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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Washington

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington 1999 Bear, Greg. Darwin's Radio. New York: Del Rey (1999); pg. 161. "'...they tell me I am fabricating evidence to support my lies. They say they have the government and the law on their side. Our old nemesis, NAGPRA.'

That stood for the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. Mitch was very familiar with... this legislation.

...'What evidence did you fabricate?' Mitch asked lightly.

'Don't joke.' But Ripper's expression loosened... 'We took collagen from the bones and sent it to Portland. They did a DNA analysis. Our bones are from a different population, not at all related to modern Indians, only loosely related to the Spirit Cave mummy. Caucasoid, if we can use that term. But hardly Nordic. More Ainu, I believe.'

'That's historic, Eileen,' Mitch said. 'That's excellent. Congratulations.' " [More on this topic, not in DB. Caucasoid/Asian origins of Native Americans similar to origins suggested by Book of Mormon. Japanese connection similar to ideas proposed in The Remnant.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1986 Brooks, Terry. Magic Kingdom for Sale - Sold!. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 44. "It was midmorning of the following day. He had flown to Washington National, stayed overnight at the Marriott across from the airport, then caught Allegheny's 7:00 A.M. flight to Charlottesville. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1993 Anthony, Patricia. Brother Termite. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1993); pg. 119. "'...Well, not only am I proficient in Word Perfect and take dictation like a dream, but I also have a black belt in kar-at-e...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 203. "Random images flickered across the screen: Bugs Bunny, 'Bonanza,' soaps, 'Reading Rainbow,' vintage PeeWee, Windex, the Stephen King Network, what looked like a live broadcast of an assassination attempt but turned out to be the new Slush video, Pepsi, Astroboy, Hoji Fries. It was impossible to tell what you were supposed to buy and what you were supposed to actually watch--Brando, Datsun, IBM--Jack made another rude sound--Donahue, McDonald's, 'Mormon Matters,' Sally, Oprah, Geraldo, Angelica... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 36. "Lorenzo didn't know what it was about the number 2000 that made people crazy for the Lord's return... Ultimately, of course, the joke would be on them, because it was a biblical fact that not even the angels in heaven or Jesus Christ himself knew when the end was coming. That was written in God's own hand, on a calendar that only he could see. " [Lorenzo's thoughts here reflect the LDS beliefs of the author -- that the time of the Second Coming is unknown to all but God. See also pg. 70. Note also that this character, Lorenzo (a guard at the White House), is probably named after Lorenzo S. Snow, a historical president of the Church.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 70. "'Then when is he coming?'

'Five minutes from now.'

There was a laugh of disbelief from the crowd.

'Tomorrow afternoon.'

The sound began to rise.

'Or a hundred years from now. Go home to your Bible and look it up, my dear woman. No man knows the day and the hour of our Lord's return. It is a secret that even the angels in heaven long to know. That's why we've got to live each day, each minute of our lives for him! Because the world is till running... Don't set your watches by the faulty estimates of man, my friends! We are imperfect timekeepers against the perfection of God's universe.'

...'And friends,' he continued. 'Brothers. Sisters. As surely as the entire, vast universe is God's singular creation, so there are many incredible and wonderful elements of his creation that we have not yet seen. Things that will be revealed to us in the twinkling of an eye, as surely as God's return, yet on a schedule known only to him.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington, D.C. 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 234. "'You mean a race as advanced as yours still believes in God?'

'No,' said the visitor.

Aaronson smiled and nodded. 'That's what I suspected.'

'We know there is a God. Listen, Mick Aaronson, and learn. Worlds without number lie beyond the reach of humankind, worlds that are constantly changing...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington: Seattle 1998 Brooks, Terry. A Knight of the Word. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 3. "He stood in the shadows of a building backed up on Occidental Park in the heart of Pioneer Square... He had walked all the way from the Seattle Art Museum, all the way from the center of downtown Seattle Art Museum... " [Pioneer Square is one of the main, frequently revisited setting in the novel, and is also mentioned by name pg. 65, 97, 113-114, 146, 163, 168, etc.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Western Hemisphere 50 C.E. Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 241. Main character Johan describes his reading of the Book of Mormon: "Then came The Book of Mormon itself. Some of it I could skip, because it was historial. For my purposes, Lehi's flight from Jerusalem wasn't much use, nor was Lehi's death or the wanderings of his son Nephi in the wilderness. It was interesting to see the parallels between Nephi and Laman and Cain and Abel... There were some interesting quotes in the second book of Nephi, which I jotted down...

Then came the section named "The Words of Mormon, " and that was followed by another 250 pages of Saint theological and temporal history as recounted by the personages of Mosiah, Alma, and Heleman. That brought me to another book of Nephi, except it was a different Nephi. From what I could figure, racing through the text, the second Nephi, who presumably wrote a third book of Nephi, presided over a religious rebirth of the Nephites--those were the good Saints, I figured... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Western Hemisphere 421 C.E. Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 241. Main character Johan describes his reading of the Book of Mormon: "...the second Nephi, who presumably wrote a third book of Nephi, presided over a religious rebirth of the Nephites--those were the good Saints, I figured--except that the rebirth and godliness didn't last, and pretty soon there wasn't much difference between the Nephites and the Lamanites. After that, almost all the Nephites and the eventually perished under the swords of the Lamanites, and The Book of Mormon ended with a cautionary and advisory chapter from Moroni, who appeared to have buried the golden plates on which his and all his predecessors' words were inscribed and then expired in turn.

Just like that--over 500 pages chronicling a religious history, and all the good followers of the Lord are wiped out because, from what I could figure out, the they forsook him and indulged in wickedness. That meant to me, in practical terms, that the whole Saint 'bible' was cautionary... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -5000 B.C.E. Weis, Margaret & Tracy Hickman. Dragon Wing. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 420. "Theorists tell us... the original creation of the Omniverse. In the beginning, Elihn, God in One, stretched out his hand amid the Chaos. The motion of his hand ordered chaos into infinite possibilities of creation. This motion was the first Order out of Chaos. It is called the Wave Prime...

Elihn saw in the Prime the creation of the ethereal and the physical, and the seeing of it made it so. In the creation of the spiritual and the physical, the Prime split into two sets of waves, each infinite in their possibilities.

With delight and wonder, Elihn looked upon both waves. In the ethereal he saw the creation of Air and Fire; in the physical he saw Water and Stone... and the seeing of it made it so. Again, in its creation, the waves of ethereal and physical possibilities split into four new waves... Elihn again wove these new possibilities together. In the intersection of the waves was born Life, Death, Power and Mind. " ['Elihn' named by Hickman after Elohim.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Game of Thrones. New York: Bantam (1997; c. 1996); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "Gared would know what to make of it, and if not him, then surely that old bear Mormont or Maester Aemon. ";

Pg. 111: "'Would that I might forget him,' Ned said bluntly.

'Would that I might forget him' Ned said bluntly. The Mormonts of Bear Island were an old house, proud and honorable, but their lands were cold and distant and poor. Ser Jorah had tried to swell the family coffers by selling some poachers to a Tyroshi slaver. As the Mormonts were bannermen to the Starks, his crime had dishonored the north. Ned had made the long journey west to Bear Island, only to find when he arrived that Jorah had taken ship beyond the reach of Ice and the king's justice. Five years had passed since then. " [Is 'Mormont' derived from 'Mormon'?]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 2. [Fantasy: actual time/place immaterial or indeterminate.] "'Bugger that Old Bear too,' said the Sisterman, a thin man with sharp features and nervous eyes. 'Mormont will be dead before daybreak, remember? Who cares what he likes?'

Small Paul blinked his black little eyes. Maybe he had forgotten, Chett thought, he was stupid enough to forget most anything. 'Why do we have to kill the Old Bear? Why don't we just go off and let him be?' " [The name of the character Mormont (who is nicknamed 'the Old Bear') is simply 'Mormon' with the letter 't' on the end. The character may have intentionally named as an allusion to Mormons, or this may simply be a coincidence. 'Mormont' is not an uncommon name in France, and that may be the origin of Martin's usage. The author has written about contemporary Mormon characters before, such as Nephi Callendar, in Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 9. [Fantasy: actual time/place immaterial or indeterminate.] "Once they were tied up, he went to report. 'The prints were there like Giant said, but the dogs wouldn't track, he told Mormont in front of his big black tent. 'Down to the river like that, could be old prints.'

'A pity.' Lord Commander Mormont had a bald head and a great shaggy grey beard, and sounded as tired as he looked. 'We might all have been better for a bit of fresh meat.' The raven on his shoulder bobbed its head and echoed, 'Meat. Meat. Meat.'

We could cook the bloody dogs, Chett thought, but he kept his mouth shut until the Old Bear sent him on his way. " [More about the character named 'Mormont', a major character in the novel. He may be named intentionally after Mormons, or this may be a coincidence. Other refs. to this character not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 10. "The Old Bear [Mormont] stood before the fire with Smallwood, Locke, Wythers, and Blane ranged behind him in a row. Mormont wore a cloak of thick black fur, and his raven perched upon his shoulder, preening its black feathers. This can't be good. Chett squeezed between Brown Bernarr and some Shadow Tower men. When everyone was gathered, save for the watchers in the woods and the guards on the ringwall, Mormont cleared his throat and spat. The spittle was frozen before it hit the ground. 'Brothers,' he said, 'men of the Night's Watch.'

'Men!' his raven screamed. 'Men! Men!'

'The wildings are on the march, following the course of the Milkwater down out of the mountains. Thoren believes their van will be upon us ten days hence. The most seasoned raiders will be with Harma Dogshead in that van. The rest will likely form a rearguard...' " [The character named 'Mormont.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 173. "And somewhere close ahead, Jon knew, the Fist of the First Men loomed above the trees, home to three hundred black brothers of the Night's Watch, armed, mounted, and waiting. The Old Bear [Mormont] had sent out other scouts besides the Halfhand, and surely Jarman Buckwell or Thoren Smallwood would have returned by now with word of what was coming down out of the mountains.

Mormont will not run, Jon thought. He is too old and he has come too far. He will strike, and damn the numbers. One day soon he would hear the sound of warhorns, and see a column of riders pounding down on them with black cloaks flapping and cold steel in their hands... " [Another example ref. to the character named, perhaps coincidentally or perhaps meaningfully, 'Mormont.' Many other refs. to this character, not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world -1000 B.C.E. Martin, George R. R. A Storm of Swords. New York: Bantam (2000); pg. 173. "'We are stronger than we seem, my lady,' Lady Maege Mormont said as they rode. Catelyn had grown of Lady Maege and her eldest daughter, Dacey; they were more understanding than most in the matter of Jaime Lannister, she had found. The daughter was tall and lean, the mother short and stout, but they dressed alike in mail and leather, with the black bear of House Mormont on shield and surcoat. By Catelyn's lights, that was queer garb for a lady, yet Dacey and Lady Maege seemed more comfortable, both as warriors and as women, than ever the girl from Tarth had been.

'I have fought beside the Young Wolf in every battle,' Dacey Mormont said cheerfully. 'He has not lost one yet.' " [Many other refs. Another character with the Mormont name: 'Ser Jorah Mormont' (see pg. 473-483, 644, etc.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1000 C.E. Baum, L. Frank. "The King's Head and the Purple Dragon " in Dragon Tales (Isaac Asimov, ed.) New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 169. "A good many years ago the Magical Monarch of Mo became annoyed by the Purple Dragon, which came down from the mountains and ate up a patch of his best chocolate caramels just as they were getting ripe. " ['Mo' is a slang term for 'Mormon,' but Baum does not seem to be using the word in that sense here.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1870 Niven, Larry. The Patchwork Girl. New York: Ace (1980); pg. 10, 54. "'Well,' I said, 'it's normal where I've lived . . . California, Kansas, Australia . . . Over most of the Earth we tend to keep recreational sex separate from having children. There are the Fertility Laws, of course. The government doesn't tell people how to use their birthrights, but we do check the baby's tissue rejection spectrum to see which father has used up a birthright. Don't get the idea that Earth is all one culture. The Arabs are back to harems, for God's sake, and so were the Mormons for awhile.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1943 Rand, Ayn. Fountainhead. New York: Penguin (1993; c. 1943); pg. 340. Pg. 340: "When he turned a glance of desperate appeal upon Toohey, Stoddard's eyes looked like Jell-O. "; Pg. 636: "...don't go to the movies on Sunday... don't smoke--don't drink... Fools think that taboos of this nature are just nonsense. Something left over, old-fashioned. But there's always a purpose I nonsense... ask yourself only what it accomplishes. Every system of ethics that preached sacrifice grew into a world power and ruled millions of men... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1967 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 145. [This passage expresses sentiments which Latter-day Saints may or may not feel an affinity for.] "'A fitting abode, I suppose, for those who call themselves gods.'

'Call themselves?' asked Yama. 'You are wrong, Sam. Godhood is more than a name. It is a condition of being. One does not acheive it merely by being immortal, for even the lowliest laborer in the fields may achieve continuity of existence. Is it then the conditioning of an Aspect? No. Any competent hypnotist can play games with the self-image. Is it the raising up of an Attribute? of course not. I can design machines more powerful and more accurate than any faculty a man may cultivate. Being a god is the quality of being able to be yourself to such an extent that your passions correspond with the forces of the universe, so that those who look upon you know this without hearing your name spoken...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1970 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 212. "Lee smiled. '...I will never forget what you did for me. You broadened my perspective and restored my faith when I doubted it sorely. Because of you, I questioned tenets of my religion I had never thought to question befor and learned that Jesus would not have acted as I had. In fact, through you I came to understand Jesus Christ in a deep and personal manner. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1972 Ellison, Harlan, ed. Again, Dangerous Visions. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 711. [Introduction to "Last Train to Kankakee " by Robin Scott] "Ultimately, when the history of these last ten tumultuous years of sf is chronicled, Robin Scott Wilson's name will be listed alongside those of John W. Campell, Jr., Horace L. Gold, Anthony Boucher and J. Francis McComas as one of the men most responsible for helping to create new writers in speculative fiction... Tony Boucher and Mick McComas brought the literary values of sf into sharper focus and developed Avram Davidson, J. T. McIntosh, Leiber, Idris Seabright, Matheson, Chad Oliver, Poul Anderson, Zenna Henderson and others... " [Henderson was a Latter-day Saint]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 16. "...the Call of the Wild, Consciousness III, the Reorganized Church of the Latter-Day Saints, Standard Oil of Ohio, the Zig-Zag Men, the Rubble Risers, the Children of Ra... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1977 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. Lucifer's Hammer. Chicago, IL: Playboy Press (1977); pg. 126. In this book, a massive comet is heading toward Earth: "Then there were the mail-order 'survival packages' that had been sold for the past few weeks. They'd not be getting any more orders, of course, not this close to Hammerfall. Maybe--just maybe--they weren't intending to deliver? Have to look into that. There were four companies selling them. For from fifty to sixteen thousand dollars you could get anything from just a food supply to the whole thing in one lump. The foods were nonperishable and constituted a more-or-less-balanced diet. (What religious sect was it that had required all its members to keep a year's supply of food? They'd been doing that since the Sixties, too. Harvey made another mental note. They'd be worth interviewing, after That Day had passed.) "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1981 Dick, Philip K. Dr. Bloodmoney. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 35. Pg. 35: "He thought of himself in the nose cone, like Walt Dangerfield, strapped next to a woman of great physical attractiveness. Pioneers, he and her, founding a new civilization on a new planet. "; Pg. 36: "To Connie, the waitress? " [More about Connie the waitress, not in DB. There is probably no connection between her and Francine Riber's film character of the same name in God's Army (2000).]; Pg. 37: "The frycook said, 'Fergesson don't allow his employees to drink; it's against his religion, isn't it, Stuart?'

'That's right,' Stuart said... " [Fergesson here may or may not be a Mormon. Similar ref. pg. 282. Also note that one of the main characters in novel is named Stuart McConchie, although there's no evidence that he is named after Bruce R. McConkie.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1981 Zelazny, Roger. Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983); pg. 200. [Author's introduction to 'The George Business'] "This was an impulse story. I read somewhere--in Locus, I believe--that Orson Scott Card as putting together a collection of original stories involving dragons. I read it just at the right time. I was in the mood to do a story about a dragon. So I did... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1982 Asimov, Isaac, ed.. Introduction by Asimov to: "Pebble in Time " by Cynthia Goldsone & Avram Davidson, in Laughing Space. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 334. [Isaac Asimov's introduction to "Pebble in Time "] "Janet [J. O. Jeppson] and I have a special interest in stories about Mormons. In Janet's case there's a loose genealogical connection. In my case, there's an interest in any group that considers me a Gentile. It makes for novelty. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1982 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in Dragon Tales. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 13. "On the other hand, the gift of nonexistence is this: We can, if we wish, make our dragons bumbling, well-meaning creatures, or even entirely kindly. There is Walt Disney's Pete's Dragon, in which the dragon is rather an overgrown puppydog... " [Animated by Don Bluth.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1982 Norden, Eric. "The Curse of Mhondoro Nkabele " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 171-172. [Fictional letter from Harlan Ellison to Edward L. Ferman, editor of the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction]

Edward me darlin':

Sorry you couldn't reach me on the phone... I've been batting my brains out on The Sound of Screaming, that TV musical comedy of mine about the Moors Murder Trial in England. Some... producer case cast Julie Andrews as Myra Hindley, and she's breaking my chops with script revisions. It's my first score, too, and the... is ruining the title song. ('And the moors echo now/With the sound of screaminggg. . . .') I'm not too happy with their choice of Donny Osmond for Ian Brady, either...

Love and Kisses,
Harlan "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 545. Pg. 545: "'You can't walk out of an airplane. I don't think he's going to do a D.B. Cooper...' ";
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1985 Bear, Greg. "Dead Run " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1985); pg. 160. Pg. 159: "I closed the gate after them and led them away from the truck... 'Nobody's really sure where it goes,' I said. 'But it doesn't go to Hell, and it doesn't go back to Earth.'

'Where then?'...

'Maybe it's the High Road,' I said. 'At least it's a chance. You light out across the stretch, go back of that hill... It's not easy to find, but if you look carefully, it's there. Follow it.'...

'Why are you doing it?' [Helping sinners consigned to Hell to escape that fate.]

I had hoped they wouldn't ask. 'When I as a kid, one of my Sunday schoolteachers told me about Jesus going down to Hell during the three days before he rose up again. She told me Jesus went to Hell to bring out those who didn't belong. I'm certainly no Jesus... but that's what I'm doing. She called it Harrowing Hell.' I shook my head. 'Never mind. Just go,' I said. I watched them walk across the gray flats and around the hill... " [Bear's themes in these story strongly reflect LDS theology.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1985 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 133-134. "...the religious networks, where, with sustained and general excitement, the Message [from extraterrestrials] was being discussed... The Message, Ellie believed, was a kind of mirror in which each person sees his or her own beliefs challenged or confirmed... The Mormon Church declared it a second revelation by the angel Moroni. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1986 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 258. "But that week, his former father-in-law had seized on a single topic, wouldn't let it go: the just-aborted voyage of Thor Heyerdahl and the Norseman's quixotic attempts to prove that early explorers, sailing on papyrus-reed boats, could have brought Egyptian culture to the Americas more than three thousand years before Columbus. " [More, pg. 260-261]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1990 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 101-102. "I had dipped into records of past prophets during my Earth research. Zarathustra. Jesus. Mohammed... Al Mahdi, who had defeated the British at Khartoum. Joseph Smith, who had read the Word of God from golden tablets with special glasses, and Brigham Young... And all the little ones since, the pretenders whose religions had eventually foundered, the charlatans of small talent, of skewed messages... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1991 Anthony, Piers. Virtual Mode. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1991); pg. 242. "But Provos had remembered him killing the monster, so the success of his mission was not in doubt, merely the manner of its accomplishment. Of course Provos had been in error about him... Provos did not know the literal future, only that part of it she was to learn... " [One character, mentioned numerous times in novel, is named 'Provos'. It is not known whether the author based this name on Provo, Utah, one of the world's major Latter-day Saint cities.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1993 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. Of Tangible Ghosts. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 88. "I tried to find a book that would suit my purpose... one that Miranda was unlikely to have had. When I saw the title after having scanned nearly two hundred books, it didn't exactly leap out at me: The Other World--Seeing Beyond the Veil. But I pulled it out and studied it. It was a sturdily bound book, published by Deseret Press, but not an original, written by Joseph Brigham Young, a former elder in the Church of the Latter Day Saints and later the Prophet, Seer and Revelator of the Church.

After leafing through The Other World, I decided it would do. An entire section dealt with the spirituality of music and the role of music in 'piercing the veil.' While it was a gamble, the only one who was likely to call me on it was dead. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1993 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. Of Tangible Ghosts. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 122-251. "Leaders of virtually all major religious orders, but particularly those of the Anglican-Baptists, the Roman Catholic Church, the Spirit of God, the Unified Congregation of the Holy Spirit, and the Latter Day Saints, have taken positions firmly opposing such research... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1993 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 170. [Julie Katz apparently visits Hell.] "Day by day, the categories of iniquity grew even more arbitrary and excessive. Julie could understand why there was an Island of Atheists. Ditto the Island of Adulterers, the Island of Occultists, the Island of Tax Dodgers. Depending on one's upbringing, the precincts reserved for Unitarians, Abortionists, Socialists, Nuclear Strategists, and Sexual Deviates made sense. But why the Island of Irish Catholics? The Island of Scotch Presbyterians? Christian Scientists, Methodists, Baptists?

'This offends me,' she said, thrusting a navigational chart before Wyvern and pointing to the Island of Mormons.

The devil's [replied] 'Throughout history, admission to Hell has depended on but one criterion.' He gave the Island of Mormons an affectionate pat. 'You must belong to a group some other group believes is heading there.'

'That's perverse.'

'It's also the law...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 114. "The League's ['Enlightenment League': a small radical atheist organization] treasurer, matronly Meredith Lodge, an IRS functionary whose lifelong ambition was to deliver a tax bill to the Mormon Church, popped open her ledger book. 'Is this really the sort of enterprise we should be spending money on?'

'I'll pay for everything.' Oliver polished off his brandy. 'Plane fares, helicopter rentals. . .' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1995 Bradbury, Ray. "One More, Legato " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996; c. 1995); pg. 199. "But driving in search didn't do it. It wasn't like calling in lost dogs or telephone-poled cats. They must find and cage an entire Mormon tabernacle team of soprano springtime-in-the-Rockies birdseed lovers to prove one in the hand is worth two in the bush.

But still they hastened from block to block, garden to garden, lurking and listening. Now their spirits soared with an echo of 'Hallelujah Chorus' oriole warbling... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 359. "'Yeah, but I haven't told you about Microsoft and Rupert Murdoch... and Larry King Live...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 62. "It should have surprised no one that paralysis of the body politic might leave one limb functioning if it were insulated against systemic shock. If you put aside the arguable features of Mormon theocracy--the fact of theocracy, women's rights, the identification of Amerinds as lost tribes of Israel--you could focus on the more secular facts of Mormonism. They scorned drugs, including nicotine and alcohol; they swelled their ranks with as much missionary zeal as any Moslem, and they strengthened their church with tithes. They were studious. They voted as a bloc.

Each of these factors was a survival factor, though not obviously so. The most obvious survival factor was the one which Mormons had taken for a century as an article of faith without demanding an explicit reason: stored provisions. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 63. "Every good Mormon knew from the cradle that he was expected to maintain a year's supply of necessities for every family member against some unspecified calamity. Mormon temples maintained stocks of provisions. A year's supply of raw wheat was not expensive, and its consumption meant that one must be able to grind flour and bake bread. The drying of fruit, vegetables, and meat allowed storage at room temperature with no chemical additives more injurious than a bit of salt and sulfur.

Mormons had such a long Darwinian leg up on their gentile neighbors (to a Mormon, all unbelievers including Jews were gentiles) that, by the 1980's, the church found it wise to downplay the stored provisions. Faced with a general disaster, a Mormon might choose to share his stored wealth with an improvident gentile--but no longer advertised his foresight because he did not want that sharing at gunpoint. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1996 King, Stephen (written as Richard Bachman). The Regulators. New York: Penguin Books (1996); pg. 64. "'Hear what?' she asked irritably. 'I was in the shower, what'm I gonna hear in there?... The Reed kids with their Frisbee, I heard them. Their damn dog barking. Thunder. What else'm I gonna hear? The Norman Dickersnackle Choir?' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1997 Bova, Ben. "Introduction: The Art of Plain Speech " in Twice Seven. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 5. "It may be de rigueur in academic circles to moan about the myth of Sisyphus and the pointless futility of human existence, but such an attitude is antithetical to the principles of science fiction... Science fiction is a fundamentally optimistic literature. We tend to see the human race not as failed angels but as evolving apes struggling toward godhood...

Does that make science-fiction silly? Or pedestrian? Or juvenile? Hell no! It's those academic thumb-suckers who are juveniles. I science fiction we deal with the real world and try to examine honestly where in the universe we are and where we are capable of going... at its best, science fiction is wonderful. And it tends to be optimistic. " [Author Ben Bova here suggests a central philosophy for science fiction which, interestingly enough, is essentially identical to the central philosophy of Mormonism.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 DeFalco, Tom & Adam-Troy Castro. X-Men and Spider-Man: Time's Arrow Book 2: The Present. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 276. "Iron Man checked his power systems. The Texas Twister spiraled upward, carrying his onetime teammate Firebird... She-Hulk and Doc Samson leapt up in stages. The various members of Power Pack [possible LDS Church members], none of whom were older than twelve, flew up as a group, with all the pent-up energy of any children who've been kept inside for too long. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 5. "Bester's mistake was growing up. If the golden age of science fiction is twelve, it follows that SF writers will be successful in proportion as they can maintain the clarity and innocence of wise children. Writers as diverse as Ray Bradbury, Harlan Ellison, Anne McCaffrey, Piers Anthony, and Orson Scott Card all owe a good part of their popularity to their Peter Pannishness. Characteristically, their stories do not pay much heed to those matters of family and career that are the usual concern of mature, responsible adults and the mature, responsible novelists who write them, like John Updike and Anne Tyler. Many classic novels and stories of the genre are about children of exceptional wisdom and power: A. E. Van Vogt's Slan, Theodore Sturgeon's More Than Human, Orson Card's Ender's Game. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 13. "These works are admired by discerning readers within the field, but being inimitable, they have not been imitated. By contrast, some of the most influential and widely imitated writers in the field--Asimov, Heinlein, Herbert, Pournelle, Card--vaunt themselves on their artlessness and lack of literary polish, or at least that is the John-Wayne persona they affect. they are simple 'tellers of tales.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 95. Pg. 95: "...Roger Zelazny in Damnation Alley (1969, filmed in 1977), with its mutated, carnivorous, high-camp cockroaches... " [The main character in Damnation Alley is a non-practicing, ethnic Mormon, and a large section of the novel takes place in Mormon-run Salt Lake City.]; Pg. 96: "Another and more potent technology than that of the Bomb came to dominate our lives and culture in the years we have been considering: the technology that was becoming our second nature all through the era of nuclear dread and that rules us now: television. " [Television, invented by Mormon inventor Philo Farnsworth. More about the powerful influence of television, pg. 97-98, etc.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 151. Pg. 151: "...the founders of religions... have been as fiercely protective of Hubbard's posthumous reputation as have been Mrs. Eddy's followers and Mormons as well. "; Pg. 163: "Readers turn to the op-ed pages for electoral politics or to novelists like Allen Drury, Tom Wolfe, or Anonymous. " [Drury won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Advise and Consent, about a Latter-day Saint congressman.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 198. "On the one hand, one award-winning black SF writer, Octavia Butler, has made racial (and sexual) confrontations, in the future and in alternative pasts, almost her exclusive theme. Like [Orson Scott] Card, she works on large canvases. A first series of Patternist novels ran to five volumes, and that was followed by the Xenogenesis trilogy... As with Card, or the gothic fantasist Anne Rice, an intense conviction coupled with a total lack of human allows Butler to invent compelling, if implausible plots. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 224. "...SF is likely to be the first genre to cross the technological gap in a big way. SF fans, after all, were among the first enthusiasts of the personal computer, and a good percentage of them are amateur writers who would welcome the opportunity--already provided by the more prescient SF authors, like Orson Card--of kibbitzing rather than passively receiving the writer's word as writ. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 238. [Footnotes] "26. The SF writers who have tried their hand at historical fiction (not counting those who have written hybrids of the two genres that involve traveling backward in time or 'alternative' pasts) include Jules Verne, John Brunner, Ursula Le Guin, Robert Silverberg, Brian Aldiss, Orson Scott Card [Saints], and me. The reason for this crossover phenomenon lies in the similarity of the task: to create a densely imagined world, with social protocols and physical environments radically unfamiliar to most readers. That skill, learned in one genre, can be readily transferred to the other.

...9. The Alvin Maker novels [by Card] are, in order of publication, Seventh Son (1987), Red Prophet (1988), Prentice Alvin (1989), and Alvin Journeyman (1995), with more volumes projected. " [More, pg. 239.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 239. [Footnotes] "12. In this regard, I cannot resist passing along a perhaps apocryphal tale concerning the creator of Tarzan and John Carter. In Burrough's sunset years, the woman who had for many years known herself to be the designated heir of his considerable estate made the mistake of referring to his fictions as escapist nonsense, supposing that he regarded them in the same light. He did not, and she was cut out of his will. Burroughs believed in his wish-fulfilling tales as fervently as Card believes in his. It is the secret of their success. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 169. "Who wanted to join a faith based on... gold tablets translated by a prophet who had never been to school? While the idea of dying and becoming God sounded all right, I had my doubts about what it really might be like... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 180. "'So the Twelve Apostles are like the apostles of Christ, except they're more of a government, like, say the ministers of government in Columbia?' I paused, then added, 'But what's the difference between the First Presidency and the Twelve Apostles?'

'Same people, but different functions,' answered the composer. 'As the apostles, they guide the church. As the Presidency, they guide the country.'

I frowned, not dissembling in the slightest. 'Is the President also the. . . Prophet, Seer, and . . .?'

'Revelator?' Perkins took a sip of cider. 'Actually, the First President--that' the official title--is usually the head of the church, the Prophet, Seer, and Revelator, but in his government role, he's more like the president of Columbia.'

'The head of state? Then who functions as the real head of government?'

'That's the First Counselor.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 199. "I had to wonder where the Saint missionaries were going. It couldn't be to Europe. Ferdinand and his crew had treated the Saints as badly as the Gypsies and other dissidents. There were some Saints in the western parts of Columbia [in this book, Columbia refers to the Dutch-settled nation in the eastern half of North America] and in New France [also in North America] and in Oceania and South America. But were they trying to convert New France? Or would the loosening of relations with Deseret mean an influx of Saint missionaries? "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 268. "...I took The Book of Mormon and began to read through it.

Parts of it struck me as strange--strange because I had to wonder. How could a barely literate farm boy who followed a vision from Virginia backcountry to New Ostend ever even transcribe a five-hundred-page printed manuscript, let alone keep it consistent?...

How did he manage to convert thousands to a new religion--or a new manifestation of the old? Would he have managed it if things had been different? If the English colony at Plymouth had succeeded? "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 277. "It had to be the Tabernacle, because the Temple hadn't been consecrated until well after the death of Joseph Smith. Hard to imagine how a Virginia farm boy ended up in New Ostend, called to a mystical hill among skeptical Dutch, proclaiming a new religion that had turned into a sovereign and powerful nation in little more than a century. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 179-180. "'Maybe. . . it's just that all the terms I read in the papers are confusing. I read about counselors and presidents and a presidency and apostles, and I see the same name being so many things.' I shrugged.

'The same name?' asked the composer.

'Cannon, I think. He talks about culture, and he's a counselor to someone, and then I read that he's an apostle, or one of the Twelve. But he's also a businessman.' I shrugged, then grinned. 'I've done a lot of things, but I don't think I've ever done four separate jobs all at once--and been in the media as well.'

Perkins nodded, an amused grin. 'He does get around, but it's simpler than you think. The same people are members of the Twelve and the First Presidency. Counselor is one of the titles within the Presidency. We've never had a full-time government separate from the church and business. For Deseret, they all go together.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 268. [Telman is talking with the head lama in a monastery in Thulahn, a fictional country near where Nepal is.] "'What about other faiths?' I asked. 'Do you, for instance, get Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses turning up here?' I had a sudden comical image of two guys in sober suits and shiny shoes (covered in snow) shivering outside the giant doors of a remote monastery.

'Very rarely.' The Rinpoche looked thoughtfully. 'Usually by the time we see them they are . . . changed,' he said. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 379. "'So the Nigerian is visited by his wife, the Indian by her dead husband,... the Chinese by some Mongol warlord--'

'Qin was not a Mongol--'

'--and you, for crissake, you get visited by your dearly departed father, who tells you that he and his friends have been busy rebuilding the universe, for crissake. 'Our Father who art in Heaven . . .'? This is straight religion. This is straight cultural anthropology. This is straight Sigmund Freud. Don't you see that? Not only do you claim your own father came back from the dead, you actually expect us to believe that he made the universe--'

'You're distorting what--' " [Many themes in Contact closely parallel LDS teachings and scripture, but either it was a coincidence and Sagan arrived at similar ideas on his own, or he was actually familiar with these LDS concepts, and used them without visible attribution.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 2000 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 361. [Afterword by author.] "...but I also read Mormon scripture (most notably the Book of Mormon stories of the generals Gideon, Moroni, Helaman, and Gidgiddoni, and Doctrine and Covenants 121) and the Old and New Testaments, all the while trying to imagine how one might govern well when law gives way to exigency, and the circumstances under which war becomes righteous. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints world 2003 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 172. "...the Ecucatholic Movement [Pope Paul John Paul] had launched [2003] was the kicker... By canonizing practically every Protestant leader since the Reformation... PJP had somehow gotten millions of Protestants to come back under the Roman umbrella. Realizing that there was now a Saint Brigham Young and a Saint Mary Baker Eddy gave me an idea of how far things had gone. "


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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