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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Disney, USA

Disney, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Disney Utah 2000 Budrys, Algis (ed.) L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000); pg. 155. [Intro to illustrator, story "Recalling Cinderella "] "Darren J. Albertson was a winner in the Illustrators of the Future Contest in 1991... He has gone on to... he sculpts relief images used for coin collectibles for clients like The Beatles, Yellow Submarine, The Grateful Dead and for various Disney characters and products...

Darren resides in Provo, Utah, with his wife, Cindy, and their five children, who are currently in search of their dream home and his dream studio. "

Disney Vietnam 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 325. "It caught his eye for a moment, looking almost manmade, of painted concrete and plaster, like a hill at Disneyland. But it was too ugly for Disneyland, not picturesquely ugly like a haunted castle or a romantic crag, but naturally ugly... "
Disney Virginia 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 301. "Disney coloring book "
Disney Washington, D.C. 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 143. "Aside from work, Malatesta seldom left home without his wife on his arm, a miniature human being four foot eight or nine, who minced along on huge high heels. Amari referred to her as 'Minnie Mouse,' and Minnie Mouse was omnipresent... " [More refs. to her as Minnie.]
Disney West Bank 2015 Willis, Connie. "Even the Queen " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1992); pg. 86. "'Karen went back to Iraq, didn't she?' I asked Bysshe.

'Yeah,' he said. 'Viola said there was some snag over whether to put Disneyland on the West Bank or not.' "

Disney world 1347 C.E. Tepper, Sheri S. Beauty. New York: Doubleday (1991); pg. 312. Pg. 312: "'She looks almost like she's asleep, Beauty. Very pale, but not . . . you know, not rotted or anything. They've put her in a kind of case, so nothing will chew on her. I don't think she's dead.'

Giles had never seen Disney. This time I did get up.

'I want to see for myself,' I said... ";

Pg. 313: "She was dressed very simply, in a full white shift with puffy sleeves and a kind of laced bodice over it. Disney had got that part right. " [More, pg. 316.]

Disney world 1940 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: In the Balance. New York: Ballantine (1994); pg. 433. "'...First saw those out around Shabbona. You step on one, you'll walk like Peg-Leg Pete in the Disney cartoons the rest of your life.' "
Disney world 1943 Rand, Ayn. Fountainhead. New York: Penguin (1993; c. 1943); pg. 232. Pg. 232: "'...Nothing's really sacred but a sense of humor. Still, I've always loved the tale of Tristan and Isolde. It's the most beautiful story ever told--next to that of Mickey and Minnie Mouse.' "; Pg. 239: "He thought that they were walking there like Mickey and Minnie Mouse and that they probably appeared ridiculous to the passers-by. "
Disney world 1944 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Striking the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 193. "Some of the animation and trick photography the Lizard instructor used to get his point across far outdistanced anything the Disney people had done so far in Snow White or Fantasia. He wondered how they'd managed several of the effects. "
Disney world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 25. "...and Count Dracula and His Brides were giving forth a rage-rock version of an old Walt Disney cartoon song... "
Disney world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 42. "It's like one of those Walt Disney films where you watch a plant growing before your eyes and the whole cycle from bud to fruit takes about two minutes. "
Disney world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 48. "'...When you're actually dealing with these figures, the only safe, pragmatic and operational approach is to treat them as having a being, a will, and a purpose entirely apart from the humans who evoke them. If the Sorcerer's Apprentice had understood that, he wouldn't have gotten into so much trouble.' "; Pg. 152: "I'm approaching it from the outside, and it's just as big as I think it is. Even if it doesn't go anywhere and this is all happening in Disney World. "
Disney world 1982 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in Dragon Tales. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 13. "On the other hand, the gift of nonexistence is this: We can, if we wish, make our dragons bumbling, well-meaning creatures, or even entirely kindly. There is Walt Disney's Pete's Dragon, in which the dragon is rather an overgrown puppydog; and The Reluctant Dragon, which only wants to be left in peace; and the altogether kindly and ill-used Puff, the Magic Dragon of the affecting ballad. "
Disney world 1983 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 68. "...piped a weird high voice like Mickey Mouse's. "
Disney world 1991 Tepper, Sheri S. Beauty. New York: Doubleday (1991); pg. 230. "'What is this?' I demanded, half hysterically. 'I've been in the twentieth, Puck. I've read books. I've seen Disney, for the love of God. I know the Cinderella story. What is this?'

'Did you think the stories were made up?' he asked me. 'Did you think there was no real Beauty, no real Cinderella, no real Goldilocks or Rose Red or . . .'

'But why me? Why my daughter?' "

Disney world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 279. "'Another tram.' Brink swore softly. 'How exciting. Perhaps this tunnel terminates in Orlando. The Cape or Disney World, I would not care...' "
Disney world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 38. "He drew the draperies on the bay and the glittering, Disneylandish conglomeration of shops and restaurants called Seaport Village. "
Disney world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 158. "'A lot like Ayers Rock, only smaller... It's less convincing than the cinder cone in Death Valley. Frankly, I wouldn't have been surprised to find it at Disney World.' "
Disney world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 31. "Wherever he walked, the wind dropped before him. Like the wizard calming the brooms and buckets in the Sorcerer's Apprentice sequence in Fantasia. Which cast me, of course, as Mickey Mouse. "
Disney world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 204. "Back out in Nassau Street, the Disneyland Gothic of the university facing us, Steve announced that we would go on a walk all around campus. "
Disney world 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 371. "'I hear there are rock climbers on El Capitan.'

'Hot damn. Just like Disneyland.' "

Disney world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 90. Pg. 90: Mickey Mouse wristwatches; Pg. 145: "She [Mary Baker Eddy] was, however, a dynamite franchiser, who oversaw her expanding empire with the jealousy of Jehovah and the merchandising skills of Walt Disney. " [Also pg. 52.]
Disney world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 98. "...now that Ronnie's Evil Empire [U.S.S.R.] has a GNP a little less than Disney Corp. "
Disney world 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 301. "'There is a degradation with the process; although the technique is as safe as a general anesthetic over periods of up to four years, we have never successfully revived anyone after more than ten years in cyrofreeze [sic]. It is a convenience for traveling, not a way of moving into the future.'

Ah, well; I never quite saw myself following Walt Disney's frosty footsteps, anyway. "

Disney world 2003 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 132. "The favorite explanation seemed to be that entertainment had been so violent for so long that these kids thought an opportunity to go somewhere and commit random mayhem was better than Disneyland. Everyone denounced them but because almost all of them were anti-Sov and doing a lot of random damage in the Soviet-controlled areas, the West had one little to curb them. "
Disney world 2008 McDonald, Ian. Evolution's Shore. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1995); pg. 231. Pg. 231: "Seven of us. I'm sorry. Once it got into my head, it just wouldn't go away. How could you resist the temptation to sing 'Heigh-ho,' heigh-ho'? " [Reference to the song from the Academy Award-nominated score of Snow White and Seven Dwarves, written by composer Leigh Harline.]; Pg. 232: "We follow the narrow twining watercourse through a Disneyland of kitchen paraphernalia. "; Pg. 388: Magic Mountain
Disney world 2010 Swanwick, Michael. "The Edge of the World " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1989); pg. 652. "Staring at the great fat boojum snark of a moon she felt the flow of potential worlds... sensed the invisible presence of Rus's primitive monks... vibrated with power, existing as matrices of patterned stress, no more actual than Donald Duck, but no less powerful either. "
Disney world 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 211. "The decor for the interior of the world's only deep-diving tourist submarine had been borrowed straight from Disney's classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. "
Disney world 2015 Willis, Connie. "Even the Queen " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1992); pg. 83-84. "'When I got my period, I asked my mother if Annette had it, too.'

'Who's Annette?' Twidge said.

'A Mouseketeer,' Mother said... 'On TV.'

'High-rez,' Viola said.

'The Mickey Mouse Club,' Mother said.

'There was a high-rezzer called the Mickey Mouse Club?' Twidge said incredulously.

'They were days of dark oppression in many ways,' I said.

Mother glared at me. 'Annette was every young girl's ideal,' she said to Twidge. 'Her hair was curly, she had actual breasts, her pleated skirt was always pressed, and I could not imagine that she could have anything so messy and undignified. Mr. Disney would never have allowed it. And if Annette didn't have one, I wasn't going to have one either...' "

Disney world 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 94. "'It's not like the Warsaw Pact, before openness,' continued Andrei... 'Our island is more like little OPEC country--Kuwait, Abu Dhabi. . . . Too much easy money eats the social values, makes life like Disneyland, all fat Cadillacs and the cartoon mouses . . . empty, meaningless.' "
Disney world 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 222. "Like little independent consciences, like so many copies of Pinocchio's Jiminy Cricket, control chips are forever alert for wrongdoing. "
Disney world 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 375. "Her image appeared on the wallscreen at the end of the conference table, floating above their heads like the magic mirror in Snow White. "
Disney world 2040 Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood's End. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1981; c. 1953); pg. 146. "But it was in the art of the cartoon film, with its limitless possibilities, that New Athens had made its most successful experiments. The hundred years since the time of Disney had still left much undone in this most flexible of all mediums. "
Disney world 2048 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 211. "'It's a small world after all' was the trigger phrase. We'd used some of Murphy's memeware and built a binary chaser for each of us. When one of us said 'It's a small world after all,' normally it activated an old Disney meme that both of us were carrying, followed by a simple chaser to turn it back off. The whole process of calling it up and getting rid of it took a tenth of a second at most. But if there were a new meme in either of our heads... "
Disney world 2050 Carr, Carol. "Look, You Think You've Got Troubles " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1969); pg. 205. "His ears are adorable. Remember Dumbo the Elephant? Only a little smaller--I never exaggerate, even for effect. "
Disney world 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 38. "A few carefully chosen terminally ill children are scanned and resurrected every year: better than a trip to Disney World. There's discreet sponsorship of a sitcom about working-class Copies, which makes the whole idea less threatening. "
Disney world 2050 Egan, Greg. Permutation City. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 57. "'They want me, physically. It's a prestige thing. Every Mickey Mouse university can plug into the networks and bring a dozen lecturers from around the world--'

'That's not Mickey Mouse, it's efficient.'

'Cheap and efficient. This place doesn't want to be cheap. They want a piece of exotic cultural decoration...' "

Disney world 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 43. " . . . falling, merciful Heaven I'm falling into the pit!

He wrenched his body around in blind terror, flailing for something besides empty air. The laserflare jumped from his grasp. For a split second, suspended in slow motion, he watched it fall . . . and fall . . . and fall . . . down into the man of a gaping abyss, like Gepeto's lantern hurtling into the belly of the whale. " ['Disney' is a new category in the literature DB, first used 16 July 2000. There are likely un-indexed refs. in previously indexed books.]

Disney world 2075 Dick, Philip K. "What the Dead Men Say " in The Preserving Machine. New York: Ace Books (1969; c. 1964); pg. 242. "'To quote Thumper Rabbit,' Sarah Belle said, smiling gently, ' 'if you can't say nothing good, don't say nothing at all.' ' She added, 'From Bambi, an old film classic. If you attended the lectures at the Museum of Modern Art with me every Monday night--' "
Disney world 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 27. "Disney and grief are more potent to immortals than 'phems, they say; a lot of drugs affect us differently. "
Disney world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 18. "A change of climate was the simplest and most obvious answer, and had inspired one classic work of art--the brilliant 'Rite of Spring' sequence in Walt Disney's masterpiece Fantasia. "
Disney world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 96. Stein laughed contemptuously. 'And how you gonna mine the stuff? Draft Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs? The nearest coal's gotta be a hundred kloms north...' "
Disney world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 142. "Felice frowned. 'That could be. It would need a sophisticated technology to manufacture things like that. And so far, this outfit looks damn Mickey Mouse...' "
Dogon Africa 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 148. "George leaned forward. 'The Dogon.'

'What?'

'An African tribe. They knew about the existence of the companion star of Sirius before European astronomers. They had contact with space aliens before recorded history.'

'I think I heard about it.' Burdock adjusted his glasses. 'But didn't some astronomer explain how they knew?'

'He had to twist the facts more than HCR ever did. And what we ran was just the tip of the iceberg...'

'Wouldn't these Africans have more details?'

'Not if the aliens erased all details from their memories.'

'Why would advanced aliens contact a primitive tribe?'

'Who's to say what an alien would consider advanced? The Dogon are a stable hunter-gatherer society. They have no crime. They're in balance with their environment. NO poverty, no psychosis, no social maladjustment. It might seem to an alien that they were the most advanced society on earth. Especially if the aliens were black.' "

Dogon Mali 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 510. "It was labeled, simply, 'Dogon Artifact.'...

'Hello,' he said. 'I am Ajabwe. I come from Mali in Africa. My people, a great people, are the Dogon.' He paused. 'The legend says that many years ago my people were visited by a strange folk, who came from another star. It was said that they traveled in search of those who could understand, and that only a very small number of people could understand the gift that they offered. They said that they traveled in search of the few who had this, and when the found it, they would leave one of the Orbs with which they were entrusted. I do not know if the story is true, or how much of it is true--but it is said that these people either represented, or called themselves the Prophets.' " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Dogon Mali 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 78. "'Well, there's a tribe in Africa called the Dogon--'

'Where?' Jenny asked.

'The Mali Republic. They have a legend that is a little difficult to explain.'

'What's that?' Benny asked.

'Well, the story is that thousands of years ago, their ancestors were visited by creatures from another star. Apparently, there was some kind of exchange between them, and the aliens were said to have left something behind.'

'Something like what?'

'Well . . . it's only been in the exhibition for a couple of days at this point, like I said, the exhibit is new--but in the paper they said that it looked kind of like a crystal hourglass [a Bajoran orb]. He won't let anyone look at it more closely, so no one knows quite what to make of it, but I think it's a real cultural artifact.' "

Dogon New York: New York City 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 100. [World' Fair] "...where he finally found the exhibit from the Mali Republic. It was labeled, simply, 'Dogon Artifact.'

There was a curtain across an alcove, and an irregular radiance pulsing from about it. A withered little black man sat on a stool, looking out at them as if doing a mental count, as if he was hoarding his remaining life energy, waiting for a critical mass of bodies to arrive before beginning his spiel... "

Dogon New York: New York City 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 101. [World' Fair] "'Hello,' he said. 'I am Ajabwe. I come from Mali in Africa. My people, a great people, are the Dogon.' He paused. 'The legend says that many years ago my people were visited by a strange folk, who came from another star. It was said that they traveled in search of those who could understand, and that only a very small number of people could understand the gift that they offered. They said that they traveled in search of the few who had this, and when they found it, they would leave one of the Orbs with which they were entrusted. I do not know if the story is true, or how much of it is true--but it is said that these people either represented, or called themselves the Prophets.' He looked out at them, and Benny had to admit that his smile was a little unnerving.

'Perhaps one of you will be a Chosen One.' " [More about the Dogon presentation of the Bajoran Orb, pg. 101-103, 130, 171-173.]

Dogon New York: New York City 1940 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 130. "Except for the Dogon exhibit. For some reason, he couldn't quite remember anything connected with it, and barely recalled that he had gone there at all. "
Dogon New York: New York City 1953 Barnes, Steven. Far Beyond the Stars (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1998); pg. 94. "...a varied collection of native African artifacts... Hung on his living room wall to the right of his desk was a Dogon door, barrier against evil spirits. A Zulu medicine mask graced the wall nearby, and another Dogon artifact, a burial urn shaped like a bird, sat somberly on a kitchen shelf. "
Dogon Sudan 1971 Dick, Philip K. Valis. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 52. Pg. 52: "'Then you believe that the Dogon people of the western Sudan are the source of Christianity.'

'They use the fish sign,' Fat said. 'For Nommo, the benign twin.' "; Pg. 90: Dogon tribe [Also pg. 158-159, 225.]

Donatists Africa 316 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 300. Pg. 300-301: "Now he was Emperor, with the power to enforce his will, unable to understand why the quarreling Christian factions to whom he had granted his favor still clung to their enmities. The Donatists of Africa and the followers of the Egyptian Arius elsewhere were being slandered by the Orthodox with more energy than they spent on the pagans, and giving as good as they got. "
Donmeh world 1990 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 101-102. "I had dipped into records of past prophets during my Earth research. Zarathustra. Jesus. Mohammed. Shabbetai Tzevi, the seventeenth-century Turkish Jew who had claimed to be Messiah, and who in the end had apostatized and become a Moslem. Al Mahdi, who had defeated the British at Khartoum... "
Doukhobors British Columbia 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 58. "Five hundred Doukhobors stripped themselves mother-naked, burned their homes, and marched on Vancouver. "
Doukhobors galaxy 2732 Simmons, Dan. Hyperion. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 117. "...they had entered a rarely used stretch of the hoolie north of Doukhobor's Copse. " [Refers to a geographical location.]
Doukhobors galaxy 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 222. "Sunrise found him below the village of Doukhobor's Copse, almost to the Karla Locks, where the Royal Transport Canal cut west toward the northern urban settlements and the Maine. "
Dravidian India -445 B.C.E. Vidal, Gore. Creation. New York: Random House (1981); pg. 150. Pg. 150: "We found the village people to be shy but kindly. According to Caraka, the country folk are of the old pre-Aryan stock, while the cities are the homes of the Aryan invaders. The two groups seldom mingle.

'It is the same here,' said Caraka, 'as in the Dravidian south.' ";

Pg. 151: "We were received in the vice-regal palace of the viceroy of Varanasi. Although dark as a Dravidian, he belonged to the Aryan warrior class. "; Pg. 154: "...he liked to claim he was a worshiper of Naga, the Dravidian snake god upon whose coils rests the world. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Dravidian India 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 227. "No tigers in Africa, Hartmann. The story of little black Sambo comes from Dravidian India. "
Dravidian India 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 205. "'...All this is probably some vaguely remembered account of the Aryan invastion that pushed the Dravidians, my ancestors, to the south...' "
Dravidian world 2106 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 58. "An ethnic assay of the travelers showed significant numbers of Anglo-Saons, Celts, Germans, Slavs, Latins, Native Americans, Arabs, Turks and other Central Asiatics, and Japanese... Inuit and Polynesian peoples were attracted by the Pliocene world; Chinese and Indo-Dravidians were not. "
Drej* galaxy 3029 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 2. "New Marrakech, like most Drifter colonies, had been formed by the fortunate Humans who escaped before the bloodthirsty Drej Mothership had blown up Earth. The energy-based aliens gave no reason for attacking humanity, and very little warning. And, after basting the planet to rubble, the Drej had disappeared again, going dormant to recuperate after such an exhausting expenditure of energy. " [Many refs. to the Drej throughout the novel, most not in DB.]
Drej* galaxy 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 2. "He'd been stuck on this planet ever since the evil alien Drej had chosen Earth as their next target for destruction. Despite the warnings, despite the best efforts of Human defense forces, the implacable, unstoppable Drej had blown up the Earth. "
Drej* galaxy 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 37. "'I hope that Drej ship didn't follow us,' Iji said. 'They are dangerous, aren't they, Father?'

'Yes, they're dangerous,' Tek said in a low voice. 'The Drej have destroyed more than one planet.'

'But why?' Cale wanted to know. 'No one's ever been able to explain it to me.'

Tek shook his large had slowly. 'No one really has the answers. The Drej don't send out announcements about why they're going to attack a planet, why they target one civilization instead of another.'

'It doesn't make sense,' Cale said. 'Earth technology wasn't nearly as advances as the technology on Vusstra or Solbrecht or Fauldro. The Drej can't have thought we were a threat. So why pick on us?'

'Because they could?' Iji suggested. 'Sometimes you pick on me just because I'm smaller.'

Tek shook his head again. 'No, there are weaker planets, even more vulnerable civilization...' "

Drej* galaxy 3038 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Cale's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 38. "'...The only thing we've really learned about the Drej is that when they target a culture to destroy, they want to be certain its people are defeated. They don't have to wipe out every last member of that race--just break their spirit. That's how the Drej conquer.' "
Drej* galaxy 3039 Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Titan A.E.: Akima's Story. New York: Ace (2000); pg. 174. Pg. 174: "...he saw several glowing blue ships! Drej Stingers!

The crablike, angular vessels that had haunted him for years.

...The Drej scout ships experienced no such difficulty. Pulsing with eerie energy, they accelerated in perfect unison as if the aliens themselves shared a single mind. Perhaps that was indeed the case. ";

Pg. 175: "Instead of crashing through the alien blockade, Golbus found himself stuck like a panther beetle in a droplet of blue jelly. NO matter how he fired the Sandor Gamma's remaining engines or tried to power up the academy ships' weapons systems, he could not strike back. He could not break free.

'No, no!' he shouted.

Then he heard the blue-fire aliens banging against his hull. Trying to get in.

...The Drej already had one of their best interrogation chambers peppered and ready for their latest victim. . . . "



Drej*, continued

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