Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to artificial intelligence, Coruscant

artificial intelligence, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
artificial intelligence Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 113. "He went to the storage locker, pulled out an extra helmet, some snap-on camouflage battle fatigues to hide Threepio's golden exterior. He went to find Threepio and get him dressed, but the droid was already standing at the bottom of the gangplank, his golden eyes shining as he gazed out into the forest in the dusk...

'Clothes?' the droid asked. 'I wouldn't know. I've never worn clothes before, sir.'

'Well, there's a first time for everything,' Han said, moving behind Threepio to snap the fatigues on. Somehow, it made him feel uncomfortable. In some homes, the wealthy had droids dress them, but Han had never heard of anyone dressing a droid.

'I think it would be best if you leave me here, sir,' Threepio volunteered. 'My metallic surface might act as a lure for predators.' "

artificial intelligence Dathomir -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 145. "Some of the domes had access sockets that Artoo could have plugged into and opened, but the sockets were far too rusted...

'...and they never came back,' Luke told Artoo.

The droid issued some beeps and clicks, reminding Luke of Yoda's message: 'Repulsed by the witches.' Luke could feel the disturbances in the Force here, like dark cyclones sucking in all light.

'Yeah,' Luke said. 'Whatever Yoda encountered on this planet, it's still here.'

Artoo groaned... Blue gouts of molten transparisteel bounced off the deck of the Chu'unthor, and Artoo wheeled back a pace. " [Artoo-Deetoo (R2D2)is the main robot/droid in the novel. Many other refs. to it, and other droids, throughout novel, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence Deep Space 9 2370 Archer, Nathan. Valhalla (Star Trek: DS9). New York: Pocket Books (1995); pg. 231. "Dax's voice replied, 'Benjamin, I can't seem to make contact . . .'

'I am preventing it,' the computer's voice interrupted.

'Who is that?' Sisko snapped.

'I am Enak,' the computer replied. 'I require that these beings you call Cardassians be permitted to board.'

Now the alien computer decided to speak up! Sisko clenched his teeth. 'Why?' he demanded. 'Do you want them to take you captive, and dissect you?' " [Many other refs., not in DB. A sentient computer that believes in Ashterian religion is the central plot element of the novel.]

artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 25. "Alvin... continued on toward the center of the park... Once he came across a small polyhedral machine, no larger than a man's head, floating among the branches of a tree. No on knew how many varieties of robot there were in Diaspar; they kept out of the way and minded their business so effectively that it was quite unusual to see one. "
artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 52. "Eriston, for example, spent much of his time in prolonged soliloquies with the Central Computer, which virtually ran the city, yet which had leisure for scores of simultaneous discussions with anyone who cared to match his wits against it. For three hundred years, Eriston had been trying to construct logical paradoxes which the machine could not resolve. He did not expect to make serious progress before he had used up several lifetimes. "
artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 61. "Sometimes Alvin would meet a wandering robot, obviously on a tour of inspection, and he never failed to question the machine. He learned nothing, because the machines he encountered were not keyed to respond to human speech or thoughts. Though they were aware of his presence, for they floated politely aside to let him pass, they refused to engage in conversation. "
artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 66. "'...In the two experiments I've described, the plank would be exactly the same in both cases. One of those wheeled robots you sometimes meet could cross it just as easily if it was bridging those towers as if it was laid along the ground. We couldn't, because we have a fear of heights...' "
artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 74. "The Council ruled Diaspar, but the Council itself could be overridden by a superior power--the all-but-infinite intellect of the Central Computer. It was difficult not to think of the Central Computer as a living entity, localized in a single spot, thought actually it was the sum total of all the machines in Diaspar. Even if it was not alive in the biological sense, it certainly possessed at least as much awareness and self-consciousness as a human being. It must know what Alvin was doing, and, therefore, it must approve, otherwise it would have stopped him or referred him to the Council, as the information machine had done to Alystra. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 190. "'Have you anything more to say,' he asked, 'before we consider what is to be done?'

'Only one thing. I would like to take this robot to the Central Computer.'

'But why? You know that the Computer is already aware of everything that has happened in this room.'

'I still wish to go,' replied Alvin politely but stubbornly. 'I ask permission both of the Council and the Computer.'

Before the President could reply, a clear, calm voice sounded through the chamber. Alvin had never heard it before in his life, but he knew what it was that spoke. The information machines, which were no more than outlying fragments of this great intelligence, could speak to men--but they did not possess this unmistakable accent of wisdom and authority.

'Let him come to me,' said the Central Computer.

Alvin looked at the President. It was to his credit that he did not attempt to exploit this victory. He merely asked. 'Have I your permission to leave?'

...'Very well...' "

artificial intelligence Earth Observation Station Avernus 4000 Aldiss, Brian. Helliconia Spring. New York: Atheneum (1982); pg. 87. "Not a comet but Earth Observation Station Avernus... The Avernus housed some five thousand men, women, children, and androids, all of the adults specialising in some aspect of the planet below. Helliconia. "
artificial intelligence France 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 41. "Pushing open the door of the Japanese restaurant... She slipped out of her raingear and accepted a plastic token from the hat-check robot. " [May be other refs. not in DB, but not at all significant.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -100008 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. Jedi Apprentice: The Rising Force (Star Wars). New York: Scholastic (1999); pg. 24. "Yoda waved his hand and, as he did so, a referee droid appeared from behind the bushes.

'Advanced Jedi Training Droid 6, last night the fight you saw,' Yoda prompted.

'Obi-Wan's heart was beating at sixty-eight beats per minute,' the droid reported. 'His torso was faced northeast at twenty-seven degrees, with right hand extended down, clutching his training saber. His body temperature was--'

Mace Windu sighed. If allowed to continue, the training droid would take an hour just to describe how Obi-Wan had crossed the room.

'Just tell us who provoked the fight,' Mace Windu said. 'Who said what, and then what happened?'

The training droid AJTD6 gave an indignant buzz at being curtailed. But after a glower from Mace Windu, it began the story of how Bruck had provoked Obi-Wan into the fight. " [More, pg. 26.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -100008 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. Jedi Apprentice: The Rising Force (Star Wars). New York: Scholastic (1999); pg. 107. "A wall of Offworld miners -- Hutts, Whiphids, Humans, and droids -- backed Jemba. The Offworlders stood ready for battle. "
artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 1. "Internal chronometer activated. BEGIN.

Electricity flooded through circuits, a power surge racing through a billion neural pathways. Sensors awakened, producing a flood of data--and with it came questions.

Who am I?His internal programming finished the tedious two-second-long initialization procedures and poured out an answer. He was IG-88, a droid, a sophisticated droid--an assassin droid.

...Then IG-88 detected something that focused his entire attention. Four other assassin droid, apparently identical to his own bodily configuration. ";

Pg. 3: "Three seconds had already passed [since his activation], and another important question surfaced in his burning-awake brain.

Why am I here? "

[This entire 72-page story is about IG-88, a droid, so of course there are references to this artificial intelligence, and others, throughout the story; only a few are in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 4. "'Greetings, Imperial Supervisor Gurdun,' she said. 'This report is to serve as a synopsis of the final phase of our project. As you know, Holowan Laboratories was commissioned to develop a series of assassin droids with sophisticated, experimental sentience programming. They were to be resourceful and innovative and absolutely relentless at carrying out whichever missions the Imperial authorities choose to program into them.'

...She continued with a long and tedious explanation of improvements to droid neural pathways, how the usual inhibition systems had been bypassed...

IG-88 closed the file. He could sense that his crackling neural pathways had already progressed far beyond anything his designers had anticipated... he was less pleased that he must follow orders from these inferior biological beings. He was a special kind of droid beyond the capabilities of other machines. Superior.

I think, therefore I am. "

artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 5. "Curious, he allowed Loruss's words to flow pat him so he could understand what she was saying. 'His circuits are reinforcing themselves like wildfire!' the bald woman screamed. 'It's a chain-reaction of sentience blazing through his computer brain.'

'We can't stop it!' one of the other technicians bellowed.

The others looked at IG-88 with panic-stricken faces. 'We have to!'

'Shut him down! Abort!' Loruss said...

As he assimilated the information, IG-88's warning systems powered on and self-defense modes took over. These irrational humans were trying to shut him down. They would not allow him to go forth and pursue his primary programming. They were afraid of his new-found abilities.

Afraid with good reason.

A statement and corollaries aligned themselves in his brain like freighters in a convoy:

I think, therefore I am.
Therefore I must endure.
Therefore I must take appropriate actions to survive.
"

artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 17. "Droids of all shapes, sizes, and purposes were ubiquitous across the Empire from the deepest Core Systems to the Outer Rim. Over the centuries numerous manufacturing planets had developed to fill the ever-growing demand for gigantic construction droids, heavy laborers, mechanical servants, and minuscule surveillance droids. The most important of all such droid production centers was the grim, smoke-laden world of Mechis III.

IG-88 decided the planet would be the perfect base of operations to being a plan to transform the entire galaxy. . . . "

artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 24. "IG-88 mapped out the dispersal of the new droids, projected shipping routes and end destinations. Mechis III had such a widespread distribution that the infiltrators would spread from star system to star system in no time, replacing obsolete models, filling new niches in society, setting themselves up for the eventual takeover.

The biologicals would suspect nothing. To them, droids were merely innocuous machines. But IG-88 deemed that it was time for 'life' in the galaxy to take another evolutionary step. The old cumbersome organics must be replaced with efficient and reliable machines like himself. "

artificial intelligence galaxy -99940 B.C.E. Stackpole, Michael A. "Missed Chance " in Star Wars: Tales from the Empire (Peter Schweighofer, ed.) New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 83. "Coran Horn smiled broadly as the R2 droid's muted warble came to him from back in the darkened interior of the temporary hangar. 'Yes, Whistler, you have done a good job of this disgusting place.' In his absence the droid had busied himself by strewing all manner of debris inside the abandoned vehicle shed. " [More about this droid, pg. 83-86.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99938 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 43. "Thousands of probots would be IG-88's eyes and ears, spying on the galaxy as a whole, uncovering weaknesses for the droids to exploit in their plans for overall conquest.

These probots also had the sentience programming, the spark of intellect that IG-88 had shared with his mechanical brothers. The probe droids would be the scouts in the great droid revolution. "

artificial intelligence galaxy -99938 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 47. "In contrast, [Zuckuss's] droid companion 4-LOM seemed sleek and insectile, independent and efficient. IG-88 studied the black droids, considering whether to recruit him for the coming revolution . . . but decided against it. He didn't dare take the risk that a loose cannon like r-LOM might give away IG-88's carefully laid plans. "
artificial intelligence galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. "Therefore I Am: The Tale of IG-88 " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 72. "The end of all biological life forms was at hand... The tiny Rebel ships streaked toward IG-88's reactor core as if they had a chance of succeeding, and he contented himself with his own private thoughts.

I think, therefore I am.
I destroy, therefore I endure.
"
artificial intelligence galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Bell, M. Shayne. "Of Possible Futures: The Tale of Zuckuss and 4-LOM " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 216. "'Does Darth Vader know?' the droid 4-LOM asked Zuckuss, his Gand bounty hunger partner. 4-LOM had asked that same question every 8.37 Standard minutes from the start of Zuckuss's meditation... 4-LOM noted that it was the 1,057th breath of this meditation. The Gand did not need to breath often... " [One of the 2 main characters of this story is 4-LOM, a sentient droid. Many refs. throughout story, of course, but others not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. "The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 164. Pg. 164: "Chenlambec hooted at the service droids. They set down their burdens, swiveled on their treads, and squeaked back towards the passage, returning to the Executor's droid pool.

Bossk' huge, red-and-bronze X1-D service droid rolled forward. Chenlambec backed away from it... ";

Pg. 177: "'How are you progressing with the Hound?'

'Oh,' Flirt [a droid] said evasively, 'not as well as I'd like. He's one of those true-blue incorruptible types. He was more vulnerable from the bridge. I hd to concentrate on this cabin while I was there, or maybe I could've accomplished something.' " [Many other refs., not in DB. The droid Flirt is one of 4 main characters in the story.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. "Payback: The Tale of Dengar " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 101. "The bounty hunters were a motley array, and despite their small number, they were also very dangerous. Certainly the IG-88 assassin droid bothered Dengar a great deal, but Lord Vader had also brought on Boba Fett... "
artificial intelligence galaxy -99934 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. The Truce at Bakura (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 1. Pg. 1: "Droids swarmed around stone, performing repairs. "; Pg. 2: "Behind and above it, a magnacrane lowered Artoo-Detoo into the cylindrical droid socket around his cockpit. ";

Pg. 7: "Much to Luke's relief, they'd saved all his fingers. Surgical droid Too-Onebee set the control board and then swiveled to face Luke. Slender, jointed limbs waved in front of his gleaming midsection. 'Now you, sir. Please step behind the scanner.'

'I'm all right.' Luke leaned his stool against the bulkhead. 'Just tired.' Artoo-detoo bleeped softly beside him, sounding concerned.

'Please, sir. This will only take a moment.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99931 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Planet of Twilight (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 17. Pg. 3: "The table was already pumping stimulants and antishock into the boy's veins, and the Two-Onebee plugged into the other side had the blank-eyed look of a droid transmitting to other stations within the ship. "; Pg. 17: "...as the astromech droid Artoo-Detoo emerged from around the airfoil of the modified B-wing that rose like a suspended wall in the rear corner of the deck-six shuttlecraft bay. See-Threepio, protocol droid extraordinaire, followed close behind, golden carapace shining in the soft light. 'According to Artoo, al systems appear to be in flying order, Master Luke,' stated the protocol droid in his prissy mechanical tenor. "; Pg. 195: "Liegeus Sarpaetius Vorn was mentioned as the vessel's A.I. designer and programmer... " [Other refs. to droids, not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99931 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. Heir to the Empire (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 15. "He turned to see C-3PO shuffling his way across the roof toward him, radiating the droid's usual mixture of relief and concern. 'Hello, Master Luke,' he said, tilting his head to look at the cup in Luke's hand. 'I'm terribly sorry to disturb you.' " [C-3PO and R2-D2, two droids, are among the central characters of the novel. Many other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99929 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. Specter of the Past (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 134. "'No, but Skywalker's astromech droid does,' Mara reminded her. 'Droid, how about feeding us some numbers?'

The R2 warbled acknowledgment, and a course layout appeared on the computer display. " [Other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99929 B.C.E. Zahn, Timothy. Vision of the Future (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 15. "'Okay, Artoo,' he told the droid as he rolled out of his bunk... 'Okay, I'm awake... We almost there?'

The droid twittered an affirmative as Luke snagged his boots, a twitter that was echoed from the direction of the cockpit. The echo was Mara's Veeone pilot droid, who had been flying the Fire ever since Luke and Artoo had come aboard... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 4. "Han ran past the first five entrances, then suddenly saw a golden protocol droid nervously trying to jump or stand on tiptoe to see over the crowd. Many people claimed that all droids of a certain model looked alike, but Han recognized See-Threepio instantly--no other protocol unit ever managed to look quite as nervous or excited.

'Threepio, you hunk of tin!' Han shouted to be heard over the crows. Chewbacca roared in greeting.

'General Solo!' Threepio responded, a note of relief in his voice. 'Princess Leia asked that I find you and escort you to the Alderaanian ambassador's balcony...' " [Many refs. throughout novel to this droid, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 6. "'Do you speak this stuff?' Han asked Threepio.

'I am fluent in over six million forms of communication,' sir,' Threepio said regretfully, 'but I think I must be experiencing a malfunction. The Hapan ambassador cannot have said what I heard.' He turned and started to walk off. 'Darn these rusty logic circuits! Excuse me while I report for repairs.'

'Wait!' Han said. 'Forget about repairs. What did she say?'

'Sir, I think I must have misunderstood,' Threepio said.

'Tell me!'...

'Well, if you're going to be that way about it!' Threepio affected a hurt tone. 'If my sensors monitored her correctly, the delegate reported the words of the great queen mother: 'Worthy Leia, I offer gifts from the sixty-three worlds of Hapes. Take joy in them.' '

'Gifts?' Han said. 'That sounds pretty straightforward to me.'

'Indeed it is. The Hapans never ask a favor without offering a gift of equal value first,' Threepio said condescendingly. 'No, what troubles me is...' "

artificial intelligence galaxy -99926 B.C.E. Hambly, Barbara. Children of the Jedi (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1996; c. 1995) [Book jacket] "Princess Leia, Han Solo, and Chewbacca set out on a mission vital to the survival of the fragile New Republic... Luke Skywalker is on an equally dangerous mission. Taken aboard the enemy Dreadnaught Eye of Palpatine, Luke must find a way to destroy the automated ship before it completes the mission encoded into its supersophisticated artificial intelligence system: the total annihilation of Belsavis. To succeed, Luke will need the help of the spirit of the Jedi Knight Callista, who gave her life to stop the ship once before. The mystery of the crypts, the invincible power of the Dreadnaught, the lost Jedi, and the burgeoning passion between Luke and Callista come together in a stunning climax worthy of the magnificent Star Wars saga. " [Clearly many A.I. refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99914 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. Champions of the Force (Star Wars). New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 30. "The turbolift doors slid open. Artoo-Detoo extended his front wheeled foot and rolled out, moving slowly, almost respectfully, along the polished stone promenade. The droid proceeded toward the raised platform... Artoo-Detoo trundled up the ramp to Luke's shrouded body. The droid hooted, a low, mournful sound that expressed deep grief--if droids could feel such emotions. It tore Luke apart to see his mechanical friend looking at the body; his optical receptor winked from red to blue and back again.

Luke realized that the droid was taking readings, checking on his body's condition. He wondered if Artoo would detect anything different, now that Luke's spirit had been set free; but the droid gave no sign. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99911 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Heirs of the Force (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights). New York: Berkley (1995); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "Artoo-Detoo, the little droid Luke kept near his side, rushed into the grand audience chamber, emitting a loud series of unintelligible electronic whistles and beeps. Luke seemed to understand them, though, and he leaped down from the stage. "; Pg. 155: medical droids [Some other minor refs., not in DB, including a somewhat prominently featured droid named Em Teedee.]
artificial intelligence galaxy -99910 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Shadow Academy (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights). New York: Berkley (1995); pg. 10. Pg. 10: "'No unnecessary risks, okay?' Artoo added a few beeps and whistles of his own. ";

Pg. 40: "Jacen yelled to the droids, 'Hey, is there an armory in here? Do you have any weapons?'

The droids interrupted their packing and swiveled smooth copper heads toward him, optical sensors glowing. 'Please do not disturb us, sir,' they said, then resumed their tasks. 'We have essential work to do.' " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99908 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Jedi Under Siege (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights). New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 48. Pg. 48: "'...Artoo-Detoo's down in the hangar bay already waiting with the ship. He's all the copilot you'll need.' ";

Pg. 49: "'What's that, Artoo? Calm down,' Luke said.

'If you would allow, Master Skywalker,' Em Teedee said, 'I was able to parse your astromech droid's message and could provide a translation for you. I am fluent in over six forms of communic--'

'Thank you, Em Teedee,' Luke Skywalker cut off the little droid's chatter, 'that would be very helpful.' " [Some other refs., not in DB, particularly to the droids Artoo-Detoo and Em Teedee.]

artificial intelligence galaxy -99907 B.C.E. Anderson, Kevin J. & Rebecca Moesta. Shards of Alderaan (Star Wars: Young Jedi Knights). New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 158. "'...while I check with Lowie to see what diagnostics Em Teedee's been able to run, I'd like you two to dismantle these damaged systems. Pull them out--we'll have to bypass them. Maybe we can salvage a cyberfuse or two...'

...Inside the Rock Dragon's cockpit, Jaina bent over Em Teedee where Lowbacca had hardwired him into the main control systems.

'This is all terribly confusing,' the translating droid, said his optical sensors glowing up from the center of the cockpit panels... " [Many refs. to droids in novel, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 87. Pg. 87: "There were in excess of eighteen trillion people in the Culture, just about every one of them well nourished, extensively educated and mentally alert, and only thirty or forty of them had this unusual ability to forecast and assess on a par with a well-informed Mind (of which there were already many hundreds of thousand)... she must be left to her own devices and not watched by the Culture's. She would take a pocket terminal with her to record everything, but she would not have a real-time link with any part of the Mind network on the Plate she lived on. "; Bookjacket: "Two vast empires are intent upon each other's destruction. To the Idirans, it was phad, a holy war against the communistic Culture and its sentient Minds. " [The 'Minds' are artificial intelligences that rule the Culture. Many refs. to them throughout novel, not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 177. [1] "The Mind had an image to illustrate its information capacity. It liked to imagine the contents of its memory store written out on cards; little slips of paper with tiny writing on them, big enough for a human to read. If the characters were a couple of millimetres tall and the paper about ten centimetres square and written on both sides, then ten thousand characters could be squeezed onto each card. In a metre-long drawer of such cards maybe one thousand of them -- ten million pieces of information -- could be stored. In a small room a few metres square, with a corridor in the middle just wide enough to pull a tray out into, you could keep perhaps a thousand trays arranged in close-packed cabinets: ten billion characters in all.

A square kilometre of these cramped cells might contain as many as one hundred thousand rooms; a thousand such floors would produce a building two thousand metres tall with a hundred million rooms... "

artificial intelligence galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 177. [2] "If you kept building those squat towers, squeezed hard up against each other until they covered the surface of a largish standard-G world -- maybe a billion square kilometres -- you would have a planet with one trillion square kilometres of floor space, one hundred quadrillion paper-stuffed rooms, thirty light-years of corridors and a number of potential stored characters sufficiently large to boggle just about anybody's mind.

In base 10 that number would be a 1 followed by twenty-seven zeroes, and even that vast figure was only a fraction of the capacity of the Mind. To match it you would need a thousand such worlds; systems of them, a clusterful of information-packed globes . . . and that vast capacity was physically contained within a space smaller than a single one of those tiny rooms, inside the Mind. " [The Mind -- an artificial intelligence that rules the Culture.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 179. "The Mind's information was held in binary form, in spirals composed of protons and neutrons; and neutrons -- outside a nucleus, and also outside hyperspace -- decayed (into protons, ha-ha; not too long after entering the Command System, the vast majority of its memory would have consisted of the stunningly illuminating message: '0000000 . . .'). So it had effectively frozen its primary memory and cognitive functions, wrapping them in fields which prevented both decay and use. It was working instead on back-up picocircuitry, in real space, and using real-space light to think with (how humiliating). "
artificial intelligence galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 334. "And worse still, worst of all, not just producing, but embracing and giving ourselves over totally to the ultimate anathema: the Minds, the sentient machines; the very image and essence of life itself, desecrated. Idolatry incarnate.

No wonder that they despise us. Poor sick mutations that we are, petty and obscene, servants of the machine-devils that we worship. Not even sure of our own identity: just who is Culture? "

artificial intelligence galaxy 1966 Adams, Douglas. "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe " in The More Than Complete Hitchhiker's Guide. Avenel, New Jersey: Wings Books (1989; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 618. "'Ship?' he [Zaphod] called.

'Yup?' said the ship.

'Do what I do.'

The ship thought about this for a few milliseconds and then, after double checking all the seals on its heavy duty bulkheads, it began slowly, inexorably, in a hazy blaze of its lights, to sink to the lowest depths. "

artificial intelligence galaxy 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 172. "'MacDuff,' Luthor addressed the machine, which responded by lighting a red signal on its front plate, 'get me a three-dimensional projection of the planetary system of the star Delphinus immediately preceding the time it became a nova.'

The robot wheeled out of the room. ";

Pg. 173: "'MacDuff!'

The robot stopped and spun around, flashing its red signal. " [Some other refs. to this robot, and a few passing refs. to other robots. But AIs are not featured prominently in this novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 1979 Adams, Douglas. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. New York: Harmony Books (1979); pg. 83. "'...I'll send the robot down to get them and bring them up here. Hey, Marvin!'

In the corner, the robot's head swung up sharply, but then wobbled about imperceptibly. It pulled itself up to its feet as if was about five pounds heavier than it actually was, and made what an outside observer would have thought was a heroic effort to cross the room...

'I think you ought to know I'm feeling very depressed,' it said. Its voice was low and hopeless. " [Many other refs., not in DB. Marvin is one of the main characters in novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 15. "The only light on the bridge came from two dim red triangles in a far corner where Marvin the Paranoid Android sat slumped, ignoring all and ignored by all, in a private and rather unpleasant world of his own. " [Many other refs. to Marvin, one of main characters in novel, as well as refs. to massive thinking super-computers.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 1982 Adams, Douglas. Life, the Universe and Everything. New York: Harmony Books (1982); pg. 28. "They were robots, white robots.

What was most extraordinary about them was that they appeared to have come dressed for the occasion. Not only were they white, but they carried what appeared to be cricket bats, and not only that but they also carried what appeared to be cricket balls, and not only that but they wore white ribbing pads around the lower parts of their legs. These last were extraordinary because they appeared to contain jets that allowed these curiously civilized robots to fly down from their hovering spaceship and start to kill people, which is what they did. " [Many other refs. to robots and AIs, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 1992 Adams, Douglas. Mostly Harmless. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1992); pg. 4. "Robots were instructed to bring the backup central mission module from the shielded strong room, where they guarded it, to the ship's logic chamber for installation. " [More here. Many refs. not in DB, e.g. pg. 42-46.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 1992 Anthony, Piers and Philip Jose Farmer. The Caterpillar's Question. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 206. Pg. 206: "The screen faded to blank. The fully mechanical robots appeared around the bubble, using tool appendages to sever and seal off the various tubular connections it had to other parts of the ship. "; Pg. 207: "Then another robot came. This one was spraying something. A fungicide! It sprayed the other robots, and they then resumed faster motion. Maybe there wasn't enough of the stuff to douse the whole ship, but that wouldn't help Jack. " [Other refs., not in DB. Not a focus of novel, however.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 100. "'Then what is it, this God-being?'

'I see no evidence here on Earth that you have yet achieved artificial intelligence.'

That seemed a non sequitur to me, but I nodded. 'That's right, although a lot of people are working on it.'

'We do have self-aware machines. My starship, the Merelcas, is one such. And what we have discovered is this: intelligence is an emergent property--it appears spontaneously in systems of sufficient order and complexity. I suspect that the being which is now the God of this universe was a noncorporeal intelligence that arose through chance fluctuations in a previous universe devoid of biology...' "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2052 Williams, Sean. "Evermore " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 554. "'Not according to the archives,' Emmett says. 'In our day, such experimentation was forbidden on subjects that were legally alive, which ruled out AIs and intelligences based on humans. Engrams hadn't been around long enough for problems with the templates to arise.' "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2100 Bear, Greg. Anvil of Stars. New York: Warner Books (1992); pg. 208. "Beside him followed a half-sized copper-bronze mom; he had not seen the craft produce the little robot, but no explanations were necessary. The diminutive mom advanced on its own firecracker bursts.

'What do I look for?' he asked the little mom.

'Ship's mind will have left a marker that will interact with close fields. The deep time memory store will probably reside within the third homeball, in the densest concentrations of real matter.' " [Some other refs. not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2100 Dick, Philip K. "Imposter " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1953); pg. 121. [Year estimated.] "The ship would have landed close to the Project; the robot would have expected to go the rest of the way on foot... " [Other refs., not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2100 Leinster, Murray. "Exploration Team " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1956); pg. 86. [Year estimated.] Pg. 86: "'What colony?'

'Loren Two Robot Installation--' Then Roane said indignantly, 'Don't tell me that idiot skipper dropped me at the wrong place! This is Loren Two, isn't it? And this is the landing field. But where are your robots? You should have the beginning of the grid up! What the devil's happened here and what are these beasts?' ";

Pg. 90: "'Hold it! I'll agree that you can't make a hunting-robot. A machine can discriminate, but it can't decide. That's why there's no danger of a robot revolt. They can't decide to do something for which they have no instructions. But this colony was planned with full knowledge of what robots can and can't do...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2100 Yep, Laurence. Seademons. New York: Harper & Row (1977); pg. 3. "Using some of the lore preserved by the rectors, he had been able to re-program our old war robots and drones into farm laborers. Even as I watched, the amorphous metal of the robot's side formed into an arm with a hoe blade to chop at some weed. But the tentacles at either end of the monster caught the robot before it could complete its task.

For a moment the robot jerked about like a little fish caught in an anemone's tentacles... The monster moved back to the others slowly, holding the now quiet robot over the center of its body between two tentacles... " [May be other refs., but very little about A.I.s or robots in this novel.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2165 Carver, Jeffrey A. The Rapture Effect. New York: Tor (1987) [Book jacket.] "The year is 2165, and humanity's first fleet of colonizing starships is approaching the planet Argus... The war is being waged far from Earth by AI robot fighters, commanded by the central artificial intelligence of the McConwell Company's gnostic system. Assigned the task of winning the war, it is the gnostic system--not its human overseers--that first recognizes the war's futility. The gnostic core sets out to alter its own programming, to gain the freedom to take a terrible risk: to make a deliberate, peace-seeking contact with the enemy. " [Clearly, one of the novel's main characters is an AI. Other refs. not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2200 Dick, Philip K. "Human Is " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1955); pg. 300. [Year estimated.] "'Repeat all the things you remember,' Frank said. His robot pencil poised itself alertly. 'The changes you've noticed in him. I'm curious.'
artificial intelligence galaxy 2200 Dick, Philip K. "Rautavaara's Case " in I Hope I Shall Arrive Soon. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1985; c. 1980); pg. 151. Pg. 151-152, 156: many refs. to robots
artificial intelligence galaxy 2200 Saberhagen, Fred. "The Adventure of the Metal Murderer " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 251. [Year indeterminate.] "It had the shape of a man, the brain of an electronic devil.

It and the machines like it were the best imitations of men and women that the berserkers, murderous machines themselves, were able to devise and build. Still, they could be seen as obvious frauds when closely inspected by any humans... All of Earth's defensive forces were still on full alert, though the attack had been tiny, no more than an attempt at infiltration, and seemed to have been thoroughly repelled. Berserkers, remnants of an ancient interstellar war, were mortal enemies of everything that lived and the greatest danger to humanity that the universe had yet revealed. " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

artificial intelligence galaxy 2267 Marshak, Sondra & Myrna Culbreath. The Price of the Phoenix (Star Trek). New York: Bantam (1985; c. 1977); pg. 17. android
artificial intelligence galaxy 2267 Sargent, Pamela & George Zebrowski. Heart of the Sun (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 212. "'By attempting to explore the mobile, we stimulated its defensive programs, which are run by a very advanced artificial intelligence that has given up on changing the given universe. Instead, it has achieved the experience of omnipotence, by linking the output of its minds to the AI input. This culture does not crave the secrets of a transcendent universe, which can never be unraveled because one cannot reach the end of a standing infinity--that is what they believe our universe to be. But do not misunderstand--they know enough about the physical universe to attain what they wish.' "
artificial intelligence galaxy 2268 Oltion, Jerry. Mudd In Your Eye (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 54. "That still left the question of the Stella android. What was she doing here? Watching over Mudd, of course, but the androids could have done that just as well on their home planet. They would never have let him go even with a chaperone unless... " [Many refs. to androids, not in DB.]
artificial intelligence galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 180. "'Who is Vejur?' Kirk repeated.

'Vejur is that which seeks the Creator.'

Kirk had difficulty believing that his ears had heard correctly. The Creator? The considerable astonishment on Spock's features said he must have heard these same words, too.

'Jim--this is a mechanism.' It was McCoy, indicating 'Ilia.' "

artificial intelligence galaxy 2271 Roddenberry, Gene. Star Trek: The Motion Picture. New York: Pocket Books (1979); pg. 181. "'Vejur's ship,' Kirk asked, 'who does it travel in toward the third planet of the solar system directly ahead?'

'Vejur travels to the third planet to find the Creator.'

It stunned them. Whatever Vejur might be, some single great entity or an entire alien race, it was simply impossible that anything capable of that vessel's technology could believe that Earth was the location of anything that could be called 'Creator.'

Kirk tried to pursue it sensibly. 'What is the Creator?' he asked.

'That which creates,' answered the 'Ilia' probe.

'To join with Him.'

'Join with the Creator?' Spock asked. 'How?'

'Vejur and the Creator will become One.'

'What does the Creator create?' asked Spock.

'The Creator is that which created Vejur,' the 'Ilia' probe was saying. " [Many other refs. in novel to Vejur's quest for the Creator, which turns out to be mankind, as Vejur is actually the now artificially-intelligent Voyager space probe.]



artificial intelligence, continued

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