Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, USA

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 139. "'I tell you, Mills, there's no end of wisom in that scripture.'

Mills let his gaze follow Young's open-handed gesture. On one wall of the lavish ultramodern room was a tablet of black onyx, and inset in flowing script in richest polished gold was the legend: '. . .And it is by the wicked that the wicked shall be punished.'

'Interesting,' said Mills, not knowing what else to say.

'Interpretation of the Book of Mormon is just a matter of Divine guidance,' said Young, as if that guidance was self-evident... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 213. "'Look: we've had these Catholics... and liberal Mormons all along--no worse than a bad cold, right?...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 296. "Unless Mills could offer some outrageous inducements, the IEE board might begin realigning companies like Latter-Day Shale. And Mills could find no inducements to sway some of those staunch upright Mormons. It was clear that [U.S. President] Blanton Young's vision of Zion no longer coincided with theirs. If LDS voters found common ground with Catholics..., Mills would be wise to have his bags packed... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 12-13. "This was not to say that most Mormons, guided by their Council of Apostles, sought a repressive society. In a genuine ecumenical spirit, LDS tithes helped defray the costs of some protestant sects and promoted open forums for debate. The church had even donated campaign contributions to some fence-straddling legistlators of the Independent party, though Indys were similar to Democrats of the prewar era, many of them openly critical of this growing connection between the state and the church of the LDS.

It was not the fault of devout Mormons if open debate helped pinpoint certain rabble-rousers... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 138-139. "For all its gleam and pillared portico, White House Deseret was chiefly a ballroom with a few staff offices, guest rooms and kitchen... the real hardball business of Streamlined America was transacted directly beneath the repository of Mormon genealogical files in Cottonwood Canyon. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 56-57. "Boren Mills stood in the reception room amid the hubbub of young voices, the clink of glasses, the exhalations of food and fruit juices... Idly he sipped his execrable carrot cocktail... He sidled up to the refreshment table for a change of poisons--celery juice...! Young's Mormons would kill him with nutrition... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2004 Ing, Dean. Wild Country. New York: Tor (1985); pg. 11. "The post-war [SinoInd War: nuclear attack from India and China] excesses of Young' people had driven Quantrill to rebellion... They drove so many good people to the rebel ranks that the elections of 2004 had cut across the lines of Mormonism and federalism. Now it was President Ora McCarty whose cabinet struggled to reconstruct America. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2006 Ing, Dean. Wild Country. New York: Tor (1985); pg. 191. "'Bank? When I said hard cash, I meant it. Gold Mex coins, Krugerrands, them Mormon fifty-buck pieces the Navajos uprated with turquoise--hard money.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2006 Ing, Dean. Wild Country. New York: Tor (1985); pg. 314-315. "He scrabbled for the thing, stood up, displayed it between thumb and forefinger, and then flipped it to Sandy. She was turning it over as he waded back. 'It's one of those Mormon fifties,' he said.

Briefly, after the [SinoInd] war, the Young administration had done the best it could to make up for the loss of U.S. mints in Denver, San Fancisco, and Philadelphia. The so-called 'Mormon fifty' was a coin the size of an old silver dollar, minted in Ogden.. the coin had not been a success. for one thing, its alloy was of little value--but Amerinds in the west found a partial solution. Navajo silversmiths embedded softly rounded turquoise ovals in the centers of the coins. Some were irregular, and none could have fitted a coin slot. They had been accepted at face value and were now worth twice that as rarities... He held a score more in his hand: Krugerrands, gold Mexican thousand-peso pieces, more of the reworked Mormon fifties. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 87. [News report.] "'Other members of the group seen leaving today include Myra Caslon, here leaving with her husband and six children. She originally had been identified as her own granddaughter. In this frame, however, Ms. Caslon can be seen between her youngest son, Sydney, eleven, and daughter Linette, in her twenties. Of all the images seen so far, this one seems to illustrate clearly what has befallen these people. Caslon, fifty-four years of age, is the mother of six children, and yet here she is, not even as tall as her youngest child...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228. [Press release from Soldiers of God group member Meg Parker.] "'...Father van Kellin [an Evangelical preacher] has no doubts, why should we? Did not the Elders of the Mormon Church decree Myra Caslon outside the province of God, unable to receive his blessings? Did not the Pope himself say that these beings cannot be true to God's creation? Are there not scientists who are saying these people cannot be human because you cannot make an adult into a child? "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228-229. [News report.] "'I understand there is a mixture of religious affiliations in the group'

'Eight Protestants of various stripes, three Catholics, two Jews, one who calls himself a New Age minister, three Mormons.'

'No Muslims...?'

'No Muslims, no Anglicans, no Unitarians.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 94. "The Student Senate was crammed with SUBbies and members of an outlaw Mormon splinger group called the Temple of Unlimited Godhead (TUG). Each of these groups claimed to represent all the students. As Sarah explained, no one in his right mind was interested in running for Student Senate, explaining why it was filled with fanatics and political science majors. Fortunately, SUB and TUG canceled each other out almost perfectly.

'I'm tired of having all aspects of my life ruled by this administration that doesn't give a [crap] for human rights, and I think it's time to do something about it,' said the first speaker. There was a little applause from the front and lots of jeering. A hum filled the air as the TUG began to OMMMM . . . at middle C--a sort of sonic tonic which was said to clear the air of foul influences and encourage spiritual peace... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 96. "The speaker yielded to another TUGgie [a Mormon], who stood rigidly with a stack of 3-X-5 cards and began to drone through them. 'At one time the leftist organizations of American Megaversity could claim that they represented some of the students. But the diverse organizations of the Left soon found that they all had one member who was very strident and domineering and who would push the others around until he or she had risen to a position of authority within the organization. These all turned out to be secretly members of the Stalinist Underground Battalion who had worked themselves into the organizations in order to merge the Left into a single bloc with no diversity or freedom of thought. The SUB took over a women's issues newsletter and turned it into the People's Truth Publication, a highly libelous so-called newspaper. In the same way . . .' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 117-118. "'Look,' Krupp continued. 'We've got a security force here. We've got organized religions that have been doing just fine for millennia. Now what we don't need is a brainwashing franchise, or any of your Kool-Aid-stoned outlaw Mormon Jesuits. I know times are hard in North Dakota, but they're hard everywhere, and it doesn't call for new religions. Of course, you have some very fine points on the subject of Communism. Now, this does not mean we will in any way fail to extend you full religious and politial freedoms as with the old-fashioned nonprofit religions.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 216. "'...Miracles, you see, change things. They tear things up, turn everything upside down. An established church doesn't like tales of miracles, at leat not outide of scripture, in the here and now. They're so. . . uncontrolled. That's where the Mormons are going wrong, in my view--they're trying hard to become an establishment church, and they're just not. They were revolutionary in their day--the Book of Mormon addresses every single political and spiritual question that beset New York in the 1920s. Maybe that's why it's so hard to read now.' He flashed a smile. 'And the Apostles [Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene] were rebels against even the Mormons, which should make us even more antiestablishment. Our social prorams were a century ahead of their time.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2024 Ellison, Harlan. "A Boy and His Dog " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 22. Pg. 22: "I started off, loading the Browning from my bandolier. I didn't see anyone moving among the bombed-out shells of the building. "; Pg. 24: "I bowslung the Browning and took out the .45 automatic. "; Pg. 29: "I climbed one of the ropes hanging down from the girders and laid out up there with the Browning and a couple of handfuls of reloads. " [Many more references to the Browning, pg. 29-30, 40.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2025 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 25. "Tana sat in her cave, stared out into the starlight, and wondered about the Mormons. On tough days she imagined that there were golden wheatfields beyond the cave where children could dance and play without a care. Missouri might well be an abundant garden, lush and green, where the living was easy. Dreaming about it made her hard life more bearable. So it had to be out there, somewhere, a place with food, shelter, law, and love.

Or more likely these were all just dreams that the Mormons had died for, and even now their skulls, bleached white by the sun, littered the tall bluegrass on the plains of Kansas. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 107. "'Okay, what about the conversion experience? How old were you when it happened?'

'I can't tell it like that.' She paused to think. 'Okay. When you grow up knowing about he idea of getting saved, it never hits you the way it hits other people when they hear about it for the first time. I always knew the Plan of Salvation, I can't remember not knowing about it. We learned it in Sunday School... There's something called the Age of Accountability... I was baptized when I was nine...' " [Much of the terminology and doctrine here if, of course, the same as found in the LDS Church, although this particular passage is told by a Southern Baptist.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xxiv. "And no wonder the Gaians have targeted our brief, transitional, pastoral/agricultural era as the one we most need to stay in contact with. I believe them when they tell us that even if there were any way for us as a viable species to be hunters and gatherers again, which there certainly will never be, such a life for humans has less to recommend it. And what is small-scale herding and diversified planting, with a little hunting and foraging thrown in, but homesteading--the most wholesome way people have ever devised for living upon the Earth, the happiest balance between nature and culture, the best way to use natural resources without using them up. " [Reminiscent of the early Mormon colonial period in the Deseret region.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. "Coda " in Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballantine (1991; book c. 1953; 'Coda' c. 1979); pg. 178. "For it is a mad world and it will get madder if we allow the minorities, be they dwarf or giant, orangutan or dolphin, nuclear-head or water-conversationalist, pro-computerologist or Neo-Luddite, simpleton or sage, to interfere with aesthetics. The real world is the playing ground for each and every group, to make or unmake laws. But the tip of the nose of my book or stories or poems is where their rights end and my territorial imperatives begin, run and rule. If Mormons do not like my plays, let them write their own. If the Irish hate my Dublin stories, le them rent typewriters. " [Bradbury's reference to Mormons here is probably inspired by his time working with a Mormon theatre near his home in Los Angeles, which was headed by Mormon movie star Laraine Day. He wrote plays performed by the theatre, and sometimes clashed with Day about their content.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballantine (1991; c. 1953); pg. 57. "'Now let's take up the minorities of our civilization, shall we? Bigger the population, the more minorities. Don't step on the toes of the dog-lovers, cat-lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 64. [Year is estimated.] "'Now let's take up the minorities of our civilization, shall we? Bigger the population, the more minorities. Don't step on the toes of the dog-lovers, cat-lovers, doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians, Germans, Texans, Brooklynites, Irishmen, people from Oregon or Mexico. The people in this book, this play, this TV serial are not meant to represent actual painters, cartographers, mechanics anywhere. The bigger your market, Montag, the less you handle controversy, remember that! All the minor minor minorities with their navels to be kept clean. Authors, full of evil thoughts, lock up your typewriters. They did. Magazines became a nice blend of vanilla tapioca. Books, so the damned snobbish critics said, were dishwater. No wonder books stopped selling, the critics said...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 23. "Jarret supporters [conservatives Protestants/Christian fundamentalists] have been known, now and then, to form mobs and burn people at the stake for being witches. Witches! In 2032! A witch, in their view, tends to be a Moslem, a Jew, a Hindu, a Buddhist, or in some parts of the country, a Mormon, a Jehovah's Witness, or even a Catholic. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 3. "Science, which had brought an ugly end to the fighting by producing and detonating the Medusa bombs, and the secular humanism that spawned it, had fallen so far out of favor that it was not officially a crime not to be at least nominally part of an organized religion... People had suggested I simply convert to another religion and have done with it. There had been several offers. Still, my Catholic guilt told me I deserved to be punished for what had happened between Daniel and me. Moreover, the Pope had made things more complicated when he excommunicated me. Legally, I was still a Catholic, just an excommunicated one. So, if I tried to officially join another religion, it would be like trying to marry a new husband without being divorced from a previous one--not even Mormon women got away with a stunt like that in this country. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2088 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 316. [This passage describes early participants in Mike Smith's new Church of All Worlds.] "...two Fosterites... one circumcised Jew and his wife and four children... One Catholic couple with a little boy... One Mormon family of the new schism--that's three more, and their kids. The rest are Protestant and one atheist... " [Technically, of course, this citation should be classified under 'Latter Day Saints', not 'Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,' because these 'Mormons' represent a splinter group, and are not part of the mainstream LDS church. Citation is listed here so that all LDS-related refs. are grouped together in database.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 3. "It was cold on the rampart. I slapped my numbed hands together, then stopped hastily for far of disturbing the Prophet. My post that night was just outside his personal apartment--a post that I had won by taking more than usual care to be neat and smart at guard mount . . . but I had no wish to call attention to myself now.

I was young then and not too bright--a legate fresh out of West Point, and a guardsman in the Angels of the Lord, the personal guard of the Prophet Incarnate. At birth my mother had consecrated me to the Church and at eighteen my Uncle Absalom, a senior lay censor, had prayed an appointment to the Military Academy for me from the Council of Elders. " [This entire story is about a future theocratic government in the U.S. based on Protestants/Evangelicals, but which has some terminology and institutions similar to the LDS Church. It is not identical to the LDS Church, however. In fact the LDS Church helps to overthrow it.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 4. "Somehow, life at New Jerusalem was not as I had imagined it while at West Point. The Palace and Temple... priests and deacons, ministers of state, and Palace functionaries... As a kid in junior seminary before going to the Point I was almost afraid of girls; my interests were divided between my lessons, my mother, and our parish's troop of Cherubim, in which I was a patrol leader and an assiduous winner of merit badges in everything from woodcraft to memorizing scripture. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 4. "True, most of my fellows did not ask permission to marry, as it would have meant transferring to one of the regular regiments and many of them cherished ambitions for the military priesthood--but it was not forbidden.

Nor were the lay deaconesses who kept house around the Temple and the Palace forbidden to marry. But most of them were dowdy old creatures who reminded me of my aunts, hardly subjects for romantic thoughts. I used to chat with them occasionally around the corridors, no harm in that. Nor was I attracted especially by any of the few younger sisters--until I met Sister Judith. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 6. "We had gone on chatting. She had been in New Jerusalem, it developed, even less time than had I. She had been reared on a farm in upper New York State and there she had been sealed to the Prophet at the Albany Seminary. In turn I had told her that I had been born in the middle west, not fifty miles from the Well of Truth, where the First Prophet was incarnated... The Temple Herald printed the duty lists of both my service and hers. " [The specifics here are a good example of things that are NOT LDS-related, although some of the terminology seems to be similar to LDS terminology. Later in the story, the LDS Church is seen to be one of the last holdouts against the Protestant/Evangelical led theocracy which has taken over the United States.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 15. "...no more connection with the Church and the Prophet than Sunday meeting and tithes. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 129. "Beside our own simple powder-blue dungarees there were several other uniforms around, volunteer brigades from outside the country and some native American outfits. The Mormon Battalions had their own togs and they were all growing beards as well--they went into action singing the long-forbidden 'Come, Come, Ye Saints!' Utah was one state we didn't have to worry about, now that the Saints had their beloved temple back. The Catholic legion had its distinctive uniform... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2249 Carey, Diane. Best Destiny (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 10. "'We're pioneers,' he [young James T. Kirk] said. 'We're going straight up the Oregon Trail, just like the people who settled this country and put in the railroads and the towns like Riverside across this part of Iowa. Only instead of horses or steel, we're hopping the Stampede.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA - West 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 110. [Chapter 26] "From ocean to ocean "--so say the Americans; and these four words compose the general designation of the "great trunk line " which crosses the entire width of the United States. The Pacific Railroad is, however, really divided into two distinct lines: the Central Pacific, between San Francisco and Ogden, and the Union Pacific, between Ogden and Omaha. Five main lines connect Omaha with New York.

New York and San Francisco are thus united by an uninterrupted metal ribbon, which measures no less than three thousand seven hundred and eighty-six miles. Between Omaha and the Pacific the railway crosses a territory which is still infested by Indians and wild beasts, and a large tract which the Mormons, after they were driven from Illinois in 1845, began to colonise.

The journey from New York to San Francisco consumed, formerly, under the most favourable conditions, at least six months. It is now accomplished in seven days.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA - West 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 19. "The pond had been dammed a century before; local flat stones fitted by long-dead hands of pioneers... Sites in Utah, Idaho and Oregon were also set aside for people who kept the old ways; living anachronisms who spun their own cloth, cured their own meat... There were still other repositories of ancient crafts and ethics in the north among the Amish, in the west among separatists from Mormonism... "

[Technically, of course, this citation should be classified under 'Latter Day Saints', not 'Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,' because these represent a splinter group, and are not part of the mainstream LDS church.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA - West 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 62. "Least affected of the American homeland [by the SinoInd nuclear attack] on Monday was the intermountain region from the Sierra-Cascades to the great plains... At the bottom line, as Israelis on Cyrpus knew, lay the survival of the population. In our intermountain region, folks near Twin Falls, Winnemucca, Green River, and Holbrook wept and prayed for their urban relatives; and while they prayed, they worked. Prayer and honest labor characterized these people more than most, particularly among members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints--Mormons. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA - West 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 63. "Devout, self-sufficient, indecently healthy, many of the more liberal Mormons had moved to cities by 1990. Most of those perished [in the nuclear war]. The more conservative Mormons, and the excommunicated zealots of splinter groups, tended to remain in the sprawling intermountain American west; and most of those were alive on Monday, 12 August 1996, the day that would become known as Dead Day. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA - West 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 36. "Everywhere in Mormon country, even at its fringes in Tucson, Gentiles--non-Mormons like Watters--were always hammering away at the church, threatening to reveal horrors and hobgoblins and secret voodoo rituals that would convince the world of what they had been claiming for years... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1860 Whipple, Maurine. "They Did Go Forth " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 13. "...United Order... The Order vegetable garden and orchard and the farms produced unbelievably; she had her own shanty dwelling in the square of shanties; she had managed to carry a child full-term again, had even been delivered by Ann Rice, the forewoman of the midwife department. Life in the fort began to be pleasant. Then the authorities called Thomas on a mission back to England. they said he'd know how to make lots of converts among the miners there. But she wondered inside herself if converts were so important. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 106. "'Amazonia, Munitia, Lippenreider--' Rita realized the names weren't registering, and tried again. 'Loveless's women. They talk. 'What's it going to be like in Utah?' ' Rita said, imitating someone. ' 'Can you get a drink there?' ' " [A reference to the non-drinking culture of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, of which most residents of Utah are members.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1870 Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 230. "I passed through Utah once... I saw a handsome man. 'Who is that?' I inquired. 'That is Brigham Young, leader of the Mormons,' my companion informed me.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 111. [Chapter 26] The Pacific Railroad is joined by several branches in Iowa, Kansas, Colorado, and Oregon. On leaving Omaha, it passes along the left bank of the Platte River as far as the junction of its northern branch, follows its southern branch, crosses the Laramie territory and the Wahsatch Mountains, turns the Great Salt Lake, and reaches Salt Lake City, the Mormon capital, plunges into the Tuilla Valley, across the American Desert, Cedar and Humboldt Mountains, the Sierra Nevada, and descends, via Sacramento, to the Pacific--its grade, even on the Rocky Mountains, never exceeding one hundred and twelve feet to the mile.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 114. [Chapter 26] The best course was to wait patiently, and regain the lost time by greater speed when the obstacle was removed. The procession of buffaloes lasted three full hours, and it was night before the track was clear. The last ranks of the herd were now passing over the rails, while the first had already disappeared below the southern horizon.

It was eight o'clock when the train passed through the defiles of the Humboldt Range, and half-past nine when it penetrated Utah, the region of the Great Salt Lake, the singular colony of the Mormons.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 81. [Brigham] Young speedily proved himself to be a skilful administrator as well as a resolute chief. Maps were drawn and charts prepared, in which the future city was sketched out. All around farms were apportioned and allotted in proportion to the standing of each individual. The tradesman was put to his trade and the artisan to his calling. In the town streets and squares sprang up as if by magic. In the country there was draining and hedging, planting and clearing, until the next summer saw the whole country golden with the wheat crop. Everything prospered in the strange settlement. Above all, the great temple which they had erected in the centre of the city grew ever taller and larger. From the first blush of dawn until the closing of the twilight, the clatter of the hammer and the rasp of the saw were never absent from the monument which the immigrants erected to Him who had led them safe through many dangers.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 82. The two castaways, John Ferrier and the little girl... accompanied the Mormons to the end of their great pilgrimage. Little Lucy Ferrier was borne along pleasantly enough in Elder Stangerson's wagon, a retreat which she shared with the Mormon's three wives and with his son, a headstrong, forward boy of twelve... she soon became a pet with the women, and reconciled herself to this new life in her moving canvas-covered home. In the meantime Ferrier having recovered from his privations, distinguished himself as a useful guide and an indefatigable hunter. So rapidly did he gain the esteem of his new companions, that when they reached the end of their wanderings, it was unanimously agreed that he should be provided with as large and as fertile a tract of land as any of the settlers, with the exception of Young himself, and of Stangerson, Kemball, Johnston, and Drebber, who were the four principal Elders.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 82. On the farm thus acquired John Ferrier built himself a substantial log-house, which received so many additions in succeeding years that it grew into a roomy villa. He was a man of a practical turn of mind, keen in his dealings and skilful with his hands. His iron constitution enabled him to work morning and evening at improving and tilling his lands. Hence it came about that his farm and all that belonged to him prospered exceedingly. In three years he was better off than his neighbours, in six he was well-to-do, in nine he was rich, and in twelve there were not half a dozen men in the whole of Salt Lake City who could compare with him. From the great inland sea to the distant Wasatch Mountains there was no name better known than that of John Ferrier.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 82. There was one way and only one in which he offended the susceptibilities of his co-religionists. No argument or persuasion could ever induce him to set up a female establishment after the manner of his companions. He never gave reasons for this persistent refusal, but contented himself by resolutely and inflexibly adhering to his determination. There were some who accused him of lukewarmness in his adopted religion, and others who put it down to greed of wealth and reluctance to incur expense. Others, again, spoke of some early love affair, and of a fair-haired girl who had pined away on the shores of the Atlantic. Whatever the reason, Ferrier remained strictly celibate. In every other respect he conformed to the religion of the young settlement, and gained the name of being an orthodox and straight-walking man.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 83. Lucy Ferrier grew up within the log-house, and assisted her adopted father in all his undertakings. The keen air of the mountains and the balsamic odour of the pine trees took the place of nurse and mother to the young girl. As year succeeded to year she grew taller and stronger, her cheek more ruddy and her step more elastic. Many a wayfarer upon the high road which ran by Ferrier's farm felt long-forgotten thoughts revive in his mind as he watched her lithe, girlish figure tripping through the wheatfields, or met her mounted upon her father's mustang, and managing it with all the ease and grace of a true child of the West. So the bud blossomed into a flower, and the year which saw her father the richest of the farmers left her as fair a specimen of American girlhood as could be found in the whole Pacific slope.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 83. It was not the father, however, who first discovered that the child had developed into the woman. It seldom is in such cases. That mysterious change is too subtle and too gradual to be measured by dates. Least of all does the maiden herself know it until the tone of a voice or the touch of a hand sets her heart thrilling within her, and she learns, with a mixture of pride and of fear, that a new and a larger nature has awakened within her. There are few who cannot recall that day and remember the one little incident which heralded the dawn of a new life. In the case of Lucy Ferrier the occasion was serious enough in itself, apart from its future influence on her destiny and that of many besides.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 83. It was a warm June morning, and the Latter Day Saints were as busy as the bees whose hive they have chosen for their emblem. In the fields and in the streets rose the same hum of human industry. Down the dusty high roads defiled long streams of heavily laden mules, all heading to the west, for the gold fever had broken out in California, and the overland route lay through the city of the Elect. There, too, were droves of sheep and bullocks coming in from the outlying pasture lands, and trains of tired immigrants, men and horses equally weary of their interminable journey. Through all this motley assemblage, threading her way with the skill of an accomplished rider, there galloped Lucy Ferrier... her long chestnut hair floating out behind her. She had a commission from her father in the city, and was dashing in as she had done many a time before, with all the fearlessness of youth, thinking only of her task and how it was to be performed.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 84. The travel-stained adventurers gazed after her in astonishment, and even the unemotional Indians, journeying in with their peltries, relaxed their accustomed stoicism as they marvelled at the beauty of the pale-faced maiden.

She had reached the outskirts of the city when she found the road blocked by a great drove of cattle, driven by a half-dozen wild-looking herdsmen from the plains. In her impatience she endeavoured to pass this obstacle by pushing her horse into what appeared to be a gap. Scarcely had she got fairly into it, however, before the beasts closed in behind her, and she found herself completely embedded in the moving stream of fierce-eyed, long-horned bullocks. Accustomed as she was to deal with cattle, she was not alarmed at her situation, but took advantage of every opportunity to urge her horse on, in the hopes of pushing her way through the cavalcade.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 84. Unfortunately the horns of one of the creatures, either by accident or design, came in violent contact with the flank of the mustang, and excited it to madness. In an instant it reared up upon its hind legs with a snort of rage, and pranced and tossed in a way that would have unseated any but a skilful rider. The situation was full of peril. Every plunge of the excited horse brought it against the horns again, and goaded it to fresh madness. It was all that the girl could do to keep herself in the saddle, yet a slip would mean a terrible death under the hoofs of the unwieldy and terrified animals. Unaccustomed to sudden emergencies, her head began to swim, and her grip upon the bridle to relax. Choked by the rising cloud of dust and by the steam from the struggling creatures, she might have abandoned her efforts in despair, but for a kindly voice at her elbow which assured her of assistance.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 86. Young Jefferson Hope rode on with his companions, gloomy and taciturn. He and they had been among the Nevada Mountains prospecting for silver, and were returning to Salt Lake City in the hope of raising capital enough to work some lodes which they had discovered. He had been as keen as any of them upon the business until this sudden incident had drawn his thoughts into another channel. The sight of the fair young girl, as frank and wholesome as the Sierra breezes, had stirred his volcanic, untamed heart to its very depths. When she had vanished from his sight, he realized that a crisis had come in his life, and that neither silver speculations nor any other questions could ever be of such importance to him as this new and all-absorbing one. The love which had sprung up in his heart was not the sudden, changeable fancy of a boy, but rather the wild, fierce passion of a man of strong will and imperious temper.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 88. THREE weeks had passed since Jefferson Hope and his comrades had departed from Salt Lake City. John Ferrier's heart was sore within him when he thought of the young man's return, and of the impending loss of his adopted child. Yet her bright and happy face reconciled him to the arrangement more than any argument could have done. He had always determined, deep down in his resolute heart, that nothing would ever induce him to allow his daughter to wed a Mormon. Such marriage he regarded as no marriage at all, but as a shame and a disgrace. Whatever he might think of the Mormon doctrines, upon that one point he was inflexible. He had to seal his mouth on the subject, however, for to express an unorthodox opinion was a dangerous matter in those days in the Land of the Saints.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 88. Yes, a dangerous matter--so dangerous that even the most saintly dared only whisper their religious opinions with bated breath, lest something which fell from their lips might be misconstrued, and bring down a swift retribution upon them. The victims of persecution had now turned persecutors on their own account, and persecutors of the most terrible description. Not the Inquisition of Seville, nor the German Vehmgericht, nor the secret societies of Italy, were ever able to put a more formidable machinery in motion than that which cast a cloud over the state of Utah.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 88. Yes, a dangerous matter--so dangerous that even the most saintly dared only whisper their religious opinions with bated breath, lest something which fell from their lips might be misconstrued, and bring down a swift retribution upon them. The victims of persecution had now turned persecutors on their own account, and persecutors of the most terrible description. Not the Inquisition of Seville, nor the German Vehmgericht, nor the secret societies of Italy, were ever able to put a more formidable machinery in motion than that which cast a cloud over the state of Utah.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 90. One fine morning John Ferrier was about to set out to his wheatfields, when he heard the click of the latch, and, looking through the window, saw a stout, sandy-haired, middle-aged man coming up the pathway. His heart leapt to his mouth, for this was none other than the great Brigham Young himself. Full of trepidation--for he knew that such a visit boded him little good--Ferrier ran to the door to greet the Mormon chief. The latter, however, received his salutations coldly, and followed him with a stern face into the sitting-room.

"Brother Ferrier, " he said, taking a seat, and eyeing the farmer keenly from under his light-coloured eyelashes, "the true believers have been good friends to you. We picked you up when you were starving in the desert, we shared our food with you, led you safe to the Chosen Valley, gave you a goodly share of land, and allowed you to wax rich under our protection. Is not this so? "

"It is so, " answered John Ferrier.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 90. "In return for all this we asked but one condition: that was, that you should embrace the true faith, and conform in every way to its usages. This you promised to do, and this, if common report says truly, you have neglected. "

"And how have I neglected it? " asked Ferrier, throwing out his hands in expostulation. "Have I not given to the common fund? Have I not attended at the Temple? Have I not-- --? "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 90. "In return for all this we asked but one condition: that was, that you should embrace the true faith, and conform in every way to its usages. This you promised to do, and this, if common report says truly, you have neglected. "

"And how have I neglected it? " asked Ferrier, throwing out his hands in expostulation. "Have I not given to the common fund? Have I not attended at the Temple? Have I not-- --? "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 90. "There are stories of her which I would fain disbelieve--stories that she is sealed to some Gentile. This must be the gossip of idle tongues. What is the thirteenth rule in the code of the sainted Joseph Smith? 'Let every maiden of the true faith marry one of the elect; for if she wed a Gentile, she commits a grievous sin.'... " [Doyle appears to have based this passage on anti-Mormon propaganda, because the actual thirteenth rule reads: "We believe in being honest, true, chaste, benevolent, virtuous, and in doing good to all men; indeed, we may say that we follow the admonition of Paul--We believe all things, we hope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to endure all things. If there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, we seek after these things. "]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 91. "Reference

1. Heber C. Kemball [sic: Kimball], in one of his sermons " [This appears to be a footnote inserted by Doyle in the original text.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1890 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 305. [Academic symposium in Nanavit, year 2195.] "The need for what I call birth services was already recognized in the pre-Gilead period, where it was being inadequately met by 'artificial insemination,' 'fertility clinics,' and the use of 'surrogate mothers,' who were hired for the purpose. Gilead outlawed the first two as irreligious but legitimized and enforced the third, which was considered to have Biblical precedents; they thus replaced the serial polygamy common in the pre-Gilead period with the older form of simultaneous polygamy practiced both in early Old Testament times and in the former state of Utah in the nineteenth century. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 266. "'Sir, I wouldn't call what we did in Utah during the Second Mexican War clasping the Mormons to our bosom, or afterwards, either,' Dowling said; Custer had a selective memory for facts. John Pope and later military governors in Utah had jumped on the Mormons with both feet then, to make sure they didn't try giving the USA any more hard times. He supposed he could see why they'd outlawed polygamy, but suppressing public worship along with all other public meetings had always struck him as far too heavy-handed. Even after Utah joined the Union, public worship for groups larger than ten remained illegal; since the Second Mexican War, the Supreme Court hadn't been inclined to interfere with claims of military necessity. And so the Mormon Temple in Salt Lake City remained empty to this day. No wonder the Mormons didn't love the U.S. government. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 266. "Custer... asked, 'Are the damned Mormons in bed with the Rebs or the Canucks or both at once?'

'That's--not immediately clear from the reports I have here, sir,' Dowling answered... 'There are some foreign agitators in the state, but no details as to who they are.'

'Could be either one,' Custer judged. 'The Mormons don't like... much better than the Rebels do, but the Canadians could be seducing them with lied about freedom of religion.' He laughed unpleasantly. 'If they were up in Canada, they's have gotten the same short shrift the Germans who settled that town called Berlin did...'

'That's probably true, sir,' Dowling said... 'Shall I draft orders implementing this command for your signature, sir?'

'Yes, go ahead,' Custer said with a melodramatic sigh. 'They must have timed their damned uprising with a view to spoiling my offensive and robbing me of the breakthrough I surely would hav eearned. They'll pay, the scum.'

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Utah 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 280. "Picking his words with care, Morrell asked, 'What do you think of what's going on in Utah these days, son?'

He'd never seen Dimwiddie's bright-blue eyes anything but open and candid. He did now. Shutters might have slammed down on the private's face. He spoke like a machine: 'Sir, I do'nt know much about it.'

... Morrell... tried again: 'Have you heard from your family? Are they all right?'

'I got one letter not long ago, Dinwiddie answered. 'It was censored pretty bad, but they're well, yes, sir.'

'Glad to hear it,' Morrell said, on the whole sincerely. 'With things the way they are, how do you feel about being a soldier in the United States Army?'

That hooded look stayed on Dinwiddie's face. 'Sir, it doesn't have anything to do with me right now, does it? Provo's a long way from here.'

'So it is.' Morrell cocked his head to one side and studied the young Mormon. 'Rebel lines, though, they're only a few hundred yards off.' He waved southwest. "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.