Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Utah

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 321. "Not far away, Gordon McSweeney... was telling his squad, 'Properly speaking, these Mormons are not even Christians. They will go to hell regardless of whether we shoot them down or they die in bed. Spare not the rod, then, for not only are they heretics, they are rebels against the United States of America.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 321. "Lieutenant Norman Hinshaw was talking to the whole platoon: 'We have to root out these bandits and rebels and bring Utah back under the Stars and Stripes. Remember, most of the people we come across will be loyal Americans. Only a handful have sold themselves to the Canucks and the Rebs, and they're the ones causing the trouble. Once we get rid of them, Utah should be a peaceable state, just like all the others... When they first hatched their plot, the Mormon madmen blew up the railroad line right at the border and seized the weapons in every arsenal in the state. Now we've pushed more than halfway to Salt Lake City. They town ahead of is called Price. We'll take it, repair the tracks, and move on.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 322. "...he stepped out into the bright sunshine. The first breath of fresh air told him he wasn't in Kentucky any more... It was hot and dry, with an alkaline tang to it. It wasn't summer yet, but it felt that way. Ahead--westward and to the north, he saw mountains in the distance. A nearer line of green marked the Price River. But the land where he was standing had only scattered sagebrush and tumbleweeds and other desert plants on it. All it needed was the bleached skull of an ox to make it the perfect picture of an arid waste.

'This is the abomination of desolation, as was spoken of in the Book of Daniel,' McSweeney said...

...How the devil were you suppoed to raise crops on soil like this?

Plainly, the Mormons did it. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 323. "In an abstract way, Mantarakis sympathized with the Mormons who'd been supid enough to rise up against the might of the Unites States. He'd had artillery barrages come down on his position only too often... It went on for three hours. When it stopped, whistles blew, ordering the U.S. soldiers forward. Paul came up out of the foxhole in which he'd crouched and sprinted toward the outskirts of Price.

He hadn't gone fifty yards before a Mormon machine gun started stuttering out death....

He didn't know where the Mormons had learned. Wherever it was, they'd earned high marks. They defended every ruined store and pile of rubble as if losing it meant losing the war. They wouldn't retreat. They wouldn't surrender... Men, women, children down to about the age of eight--every Mormon in Price--fought, and fought to the death. Every smashed house had to be combed through room by room, every cellar checked for lurkers with guns. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 323. "...Mantarakis... blew a stream of smoke toward the little patch of Price to which the Mormons still clung. 'Still think this is just a few fanatics fighting us? If the rest of Utah is anything like this, the next Mormon who likes us will be the first.'

'You may be right about that,' McSweeney said. 'But what if you are? I keep telling you, the Mormons will burn in hell regardless of what they do here on earth.'

'Thanks a lot, Gordon,' Mantarakis muttered. McSweeney didn't see it, but to him, fighting a whole bunch of people who all hated you was different from fighting fanatics who hated you hidden among people who mostly didn't. If all the Mormons hated the U.S. government, what did that make them when they rose up against it? Patriots?

Whatever it made them, it had to be dangerous. A couple of bullets snapped by, too close for comfort. Paul stubbed his cigarette on a rock, made sure he had a full clip... and wen tack to clearing the Mormons out of Price. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 391. "Once upon a time, Provo, Utah had probably been a pretty town. Mountains towered to the east and northeast; to the west lay Utah Lake. The streets were wide, and shade trees had lined them. This July, as far as Paul Mantarakis was concerned, the place was nothing but a bottleneck, corking the advance of U.S. forces toward Salt Lake City. The trees had either been blasted to bits by artillery fire or cut down to form barricades across the broad streets. Thanks to the mountains and the lake, you couldn't go around Provo. You had to go through it...

Captain Norman Hinshaw--a captain because of casualties, the same reason Mantarakis was a sergeant--squatted down in a foxhole beside him. He pointed ahead. 'The big set of buildings--that big set of ruins, I should say--that's what's left of Brigham Young College. That's where the damned Mormons have all their machine guns, too. That's what keeps us from taking the whole town.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 391. "'Yes, sir,' Mantarakis said. He knew where the Mormons had their machine guns, all right. They'd killed enough Americans with them. Deadpan, he went on, 'Of course, it's just a few goddamn fanatics doing all the fighting. The rest of the Mormons all love the USA.'

Hinshaw's narrow, sour face looked even narrower and more sour than usual. 'They're still feeding that tripe to the people back home,' he said. 'Some of them may even still believe it. Only soldiers who still believe it are the ones who got shot right off the train.'

'That's about the size of it,' Mantarakis agreed. As he spoke, he checked right, left, and to the rear. As in Price, the Mormons in Provo had the nasty habit of letting U.S. soldiers overrun their positions, then turning around and shooting them in the back. Paul summed it up as best he could: 'If you're a Mormon in Utah, you hate the USA.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 392. "Back of the line, back behind the train station, U.S. artillery opened up on Brigham Young College again. Up above, an aeroplane buzzed, spotting for the guns. The Mormons shot at it, but it was too high for their machine guns to reach.

...'...Here, though, anybody over the age of eight, boy or girl, is an even-money bet to be a franc-tireur. I heard tell they planeted an explosive under a baby, and when one of our soldiers picked up the kid--boom!'

Mantarakis wondered if that was true, or something somebody had made up for the sake of the story, or something somebody had made up to keep the troops on their toes. No way to tell for certain. That it was even within the realm of possibility said everything that needed saying about thekind of fight the Mormons were putting up. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 392. "As if to remind him what kind of fight that was, the Mormons in the front-line foxholes and shelters in the rubble opened up again on the U.S. positions south of Center Street. Rifle fire picked up all along the line as government soldiers started shooting back. Machine guns began to bark and chatter. Here and there, wounded men shrieked.

'Be alert out there!' Paul shouted to his men as he got to his feet. 'They're liable to rush us.' The Mormons had done that to ther regiment in the brigade, down near the town of Spanish Fork. Farmers and merchants in overalls and sack suits, a couple even wearking neckties, had thrown the U.S. soldiers back several hundred yards, and captured four machine guns to boot. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 393. "He shook his head in bemusement. It had looked like a botle. He wondered what was in it. Not whiskey, that was for sure--the poor stupid damn Mormons were even drier than the dert in which they lived.

Another bottle hurtled toward the U.S. lines. The Mormons had used some sort of outsized slingshot arrangement to fling makeshift grenades a the soldiers battling to crush their rebellion...

'Look out, Captain!' Paul shouted. The Mormons must have been saving up bottles, because they had a lot of them. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 394. "A few minutes later, artillery stopped poundin Brigham Young College and started hammering the Mormons in the front-line positions. A couple of shells fell short... by the way his men were shouting as they rushed the Mormon lines, they felt the same as he did.

He sprang down intoa length of trench. The Mormons fought hrd. They always fought hard. Hardly any of them threw down their rifles, even in the face of death. That didn' matter, not today it didn't. He hadn't planned on taking prisoners, anyhow. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 439. "'Salt Lake City!' Paul Mantarakis said with considerable satisfaction. 'One more fight to go and then we've licked this Mormon bastards once and for all.'

'Matter of fact, I hear tell there's one big town after Salt Lake City, Ben Carlton said. 'Place called Ogden, north of here.'

'Yeah, all right, I heard aout Ogden, too,' Mantarakis admitted. 'But it stands to reason, once tthey lose their capital, they ain't gonna have a whole lot of fight left in 'em.'

'Just like the USA and Washington, right?' the cook said with weary cynicism.

Mantarakis gave him a resentful look. 'It's not the same,' he said. 'Salt Lake's the only real city--city-type city--the Mormons have. Provo and Ogden, they're just towns. I'm from Philly, remmeber, I know the difference. Next to what I'm used to, even Salt Lake City isn't a big thing.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 440. But McSweeney, luckily for him, was looking north, toward Salt Lake City. " 'Now also the axe is laid onto the root of the trees: there every tree which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire,' " he said. " 'Because they had no root, they withered away.' So it says in the Holy Scriptures, whose words shall be fulfilled. "

Mantarakis looked north, too. Here and there, flames burned in the Mormons' capital. Artillery fire had blown the gilded angel off the east-center tower of the Temple and had knocked down two of the other towers, but the big buildings, the heart of Salt Lake City, still stood. Enormous beehive flags flapped defiantly from the towers that survived.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 440. "'They read a different book there,' Paul said.

'And they will burn in hell because of it,' McSweeney answered, sounding as certain as he generally did when speaking of matters of religion. 'The Book of Mormon is no more the word of God than is an advertising circular for stomach powders.'

It wasn't so much that Mantarakis thought McSweeney wrong--he didn't figure the Book of Mormon was divinely inspired either. But the way McSweeney said it, like the way McSweeney said anything, put his back up. 'Lot of people up there think you're wrong, Gordon,' he remarked.

'The more fools they,' McSweeney said. 'They suffer in this world for their arrogance and overweenig pride, and in the next for their false and blasphemous faith.' He wasn't simply armored in his faith, but also used it as a sword against the foe. Mantarakis supposed that helped make him a good soldier; it also made him a scary man. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 441. "He'd been through worse in Kentucky; the Confederates had far more guns to fire at U.S. forces than Mormons did... After about half an hour, the Mormon guns eased up. Men helped their wounded comrades back toward the rear. Mormon snipers took potshots at them. The Mormons were short of men, short of guns, short of munitions, but they not only held the high ground (they had their artillery on the mountain spur above Temple Square, not far from the wreckage of what had been the state capitol before the revolt), but they also knew the terrain well and squeezed from it all the advantages they could. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 442. "'Sir, is there any way of rooting out the Mormons without going straight at them?'

'General Staff doesn't seem to think so,' Schneider answered. 'They've go the Great Salt Lake on one side and the mountains on the other, after all. It's not going to be pretty, but it's what we've got to do.'...

'Mormons don't help,' Ben Carolton said. 'The Rebs fought fair, anyways. Any civilian you see here--man, woman, boy, girl--is gonna cut your throat in a second if he catches you asleep.'

'You got that right.' Mantarakis turned to Lieutenant Schneider. 'Sir, once we beat these Mormons flat, what the hell are we going to do with them? What the hell can we do with them?'...

'Where they make a desert, they call it peace,' Schneider said.

McSweeney rumbled again, this time in approval. 'Just what the Mormons deserve,' he said: 'Solitude Lake City.'

Mantarakis stared at him... 'Yeah, we'll make a desert out of Deseret,' he said. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 443. "Irving Morrell studied the situation map of Utah with considerable dissatisfaction. If it had been up to him, he would have tried to push men through the Wasatch Mountains, and he would also have had a column coming down from Idaho to make the Mormons divide their forces and keep them from concentrating everything they had on the main U.S. attack... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 265-266. "'Sir, a major Mormon uprising has broken out in Utah,' Dowling said, waving a decipherment of the telegram to show the source of his news. 'They're right on one of our cross-country rail lines; we have to bring them back under the flag as fast as we can.'

'God damn them to hell, and may the U.S. Army send them there,' Custer exclaimed. 'We should have done it before the War of Secession, and we really should have done it before the Second Mexican War, when they tried to sneak out of our beloved Union. If anyone had listened to me then--' He shook his head.' But no. We had to clasp the viper to our bosom. It was there, by God. I wanted to hang all the Mormons' leaders, not just a handful of them. I wanted them to hang Abe Lincoln, too, while they had the chance. But would anybody hear a word I said? No. Are we better off because no one would? No again.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 322-323. "The Mormons were holed up in another farmhouse. It had a big flag flying above it, on what had to be a makeshift pole. Paul couldn't make out what the flag was, but it wasn't the Stars and Stripes. He saw muzzle flashes from several windows; the Mormons were putting a lot of lead in the air, doing their best to hold the U.S. troops at bay...

Paul trampled on the fallen flag--it was, he saw, a beehive with the word DESERET beneath it... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 322-323. "Paul trampled on the fallen flag--it was, he saw, a beehive with the word DESERET beneath it... Of the Mormon defenders, five had been men and two women. They all had rifles, and had all known what to do with them. Mantarakis had seen plenty of death, but never till now a woman in a white shirtwaist with pearl buttons and a long black skirt--with half her head blown away. He turned away, a little sickened. 'They fought harder'n the Rebs ever did,' he muttered.

'Fanatics,' Lietenant Hinshaw said. 'This is what they warned us about, these nests of maniacs. But mos of the people are loyal to the USA. We'll see that when we get into Price. Come on, men.' He led his soldiers outside. Once out there, he picked up the Mormons' flag. 'Spil of war. Now-- on with the advance.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 322-323. "If the people of Price, Utah were loyal to the United States, nobody had bothered telling them about it. They had a trench line just east of town, and defended it ferociously till machine-gun and artillery fire drove them back in amongst the buildings. But when the U.S. soldiers tried to advance into price, rifle fire and a couple of Mormon machine guns hurled them back with heavy losses.

...Instead of drowning Price in U.S. blood, [the divisional commander] decided to shell t into ruins. Back of the U.S. line more artillery unlimbered and started bellowing away. The Mormons held machine guns, but evidently no cannon of their own. A great cloud of smoke and dust rose above the Utah town. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1959 Bear, Greg. "Book Two: The Serpent Mage " (c. 1986, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 415. "The shock... made Michael recoil drastically, throwing his probe out in a wide arc.

And he saw--for a brief moment became . . .

Eldridge Gorn, a horse trader. That was his euphemism for rounding up range horses and selling them to knackers. He had been in the trade for thirty years, starting in 1959, two years after he had been dishonorably discharged from the Navy.

He had come back to Utah and been received by his Mormon family with chilly aloofness. Eldridge Gorn had not lived up to his father's expectations. His father was a hard, unforgiving man, whom Gorn loved very deeply, and the rejection hurt.

He moved to Colorado, married and been divorced within a year. He tried to take his life with a twelve-gauge shotgun in a small motel room in Calneva. The gun jammed, and he spent twenty-five minutes laughing and crying and trying to get the gun to work. It wouldn't.

It appeared to Gorn that someone, at least, wanted him alive. " [More, pg. 416-417.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1959 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 67. "Eldridge Gorn, a horse trader. That was his euphemism for rounding up range horses and selling them to knackers. He had been in the trade for thirty years, starting in 1959, two years after he had been dishonorably discharged from the Navy.

He had come back to Utah and been received by his Mormon family with chilly aloofness. Eldridge Gorn had not lived up to his father's expectations. His father was a hard, unforgiving man, whom Gorn loved very deeply, and the rejection had hurt.

He had moved to Colorado, married and been divorced within a year. He had tried to take his life with a 12-gauge shotgun in a small motel room in Calneva; the gun had jammed, and he had spent twenty-five minutes laughing and crying and trying to get the gun to work. It wouldn't.

It appeared to Gorn that someone, at least, wanted him alive. " [More about this character, pg. 67-69.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1963 Sorenson, Virginia. "Where Nothing is Long Ago " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1963); pg. 1-10. Pg. 1: "You'll probably remember Brother Tolsen...,' my mother wrote me recently Her fat script traveled the whole way around the photograph and obituary she had clipped from our Mormon newspaper...

Remember Brother Tolsen? I looked at his square jaw and his steady eyes, and it was as if I had seen him yesterday. Well, I thought, another one is gone; soon there won't be a real Danish accent left in the whole valley. Mormon converts from Denmark came to Utah by the thousands during the second half of the nineteenth century. Now there were only a few survivors. Not long before, it had been old Bishop Petersen himself who had died. "; Pg. 2: "My mother sent me a clipping about one in Utah Valley, near Provo, just last year. " [Other refs., not all in DB, throughout story.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1963 Sorenson, Virginia. "Where Nothing is Long Ago " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1963); pg. 3. "I recall her saying many times that Brigham Young must have been a true prophet, because he had said that Utah was The Place right in the middle of July, when nobody would think, to look at it without water, that it would ever grow a respectable bean. It was on the twenty-fourth of July that Brigham Young made his historic pronouncement, and as far as I know not a drop of rain has ever fallen to spoil the parades, the fireworks, and the pageants that take place every year on that day. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1963 Sorenson, Virginia. "Where Nothing is Long Ago " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1963); pg. 4. "Bishop Petersen said that to leave the lovely land of Denmark one had to be very certain it was to God's Kingdom he was coming. He himself had been sure of it when he heard about the mountain water, so pure, so shining, so cold, so free. Whenever his turn came to speak at Testimony Meeting, which followed Sunday school on the first Sunday of every month, he spoke about the water. It was to him, next to the Gospel itself, the unmistakable sign of the Kingdom. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1972 Marshall, Donald R. "The Week-end " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1972); pg. 40. "For a year or more they came to Relief Society meetings together... Thalia came out to Sunday school fairly regularly before Elvina got so sick... There was a time just before that when Thalia seemed to take quite an interest in M.I.A. for a while and was even asked to take a position--Speech and Drama Director was what they wanted her for--but when Elvina got wind that Brother Bettenson had his eye on Thalia for that scoutmaster... she put a fast stop to that. We didn't see much of Thalia at church at all after that. The visiting teachers, though, they continued to go there and, like as not, the home teachers as well... " [Many other LDS refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1974 Kump, Eileen Gibbons. "Sayso or Sense " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1974); pg. 77. "'My garden and kitchen are on the north... Who will walk clear around the horse just to get in right? Everyone will come through my kitchen--the bishop, the Relief Society sisters, the apostles!' " [Many other refs. to Latter-day Saints throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1974 Kump, Eileen Gibbons. "Sayso or Sense " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1974); pg. 79. "As Grandpa began to pray, Amy's heart churned for a miracle. She had to have it! 'Father, we dedicate into Thy watchcare and keeping this beautiful home.' Oh Father, it is beautiful, it's beautiful regardless! 'Bless this good family. Thou knowest the intents of their hearts are righteous, Father.' Thou knowest how men are, Father. Help me to take no delight in their folly. 'Bless every comfortable from, bless every child who grows there. Bless the timbers that the elements--' Bless me never to mention my basement again. Remove bitterness, doubt. 'Within these walls let Thy Holy Spirit abide in peace always, we pray Thee, in Christ's name, Amen.' In peace. In peace. Oh, please! Amen. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1982 Johnston, Sibyl. "Iris Holmes " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 323. "There was Carolyn's bishop, who had handed her a check for $1,600 to cover Iris's latest hospital bill. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1982 Johnston, Sibyl. "Iris Holmes " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 313. "The walls were lined with cardboard boxes full of books, stored foods, and back issues of the underground Mormon newsletter Robert edited. " [Other refs., not in DB. Story's characters are LDS.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 140. [1] "'What a place,' Lumky said. 'I stay here as little as possible. And right across the border from Utah . . .' He pointed. 'As soon as you go down there you find yourself in a forest, and then you come out in Logan. That's where I'd like to be. It's clean. All Utah is clean.'

'I know,' he said. And he thought, This is the extreme edge of Milton Lumky territory. It's frontier.

'In Utah they'd never let this dust blow around,' Lumky said, searching for a parking slot. Mud-splattered trucks had most of them already, the work vehicles of a farm area. 'They have water running down the gutters. Everything's fertile. They make it that way. It's due to L.S.D.'

'L.D.S.,' Bruce said.

'That's right. I'm thinking of 'LSMFT.' Of course that's the joker...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1985 Dick, Philip K. In Milton Lumky Territory. Pleasantville, NY: Dragon Press (1985); pg. 140. [2] "'...If you live in Utah you have to join the [LDS] Church. It's a hell of a thing--they won't let you alone. You can't but cigarettes or booze; they look at you funny if you drink coffee. You can't rent a room or go to the toilet' He found a parking slot and parked the Mercedes. 'These people up here [in Montpelier, in contrast to Utah] don't give a damn about anything. The whole town's collapsing in ruins.' He got out of the car and stepped up on the sidewalk, fastening his belt; while driving he had undone it. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Budrys, Algis (ed.) Writers of the Future: Volume III. Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987). [Introduction to "On My Way to Paradise ", by Dave Wolverton.]; pg. 366. [Factual information about the author in introduction to a short story.] "Dave Wolverton is at Brigham Young University studying to become an editor. He is a rugged individual who has done such things as being a prison guard, and has also served as a Mormon missionary. He is the editor for The Leading Edge, a Provo-based semiprofessional SF magazine of high caliber. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 4. "Under Wendover Will, the sign reads THIS IS THE PLACE, and he is facing east, making this claim across the salt flats, across the desert, over a hundred miles to where Brigham Young is standing atop his monument, saying the same thing. THIS IS THE PLACE. I know their argument well: in Utah you will learn morality and restraint and you will yearn for everything you deny yourself; here in Nevada, nothing is illegal, everything is permitted and encouraged and will make you feel hollow. Believe me, the states need each other to recognize themselves, to savor the knowledge that there is an unhappiness more desperate than their own. Evil likes an audience, but good can't exist without one.

Brigham is a statue. He stands in the confidence of stone, the patience of the truth. I've felt the pull of Salt Lake City... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 20. "At first I wondered if she hoped things with the world were getting better or worse; after all, for a Mormon there's nothing so fortunate, no blessing quite like an apocalypse. They are the Latter Day Saints because after the apocalypse they'll be left behind to have their fun. Yet this was not how Charlotte was thinking. "; Pg. 21: "She watched the cars on the salt flats, trying to set speed records. She remembered the Guinness Book of World Records in grade school, the handsome man in the leather jacket, sitting astride his bicycle out on the flats. And the cars--the Blue Flame, the Mormon Meteor. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 35. [In Wendover.] "Charlotte was praying. She'd gone to the service at the Mormon church on the Utah side of town. It might seem that the Utah side would be more pious; in fact, it's only poorer, it lacks the gambling revenue we enjoy across the border. Any Mormon will tell you that the rich man is enjoying God's grace and favor; the poor have no corner on piety. On the Utah side, the church is surrounded by trailers, like boats moored around an island... It was a mistake to sit in the front. She felt all the eyes on her, someone new, and it would make her escape more difficult. Babies were crying, like they always did in church... The announcements--relief society, Boy Scouts, primary and firesides--made Charlotte feel at home... She did not want to meet anyone, she only wanted to come to the sacrament meeting, to keep up her strength, to remind herself what she was doing and why. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 63. "The bus crossed the flats, then climbed a little into the desert. It raced the train along the shore of the Great Salt Lake, past Saltair, and on. The Mormons built Saltair at the turn of the century, as a place of wholesome recreation. Its dome is a reminder of the tabernacle, gold spires like India--or even Atlantis, not that the great building is underwater, so flooded you can row a boat through its vaulted rooms. Once people came to take the cure on the Salt Lake, to float there, unable to sink--as if there could be thrill in swimming without the threat of drowning. Twice the building has burned down and now the water wants it, surounding it like a hungry moat. Charlotte looked right through it. Once a rollercoaster, the Racer, went up in flames; scaffolding folded in on itself and the heavy tracks collapsed... The last time Saltair burned, in 1970, it had already been abandoned. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 199. [In Wendover] "A man walked toward me and I recognized him, I sized him up. A local, a family man, from the Utah side of the border.

You, I said. You're the owner of Taco Burger.

How did you know?

Picked up a Book of Mormon there, I said. Photo of your family pasted in the front. Pretty little girls.

Thank you, he said, stepping into Will's shadow. Did you read it? People do take them, but I always wonder.

Yes, I said. Very interesting.

...Did you get to the end?

What?

Of the book.

Not yet.

Well, he said. See that you do. There's a surprise for you at the end.

He turned and I watched him go, walking like a man with many children, who had provided tabernacles for plenty of souls and was not through yet. I'd read every word... but that man did not need to know. At the end you are asked to look into your heart, to ask if these things are true. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 220. "We hit the edge of the Great Salt Lake, where the water looks too heavy for waves. The road was white, covered in salt, and I moved like Gandhi, past the strange spires of Saltair, built by the Mormons to be the Coney Island of the west... We swung up onto an overpass, swerved around, then descended into the city. Salt Lake... We circled the temple, where people were all dressed up, serene in the heat, eating ice cream. They waited for me to stop at the crosswalk, then looked on in disbelief when I did not. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1989 Bennion, John. "Dust " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 282. "Rockwood, Utah:... From my position I can see the range of mountains around my former home. My wife Sylvia and our five children--Benjamin, Abigail, Joshua, Ruth, and Heather--live there with my mother in the town named after my violent great-grandfather, James Darren Rockwood, who was once a body-guard to the prophet Joseph Smith. Anti-Mormon historians claim that Great-grandpa show the mayor of Carthage, Illinois, Frederick Diggs, because Diggs harassed the People of God. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1989 Bennion, John. "Dust " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 284. "Coriantumr, Utah: Five miles south of my cabin lives a community of apostates from the Mormon church, two hundred strong, who have returned to the practices of the nineteenth-century pioneers... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1989 Bennion, John. "Dust " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 290. "No end depends upon a middle in my life, no new and glorious future grows organically out of my past, as Aristotle, Alexander Hamilton, Walt Whitman, Brigham Young, Horatio Alger, and Karl Marx promised. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1989 Sillitoe, Linda. "Windows on the Sea " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 154. Pg. 146: "Since this was Sunday, her family would drive the 120 miles from Cedar Springs to Salt Lake City for a visit this afternoon. "; Pg. 147: "She was beginning to anticipate going home, sorting like so much laundry what her children's reactions might be when she wore her strange, new face to PTA meetings, o church, to the park on family outings. "; Pg. 154: "That night Lora dreamed she was at church with her family. The children were seated all down the pew with Brad at the other end, holding Amber. But no, they weren't all there. Amy was up in front with two other girls her age, who were warbling a hymn. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1991 Whipple, Maurine. "They Did Go Forth " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 11. "Tildy Elizabeth sat by the cradle, Book of Mormon open on her knee. One hand rocked absently while the other traced in painful concentration the small print, dim in the yellow lamplight. Some time ago the bugle had sounded for supper. 'Do what is right, let the consequence follow,' and the sisters had gone to the dining room. She wanted to memorize the words so that she could think about them even after they got back...

Of course, taking turns sitting up, the sisters were only doing their duty and being kind, but she knew they'd disapprove--All right, what if Brother Brigham had exhorted against such things as speaking in tongues! Tildy Elizabeth knew there were spirits wandering the earth until the Second Coming. Many's the time she had overheard the men whispering about the Gadianton Robbers told about in this same Book of Mormon... " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1991 Young, Margaret Blair. "Outsiders " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 295. "My friend Junie and I were Utah Mormons. We knew no blacks till we were teenagers. But the summer I was sixteen and she eighteen, the Peace Corps hired Dad to train volunteers, and Junie and I were initiated into a larger world.

The PCVs, as we called the trainees, would go to Brazil--provided they got through Dad's program at Alta, Utah. They would have to show basic emotional stability and some mastery of Portuguese--or an aptitude to learn it--before the government would pay their ticket to Rio... " [Many refs. throughout story, not in DB. Main characters are LDS.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1991 Young, Margaret Blair. "Outsiders " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 297-298. "...my father... He was my revered commander, my gentle, omniscient patriarch. When he prayed he talked to God. Sometimes I felt as if the ceiling would open and angels descend to grant his desires. He prayed for the poor and prayed that his children would grow to empathize with them, to love all nations of the world, to never lose themselves in wealth or lust. He prayed for our prophet, for our missionaries, for the leaders of the nations. He prayed that Russia would open its doors and let the gospel in. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1993 Anderson, Glenn L. "Shannon's Flight " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 224. "Porter's Desert Souvenirs sat amid a jumble of sandstone tablets and old wagon wheels. A column of rusty mine cars tood mustered near the shop's front door, some filled with coal, others with hunks of colored rock. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1993 Anderson, Glenn L. "Shannon's Flight " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 240. "'Well, I have to leave for Salt Lake this afternoon, and I just got a wrench thrown in the works.' Porter stepped inside. 'I don't know if you can help me or not, but Trish's grandma was going to stay home with her while I was gone, and she got a call this morning from her sister. They had some quilts accepted in a show in Utah County, so she has to go up there to get them hung. I could postpone my trip, but I hate to put these guys off. University money evaporates like gin at an Irish funeral.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1994 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 14. "'After I run off from the hospital in Utah,' Willy said, 'I tried real hard to do what you asked. I tried writing in that book... but none of it made sense. I headed south down to Zion's Canyon for a while, and one night a big storm blew in. I sat in the dark and watched lightning strike this big stone mountain, all around, going boom, boom, boom, and the lightning was like the thorns in the cross that Jesus wore when he was crucified--bloody and full of light and cruel--and I realized I had seen this all before, the lightning and the crown on Jesus' head...' " [Zion's Canyon, named by LDS settlers in Utah after the Biblical/LDS Zion.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 13. [Referring to U.S. centers of high tech/software industry.] "Anyway, I went with this little startup in Seattle because I liked the area, liked the culture and the scenery. It was also a damned sight cheaper and cleaner than Silicon Valley, didn't make me feel like I was undressed in somebody else's church like central Utah, didn't have New England winters or south Florida's crime rate, and wasn't the government. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 18. "Robert Garnett, our sales manager... He'd actually been headhunted by Novell, the big boy in networks, but he'd turned it down because it meant moving to Utah. He was quite comfortable most places but somehow he didn't think there was a closet big enough for him in Utah; life was too short. That's not to knock Utah or its people or its religion, but, face it, if Utah were a tuxedo, Rob would be a pair of brown shoes.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 204. "But Joshua had left the village, around the end of his teens, to visit a similar and sympathetic group [splinter Latter Day Saint sect] in southwestern Utah to help with a barn raising, and the trip had proven a revelation to him. Once in the town, he met Angel Thompkins, a pretty, shy young woman who for some reason instantly attracted him, and was attracted to him, after he discovered she was originally from some other place in Idaho. Her mother had married into the Utah group and she'd grown up there, but she was to return with them when they were through. " [More.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 85. "'But you--well, Julia--could have given birth to a kid with two left feet,' I pointed out, 'despite all the athletes in the family. It's like the Osmonds, that singing family from Utah. One of their sons is deaf and couldn't learn to sing. And from all I hear, he's having just as decent a life as the rest of the family.'

'Yeah,' Arlo said, 'but he's not having to cuss out the rest of the family for deliberately bringing him where he wouldn't fit in.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Scholz, Carter. "Radiance " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 258. [An LDS senator and his LDS aide visit the physics research center in Arizona.] "Others were there from J Section... Highet arrived in black Western shirt... followed by a Western senator, cadaverous and grinning in white Stetson, and his young aide plump and groomed to a sheen, with the zealous black eyes of a pullet.

--Look at em, young, brilliant, confident, said the senator. --That's how I felt at their age. They own the world.

--The world? retorted Highet. --They own their genitals. The rest of them's mine, raising his voice to introduce, --Gentlemen, the right honorable Howard Bangeter, R-Utah . . .

The aide asked if physics had yet succeeded in finding in the traces of Creation the fingerprints of God, and Highet nodded, a slow smile spreading and his tonguetip darting as his hands rose to conjure, --Not God exactly . . . as Quine walked onto the deck where three barbecue grills sizzled... " [More with these characters.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1995 Siddoway, Richard. The Christmas Wish. New York: Harmony Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 205. Pg. 205: "ABOUT THE AUTHOR... Richard Siddoway is a Utah State legislator and an educator in the Utah public school system. He is the author of three previous books. "; Back cover jacket: "Richard Siddoway is an educator and a member of the Utah House of Representatives. He is the author of three previous books. The parents of eight children, he and his wife, Janice, live in Bountiful, Utah. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 305. "He would travel around the country, and in late March or April he would end up in Yosemite, where he would settle in. The first part of his journey would give him a great overview of North America, as much as he could cover--something he had always wanted to do. He would spend a few weeks in the White River Badlands of South Dakota, a few days in Zion National Park, and so on, hitting the geological highlights until by full circle he came back to his childhood and the high rocky walls of Yosemite. " [Zion National Park is in Utah, and was given its name by LDS settlers based on their religious beliefs.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 260. "White House Central abandoned its Sandia Mountain warrens for a safter residence in the Wasatch Mountains east of Salt Lake City. White House Deseret was a phrase, and a concept, deeply satisfying to many men in the Collier administration. The citizens of Utah, largely Latter-Day Saints, were among the staunchest patriots and most unquestioning followers America ever produced. In this climate, only one internal problem had grown larger: the guerrilla groups. Outlaw bands continued to borrow the trappings of Godliness to support their claims to plunder. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Budrys, Algis (ed.) L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000); pg. 50. [Introduction to story "Jacob's Ladder " by M. Shayne Bell.] "Since winning first place in the Writers of the Future Contest in 1986, M. Shayne Bell has published short fiction in a bewildering number of places, plus numerous anthologies. His short story Mr. Lincoln's China (Asimov's, July 1994) was a 1995 Hugo Award finalist. He published a novel, Nicoji (Baen Books, 1990, and edited the anthology Washed by a Wave of Wind: Science Fiction from the Corridor (Signature Books: 1993), for which he received an AML award for editorial excellence. " [AML is "Association for Mormon Letters "]

...Bell has a master's degree in English literature from Brigham Young University and lives with his partner in Salt Lake City. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Budrys, Algis (ed.) L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000); pg. 155. [Intro to illustrator, story "Recalling Cinderella "] "Darren J. Albertson was a winner in the Illustrators of the Future Contest in 1991 and was published in the WOTF anthology, Volume VIII, in 1992. He has gone on to become somewhat of an 'Artist to the Stars' by creating commemoratives, packaging and advertising collateral for some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry, such as Elvis Presley, John Lennon, Kiss... & presently Brittany Spears, to name only a few. Along with his commercial art and illustration commissions, he sculpts relief images used for coin collectibles for clients like The Beatles, Yellow Submarine, The Grateful Dead & for various Disney characters and products. Increasingly, he is setting aside more and more time to pursue personal works with his passion for fine art oil painting.

Darren resides in Provo, Utah, with his wife, Cindy, and their five children, who are currently in search of their dream home and his dream studio. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 58. "One of the things that Bybee liked about Utah was that all of its communities, big and small, were built upon the Plat of Zion, the so-called Mormon grid that Smith or Young--or some Saint--had envisioned for the new kingdom on earth, the New Jerusalem. All of the streets were wide--too wide, really--and they all ranged out in perfect, right-angled, north-south symmetry from the spiritual and social and, arguably, business epicenter of the community: the church. And each street was given a military-style designation based upon its relative direction and distance from the chapel--300 north or 400 west.

It was a clever plan, Bybee always argued, that allowed all the drop-outs and deadbeats and jack-Mormons... to navigate their way back to the church, staggering, sobbing for forgiveness. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 79. "...Mountain Meadows Massacre... A Mormon pioneer and Indian trader, a man named John D. Lee, had organized a band of white men and Indians, and ambushed the Fancher wagon train. They murdered almost everyone and stole everything they could find. Lee tried to blame the church, and some believed him, but twenty years later, after being found guilty of masterminding the massacre, he was executed for it. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 125. "Ronnie Watters's only brush with formal Mormon instruction came as a child in Ogden, when he was coaxed by an LDS chum into attending an after-school class called 'Primary.' There, after some readings from the Book of Mormon and the Doctrine and Covenants, a man in a short-sleeved white shirt... stood behind two cardboard boxes, one marked GOOD and the other BAD.

One by one, the man held up a packaged food product and beamed as the roomful of kids... squealed 'Good!' to the can of corn, and the carton of milk, and the loaf of bread, or 'Bad!' to the package of cigarettes, the can of coffee... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2000 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 22-23. [After a catastrophic asteroid hits the Earth...] "'I haven't seen that many people in one camp,' Tana said, 'since the Mormon prophet got up in Temple Square and said that Utah was about as parched as the hottest corner of Hades, so they might as well head back to Missouri where the believed the Garden of Eden once was.'

'You were there?'

'Oh yeah, I saw them leave. Must have been two million people with bicycles and wagons, some artillery scrounged from Army and Air Force bases, all of them heading up highway 215 toward Denver. I've always wondered how they fared. When they left it was like they took the law with them. Grubbers came up out of California, looting and killing. That's when I lost my husband.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 3. "...an old inspirational: 'Rocky Mountain High'...

'Call me a music-lover,' Boren Mills replied in soft derision. 'But don't tell me you didn't know that song is on the prohibited list.'

McCarty turned to face the smaller Mills. 'Aw, that's for Mormons! That song don't tempt people to take drugs, no matter what they think in Salt Lake--'

'Do I have to remind you who subsidizes your gentile services?' Boren Mills snapped... 'If the church is liberal enough to support a mildly heretical preacher, the least you can do is exercise judgment with your material.'

'Censor myself, you mean,' McCarty grumbled. 'Seems to me, you LDS folks--'

'Correction! I'm a Congregationalist, Ora. [not] Latter-day Saints.'

'Well... those LDS folks are happy with my mission just so long as it's mainly country-western entertainment that don't take issue with anything they want said.' "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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