Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

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back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Utah: Kanab

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 186. "He walked by the Book Outpost and stopped. There, in the display window, were dozens of books, all propped up to show the pictures of the old Mormon prophets and pioneers who had built and rebuilt the church, who had, out of a mist, fashioned something real.

There was Joseph Smith, of course, and Brigham Young, and all the others: John Taylor, and Oliver Cowdery and Rigdon, and the frontier heroes--Snow, Hamblin, Pratt... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 4-5. "Kanab, Utah... On his left, the church sat squarely in the middle of a grassy park, a centerpiece of sorts, a red-brick affair that also had a sign, one made of metal letters hammered into its front wall.

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS " [Many refs. to the Church throughout book, only some in DB. Some refs. to Church are positive, but the main plot point of the book is a 'conspiracy theory' about the discovery of a document accusing Brigham Young of involvement with the Mountain Meadows incident. This is contrary to the historical record, of course, but this is just a novel, a legal drama.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 442. "Except for being illuminated only by sunlight, Dr. Hiram Sharp's office in Ogden didn't seem much different from any other Jens Larssen had visited. Dr. Sharp himself, a round little man with gold-rimmed glasses, looked at Jens over the top of them and said, 'Son, you've got the clap.'

'I knew that, thanks,' Jens said. Somehow he hadn't expected such forthrightness from a doctor in Mormon Utah. He supposed doctors saw everything, even here. After that hesitation, he want on, 'Can you do anything about it?'

'Not much,' Dr. Sharp answered, altogether too cheerfully for Jens' taste. 'If I had sulfa, I could give you some of that and cure you like nobody's business. If I had acriflavine, I could squirt it up your pipe in a bulb syringe. You wouldn't like that for beans, but it would do you some good. But since I don't, no point fretting over it.' " [The doctor is a Latter-day Saint, but the soldier with the venereal disease is not.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 444. "Jens had chained his bicycle to a telephone pole outside the doctor's office. It was still there when he went out to get it. Looking up and down Washington Boulevard (which US turned into when it ran through Ogden), he saw quite few bikes parked with no chains at all. The Mormons were still a trusting people. His mouth twisted. He'd been trusting, too, and look where it had got him.

'In Ogden goddamn Utah, on my way to a job nobody else wants,' he muttered. A fellow in overalls driving a horse-drawn wagon down the street gave him a reproachful stare. He glared back so fiercely that Mr. Overalls went back to minding his own business, which was a pretty good idea any way you looked at it. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 445. "The last wagon of the convoy creaked by. He started rolling again, and soon passed Tabernacle Park. The Ogden Latter Day Saints Tabernacle was one of the biggest, fanciest buildings in town. He'd seen that elsewhere in Utah, too, the temples much more the focus of public life than the buildings dedicated to secular administration.

Separation of church and state was another of the things he'd taken for granted that didn't turn out to be as automatic as he'd thought. Here in Utah, he got the feeling they separated things to keep outsiders happy, without really buying into the notion that that was the right and proper way to operate.

He shrugged. It wasn't his problem. He had plenty of his own.

Just past the city cemetery, a concrete bridge took him over the Ogden River. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 446. "By then, he was just about out of town. The scrubby country ahead didn't look any too appetizing. No wonder the Mormons settled here, he thought. Who else would be crazy enough to want land like this?

He lifted one hand to scratch his head. As far as he was concerned, what the Mormons believed was good only for a belly laugh. Even so, he'd never felt safer in all his travels than he did in Utah. Whether the doctrines were true or not, they turned out solid people. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 446. "Is that what the answer is? he wondered: as long as you seriously believe in something, almost no matter what, you have a pretty good chance of ending up okay? He didn't care for the idea. He'd dedicated his career to pulling objective truth out of the physical world. Theological mumbo-jumbo wasn't supposed to stack up against that kind of dedication.

But it did. Maybe the Mormons didn't know a thing about nuclear physics, but they seemed pretty much content with the lives they were living, which was a hell of a lot more than he could say himself. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Ogden 1941 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Tilting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1995); pg. 446. "People looked up from whatever they were doing when he rode past. He didn't know how they did it, but they could tell he didn't belong here. Maybe somebody'd pinned a sign to him: I AM A GENTILE. He laughed, partly at himself, partly at Utah. Hell, even Jews were Gentiles here. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Richfield 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 81. "Tibor said, 'What's the story on this apple tree? Is this the tree from which the Christian-Jewish idea of the serpent in the garden of eden come?'

'It's our understanding that the Garden of Edem [sic] is located around a hundred miles to the east,' Jackson said. 'You're a Christian are you?' Tibor nodded. " [Latter-day Saints are not mentioned explicitly here, but note the location (Richfield, Utah), the idea of the Garden of Eden having been nearby/in America, and the use of 'Jackson' as a character name (a reference to Jackson County, Missouri, the location Joseph Smith associated with the Garden of Eden). Also, note that at least half of this novel takes place in Utah.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 54. "'Salt Lake City!' the conductor shouted. 'All out for Salt Lake City!' The train gave a convulsive jerk--like a man letting out his last breath, Abraham Lincoln thought--and came to a stop.

Wearily, Lincoln heaved himself up out of his seat and grabbed his valise and carpetbag. After speaking in Denver and Colorado Springs, in Greeley and Pueblo, in Canon City and Grand Junction, leaving Colorado and coming to Utah Territory was almost like entering a foreign country.

The impression was strengthened when he got out of the pullman car. An eastbound train was loading as his was unloading. Most of the men filing aboard wore the blue tunics and trousers and black hats of the U.S. Army, and were burdened with the impediments of the soldier's trade. As the crisis with the Confederate States worsened, the regulars were being called to the threatened frontiers. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 54. "A crowd of men, women, and children cheered the soldiers' departure. At most train stations, as Lincoln had seen during the war, the soldiers would have responded, waving their hats and calling out to the pretty girls. Not here, not now. Every cheer they heard seemed to make them glummer, or perhaps cheerful in a different way. 'Jesus,' one of them said loudly to a friend, 'will I be glad to get out of this God-damned place.'

'Sad, isn't it?' said a little man who appeared at Lincoln's elbow while the former presdient was watching the troops embark. 'They aren't cheering to wish the men good luck if they have to fight the Rebs. They're cheering because those fellows are getting out of here, and theyhope they won't come back.'

'I had the same impression myself, Mister . . . ?' Lincoln hesitated.

'I'm the chap who's supposed to meet you here, Mr. Lincoln: Gabriel Hamilton, at your service.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 55. "'...We hang together better than we would if that weren't so, I expect.'

'If you don't hang together, you will hang separately?' Lincoln suggested.

Hamilton took that for his wit rather than Ben Franklin's and laughed again, uproariously this time. 'You're a sharp man, Mr. Lincoln. I'm glad we've got you out here, for a fact, I am. You'll buck up the miners and the other working folks, and you'll make the bosses think twice about what they're doing, and those are both good things. Come on back to my buggy, sir, and I'll take you to your hotel.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 55. "'Thank you,' Lincoln followed his guide away from the train. Soldiers were still boarding the one bound for the East. The local crowd was still applauding their departure, too. 'Those would be Mormons, I suppose?'

'That they would,' Now Gabriel Hamilton sounded more than a little grim. 'I tell you frankly, Mr. Lincoln, the rest of us in town are nervous about it. Without soldiers here, God only knows what's liable to happen. God and John Taylor, I suppose. The Mormons think that's the same thing. Gentiles, though, will tell you different.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 55. "'You're referring to Brigham Young's successor?' Lincoln said as Hamilton took his luggage from him and loaded it onto the buggy. 'Young was an uncrowned king here during my administration.'

'And up till the day he died, four years ago,' Hamilton agreed. 'And do you know what? I think he loved every minute of it.' He untied the horses from the rail and clambered into the carriage, nimble as a monkey. 'Mr. Taylor's got the same power, but not the same bulge, if you know what I mean.'

'I do indeed.' Law and politics had both shown Lincoln that, of two men with the same nominal authority, one was liable to be able to do much more than the other if their force of character differed. 'So Taylor is King Log instead of King Stork, eh?'

'Would'nt go so far as that. He's quieter about what he does, that's all. You settled there?' At Lincoln's nod, Hamilton clucked to the horses, flicked the reins, and got the carriage going. After a while, he continued, 'The Mormons...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 56. "Trees--poplar, mulberry, locust, maple--grew alongside those guttes, and their branches, green and leafy with the fresh growth of spring, spread above the streets, shielding them from the full force of the sun. The prosplect was attractive, especially when compared to either the flat, dull towns of the prairie or the stony gulches in which most Rocky Mountain cities were set.

'Where's the Great Salt Lake?' Lincoln asked, suddenly realize he could not see the natural feature for which the city was named.

'Hamilton pointed west. 'It's almost twenty miles from here. There's a little excursion train that'll take you there if you want to see it. Don't drink the water if you do go; it'll burn you up from the inside out.'

'I've seen it from the train several times, on my way out to California.' Lincoln said. 'I have no desire for a closer acquaintance--it's only that I haven't been in, as opposed to through, Salt Lake City till now, and so missed it.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 56. "A few of the houses were log cabins that took Lincoln back to the long-vanished days of his own youth. More were of creamy gray-brown adobe bricks, some stuccoed over and whitewashed or painted, others left their natural shade. Newer homes might have been transplanted straight from the East. Almost all of them-cabins, low adobes, and modern clapboards and fired-brick houses--were surrounded by riots of trees and shrubs and climbing vines and flowers, making a spectacle all the more impressive when measured against the bleak, brown Wasatch Mountains just east of town.

Some of those adobe houses, despite being of a single story, nevertheless had a great many rooms, with seveal wings spreading out from what had begun as small, simple dwellings. Poinitnt to one of those, Gabe Hamilton said, 'You see a place like that, Mr. Lincoln, and you can bet a polygamist lives there. He'll take the center for himself and give each wife and her brats a wing.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 57. "Like the residential blocks, the central business district of Salt Lake City boasted avenues lined with trees. The buildings back of those trees were modern enough, and included several fine-looking hotels. Ahead loomed what looked like an enormous Gothic cathedral, about three fourths of the way to completion. 'That would be the famous Mormon Temple?' Lincoln asked, pointing.

'That's right.' Hamilton nodded. 'And that long dome there--the one that'd look handsomer if the wall and the trees didn't hide its lines--that's the Tabernacle, where they worship. They don't think small, do they?'

'No,' Lincoln allowed. 'Many things may be said of the, but not thinking small.'

From the window of his hotel room, Lincoln could look out at the Tabernacle and the Temple. On scaffolding that seemed hardly thicker than cobwebs, men tiny as ants against the granite bulk of the latter labored to bring Brigham Young's grandiose vision one day closer to completion. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 57. "Lincoln had just finished unpacking when someone knocked on the door. When he opened it, he found a handsome young man in a dignified suit standing in the hallway. 'Mr. Lincoln, President Taylor presents his compliments, and hopes you will be free to take supper with him this evening at seven o'clock,' the youngster said. 'If that is convenient to you, sir, I will come by with a carriage at about half past six, to convey you to his home.' "

'President Taylor?' For a moment, the only president by that name who came to Lincoln's mind was Zachary, now thirty years dead. Then he remembered where he was. 'The head of your church, you mean?'

'Yes, sir, of course.' The emissary had probably learned of Zachary Taylor in school, but John Taylor was the living reality for him. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 58. "When Lincoln knocked at the front door, a man of about his own age opened it. 'Come in, sir,' he said in an accent that showed he'd been born in England. 'I am John Taylor; it is a pleasure to meet you.' His hair, his eyebrows, and the beard growing along the angle ofhis jaw and under his chin were all snowy white. He habitually pursed his lips, which made his mouth look narrow and bloodless; his deep-set eyes, very blue, seemed to have seen more sorrows than joys. Lincoln understood that. He would have said the same of himself.

He looked around with no small curiosity. The central portion of the house seemed no more unusual within than without: the furniture was comfortable without being lavish; bookshelves lined many walls; the knick-knacks and gewgaws on tables, the pictures on the walls, were the sort any minister might have had. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 58. "Nor was the dining room in any way strange. As Lincoln sat down, Taylor said, 'I fear I can offer you only water or milk with your meal, for I have no tea or coffee or liquor in the house.'

'Water will do,' Lincoln said.

They talked of small things during supper. Taylor did not offer to introduce the girl--she was about sixteen--who brought bread and butter and beefsteaks and potatoes and squash in from the kitchen. Maybe she was a servant. Maybe she was a daughter. She didn't look much like him, but she might have favored her mother. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 58. "After she [the food server] had cleared away the last of the dishes, the Mormon president said, 'When you next communicate with President Blaine, sir, I hope you will convey to him that the line the U.S. government has taken here makes it more difficult than it might otherwise be for us to support that government with our full power in the event of a collision with the Confederate States.'

'I have no notion when I shall be in touch with Mr. Blaine again,' Lincoln answered truthfully.

John Taylor coughed. 'Please, sir, I know you may not love the faith I follow, but that I follow it does not make me a child or a fool. Can it be a coincidence that the one former Republican president of the United States comes to Deseret--Utah, if you'd rather--at the same time as the present Republican president is leading the country toward war with the CSA? For what othe rpurpose could you be here than to examine our loyalty in the event of a conflict?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 98. "There wre, Abraham Lincoln reflected, undoubtedly worse places in which to be stranded than Salt Lake City. Technically, stranded was the wrong word. He'd had several speaking enagements canceled because of the outbreak of the war, and had decided to stay where he was till more came along. The Mormons who made up the majority of the population were unfailingly polite and considerate to him. Whatever he thought of their religious beliefs, they were decent enough to spare... the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-Day Saints... " [Many other refs. to LDS Church and the Mormons in book, most not in DB. See also pg. 59, 98-101, 110-111, 118, 129-139, 142, 167-172, 191-196, 209-214, 219-223, 238-239, 242-246, 251-255, 305-310, 325-327, 379, 446, 458.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 133. "Hymn succeeded hymn, all performed by the choir and that formidable organ. Once they were done, another layman-priest--a businessman in everyday life, by his clothes--offered a long prayer. Many of the references, presumably drawn from the Book of Mormon, were unfamiliar to Lincoln, but the prayer's moral tone would not have been out of place in any church he had ever visited.

Antother choral hymn followed, this one longer than any that had gone before. While it wen on, eight bishops of he church cut sliced loaves of bread into morsals for communion. Attendants took the morsels on trays and passed them out to the audience. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 54-55. "Despite his [Hamilton's] small size--Lincoln towered over him--Hamilton had a jaunty manner and a way of raising one eyebrow just a little to suggest he was hard to impress. After shaking hands, he went on, 'Call me Gabe, if you please, sir. All my Gentile friends do.'

'Your--Gentile friends?' Lincoln wondered if he'd heard correctly. His ears, these days, weren't what they had been. Gabe Hamilton had neither a Hebraic name nor Hebraic features.

[He] laughed out loud. 'If you're not a Mormon in Salt Lake City, Mr. Lincoln, you're a Gentile... Rothman runs a dry-goods shop down the street from me. Here, he's a Gentile.'

'And what is his opinion of his... unusual status?' Lincoln asked.

'He thinks it's funny as blazes, matter of fact,' Hamilton answered. 'He's a pretty good egg, Rothman is. But Presbyterians like me, Catholics... Jews, what have you--in Utah Territory, we're all outsiders looking in. We hang together better than we would if we weren't so...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 55-56. "After a while, he continued, 'The Mormons still listen to him, I'll tell you that.' He sounded mournful: a man relating a fact he wished a falsehood. 'You won't have many of them coming to your speech tomorrow night, I'm afraid.'

'That's a pity,' Lincoln said. 'From what I've read of Utah, and from what you've told me, they are the ones who most need to hear it.'

As in Denver, the streets in Salt Lake City were all of dirt. Dust rose from the horses' hooves and from the wheels of the carraige. Though traffic was not heavy, a lot of dust hung in the air. But the water that ran over the pebbles of the gutter looked bright and clean enough to drink, and Lincoln saw a couple of women in calico dresses and sunbonnets dipping it up in pails, so he supposed it was used for that purpose. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 56-57. "'How many Mormons are polygamists, truly?' Lincoln asked. 'They write all sorts of things in the Eastern papers.'

'They say all sorts of things here, too,' Hamilton answered. 'The truth is devilish hard to find, and they don't keep public records of marriages past the first, which makes it harder yet. I'd say it's about one in ten, if that, but the polygamists have influence byond their numbers. If you're going to support more than one wife and family, you need more than the common run of money, you see.'

'Oh, yes,' Lincoln said. 'A case similar to that of slaveholders in the Confederate States. And those not in the elite group will some of them aspire to join it over the course of time, and thus support it even without presently enjoying the benefits.'

'Benefits?' Gabe Hamilton let out a derisive guffaw. 'Have you ever seen most of these Mormon women, Mr. Lincoln? You ask me--not that anybody did--taking 'em in is an act of charity.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 57-58. "'Tell him I thank him for the invitation, & I shall be pleased to see him at the hour he named.' For the life of him, Lincoln could not see why the spiritual leader of the Latter-Day Saints wanted to meet with him, but what he did not show to the young messenger, that worthy would not guess. And his own ignorance and curiosity would be relieved soon enough.

As promised, the bright young man came by the hotel in a handsome buggy at six-thirty. The journey to John Taylor's home took a little less than half an hour. The home itself, or at least the central portion of it, would not have looked out of place in Chicago or Pittsburgh: it was a two-story building, brilliantly whitewashed, with a slate roof. Added to that central portion, though, were enough wings for several butterflies, each, no doubt, housing a separate portion of the Mormon president's extended & extensive family. Poplars, maples, & grape vines surrounded the house, & ivy climbed up the front wall. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 58-59. "'I was invited here to speak to the working men of this Territory on ways in which they can hope to better their lot,' Lincoln said, again truthfully.

'A plausible pretext, I don't deny,' Taylor said, seeming intent on finding deviousness whether it was there or not. 'The timing, however, makes me doubt it conveys the whole story of your visit. Be that as it may, do please tell President Blaine that, since he seems to be continuing the longstanding U.S. policy of attempting to suppress our institutions, some of our number wonder if continued allegience to the United States be worth the cost. All we have ever sought is to be left alone, to practice our own ways as we think best.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 202. "'After the war, I spent a year studying in the Vatican. Another year in Canterbury. Six months touring the American Bible Belt. Finally three days in Salt Lake City.'

'Only three days? You seemed to have given the Mormons pretty short shrift in your studies.'

'Sometimes three days are enough.' " [By the end of the story, it is revealed that Verwoerd's time in Salt Lake City was a major turning point in his life.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 203. "'What made you leave Salt Lake City after three days?' Her eyes narrowed. 'You didn't convert, did you?'

He laughed. 'Those Mormons... the New Testament has the Pharisees use the excuse 'it's better that one man die than a whole nation perish' to kill the Nazarene. The Mormons stick that same excuse in the front of their scripture, only they have one of their prophets use it as an excuse to cut off the head of an evildoer... That wasn't their craziest saying, though. Try this one: 'As man is, God once was; as God is, man may become.' '...

'All I was struggling with was the concept of setting myself up as one of Nietzsche's supermen. Here were what I was supposed to think of as serfs, dreaming of themselves as Gods in embryo.' He shook his head... 'The belief may be absurd, but the belief in it is not. I had the son of a friend tell me that a while ago.'

'But what made you leave?'...

He paused... 'In a way, I suppose, I found what I was looking for?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 219. "'Now you know what I learned [from the Mormons] spending those three days in Salt Lake City.' He slowly edged over the door and closed it, locking it shut.

'There's no way you can escape, Hans. The courtyard is swarming with commandos.'

'Nietzsche was right all along,' Verwoerd said as if he hadn't heard her. 'Right about so many things. 'Once I thought of little else but Nietzsche'--would that I had ever been able to stop!

'Those three days I stared into the abyss--'thou heaven above me, thou pure, thou luminous heaven! Thou abyss of light!--and it stared back at me.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1944 Allred, Lee. "The Greatest Danger " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 220. "'You must become what you are.' [quoting Nietzsche] The Will to become the Superman, to rise above 'slave morality'--that makes us the Superman. It was our Will that made us [Draka] better than the rest of the world.

'Then I visited that accursed city [Salt Lake City], saw that same Will channeled into their [Mormons] morality, their serf dreams. To 'never never never' fall under the yoke, to be gods looking down in pity on mere superman. To will the absurd fantasies of religion into reality--entire nations that don't have to conquer or murder or . . .'

He composed himself. 'I knew then my people [Draka] were too evil to let them continue to exist. I dedicated my life to destroying the Domination.'

'You've made a good start,' Sally said. 'Rescuing an entire population out from under the noses of the Draka will give conquered people all over the Domination hope--' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1948 Bell, M. Shayne. "Lock Down " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 80. Pg. 80: "The Tabernacle fills to less than half capacity...2,347 people--though in that small audience the Democratic governor of Utah, Herbert Brown Maw, & his wife Florence take good seats near the front. "; Pg. 84: "...they all drive with the governor under and his wife to Utah's governor's mansion where Marian stays as an honored guest.

...The story of Marian & the governor and his wife is in all the Utah papers the next day, & the day after that in all the appers in America & after that, abroad. Utah is shamed by what happened: but more than that, the governor introduced legislation outlawing discrimination based on race in all public institutions in Utah, &... it passes. Utah becomes a bastion of civil rights in 1948. It shows America the way forward.

'Hold us there, Megan,' you call out. You know this didn't happen. You wish you could lock it down, but you know this didn't happen.

'It could have happened like that,' Megan says. 'It was in their hearts.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1948 Bell, M. Shayne. "Lock Down " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 88. "The Tabernacle fills with 6,104 people--it's standing room only... Florence does not cry, though some in the audience do. Marian sings three encores: 'Coming through the Rye,' 'Will 'o the Wisp,' and the Bach/Gounod Ave Maria, then she, Franz, and Bessie bundle up and wlak back to Hotel Utah... You've got time right. You've seen what really happened the night of Marian Anderson's only concert in Salt Lake City...

...You are still stationed above Hotel Utah... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1948 Bell, M. Shayne. "Lock Down " in Starlight 2 (Patrick Nielsen Hayden, ed.). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 79-80. "It disgusts you to see the meanness thrown at Marian in places like New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, and now this place... 'She sings Brahms and makes people weep,' Paulo had said.

And Marian was black. In America in 1948, that meant you couldn't go through the front doors of a hotel.

You'd already locked that into true time on your last shift, and on this shift it is now time for Marian's concert in the Mormon Tabernacle on Temple Square. You watch her climb down the icy fire escape, trying to hold her concert gown out of the slush, and walk the half block to the Tabernacle to warm up--'literally,' Megan says--for her concert. Franz goes to work immediately to make sure the piano is tuned... while Marian runs through scales in the space under the choir seats--the Tabernacle equivalent of backstage... " [Other references to the Mormon Tabernacle, not all in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 109. "God had blessed Coburn Heights, a suburb on the east bench of Salt Lake City where wealthy Saints shared with their gentle neighbors the pleasures of wide, curving streets, spacious houses, and driveways cluttered with motor homes, power boats and snowmobiles. The foremost shepherd of the faithful in this prosperous suburb was Sherman Colligan, president of Coburn Heights Stake. On a wintry Saturday morning, Sherman shopped for his wife in Albertson's supermarket... " [Many refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 111. "Rendella... began to recite. 'First: We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in his Son Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. Second: We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam's transgressions. Third: We believe--'

'That's excellent,' Sherman interrupted with an admiring exhalation of breath. 'It looks like you have every one of them down pat.'

Rendella wandered to the side of Sherman's shopping cart. She picked up a bottle of expensive grape juice, shook it, and peered suspiciously at the label.

'That isn't wine,' Sherman said. 'It's grape juice imported from Germany.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 115. "Yet his fine face beamed with kindness and good sense. The man-of-arms within him was tamed to Christian purposes; he was tuned entirely to the pastoral services of his calling. He forgave the sinful, comforted the bereaved, sustained the wavering. He prayed for himself and his people a proper testing, a sufficient trial to keep them alert, spiritually fecund, resistant to the softening which comes with abundance and blessings. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 116. "'That's the talk I like to hear! That's what I like about you, Art, and always have. You're Christian all the way through, and you've got drive and guts and energy. Go do'er, man! Keep up your courage, say your prayers, and tear into it. You can't fail!' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 127. "Would I want to go back? Abigail was there--and, while polygamy was acceptable in the Old Testament, it was not accepted in the forty-six states. That had been settled once and for all when the Union Army's artillery had destroyed the temple of the antichrist in Salt Lake City and the Army had supervised the breaking up and diaspora of those immoral 'families.'

Giving up Margrethe for Abigail would be far too high a price to pay... " [Heinlein, through this novel's main character, here expresses his well established acceptance for polygamy, as well as his anger for the mistreatment of the early Mormons in Utah at the hands of the federal government.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1986 Kessel, John. "The Pure Product " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1986); pg. 557. "I arrived in Kansas City at one o'clock on the afternoon of the thirteenth of August. A Tuesday. I was driving the beige 1983 Chevrolet Citation that I had stolen two days earlier in Pocatello, Idaho. The Kansas plates on the car I'd taken from a different car in a parking lot in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City was founded by the Mormons, whose God tells them that in the future Jesus Christ will come again. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 3. The Electric Monk was a labor-saving device, like a dishwasher or a video recorder. Dishwashers washed tedious dishes for you... Electric Monks believed things for you, thus saving you what was becoming an increasingly onerous task, that of believing all the things the world expected you to believe.

Unfortunately, this Electric Monk had developed a fault, and had started to believe all kinds of things, more or less at random. It was even beginning to believe things they'd have difficulty believing in Salt Lake City. It had never heard of Salt Lake City, of course. Nor had it ever heard of a quingigillion, which was roughly the number of miles between this valley and the Great Salt Lake of Utah.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 225. "At the temple grounds she was careful not to be slowed by the flowers, she avoided the missionaries at the gates. The way she moved, no one approached her--they could tell she was praying. She went over the bishop's words in her head, and she wandered through the visitor's centers, past dioramas of Mormon mannequins, the women's false faces hidden by bonnets. She tried to touch them and a voice asked her to please step back.

She passed the seagull fountain--only these people would sanctify such a dirty bird--and on toward the tabernacle, its omed roof echoing that of Saltair. She saw the Japanese, listened to the Germans. She saw the pasty-faced pilgrims from Missouri, Illinois, upstate New York--whole white families turned slow circles "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 226. "The temple rises like a theme park castle, its gingerbread spires barely holding the golden angel above the shadows of skyscrapers and car parks. She had been baptized there, many times and for many people, and now she was not sure if she'd ever cross that threshold again... It's harder to be inconspicuous in Salt Lake than it is in, say, Vegas--everyone here moves with purpose, with industry. Loiterers stand out, lurkers draw notice... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 227. [On Temple Square.] "Farther in, murals covered the walls, moving chronologically from Nebuchadnezzar's dream all the way to Joseph Smith and the angel Moroni, meeting in the forest--and beyond that, even, to the Mormon pioneers tirelessly bringing their handcards west. The murals seemlessly brough together old and new; synthesis is the Mormon's strength, that and a surprising flexibility, fortitude. They are a people, a righteous people unto the Lord, not just neighbors who meet on Sundays.

I stopped before the painting of Joseph Smith, a young man, talking to an angel. Above, up a curving walkway, I could hear voices murmuring in all different languages. I knew what was up there and I did not follow. I stayed where I was and tried to recall what I'd learned of Joseph Smith. He talked to angels, he copied down revelations from pieces of parchment... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 229. [On Temple Square.] "Through the plate glass windows of the visitor's center, I above, I saw the huge white Christ, the statue pointing at me. Behind me, behind the doors of the temple... were the baptismal fonts that look like graves. Everything is a resurrection... Outside the gates, out in the streets of the city, I saw people pointing to the apartment where the president of the church was living. The president is the earthly head of the kingdom of God--like Moses, he is the prophet, the translator and revealer. This prophet was Ezra Taft Benson, the thirteenth, and there's no doubt he's dead by the time anyone reads this. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 232. "The house, a duplex, was up in the avenues, on the side of the mountain, at the same height as Moroni, the golden angel atop the temple's spire. In the morning she'd look out at him, a mile away, to check to see that he was still blowing his trumpet, calling the saints. She tried to hear it... Up by the Capitol I looked out over the city, its trees in straight lines, suburb upon suburb; as Brigham Young promised, the desert has blossomed like the rose. West, I tried to see the lake and flat beyond.... On his days off she would show him the city. Once they had walked to the This Is The Place Monument and stood, looking down over the valley, the temple, the Capitol, the tall hospital near their houses... she turned him away toward the monument. All around the base were the trappers, Jesuits, Indian chiefs, all those who blazed trails and were then forced to make way before the saints. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 238. "The Mormon prophets foresaw trains and automobiles--I have no doubt they saw me coming. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 189-190. "The city itself [Salt Lake City] lay in ruins. Jagged stumps of tall buildings protruded like broken teeth from what had once been the center of town. A caved-in square marked the location of the great Mormon temple. Not a single structure remained intact. There were only echoes, shadows of what had once been thriving suburbs and commercial districts. Nothing moved on the roads leading in and out of the city. Whole blocks had been flattened, the ground scoured to the foundations as if by a giant abrasive. In places the earth itself had been ripped away in long gouges. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1989 Bennion, John. "Dust " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 285. "Salt Lake City, Utah:... On the highest spire of the temple the gold statue of Moroni, his horn to his lips, prepares to signal the rolling together of the scroll. Sometimes in my dreams I hear his trump then sense the stealthy movement of the quivering gas. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 63. "It had not taken him long to fatten the file on 'Indy,' as they had dubbed Mr. Harry Rex Brown. By now the FBI had shared those files with CIA, State... Gary Landis, the bronzed, long-haired young specimen accompanying Hildreth on his morning constitutional through Liberty Park in central Salt Lake City, was a case in point. 'I'm certain this 'Indy' guy is the same one we made in San Diego,' Landis was saying. 'He wasn't dirty in customs, but there was something about the dude that just didn't seem real, and I was the tail DEA put on him. I was the logical choice, I guess; cooling off from a deep UC. Turned out his contacts weren't drug-connected. A broker, an old movie actor, somebody else. Antiquities collectors is what they were. If you wanted him for that, you could probably score.' " [The nickname 'Indy' is from the Indiana Jones character. Brown is a Latter-day Saint archaeologist. More of this scene in SLC, pg. 63-64. More about Brown, e.g., pg. 65, 221.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 66. "...hit it off as if interagency rivalry did not exist; like Butch and Sundance; like Damon and Whoozis. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 230. [1] "In Salt Lake City's federal office building, lights burned late on Saturday evening. Harry Rex Brown [a Latter-day Saint archaeologist], at first an extremely reluctant guest there, began to feel after an hour that his halo burned as brightly as the lights on State Street below. While the DEA's Landis made no secret of the fact that he considered the halo somewhat askew, the strangers with him in the FBI office seemed anxious to straighten it, as though trying to impress the fellow called Mike. It seemed that while Mike had interesting maps and a promise of an extremely urgent secret mission into Chiapas and a peek into Harry's business, the man had no other names, lending him a certain aura of the mysterious and wonderful. Harry began to wonder whether, in the future, he should bill himself as just plain Harry, with no other names. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 230. [2] [Harry Rex Brown, an LDS archaeologist] "Harry's major surprise came after Mike tested him with a map of the region to the west of Lago Miramar in southern Chiapas, a region of limestone cliffs sometimes sunny but often hidden by mist, of rioting [sic] vegetation too high to be jungle, too rank to be anything else: the bosque. Mike's questions became more acute, probing like little needles into Harry's self-confidence. Finally, if Harry had explored no closer than thirty miles from the spot marked on that map, said Mike, was Harry absolutely certain that spot was reachable by men on foot when some spots in Chiapas were unexpectedly trackless, high mountain swamp?

Harry gave him a wise nod and decided to show off a little. 'In wohel be-t'-e,' Harry assured him; 'I know how to do it,' in Maya, expecting Mike to ask what the devil that meant.

'Tin t'sen tal,' Mike replied; 'I'm listening' in near perfect Maya, but maybe in a lowland dialect. Harry gaped.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 230. [3] [Harry Rex Brown, an LDS archaeologist] "Mr. Givens of the FBI had been listening quietly, but now he exchanged a glance with Mr. Landis and sat up straight. 'What's the matter, both you guys swallow your gum?'

'He speaks Maya,' Harry accused.

'And Spanish too. Don't underestimate me,' Mike said, only he said it very quickly in Spanish.

'That I can dig,' said Landis.

Harry, trying to reconcile Mike's ability with what he knew of government agents, winked at Mike. 'Why didn't you say you were LDS?'

'Because, I'm not, Harry. I've just spent a lot of time in Mexico, much of it outside the cities. And I want to make sure the guy who guides us to that spot knows at least as much about the unpleasant details as I do. I'll ask you again. How would you go through a swamp where no swamps are shown?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 231. [4] [Harry Rex Brown, an LDS archaeologist] "'You'll be part of the team I lead, then,' said Harry, ignoring the question for the moment because its answer was so elementary.

'Not unless you can answer my question, Harry,' said Mike.

Harry did not enjoy Mike's tone so much now; the man acted as if he had Harry on a string like one of those mechanical monkeys, and Harry did not appreciate it. He tried to be polite, however, and recited for Mike. 'You don't go through it, you go around it,' he said. 'Even if it's a greater distance. I always found it quicker that way. You could bring a rubber boat and pole your way through it, but they're heavier than you think. Half of your porters would be lugging equipment you can get along without.'

'Forget porters,' said Mike. 'Everybody on the team will pack his own gear. They might be toting something out, though.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 231. [5] [Harry Rex Brown, an LDS archaeologist] "'Harry knew, somehow, that if he mentioned his good friend and guide Yaxpoc at this juncture, Mike's little band might run off seeking Yaxpoc, leaving Harry himself behind. Once there they probably would not find Yaxpoc, but that would do Harry no good. Time enough to let Mike in on the secrets of jungle travel--in some places even the guide should have a guide--when they reached base camp. 'What might they be toting, Mike?'

'Sorry. You'll know when we get there.'

'If I'm leading a team, I have to know what I'm doing it for.'

'No you don't,' Mike said easily. 'Or let's put it another way, Harry: You're doing it for glory, or for ten thousand dollars, whichever sounds better to you.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 231. [6] [Harry Rex Brown, an LDS archaeologist] "This, to Harry Rex Brown, was beginning to sound like a test of wills. Harry had not been second-in-command of an expedition for some years, for reasons too illegal to mention; and Harry did not intend to be second again. Why do that, he reasoned, when he had enough funds to go again, his own boss, anytime he liked? Harry had sensed during the past hour that these government men weren't kidding about the urgency of it all but they had nothing on him worth their trouble, and that all this stroking and abrading on a holiday weekend meant that he had something they wanted very much and very, very soon. " [More about Harry, pg., 232-234, 264-269, 280-283, 288-291, 300-301, 315-318, 335-337.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1993 Nicita, Carolyn. "Solitude " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 36-37. "...the cement foundation of the ZCMI Mall. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1993 Shunn, D. William. "Rise Up, Ye Women that Are at Ease " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 104. "I kept to the west side of the street, since the east was still in shadow and would be colder. The only woman I passed was a young cash-register jockey who left the downtown Wendy's still in uniform... I turned east at the corner of Main and South Temple, passing the historic Lion and Beehive houses as I continued up to State Street. Brigham Young had lived there a century before.... I wondered what things had been like in that home.

There was a mailbox at the next corner, in the shadow of the Eagle Gate--a black metal arch that crouched over the street like a hungry daddy-longlegs... It was half a block to First Avenue, on the seam where the narrow, hilly Avenues debauched uneasily onto the broader downtown streets, then another half-block uphill to my ancient Impala, opposite the 1907-vintage apartment building I called home. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1993 Shunn, D. William. "Rise Up, Ye Women that Are at Ease " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 105. "I shivered. The loneliness was closing in. There was nothing in the neighborhood of turn-of-the-century homes and apartment buildings to defend me from it, either. The homes all around me were filled with dreams, plans, memories, family histories, and there was no comfort in that. Worse yet, with my car parked facing downhill, the Salt Lake temple rose in all its granite majesty ahead of me, just a few blocks away. Kjirsten and I had planned to be married there one day, before economic necessities forced us into a forbidden mutual living arrangement. I stared at the golden sculpture of the angel Moroni atop the temple's highest spire, trumpet lifted to his lips to sound a triumphant note I could not here, and I wept. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 111. "...a small subset of the [Englightenment] League, a kind of atheist commando unit [made various plans]... What a bold scenario, thought Oliver, as audacious as the time they'd faked a materialization of the Virgin Mary on Boston Common, as nervy as when they'd upstaged an antiabortion rally in Salt Lake City by hiring the notorious rock group Flesh Before Breakfast to stand across the street singing 'What a Drug We Have in Jesus.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. -3. "Author's Note

All characters and incidents in this book are totally fictitious, as are the Bird Cage and the circus families mentioned.

Deb Ralston's situation and opinions do not necessarily reflect those of the author or her family. In fact I, not my husband, am the computer nut of the family; all of my offspring love computers also, though only one is still living with me and playing with my computer. The bishop did indeed ask my husband and me to take over the ward newsletter because we had a nice new computer, but we were delighted with the call. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 28-29. "The year 1997... As the world spun on its course that Easter Day a whole series of manifestations came and went... In Salt Lake City appeared Joseph Smith's angel, and in Mexico the Virgin Mary... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah: Salt Lake City 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 162-163. "Although Great Salt Lake City had to hold more than a quarter-million souls, the streets were not thronged with steamers or steam buses. I craned but saw no haulers. Were they banned from the area around the Temple?

The browning grass in the park around the Temple was trimmed and raked and without leaves, despite the winds of the morning and the day before. Nowhere did I see even the smallest bit of litter.

...'The building here is the geneology center.' He gestured toward the two-story gray stone structure that bordered the street on the north side of the square. 'The difference engines there have everyone's ancestry on record...'

Then came a churchlike building.

'This is the performance hall. It's called Assembly Hall. There are three concerts a week broadcast from here all over Deseret...' "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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