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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Utah: Salt Lake City

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 23. "Great Salt Lake City, Deseret (DNS). In presiding over the Saints' Annual Conference on the Family, First Counselor Cannon highlighted the church's concerns about the role of culture in developing morals: 'We must provide to our youth the finest examples of culture that uphold the moral fabric of our society. Excellence in art must include moral excellence, not mere technical artistry.'

Cannon, owner of the Deseret media empire that includes the Deseret Star, Deseret Business, and United Deseret VideoLink, is the youngest First Speaker of Deseret. He was selected as a counselor 1988, and he has beeen one of the Twelve Apostles since 1983. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 143. "The dirigible had changed course and was approaching Great Salt Lake City from the south, coming over a long, low ridge. Below were houses, and more houses, all set on streets comprising a pattern largely gridlike, except where precluded by the hills and occasional gullies... The city lay right under the Wasatch Mountains, far closer than I had realized from my self-gathered briefing materials... a thin brownish cloud veiling the city itself... 'Must be some sort of inversion,' I speculated. 'I'd bet it's more common in the winter.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 148. "The uniformed driver eased the Browning off the expressway and onto a wide boulevard heading north in the general direction of the Temple.

A series of interconnected white stone buildings appeared on the left.

'That's the Salt Palace performing complex, where you'll be singing. The Lion House Inn is where you'll be staying,' offered Jensen... 'The original Lion House is a museum. It was the home of Brigham Young. We'll pass that after the Temple.'

'He was the second prophet? The one who founded Deseret?'

Jensen nodded... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 148. "Jensen gestured out the window again. 'There is the Temple. The building with the rounded roof is the Tabernacle.'

'Is that where the Saints' Choir--?' ventured Llysette.

'Yes. They practice and broadcast from there. Also the General Conferences are broadcast from there as well.'

'Once I heard then, in Orleans.' Lysette nodded. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 148. "The Temple was all I had expected, its towers white and shimmering on the hillside, immediately surrounded by what appeared to be white walls, browned grass and leafless trees, and a few evergreens. The Saints had emphasized the Temple's grandeur by keeping the buildings around it low. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 149. "I opened the envelope. There were ten notes, each ten Deseret dollars. Each note held a picture of the Temple on one side, with a bannered motto beneat that read: 'Holiness to the Lord.' On the other side was a likeness, but it wasn't that of Joseph Smith or Brigham Young, but of someone called Taylor... The driver turned the Browning again, onto West Temple South. Two blocks later, we passed the Temple, surrounded by white stone walls and heavy wrought-iron gates, all swung wide open. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 150. "After several blocks more, the driver turned north again.

'Up the hills in that direction'--Jensen pointed generally eastward--'that's where the University of Deseret is.'

We passed more of the overside and well-established dwellings. 'A number of the Seventy reside in this area.'

'The Seventy?' asked Llysette.

'The Quorum of the Seventy,' answred Jensen. 'That's the body below the Apostles, in a way.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 151. "'I've taken the liberty of including several bottles of wine in the cooler. Alcoholic beverages aren't permitted for Saints, and they're not served in the restaurants, but there is a dispensation for visiting dignitaries.'

'We appreciate the consideration,' I said politely, 'and all your arrangements.'

'You have been most kind,' Llysette added. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 163. "A higher stone wall encircled the Temple proper, and those grates were barred with black iron gratework. The dome-roofed Tabernacle squatted across a flat rectangular area, half-filled with raised stone enclosures that were turned bare-earth flower beds. The flower beds were bordered with low juniper hedges... The Tabernacle was impressive--essentially an amphitheatre around series of tiered risers and a huge organ. The walls were white and gold, and the woodwork glistened under the dome. The recording equipment was still in place, with microphones hung strategically. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 171. "'How do you find Deseret?' asked Hansen...

'With Llysette's rehearsals and practice, we really haven't had much time to sightsee. We did tour the Temple grounds and the gardens. They're all very impressive.' I smiled. 'It's always been amazing to me to read about how much you Saints have accomplished. To see it is even more amazing.'

'People work hard here...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 175. "'How do you like Deseret?'

'It is. . . different.' Llysette smiled gently. 'Very. . . clean.'

'The Temple is impressive. So is your husband,' I added. 'Llysette had told me about his music. She's sung some of it for years. But he's much younger than I expected.'

'Dan does have that boyish look,' Jilian replied, brushing a strand of curly hair off her forehead. 'Would you like something to drink? We have hot or cold cider, hot chocolate, and orange and grapefruit juice.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 188. "During the applause, more Saints filed in, filling many of the remaining seats.

Then came the Debussy aria, Lia's air from L'Enfant du Prodigue, and there wasn't any doubt about the volume of the applause. A few more listeners straggled in, and I began to wonder about Saint punctuality. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 147-148. "Jensen nodded. 'I should also point out a few other things. Profane language bothers people here, even if it's casual and accepted language elsewhere... The city is on a grid system. All the towns and cities in Deseret are. The main north-south street is always Main Street, and the main east-west street is Center Street.' Jensen laughed. 'Except here in Great Salt Lake. The north-south street is Temple, and the part north of the Temple is North Temple and the part south--'

'Is South Temple?'

'That's right. So if an address is two hundred west, two hundred south, you can tell that it's two blocks south of the center of the city and two blocks west.'

I nodded. That seemed simple and logical--too logical for a sect that was supposedly based on mystical revelations translated from golden plates... Then again, given the hostility that had driven the Saints... out into Deseret, I couldn't say I blamed them for some of that they'd done. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 214-215. "The store [ZCMI] bothered me, and I wasn't sure why, exactly. There hadn't been more than a handful of men anywhere, and the women in the store were well dressed and well groomed, and a number of them were smiling. Not exactly what I would have expected in a rigid theocracy... the women I'd seen hadn't seemed depressed or oppressed. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1999 Bezzant, Pat. "Finale " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 269. "'This house sits between two cemeteries.'

'Two?' Eric asked.

'City Cemetery is at the bottom of the hill and LDS Cemetery is up the hill.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2000 Datlow, Ellen (ed.) Vanishing Acts. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 275. "M. Shayne Bell has had short fiction and poetry published in Amazing Stories, Asimov's SF Magazine, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Tomorrow SF, Gothic.Net, Realms of Fantasy, and in ten anthologies, including Starlight 2, Future Earths: Under African Skies, Simulations: Fifteen Tales of Virtual Reality, and War of the Worlds: Global Dispatches. He published one novel, Nicoji, and edited the anthology Washed by a Wave of Wind: Science Fiction from the Corridor, for which he received the Association of Mormon Letters Award for editorial excellence. In 1991, he received a Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. Bell was poetry editor of Sunstone magazine for six years.

He and his partner live in Salt Lake City, but Bell grew up on a ranch on the Snake River in Idaho, a place with hundreds of acres of forest, islands in the river, wildlife everywhere. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2002 Dalton-Woodbury, Kathleen. "Signs and Wonders " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 160. "Where was the Millennium they'd been hoping for?... But the heart seemed to have gone out of most of the adults back then. [New Years, year 2000 -- the author wrote this in 1993, predicting.] Even Tevita's religion teachers acted like deflated balloons, going through the motions, tired and puzzled. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2002 Dalton-Woodbury, Kathleen. "Signs and Wonders " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 160. "Only Grandpa still burned with fire [after the turn of the Millennium]. 'I've got it! The City of Enoch! Didn't Joseph Smith say it was at the North Star? Where will it go when it comes back with the Lord? It has to land somewhere, right? But it can't land on all the people, all the cities.' Grandpa's grip on Tevita's little-kid arm was as strong as a vice. 'Remember that guy who thought the rock pictures spread out on the ground in--where was it? South America?--were for people from space? That's what we have to do. We need to make a picture for the City of Enoch, so they'll know where to land, so they won't land on Salt Lake City.' Tevita rubbed the bruise on his arm after Grandpa released him. 'We can go up to Idaho and get lava--Max Morrison has acres of it--and spread it out on the salt flats. We'll make what--a fish? Something big enough to be seen from space.'

'Why a fish, Grandpa?'...

'Early Christian symbol--fishers of men.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 206. [News report continues.] "'...That ruling, on whether she still had the blessings of God and was therefore a member of the human family or was an alien outside of God's grace, went against Caslon, according to the relative, but we have been unable to confirm that with Mormon Church officials.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 207. [Words spoken apparently by a member of the Soldiers of God, a mostly Protestant group opposed to the Rewound Children.] "'Ah, here we are at six. My friends, we are making progress. Just as I said, too, that if you wait, things will take care of themselves. The Mormon Church itself wasn't so sure if this woman was human, so the Almighty, of course, answered for them. He will end the threat, in his own time. You will see.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 225. Pg. 225: "'Jack, is the fact that all six v-- of the dead individuals were cremated rather quickly coincidental?'

Jack's image regarded her for a moment. 'Not in the least. Just as many funeral homes still refuse to embalm AIDS victims, funeral personnel will not touch these cadavers [of the Rewound Children] and insist on cremation. And in all six cases, survivors did not object. We managed to do some preliminary tests on Caslon's body [Myra Caslon, the only LDS Church member among the 17 Rewound Children], but we were not allowed to do a full-blown autopsy. Despite it being a homicide [Caslon was killed by the Soldiers of God, a group made up mostly of Protestants], state and church authorities stepped in and said no.' "; Pg. 227-228: "'...suspects in the death of Myra Caslon have all pleaded innocent to charges of first-degree murder. FBI officials and Salt Lake City prosecutors are remaining mum about the indictments...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 226. "'...Would autopsies have been helpful?'

'The bodies of the deceased would have been good resources for further study. I cannot--and will not--deny that. But I am not a ghoul... Despite what the Caslons say... I'll talk to the Caslon family, ask them to back off a bit...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 231. [News report.] "'Vroman [non-LDS lawyer in San Francisco] is resting in the hospital. In an exclusive, Pacific Regional News taped a short statement.'

'It was the death of poor [LDS Church member] Myra Caslon that woke me up. I'd been in pretty bad shape over the last few months, as my sister Grace, here can attest... After Myra was killed, I realized the trouble we [the Rewound Children] are in and how vulnerable we are. I stopped drinking and straightened myself out because no one else is going to help us.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 205-206. [News report about the death of LDS Church member Myra Caslon, killed by the Soldiers of God, a fanatical group made up mostly of Protestants.] "'The FBI is calling the death of Myra Caslon, another of the Rewound Children, a ritual murder. Caslon's age was listed as fifty-five, although records indicate her birthday was two days ago. Caslon was the mother of six children, all but one grown and living away from home. She had been living with her husband, Haley, and their youngest son, Sydney, eleven, here in Salt Lake City. According to a family member who asked she not be identified, Caslon had attempted suicide not long after being released from the Albuquerque hospital, but, as that relative put it, faith and family saved her. As recently as New Year's Eve, said the relative, Caslon had pronounced herself optimistic about the future and had renewed her faith in God whatever the church elders might rule [regarding the status of the Rewound Children]...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2010 Doering, David. "Snooze " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 217. [Year estimated.] "A Mormon once thought of using alcohol for something good. It was at my dad's wedding to his boyfriend James. The Mormon was me. The something good was Snooze... I was researching at that time Theta endorphins at the University of Utah... I just wasn't sure if Dad should marry again so soon after Mom's passing away. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Bell, M. Shayne. "The Thing about Benny " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 276. Pg. 276-278: "The light turned green. I drove us onto North Temple, downtown Salt Lake not so far off now...

'Check in,' Benny said.

'What?'

'The Marriot.'

...I called Utah Power and Light to tell them we were still coming... Utah Power and Light was a first visit. We'd do a get-acquainted sweep of the cubicles and offices, then come back the next day for a detailed study. Oh sure, after Benny'd found the Rhapis excelsa in a technical writer's cubicle in the Transamerica Pyramid, everybody with a plant in a pot had hoped to be the one with the cure for cancer... The people at UP&L were thrilled to see us... "; Pg. 280: "If a company's employees had traveled around a lot... they sometimes ended up with the kinds of plants we were looking for. UP&L has stayed put for a good long time, plus its employees include former Mormon missionaries who've poked around obscure corners of the planet. World Botanics hoped to find something in Utah. "; Pg. 281: "Marriot "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 23. "He followed the old smugglers' route he'd used to run candy to the Mormons. It was possible that he was the only one left alive that knew it. " [As mentioned on pg. 15, Tanner (the main character) previously monthly shipments of goods to Salt Lake City in Utah. His familiarity with the Mormon state, coupled with his name and other clues, such as on pg. 7 and 13, indicate that Tanner is an ethnic Mormon -- born into a Mormon family, but possibly never exposed to actual LDS religious practice in this post-apocalyptic milieu. Both his parents died within weeks after his birth and he was raised by relatives.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 49. [Soon after arriving in Salt Lake City.] "'I thought they'd send more than on car [from California].'

'They did. We lost two.'

'Oh. Sorry to hear. You know, I talked with that guy Brady when he passed through. He said Boston'd sent six cars. He sure looked bad, and his car looked like it'd been through a war. The President wanted him to stay--said we could send someone the rest of the way. But Brady wouldn't hear any of that. He'd driven this far, and by God he'd finish it, he said.'

'Jerk,' said Tanner.

'He pulled a gun when we tried to take him to a doctor. Wouldn't leave his car. I think he was off his rocker. That's why we sent a car of our own after he left, to be sure you'd get the message.'

'What car? said Greg.

'It didn't . . .?'

Greg shook his head. " [The President mentioned here is probably the President of the remaining Latter-day Saints, as well as the secular leader.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 51. "'There's a couple cops keeping the people out,' he said, 'and I see another trying to clear the way for a car. I think maybe it's the President's, but I can't tell for sure.'

'What's he want?' asked Tanner.

'To welcome you and wish you luck, probably.'

Greg ran his hand through his hair. 'How about that, the President.'

'Screw,' said Tanner.

Greg cleaned his fingernails with the edge of a matchbook. ''We're celebrities,' he said.

'Who needs it?'

'It doesn't hurt any.'

'Yeah, it's the President,' said Monk... 'I'll go out and meet him. He'll be here in a minute.'

'Why've you got to be that way?' asked Greg.

'What way?'

Obnoxious. The guy's a big wheel here, and he's coming over to say something nice to us. Why do you want to blast him?' " [In this post-apocalyptic era when all that remains of the U.S. is a few city-states, it is likely that the President of Salt Lake City referred to here is a combined secular/LDS religious leader.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 51-52. [Greg and Tanner, transporting medicine from California, stop in Salt Lake, where a meeting with the President is arranged -- probably the combined President of Salt Lake and the Latter-day Saints, although it may be noted that the term is also used in California of this post-apocalyptic era.] "'...Why do you want to blast him?'

'Who said I'm going to blast him?'

'I can just tell.'

'Well, you're wrong, citizen. I'm going to be the sweetest, nicest, ass-kissingest hero the bastard ever went to talk to, hoping that it would get him reelected, of course. Okay?'

'I don't give a damn.'

Tanner chuckled again.

The noise level rose as a door opened somewhere in the building...

'Who'd want to be a President?' he asked, as somewhere a door banked closed... The President, who was a thin, balding man, hook-nosed, pink-faced, and smiling round pearly dentures, raised his right hand and said, 'I'm Travis. I'm very glad to meet you boys and welcome you to Salt Lake.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 52. "'This is the President,' said Monk, smiling and wiping his hands on his coveralls.

Tanner stood and extended his hand.

'My name's Tanner, sir. I'm honored to make your acquaintance. This is my friend Greg. I'm happy to see Salt Lake again. It looks better each time I come this way.'

'Hello, Greg. --Oh, you've been this way before?'

'A considerable number of times. It's one of the reasons they passed over a lot of the other volunteers for this job and selected me. I did quite a bit of driving--before I retired, that is.'

'Really?'

'Yes. I have a small ranch now and only a few servants, and I spend most of my time listening to classical music and reading philosophy. Sometimes I write poetry. When I heard about this thing, though, I knew that I owed it to humanity and to the nation of California to volunteer. After all, they've been pretty good to me. So that's how I find myself visiting your town once again.'

'I admire your spirit, Mr. Tanner...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 53. [Conversation with the President in SLC continues] "'...What led you to volunteer, Greg?'

'I--well--volunteered because-- I'm a driver. I run the mail to Albuquerque. I've got a lot of experience.'

'I see. Well, both of you are to be commended. If all goes as we expect it to, will you be coming back this way again?'

'I plan to, sir,' said Tanner.

'Very good. I'd be happy to receive you anytime you're in town. Perhaps we can have dinner, and I can hear a full report of the trip.'

'Our pleasure sir. If you're ever out L.A. way, I trust you'll drop in and spend some time at the rancho.'

'Delighted.'

Tanner smiled and flicked an ash on the floor. 'I'm a bit concerned as to our route after we leave here,' he said.

'U.S. Forty is good for a distance--how far, though, nobody can tell you. there's been no reason for our drivers to push in that direction.'

'I understand. Well, that's something. I was planning on trying Forty, and this confirms it. Thank you.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 53. [Conversation with the President in SLC, continued.] "[President:] 'Glad to be of help. Have you eaten yet?'

[Tanner:] 'A fellow who works here went out to get us something. He should be back soon. We have to hurry, you know.'

'Yes, that's true. Well, if there's anything you need, let me know.'

'Thank you.'

He shook their hands again.

'As I said, good luck. A lot of folks will be hoping and praying for you.'

'That is appreciated, Mr. President.'

'I'll be seeing you.'

'Good morning.'

'Good-bye.'

He turned then and left, Monk following him out. Tanner began to laugh.

'Why'd you hand him that line of sh--, Hell?'

'Because I knew he'd believe it.'

'Why?'

'He wants everything to be nice. So I told him nice things, and he believed them. Why not? Dumb bastard actually believed somebody'd volunteer for this!' [transporting medicine to Boston]

'Some guys did, Hell.'

'Then why didn't they let them drive?'

'They weren't good enough.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2020 Zelazny, Roger. Damnation Alley. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1969); pg. 54. "'What fortune?'

'I heard the President talking about the place you've got out there on the coast. Very cool...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2025 Baker, Virginia Ellen. "Songs of Solomon " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 171. [Year estimated.] "The woman is looking back at the mural... It is a very Mormon painting. Though I know in other places the scenes would be different. For here, for this place, it is epitomal.

A family of wives stands against a sunlit horizon. Their backs are strong; their faces are plain and hard, but the austerity itself is its own beauty. Their hands are huge, like the hands of their men.... in the women's waiting eyes, watching the deep russet skyline for a sign, for any sign of his coming. The little dusting of homespun cottages scattered along a river. The unsullied white of the clouds. The yellow-butter of wheat that has been blessed, growing in such straight lines that not a furrow, not a stalk, is out of place. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2025 Baker, Virginia Ellen. "Songs of Solomon " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 173. "The scene shifts... and I am slammed into: a meeting house. It is huge; an eternity of walls that go on forever. Windows everywhere.

The tabernacle on Temple Square.

I'm sitting in a pew, right up front. The Christus, the only statue of Christ left in Utah, stares down at me. The hollow eyes are stern. They have moved him there, out of the Visitors' Center (where anyone could come to him) and into the tabernacle. I don't know why.

He stands behind the old wooden pulpit. It's much too small for him.

The sacrament table is just below. It is covered with a white cloth... I wonder just what it is that this sacrament represents.

The Christus intones, though his mouth does not move, 'Take. Eat. This is the flesh of my body. My blood.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2025 Baker, Virginia Ellen. "Songs of Solomon " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 171-172. "'Which ward are you from?' she asks.

Ahhh, I think. Here it comes. So I try. Try to tell her I have no ward, no stake, no church, no faith at all... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 42. [Year estimated.] "Every six months Zo reluctantly gathered with the faithful. Salt Lake City. Temple Square. The Mormon Tabernacle. Zo pressed shoulders with the devout to hear words from living prophets.

General conference was a tradition for Mormons. And for Zo's relatives. Every April and October his family tree transplanted to Temple Square for the weekend. His ancestors had always done the same--except they congregated in fields to hear Joseph Smith prophesy; later they stopped beside their handcarts to learn Brigham Young's plan for taming the west. A long heritage. When it came to Mormons, Zo's blood ran the deepest blue...

Zo had waited in line for over an hour with Zinnie, his grandmother. The line filed slowly into the Tabernacle, past the ushers at door #22, for the final session of general conference.

'Are you cold?' Zo said. He put his arm around Zinnie and squeezed. An early October chill had settled into the Salt Lake Valley. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 43. "Zo had spent the better part of the last year getting in and out of temporal marriages. The Brethren had recently authorized this new arrangement: 'temporal marriages.' Mormon men over thirty-five could now wed Mormon women over thirty for a three-month trial period. This new marriage carried all the respectability of regular 'eternal marriages,' the traditional wedding that would last not just for this life but through all eternity. Eternal marriage: mind-boggling, yes. But also daunting to Zo and many of his generation, so at a recent conference in Salt Lake City the Brethren announced the time had come to 'Strengthen the Homefront,' starting with the temporal marriage covenant. And like frequent flier miles, it had a neat twist: after three months couples could upgrade their temporal marriage to eternal ones, if they so desired. " [The author envisions a future response by the Church to the surrounding society's abandonment of traditional marriage.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 43. "This focus on marriage was not without precedent. Fifteen years earlier, just as Zo entered his marriageable Mormon prime, the prophet issued all single brethren a new commandment: 'Rise from the dust and be men.' Some of Zo's buddies got engaged that very night. But many of them, like Zo, sank even deeper in the dust--eternal bachelors, destined never to reach the highest level of heaven. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 44. "For some reason Zo and Grandma Zinnie hit it off. He always knew he was her favorite grandchild. And keeping Zinnie company while they waited in line for general conference seemed natural, except for one thing: usually Zo and his relatives were escorted effortlessly into the Tabernacle. Door #4 would open, the usher would scan their passes, discover their heritage, and they'd be in. No waiting. But that day Mormon leaders from around the world filled the main floor of the Tabernacle; they were special guests of the Twelve Apostles. A month before, a letter from church headquarters apologized to Zo's family for any inconvenience this might cause.

Of course, Zinnie had the option of watching conference at home, like most Mormons do. The church satellite beamed the sermons into living rooms around the world. But Zinnie wanted to come in person, she said: 'Tradition.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 44. "General conference was always the same thing: Men in white shirts and blue suits; women in dresses and heels. Children looking like advertisements for Easter shopping sprees. Even the music from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, warm-up hymns no doubt, seemed another rerun. Soft tones from the pipe organ wafted as subtly as mist through the crowd. Everyone was getting ready for the Sunday afternoon meeting of general conference, the culminating session, a kind of Mormon celebration. Most of the faithful had settled down onto blankets. Scattered like confetti across Temple Square lawns, the blankets might have passed for a communal picnic.

In the past Zo had done the blanket thing with girlfriends he hoped to impress. While outside he never heard much of the sermons--there was too much life going on around him... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 45. "'Since I was twelve,' Zinnie said, 'I've never missed a session.'

'Really?' Zo said, although he already knew. Zinnie had made this announcement at the start of every session for as long as he could remember. He knew what would follow: Zinnie's story about meeting the prophet Lorenzo Snow, the inspiration for Zo's first name--Lorenzo--a name he found remarkably old fashioned.

'That's right.' Zinnie opened her purse and fished around. 'Ever since that morning Grandfather Richards took me inside and introduced me to the prophet. I wore a pink bow in my hair--still have it, I do--and the prophet said I was as lovely as a spring morning.' Zinnie wiped her glasses with a Kleenex. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 46. "Since living at Zinnie's, Zo had met many eligible sisters in the Farmington congregation. Mainly school teachers and secretaries. But Claudine caught his eye the third Sunday in church. She sat alone in the pew on the far west wall of the chapel. Her face followed the words of the speaker so vigorously that Zo thought her eyes alone could interpret for the deaf.

But in retrospect Zo had to admit it was more than Claudine's intensity that fascinated him. It was her look. Zo couldn't place her. Ethnically speaking, that is. Was she black or Polynesian or Latin? Perhaps Southeast Asian? Zo couldn't tell. And he didn't really care either. A few weeks later, Zo an Claudine began talking temporal marriage... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 48. "Zo found Grandma Zinnie leaning against the cement wall that separates the temple from the Tabernacle. She was looking at the temple spires. She stared as if she were some bird of prey and the temple were a mouse she would soon pounce on. Zo stood behind her and looked up too. The temple spires cut sharply into the pale autumn sky, and Zo remembered his heritage. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 48. "Zo remembered his heritage.

Sort of. All those Sunday school lessons on temple history and Zo still wasn't sure he had it right. He remembered that they spent forty years building the Salt temple. (Yes, that's right, he thought: forty years.) And not only did his ancestor donate time and skills, but at one point Brigham Young asked everyone to donate their china plates. (Now was it Brigham and Salt Lake? Or was it Joseph Smith and Nauvoo?) Zo's ancestors had cradled their china so carefully over the ocean and across the plains. But at Brigham's request (maybe it was Joseph) the early Saints sacrificed their only indulgence. The workmen crushed the china plates to make a coating for the temple walls--a prophet's plan to make the temple sparkle...

'I'm going to Crossroads,' she said, now looking at the mall across the street.

'But it's Sunday,' Zo said.... Mormons--people admonished not to shop on the Sabbath... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 51. "His father arrived with Zo's uncle. They both hugged Zinnie. 'We're right behind you, Ma,' his dad said.

'Our Zinnie--a temple missionary,' his mother said, clasping her hands...

'You know, Mom,' Zo said. 'I didn't quite get what--uh--Elder What's-his-name said. We ended up in the Visitor's Center and could hardly hear a word.'

'Well, the Brethren have called all members over the age of seventy to serve full-time missions,' she said. 'That means they'll call Zinnie to serve in one of the temples, and she'll live right on the temple grounds.'

'For how long?' Zo said. He knew that church members had microfilmed all the available genealogy in the world, that computers had sketched out the family tree of humanity, and that technology could not solve their biggest bottleneck: Real-live, flesh-and-blood people had to perform the vicarious ordinances in the temple. Most Mormons were just too busy to sit through the long temple sessions very often. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 42-43. "When Zo first moved into Zinnie's house four months ago, he wasn't sure how long it would last: a Mormon gypsy living with his pioneer grandmother. " [Entire story is about LDS people and Church, with references throughout. Not all refs. in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 43-44. "The intent of the most recent announcement was of course clear to Zo: You've got no excuse now, so get married--and soon. Although most Americans lived with loose--if any--family ties, when a Mormon wasn't bound into a mom-and-pop household, church leaders didn't know what to do. And too many stray cats were wandering away, especially the unattached males.

Newspapers across the country gave the announcement little press, saying the Mormons were finally giving in to what most Americans had been doing for years: living together. But to the Mormons and Zo's family, temporal marriage was a big revelation. A sign of the last days. Zo thought it wonderful "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 44-45. "...once, when sitting on the lawn [on Temple Square, during General Conference], he almost got his picture in the official church magazine. Unfortunately, Zo got cropped out, although his friend (who was sitting next to Zo and his girlfriend at the time) appeared in the next issue. His friend looked thoughtful. Transcendent even. And it wasn't the first time a church videographer had caught Zo's friend transcending. Zo knew that the lawn outside the Tabernacle had its advantages.

But waiting in line wasn't one of them. All of Zinnie's descendants--Zo's family, his cousins and aunts and uncles--had arrived much earlier on Temple Square. They were already inside the Tabernacle. Zo agreed to bring Zinnie later, as soon as she woke up from her nap. Now standing forty yards back in line with three minutes till broadcast time, Zo doubted they'd make it inside. But he didn't say anything. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2050 Spinrad, Norman. "A Thing of Beauty " in Nebula Award Stories Nine (Kate Wilhelm, ed.) New York: Harper & Row (1974); pg. 195-196. [Year is estimated.] "I was in real trouble. I was very close to blowing the biggest deal I've ever had a shot at. I'd shown Ito the two best items in y territory, and if he didn't find what he wanted in the Northeast, there were plenty of first-rank pieces still left in the rest of the county-top stuff like the St. Louis Gateway Arch, the Disneyland Matterhorn, the Salt Lake City Mormon Tabernacle--and plenty of other brokers to collect that big fat commission. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 122. "He showed me some places in Salt Lake he'd nearly finished [re-creating in virtual reality]. The famous Mormon temple was almost complete, as well as the not-as-famous Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine nearby. Gus said these were a combination of old photos, paintings, and memories. They were beautiful. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 2160 Dick, Philip K. The Game-Players of Titan. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall (1979; c. 1963); pg. 11. "Or, he thought, I could try something much stronger. Emphytal.

Three of those, he thought, and I'd never wake up. Not in the strength capsules I've got. Here . . . he let the capsules lie on his palm as he stood considering. No one would bother me; no one would intervene--

The medicine cabinet said, 'Mr. Garden, I am establishing contact with Dr. Macy in Salt Lake City, because of your condition.'

'I have no condition,' Pete said. He quickly put the Emphytal capsules back in their bottle. 'See?' He waited. 'It was just momentary, a gesture.' Here he was, pleading with the Rushmore Effect of his medicine cabinet--macabre. 'Okay?' he asked it, hopefully. " [References to the 'Rushmore Effect' throughout novel. It is unclear whether this term is named after Mount Rushmore, the mountain monument carved by Mormon sculptor Gutzon Borglum.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 1962 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 44. "His father got his doctorate and went to teach at Brigham Young University--the 'Y.' She was eight years old when she first went to school in Orem, Utah. All the children in her class were white, all of them were Mormon, and many of them were the same children she saw on Sunday. This was the fall of 1962... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 1987 Spencer, Darrell. "I am Buzz Gaulter, Left-hander " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1987); pg. 134. "'Los Angeles is not the end of the world, Francois. Orem is.' This is the bad news. Orem, Utah. Utah's watch-us-grow city. Home of the Osmonds, Donny and Marie... East Orem is the Wasatch Fault. It runs the length of the Wasatch Mountains. It waits. Its time will come. The local paper carried a photo of the mountains above the cities below and a fracture severing them... " [Many other references to Latter-day Saints and to Orem throughout story, other refs. not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 1991 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 6. "But Tana could fix it if she never admitted witnessing the fight. She could avoid the trial. I can run a psyche profile on the transient in the morning, she thought. No matter how strait and sane he comes out, on paper I'll show him to be a madman. Hell, half the Mormons in the valley can't pass the Minnesota Mental Health Inventory. As soon as they admit belief in gods and devils and revelations, they're down the tube.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 1995 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 245. "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book would not exist if not for the kindness of these people. Thanks to Tina Pohlman, my editor... to my many L.D.S. friends (especially Elders Boyack and Gonzalez of the Provo Mission, winter, 1995), for their faith, generosity and sense of humor. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 1998 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 70. [Comments don't necessarily reflect LDS beliefs, but were given at BYU, the LDS-owned university where 98% of the students are LDS.] "'Of course man made God in his own image; but what was the alternative? Just as a real understanding of geology was impossible until we were able to study other worlds besides earth, so a valid theology must await contact with extraterrestrial intelligences. There can be no such subject as comparative religion as long as we study only the religions of man.'

El Hadj Mohammed ben Selim
Professor of Comparative Religion
Inaugural Address, Brigham Young University, 1998
"

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 114-115. [In virtual reality simulation of Provo.] "I looked up at the sky. It was a perfect powder blue--the color the sky must have been before the Eight Hours--with wisps of cloud here and there. And there were birds, sea gulls, I think. There was a hint of pollution near the horizon that was lined with most beautiful mountains I had ever seen, brown peaks with skirts of green around the bases. One of these mountains had a huge 'Y' painted on it. " [The 'Y' is for 'Young', short for Brigham Young University, the LDS Church-owned university.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 69. "The autopilot didn't answer, though I wouldn't have been much surprised if it had. Then I squeezed back into place and proceeded to override the autopilot manually. I didn't have too much time; I was already over the Deseret basin and I could see the setting sun glinting on the waters of the Great Salt Lake ahead and to the right.

...I kept curving her [the plane] up until I was lying on my back with the earth behind me and sky ahead. I nursed it along, throttling her down, with the intention of stalling with the fire dead at thirty thousand feet--still thin but within jumping distance of breathable air and still high enough to give my lady a chance to go into her dive without cracking up on the Utah plateau. At about 28,000 I got that silly, helpless feeling you get when the controls go mushy and won't bite. Suddenly a light flashed red on the instrument board and both fires were out. It was time to leave. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 71. "...I stuffed it [parachute] into a culvert I found running under the road that edged the field, then started slogging that road toward the lights of Provo... I could hardly keep from whistling as I walked, I felt so good. Sure, I was still hunted, but the... proctors thought I was still high in the sky and headed for Hawaii. At least I hoped they believed that and, in any case, I was still free, alive, and reasonably intact. If one has to be hunted, Utah was a better place for it than most; it had been a center of heresy and schism [against the despotic theocratic Protestant regime that took control of the U.S.] ever since the suppression of the Mormon church, back in the days [when the regime began]. If I could keep out of the direct sight of the... police, it was unlikely that any of the [Mormon] natives would turn me in. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Utah County 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 70-71. "I had intended to rip the chute out somewhere between one thousand and five hundred feet above the ground, but my nerve played out and I couldn't wait that long. There was a large town almost under me--Provo, Utah, by what I remembered of the situation from higher up. I convinced myself that I had to pull the rip cord to keep from landing right in the city... I was still too high up and I seemed to be floating toward the lights of Provo. So I took a deep breath--real air tasted good after the canned stuff--gathered a double handful of shrouds and spilled some wind.

I came down fast and managed to let go just in time to get full support for the landing... Then I was sitting on my tail in a field of sugar beets, and rubbing my ankle. " [The character is trying to escape the theocratic regime that rules all the U.S. He flees and hides among the LDS members living in Utah, who constitute a pocket of resistance against the despotic regime.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Vietnam 1969 Thayer, Douglas. "Opening Day " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1969); pg. 31-32. "I had read an article by one of the apostles who had visited the Mormon servicemen in Vietnam. He said that in one meeting the men came to the tent carrying their rifles. In the prayers they prayed for the Mormon boys killed the week before, prayed for the spirit of the Lord for themselves. After the testimony meeting some of the soldiers told the apostle that they had met him as missionaries in Europe nine months before when he was touring the missions. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Virginia 1998 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 309. "'It may not matter whether I publish a novel or if my son becomes a physicist, because the idea's out there already. So what are you going to do? Go back to 1898 and kill H.G. Wells? You can, if you really want to, but what's to prevent another writer from coming up with the same concept? Or maybe you stop Einstein from developing the theory of relativity. You might, but does that necessarily prevent Stephen Hawking or Kip Thorne or someone else from investigating the same problems?' " [Kip Thorne: a Latter-day Saint physicist.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Washington 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 400. "During his last hours, Trevor Hicks sat at his computer skimming and organizing genetic records sent from Mormon sources in Salt Lake City. He was staying at the home of an aerospace contractor named Jenkins, working in a broad living room with uncurtained windows overlooking Seattle and the bay. The work was not exciting but it was useful, and he felt at peace, whatever might happen. Despite his reputation for equanimity, Trevor hicks had never been a particularly peaceful, self-possessed fellow. Bearing and presentation, by English tradition, masked his true self, which he had always visualized as frozen... somewhere around twenty-two years of age, enthusiastic, impressionable, quick-hearted. "


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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