'...Like Buddha, Jesus was born an earthly ruler, but renounced earthly rule for the other kingdom, that is not of this world. He was a student, not of one religion, but of them all, for that is what it means to be raised in Alexandria, where every god in the universe has at least one follower. From the Buddhist Theraputae by the lake He learned monasticism and meditation, from the Rabbi the whole of Jewish law and tradition, and from the shaven-headed priests of Osirus He learned how a man can save his soul by identification with a sacrificial god, and it was from them, too, that He learned baptism and the wearing of the Cross of Life. "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 11. "'You know our gods are gone. They reside now in the Tuaut, the underworld, the gates of which have been held shut for eighteen centuries by some pressure I do not understand but which I am sure is linked with Christianity. Anubis is the god of that world and the gates, but has no longer any form in which to appear here... There is a spell... in the Book of Thoth, which is an invocation to Anubis to take possession of the sorcerer. This will allow the god to take physical form--yours. And as you are speaking that spell you will simultaneously be writing another, a magic I myself have composed that is calculated to open new gates between the two worlds--gates that shall pierce not only the wall of death but also the wall of time... the gods of Egypt will burst out in modern England. The living Osiris and the Ra of the morning sky will dash the Christian churches to rubble, Horus and Khonsu will disperse all current wars by their own transcendent force...' "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 154. "The torches in the temple burned slowly, steadily, occasionally flickering when someone passed by. Their light illuminated the faces of the people gathered in a small antechamber off the main hall. They were all present, those who looked like ordinary people, and the others who were extraordinary: the cat woman, the jackal-headed man, those with wings, crocodile skin, and bird heads.

Osiris the far-seer spoke. 'The winged one comes.'

'Is she one of us?'

'Will she help us?'

'Not directly,' Osiris answered. 'But within her is that which we will have the power to do great things. For now we must wait.'

'We have waited a very long time,' said Anubis the jackal. 'A little longer will not make a difference.'

The others murmured in agreement. The living gods settled back to patiently wait. " [Many other refs. throughout story, pg. 154-184, to ancient Egyptian religion, which in the story is being actively practiced in Egypt in contemporary times.]

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 154. Pg. 154: "The room in Luxor's Winter Palace Hotel was sweltering... "; Pg. 155: "'Josh, Father Squid, Hiram, and I are going to catch the afternoon ceremony at the Temple of the Living Gods. Want to come along?' "; Pg. 160: "...a high wall that surrounded several acres of desert that was the Temple of the Living Gods... 'Because of Nur,' explained Ahmed, pointing to the line of tourists waiting to enter the temple grounds... " [Many other refs. to this place, not in DB.]
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 161. "'Can you give us some background on the temple?' Peregrine asked.

'Certainly,' Kemel replied as they followed him. 'The Port Said wild card epidemic of 1948 caused many 'mutations,' I believe they've called them, among them of course, the celebrated Nasr-Al Haziz, Khof, and other great heroes of past years. Many men of Luxor were working on the Said docks at the time and were also affected by the virus. Some passed it on to their children and grandchildren.

'The true meaning of these mutations struck me over a decade ago when I saw a young boy make clouds drop much-needed rain over his father's fields, I realized that he was an incarnation of Min, the ancient god of crops, and that his presence was a harbinger of the old religion.

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 162. "'I was an archaeologist then and had just discovered an intact temple complex... beneath the ground right where we stand. I convinced Min of his destiny and found others to join us: Osiris, a man pronounced dead who returned to life with visions of the future; Anubis, Taurt, Thoth . . . Through the years they have all come to the Temple of the Living Gods to listen to the prayers of their petitioners and perform miracles.'

'What kind of miracles?' Peregrine asked.

'Many kinds. For example, if a woman with child is having a difficult time, she will pray to Taurt, goddess of pregnancy and childbirth. Taurt will assure that all will be fine. And it will be. Thoth settled disputes, knowing who tells the truth and who lies. Min, as I have said, can make it rain. Osiris sees bits of the future. It's all quite simple.'

'I see.' Kemel's claims seemed reasonable, given the abilities that Peregrine knew the virus could waken in people. "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 162. "'How many gods are there?'

'Perhaps twenty-five. Some cannot really do anything,' Kemel said in confiding tones. 'They are what you call jokers. However, they look like the old gods--Bast, for example, is covered with fur and claws--and they give great comfort to the people who come to pray for them. But see for yourselves. The ceremony is almost ready to begin.

He led them past groups of tourists posing next to statues of the gods, booths that sold everything from Kodak film, key rings, and Coca-Cola to replicas of antique jewelry and little statuettes of the gods themselves. They went past the booths, through a narrow doorway into a sandstone block wall... The stairwell was beautifully decorated with bas-relief carvings of everyday life in ancient Egypt, intricately detailed hieroglyphic inscriptions, and representations of animals, birds, gods, and goddesses...

'everything here is just as it was when I discovered it 20 years ago...' "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 163. "It didn't take long for the amphitheater to fill. The lights dimmed and the theater became silent. A spotlight shone on the stage, strange music that sounded as old and eerie as the temple itself softly played, and the procession of the living gods began. There was Osiris, the god of death and resurrection, and his consort Isis. Behind him came Hapi, carrying a golden standard. Thoth, the ibis-headed judge, followed with his pet baboon. Shu and Tefnut, brother and sister, god and goddess of the air, floated above the floor. Sobek followed them with his dark, cracked crocodile skin and snoutlike mouth. Hathor, the great mother, had the horns of a cow. Bast, the cat-goddess, moved delicately, her face and body covered with tawny fur, claws protruding from her fingers. Min looked like an ordinary man, but a small cloud hovered above him, following him like an obedient puppy... Anubis, the god of the underworld, had the head of a jackal. Horus had falconlike wings. . . . "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 163. "There was Osiris, the god of death and resurrection, and his consort Isis. " [Other refs. not in DB, but many listed under 'Egyptian ancient state religion.]
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1986 Gerstner-Miller, Gail. "Down by the Nile " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 176. Pg. 176: "Min was there, and bearded Osiris, bird-headed Thoth, and the floating brother and sister, as were Anubis and Isis and a dozen others whose names Peregrine couldn't remember. "; Pg. 177: "As she joined them, she heard him ask Anubis about the threat of Nur. Father Squid was close by, discussing theology with Osiris.

'The gods will protect us,' replied Anubis, lifting his eyes upward. 'And from what I understand, security around the temple has been strengthened.' "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 97. "'Speaking of Akhenaten, the Egyptians were big on dreams,' he said. 'They wrote them down, hired soothsayers to interpret them, believed their dreams could predict the future. There might be something... No, I doubt if there'd by anything on Akhenaten's dreams. The next pharaoh who came along, Ramses, wiped out just about every trace of him...' " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 241. "'...the history of the human species.'

It was history, beginning with the Egyptians' first encounter with the fertile Nile valley.

But there had never been a history lesson like it. Victor cited intimate habits and obscure customs--small details that rang true to the ancient Egyptians. The flood of facts--tiny bits and pieces that clearly were real--overwhelmed Aaronson. He found himself wondering why history had missed so much... Victor described incidents from Egyptian, Babylonian, and Roman times... "

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 114. "In 1981, UNESCO named the Burgees Pass its eighty-sixth World Heritage site, in the same class as the pyramids of Egypt and the Grand Canyon. "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 47. "...by early the next day, there were eight other extraterrestrials... on Earth, all of them Forhilnors... A fifth was in Egypt, joining an archeological dig near Abu Simbel. "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 3. Pg. 3: "Silence. The Egyptian mummy did not twitch.

She stood propped in a dark corner like an ancient dried plum tree, or an abandoned and scorched ironing board, her hands and wrists trussed across her dry riverbed bosom, a captive of time, her eyes slits of deep blue lapis lazuli behind thread-sewn lids, a glitter of remembrance as her mouth, with a shriveled tongue wormed in it, whistled and sighed and whispered to recall every hour of every lost night four thousand years back when she was a pharaoh's daughter dressed in spider linens and warm-breath silks with jewels burning her wrists as she ran in the marble gardens to watch the pyramids in the fiery Egyptian air. "; Pg. 137: Isis; Osirus; Bubastis; Ra (also pg. 138) [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 195. "In Egypt a felinoid being landing from a saucer was identified as the benign goddess Bast by an expatriate British theosophist, and the cult of cat-worship got off to a new beginning. According to the theosophist, the Wanderer itself was Bast's destructive twin: Sekhet, the Eye of Ra. "
Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "'Behold the Sphinx,' said Red Wig, gesturing toward an etching on the far wall, 'whose speech alternates between long periods of silence and an occasional riddle. Old as time. Highly respected. Doubtless senile. She keeps her mouth shut and waits. For what? Who knows?...' "; Pg. 54: "'Why, they're dismantling the great pyramid of Cheops,' I said.

After a time Red Wig asked it.

'Why?'

'Wel now,' I told her, 'they're kind of short on building materials hereabouts, the stuff from Old Cairo being radioactive... ";

Pg. 56: "We turned again toward the great 90 percent pyramid of Cheops/Khufu...

After a moment, 'I'll see Sakkara ahead of schedule, then,' he mused. 'You haven't begun dismantling all the monuments of Luxor, Karnak, and the Valley of Kings yet, have you?'

'Not yet, on.' " [Much more material on this subject, pg. 52-56. Some elsewhere.]

Egyptian ancient religion Egypt 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 60. Pg. 60: "We had flown them to a place I knew of and left them there under Office guard, renting the felucca for our trip--which parallled the King-God's journey from Karnak to Luxor. "; Pg. 74-75: "I was glad I was leaving Egypt, with its must and its dust and its dead, half-animal deities. "


Egyptian ancient religion, continued

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