Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, USA

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1985 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 288. "'...On the national front, we've got the shuttle going up this morning, and--'

'Which one?' Jeff rasped out.

'What?' Gene asked, puzzled.

'Which shuttle?'

'Discovery. You know, the one with the senator on board.' " [A reference to Jake Garn, the Latter-day Saint senator from Utah who was also a test pilot and who rode on the space shuttle in 1985.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1986 Cover, Arthur Byron. "Jesus Was an Ace " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 102, 107-108. Pg. 106: "'Just why did you open the Mission?' ";

Pg. 107: "'He was executed?' the reporter asked...

'Yes... He had turned some people into pillars of salt.'

'You made that promise to Gary Gilmore?' the reporter asked...

'Absolutely. Though maybe he wasn't a joker, maybe some people would all him an ace, or an individual with some of the powers you'd expect from an ace...'

'I see. And has your opening of the Jokertown mission had any effect on your position toward jokers' rights?'

'...I have always emphasized that we must deal with the victims of the virus compassionately.' ";

Pg. 108: "'Did you really meet Gary Gilmore?'

'Yes... There really hadn't been the need to publicize it before now, thought it might do the mission some good in the public relations arena.'

'Then maybe you met Mailer? He said he hadn't been able to confirm all the identities of the people who saw Gilmore toward the end.' " [Also pg. 102: Executioner's Song.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1987 McDaniel, Mary Catherine. "A Little of What You Fancy " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 196. "Even Nancy had grown peculiar. She turned up her nose at double cheese pizza. Grew bored with Sara Lee. Instead, like a caffeine addict in a Mormon household, she sneaked to the refrigerator in the night, snarfing platefuls of spinach and buckets of unshucked peas. Face to face with the empty larder, she'd assert her innocence, claiming crafty neighbors; shown the tear of lettuce or the cornsilk pasted to her chin, she'd pale... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1988 Dick, Philip K. The Broken Bubble. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988) [Blub/description of book on back cover of book jacket, written by Richard A. Lupoff.] "'As far as I can tell, The Broken Bubble fell across the invisible membrane that separates our universe from one that issimlar but not identical to ours. In that other universe, Jack Kerouac is still alive. And in that universe there was never a TV series called WKRP in Cincinnati, but there was a similar show called KOIF in San Francisco... " [Refers to the popular TV show which starred Gordon Jump.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 318. "'...Well, you owe Hiram a life, too, remember? Not to mention the life you owe me. Come to think of it, you owe... Gregg Hartmann a life, if it really went down in Syria the way the papers said. Then there's the Turtle, Golden Boy, Straight Arrow . . . is there anyone you don't owe a life?' " [Straight Arrow is an LDS character.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 328. "DEAD MAN'S HAND
CLOSING CREDITS

...with... Nephi (Straight Arrow) Callendar; created by: Walter Jon Williams " [Williams is not one of the authors of this Wild Cards novel, so presumably he created the LDS character 'Straight Arrow' in a story that appears in a previous book. If that's not the case, then authors created characters for this novel, but did not write about them.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1990 Kirn, Walter. "Whole Other Bodies " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 328. "Then the missionaries came. They were there one day when I got home from school, two young men in tight dark suits drinking strawberry Kool-Aid my mother had served them. The living room chairs were grouped in a circle, so Randy and I sat down and joined in, a long conversation about Our Lord and his plan for the American family. The missionaries had short blond hair and slow western voices, their fingernails were pink and all squared off. They said they didn't mean to put us out, just wanted to make us aware of some things, and my mother and father smiled and nodded with wide, shining looks in their eyes... " [Other refs., not in DB. Story is about one family's conversion and joining the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1990 Kirn, Walter. "Whole Other Bodies " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 330. "My brother got sleepy from reading the Bible, but tried not to show it, being polite. The blonder missionary told him not to worry, to curl up and sleep as long as he wanted, we weren't going to leave the park without him. And while my brother napped on the grass, moving his legs in his sleep, we talked about whether the Holy Ghost could visit a person in dreams... teaching truths that the person would wake up knowing. And we agreed that this was possible and might even happen to one of us. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1990 Kirn, Walter. "Whole Other Bodies " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 331. "The missionaries gave sermons first and everyone was there, the whole church, a hundred people from different towns who'd set up a table of cold cuts and cheese to eat at the party afterwards. And the sermons spoke of that perfect love which hovers around us always, in the sky, and of how some people ignored this love by always looking straight ahead with pinched, busy faces. But my family hadn't done that, we'd looked up.

One by one we went under the water. First my father, my tall father, clean and pale as he held his breath and let himself fall backwards, braced against the missionary's arm. For a time his hair spread out on the water, then it disappeared, and that was the moment when God took him in entirely. It happened to all of us that day. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 233. "Patiently Step [a Latter-day Saint] tried to explain the fact that the gospel of Jesus Christ was mostly about how we treat other people, and not at all about becoming the most powerful being in the universe and getting into a first-name relationship with God. That was for the bozos on TV who talked about Jeeee-zuz as if he was their old high-school chum or something. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1993 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 72-73. "'Hey, look, it's a monochromatic signal.'

Another display, labeled 'Intensity vs. Time,' showed a set of pulses moving left to right and then off the screen.

'Those are numbers,' Willie faintly. 'Somebody's broadcasting numbers.'

'It's probably some Air Force interference. I saw an AWACS, probably from Kirtland, about sixteen hundred hours. Maybe they're spoofing us for fun.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 68. "Friday afternoons at the firm, Robbie and Mort opened the bar in the rosewood cabinets of the Palace and welcomed the whole staff for a drink. It was pleasant and democratic. Evon declined alcohol, detailing, whenever she was asked, the beliefs of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for a number of women who had no concept about Mormons, except the Tabernacle Choir. It was a loose mood. There was talk about the week and the Super Bowl on Sunday, Dallas against Buffalo. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 211. "In high school, she was the great jock, too much for many boys to want to take on. And it was a Mormon town anyway; more than half the kids weren't allowed to date until they were sixteen. " [Also, pg. 210.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 41. [News article.] "COUP ATTEMPT RUMORS DENIED

White House sources and a spokesman for the Joint Chiefs of Staff issued a statement today denying that a military coup d'etat against the administration was in the making.

Unusual movements of airborne and infantry battalions around Washington, D.C., had roused speculation in some quarters. Publication in The Washingon Post ofa document allegedly leaked from the office of Air Force General Robert Osmond fueled rumors earlier in the week. " [No actual reference to LDS here, but 'Osmond' is best known as an LDS name. Latter-day Saints are actually mentioned elsewhere in book (pg. 303).]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1995 Ing, Dean. The Big Lifters. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 176. Pg. 176: "Wes was polishing off a Texas-style strawberry shortcake, with layers like stacked pancakes, when a smiling, fresh-faced young redhead in stylish lederhosen stopped by their table and, saying only 'Ma'am,' to Alma, presented Wes with a note on Marriott stationary. "; Pg. 185: "...Wes decided against six pointless hours of sleep in a Marriott bed. Instead, he made a lighthearted purchase at the DalWorth terminal and caught two hours of sleep on the coast redeye, beating the sun back to Oakland International. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1995 Siddoway, Richard. The Christmas Wish. New York: Harmony Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 46. "Tonight I held a small, red-faced baby. With his head in my hand his feet barely reached to my elbow. As I gazed at him, his eyes opened and he struggled to focus on my face. I wondered how much he remembered of the God and Father of us all, who had sent him here so recently. He has tiny fingernails, perfectly formed. I do not remember inspecting Samuel so closely. I am struck by the fact that immortality is in this child. Through him, Samuel and Carol live as Ruth and I live through Samuel. Truly 'Man is that he might have joy.' " [A passage from Latter-day Saint scripture is here quoted, and Latter-day Saint Christian theology is expressed here. The author is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 158-159. [Radio show discusses hatred of minorities such as Mormons or mutants.]

"Worthington: No, it wasn't. A big reason was to bring home the fact that anybody can be a mutant, that it cuts across race and class. Even the bluebloods can have a mutant baby. It's not a '...only Haitians, only poor white trash, only Jews, only blacks' sort of thing... I found out that one of my oldest prep school friends, Cameron Hodge, a man I trusted with my finances and my life, hated mutants with a passion. He tried to destroy me and my friends numerous times... later by joining and leading a rabid anti-mutant group.

Finckley: Why would a man like that--from your comments, a man with the most pedigree of backgrounds--behave that way?

Worthington: I don't want to speculate on him in particular, but why does anybody do that who should know better? With some people if it's not the mutants, it's the moneylenders, it's the Masons, it's the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 29. "Gradually, Americans were reviving a general opinion that muscle power was more ethical than machine power; that simplicity was next to Godliness. The tenets of Mormonism, outwardly simple in its absolutes and its demands that each Mormon household be as independent as possible, became more attractive. One out of every twenty-five Americans was now an LDS member--ten million Latter-Day Saints. They comprised a heaven-sent bloc of patriots, and a hell of a lot of votes. Privately, the Secretary of State suspected that the country might prosper under a Mormon President. In a liberal democracy, the administration usually bowed to its citizens. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 3. "In early August of 1996... The bulletin that had drawn [the President of the United States] back to Washington suggested complications in the sharp new rise of foreign oil prices; a rise that in itself further impeded his race for reelection against Utah's Senator Yale Collier [a Latter-day Saint]. The President considered Yale Collier a charismatic fool. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 27. "Every media survey pointed to the growing strength of the coalitions behind Senator Yale Collier of Utah.

It was not that the [current U.S.] President was, as Collier hinted, godless; it was just that Collier was so spectacularly Godly. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints had no better examplar of Mormonism than the best-known of its Council of Apostles, the organ-voiced Yale Collier. Educated at Brigham Young University, trained as a young missionary in Belgium, seasoned in argument on the Senate floor, Collier kept his farmboy accent and exuded a sense of distined greatness. He was also one of the best verbal counterpunchers on anybody's campaign trail. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 27. "In June the [U.S.] President had made a passing reference to [Senator] Collier [the challenger in upcoming presidential election] as a fundamentalist. Collier had tickled millions of holo watchers by his droll objection. He presumed, with a shake of his head, that the President knew the term 'fundamentalist,' among Mormons, meant 'polygamist.' The Senator had... only one wife [of course]... Perhaps, Collier added waggishly, a man without children found it difficult to believe that a single union could be blessed with eleven children, but such was the case. He, Yale Collier, humbly awaited apology.

By this stroke, Collier implied that the President was either ignorant of religious terms or casual about the truth; and stressed his own status as a virile family man; and left room for comparison between a once-married man who had elevin kids and a twice-married man who had none. The nation's holo pundits had played the potency jokes threadbare until July. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 88. [After SinoInd nuclear attack.] "News: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints urged Americans to turn to prayer and good works; to accept this judgment of God with a firm resolve to emulate the Godly as a path to survival... Catholics, Jews, Unitarians and atheists wanted equal [media] time. It was not difficult to infer a connection between different ratios of survival between faiths, and different amounts of Godliness. What was difficult, to gentiles, was explaining away the fact that Mormon temples were responding heroically with food and medical help to anyone standing in the queues outside.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 89. "It occurred to Eve that Senator Collier of Utah was a convincing demonstrator with the right words and, under these circumstances, the right background. B.A., J.D., and LDS. His Presidential candidacy might be a foregone conclusion if the latest rumor were true... The President, it was rumored, was not safely tucked into a maximum-security hole, nor was the Vice President. The stream of messages issued by the White House press secretary only purported to come from the top. The rumor dealt with a brace of impact nukes and one of the provisioned caverns of Virginia's once-lovely Shenandoah Valley. If it was true... then the Speaker of the House [Senator Collier] was now President of the United States. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 157. "He took his time phrasing the question, a legacy from taking courses via library holo terminals. 'Are they Mormons?'

'No!' Her knee-jerk response surprised Palma herself. She chuckled, peered guiltily at Quantrill, then back to her work. 'Well, actually some of them think they are. I could make the same claim, Ted. I was raised LDS, but I backslid to a jack-Mormon, and then--' Shrug. 'No, you can't be a Mormon and deny the tenets of the Apostles. Or the revelations of the modern Prophets.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 159. " and an LDS Apostle in White House Central will lean in that direction.'

'Who needs holovision? Seems to me if you read the Book of Mormon, you know what's gonna happen anyway.'

She smiled at what she imagined was a joke. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 232. "Yale Collier [LDS U.S. president] interlaced fingers behind his head, leaned back, studied the holo display on the wall. 'You're asking me to put our entire west coast in a state of siege merely on the basis of two Indian overflights?'

'After a thorough analysis, Mr. President, yes,' said the General, biting into the issue. He looked at the scatter of soft-faced civilians who shared the war room, wishing Collier's cabinet posts had been filled with more plain soldiers than Christian soldiers. Their very presence was irregular, but the President referred to them as his Chiefs of Civil Staff. And close coordination with civilian agencies had never been more vital than now. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 262. "'Selah,' intoned the Prophet Jansen.

Quantrill responded like the others, got to his feet, willed the pins and needles to leave his feet after an hour on his knees in a sweltering barn with fifty others. Ritual sof the Church of the Sacrificed Lamb owed little to Mormonism, much to enthusiasm. Once again, Seth Howell's briefings were verified in the field; the zealot gangs borrowed just enough from the LDS to attract some unstable Mormon rejects. Whatever crimes they committed would be placed, by gentiles, at the feet of the LDS. No wonder, then, that the Collier administration [President Collier is LDS] entrusted its remedy to T section... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 157-158. "'All males may become priests

'Maybe I shouldn't be asking you--'

'Ask away, whatthehell,' she said...

'Why do they raid other people? I thought Mormons had food and stuff all socked away.'

...'The do. I repeat, these guerrillas aren't true Mormons. Of course they take terrible chances driving like maniacs through [nuclear] fallout, and some of them will be sorry. Some of them are just banditti, out for loot, but some honestly think they're brining the gospel...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 62. "In the thirty-two years since the show's cancellation, the 'Spooky' character has taken a place in pop mythology comparable to 'Eddie Haskell' (Ken Osmond, Leave It to Beaver), 'Aunt Bee' (Frances Bavier, The Andy Griffith Show), and 'Hop Sing' (Victor Sen Yung, Bonanza). " [The 'Ken Osmond' mentioned here is not known to be a member of the famous LDS singing Osmond family.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 28-30. [Extended discussion of the non-smoking trend in America, which dates back to Latter-day Saints ban on smoking in the early 1830s.] "The nonsmoking trend started way back in the late seventies, and so far it had followed the typical pattern for aversion trends, but I wondered if it was starting to reach another, more volatile level. [Character reads a personal ad] 'Any race, religion, political party... okay. NO SMOKERS.'

And 'Must be adventurous, daring, nonsmoking risktaker' " [More.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Anthony, Patricia. Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997); pg. 293. [Introduction to "White Wives "] "I've always been a sucker for Victorian knock-offs, primarily Anne Perry's mysteries. I enjoyed writing 'Dear Froggy' so much that I wrote this... " [Perry is an LDS author.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 296. "White House Deseret viewed the 'Ellfive Solution' with cautious optimism. The Apostles--the ruling committee of the LDS--felt that the official Mormon accounts of world history would, in time, greatly benefit by a general Jewish exodus from the planet. They reasoned (simplistically) that Jews everywhere would clamor for berths on Ellfive shuttle ships, so that Mormon America would be rid of one highly visible religious minority. The truth was that most American Jews had lived urban lives, and died urban deaths, a year before [from SinoInd nuclear attack]. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 305. "...Internatioal Entertainment & Electronics. IEE was a set of commercial broadcast networks, interlaced with the Holo Corporation of America, tied to Loring Aircraft, engaged to Entertainment Talent Associates, in bed with Deseret Pacific Industries, romantically linked to Latter-Day Shale. It would have to tread carefully around a few other surviving consortia and necessary evils such as organized labor--but tread, it would.

Blanton Young asked the pivotal question: 'And how much of all this is in the hands of devout stockholders?'

'Enough to ensure us,' said the President, 'of the very most cordial relations. This country must never allow the identities of Church and State to merge,' he said, the great voice rolling across the room, 'but in Zion I forsee that both government and business will serve God.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 297-298. "Opposition to the returning US armies came from the last quarter they had expected: White House Deseret.

One of the most signal failures of American media was its failure to reassure our civilian population on the subject of plague. Everyone knew that any influx from Asia would bring keratophagic staph and blindess--and no facts to the contrary had much effect. When [U.S. President] Yale Collier announced an 'overnight, God-sent miracle cure' from Canada, only Mormons and the RUS [Soviets] believed him. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 302-303. "Blanton Young [who is LDS], Vice President of the United States, stood and stared out the window of the Presidential suite toward the dusting of November snow atop the Uinta Peaks east of Provo. His hands were pressed to his ears as if to guard against more bad news. Finally he turned, blinking back tears... 'Six months, Mr. President! And just when we'll need you most. These are tears of self-pity,' he added wryly.

Yale Collier [said]... 'Six months at the least,' he reminded Young. 'I might still be around to nominate you three years from now, if this chemotherapy works.'

'But--Yale, I know my limitations,' blurted Young, and pointed toward the fax folders on the desk... 'Do you honestly think I can handle all that?'

'You'll have help, just as I do... Don't underestimate our strengths; the Church has never been stronger, Blanton, and--' a wan smile, 'God's work may be much easier with the 'Streamlined America' package.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 157. [This joking conversation takes place in Boston, discussing Senator Jake Garn, the LDS senator from Utah.] "'You didn't see any hailstorms or panic in the streets, did you? See, the shuttle mission--I think it was Atlantis--this shuttle mission around the time of the comet with the Congressman aboard, remember that? Come on, you remember.'

Angelo looked at Amanda. He looked at LaWanda. Then back at Amanda again.

'Wait, that's right,' Amanda said. 'They did send a Congressman up in space last year. I remember. The guys on the news said they were going to use him as ballast.'

'There you go,' said Angelo, 'proof positive.'

Everett buried his face in his hand but LaWanda took his hand and held it because she wanted to look at his face some more.

'There was no Congressman on that shuttle mission,' Angelo went on. 'They just said there was because the President used the Congressman to sneak Everett here on board...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 102. "Walter said, 'We built a bunch of those. The earlier classes, I mean. CD classes last year, when we lived in Cleveland. Mom brought them along; I guess nobody else wanted them.' He laughed his braying laugh again. It was more nervous than unkind.

'That's a replica of Mormon fort,' Mrs. Keitelbein said.

'I'll be darned,' Ragle said. 'I'm interested in this. You know, I was in World War Two; I was over in the Pacific.'

'I dimly remember reading about you,' Mrs. Keitelbein said. 'You being such a celebrity...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 194. [1] "But it [America] has always wanted to be unique: a new Chosen People with God's own seal of approval. That's why the controversy has become so heated. If the liberals were right, then the Indians still have a moral claim on those lands that they were, by various means, cheated of, a claim that might encompass the whole continent. But if the continent is the white man's by virtue of his Manifest Destiny, then all of outer space belongs to him as well. The two claims--retroactively on the continent; prospectively on the galaxy--issue from a single sense of moral entitlement.

No other writer in the SF field has been drawn to this theme so frequently or to such striking effect as Orson Scott Card. Card is a relatively late arrival on the SF scene, but since his first novel, Ender's Game (1985), Card has won numerous awards, produced a body of work as remarkable for its quantity as its popularity... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 194. [2] "...and [Orson Scott Card] may well be considered Heinlein's true heir--not because his fictions recirculate the Master's mannerisms and ideology... but because of his knack for attack-dog narrative, his fertile invention, and the moral conviction he brings to his work. What he also brings to his work is Mormonism, the faith he was reared in and whose tenets and history have provide the allegorical subtext to so much of his work.

Mormons have a unique perspective on American history. In their enforced migration westward, they are a communal embodiment of Manifest Destiny. Yet their attitude toward the Indian tribes whose orbits intersected theirs was not antagonistic but cautiously respectful, for according to The Book of Mormon, the indigenes of North America were descended from a lost tribe of Israel, the Nephites, who voyaged to North America with miraculous aid, circa 200 B.C., and were later visited by the resurrected Christ. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 194. [3] "The early Mormons actively sought to convert Indians/Nephites to Mormonism (while refusing until very recently to welcome blacks into their fold) [actually, blacks have always been allowed as members, although were not initiated into the unpaid priesthood until 1978], and their missionaries are still most active in Central and South America. Card spent his required two years of missionary labor in Brazil during the time of the Vietnam War. It is hard to think of a more ideal apprenticeship into Otherness for someone aspiring to a career in SF. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 194. [4; more on Orson Scott Card] Pg. 194-195: "Ender's Game, based on Card's first published SF story of the same title (1977), conflates a number of tried-and-true SF elements into a plot that, like much of Heinlein, would seem steeped in irony if it were not presented in a tone so dead earnest. The protagonist, Ender Wiggen, is that most beloved figure of the genre, a child genius of modest circumstances destined to be the savior of his race while still an adolescent. Not only that, but his two siblings are almost as remarkable: they become the intellectual leaders of their time while they are still children. This one-ups Theodore Sturgeon's More Than Human, but Card further flatters his aimed-for constituency of bright juveniles by having Ender's special talent be a genius for arcade games. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 195. [4; more on Orson Scott Card] [More about Ender's Game] "The military, discovering Ender's pinball wizardry, recruits him into a special corps of youthful arcade-gaming geniuses, and Ender, thinking he is zapping only computer-simulated enemies, saves the human race from destruction by destroying a galactic civilization of Heinlein-like insect enemies. Heinlein called them Bugs; Card, archly, calls them Buggers, to make them doubly objectionable.

It is, then, quite at the end of his novel that Card pulls off a memorable coup de theatre: the Buggers aren't really bad. They just didn't realize that the humans they'd attacked were a form of intelligent life like themselves. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 195. [5; more on Orson Scott Card] [More about Ender's Game] "The child Ender has been the unwitting instrument of an unmerited genocide, and so, in the sequel, Speaker for the Dead (1986), the mature Ender tours the galaxy confessing his sin and trying to find a suitable home for the one surviving Bugger queen whom he has rescued from this one-man holocaust (not the only such event in Card's oeuvre). Once more, he discovers an alien race, the Pequininoes of the planet Lusitania, who seems to be bad (they crucify a missionary) until they're shown, like the Buggers, to have been misunderstood. Another sequel, Xenocide (1991), does not fully resolve all the complications, but its title does signal Card's moral and allegorical concern: how can one hope to live a moral life as a citizen of a nation drenched in the guilt of unjust and genocidal wars? "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 195. [6; more on Orson Scott Card] "In a later and still ongoing series of novels, The Tales of Alvin Maker, Card poses the same question, more artfully, in a saga that transmutes American--and Mormon--history into the stuff of legend. The series posits an alternative Federal Age America in which the Revolution fizzled and there is a Macedonian salad of smaller states and alliances; it also employs that stable trope of lazy fantasists: a world in which magic really works. The hero, once again, is a preternaturally gifted boy, Alvin Maker (aka Alvin Smith), destined to become a world savior. Look at the pattern of the plot in one light, and Alvin is a stand-in for Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism, but look at it in another way, and he is Wagner's Siegfried, an apprentice blacksmith like Alvin. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 196. [7; more on Orson Scott Card] [More about Tales of Alvin Maker series] "At this point in the story, with four volumes in print, the parallels of Alvin's and Joseph Smith's careers have only begun to be developed, though Alvin's world, with its supernatural embroideries of folk magic, would seem to be one that Joseph would have no trouble believing in. The Wagnerian parallels are more telling. Neither Card nor any of his critics whom I've read have noted how his plot, especially in the latter two books, derives from Wagner's Ring cycle, sometimes on a scene-for-scene basis. The truth-telling woodland bird makes an appearance, as do the fate-weaving Norns (who deliver great chunks of exposition, as they did in Gotterdammerung), and the heroine is a dead ringer for Brunhilde, a woman who superintends the hero's childhood from afar and is destined to be his consort. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 196. [8; more on Orson Scott Card] [More about Tales of Alvin Maker series] "It is artfully done, with interesting reversals of Wagner's moral equations. Thus, Alvin is brought up, like Siegfried, by a foster father of an alien race--but not a scheming Nibelung like Mime; rather, a noble Red Indian, Tenskwa-Tawa, the 'Red Prophet' of the second book in the series. By this association, Alvin is empowered, like Cooper's Deerslayer, with the secret wisdom of the Red Indians and their supernal strengths. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 196. [9; more on Orson Scott Card] [More about Tales of Alvin Maker series] "'He could run like a Red man,' Card writes:
Just like a Red man, that was how he moved. And pretty soon his White man's clothing chafed on him, and he stopped and took it off, stuffed it into the pack on his back, and then ran naked as a jaybird, feeling the leaves of the bushes against his body. Soon he was caught in the rhythm of his own running, forgetting anything about his own body, just part of the living forest, moving onward, faster and stronger, not eating, not drinking. Like a Red man, who could run forever through the deep forest, never needing rest, covering hundreds of miles in a single day.
The Alvin Maker series plays games with American history that sometimes improve it in wish-fulfilling ways. His red men have held their own against white men in a way that bodes well for their own (alternative) future... " [More on O.S. Card, pg. 197-198.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 197. "Abolition remains an ongoing battle as the fourth volume comes to an end, but Card probably intends a redemptive ending for the country at large, as well as for Alvin's band of latter-day psychics. Alvin's own fate will be a test of the author's willingness to defy the genre's resistance to tragic endings, since by both templates he has adopted (Joseph Smith and Siegfried), Alvin would seem destined for tragedy. However, he has magical powers that Joseph Smith and even Siegfried lacked, so perhaps he will solve all the basic problems of American history and still get the girl, the gold watch, and everything. The remarkable thing is that Card's flair for storytelling is such that even sophisticated readers can be engaged by his inventions. He is the Edgar Rice Burroughs of Generation X. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 10. "At war's end in 1998 America's great Mormon president, Yale Collier, had envisioned a regular cadre of young civilians who would operate directly under executive orders, and who would be superbly trained to rescue citizens in mortal trouble. Freeway overpasses, weakened years before by nuclear blasts, still occasionally collapsed without warning--as did buildings, dams, and underground structures... Collier had become infused with a dream that Streamlined America, under the Mormon stewardship of his administration and those groomed to follow, would be rebuilt into the true Zion. But Yale Collier had been infused with cancer, too. He lived long enough to see his Search & Rescue teams become a symbol of young American altruism and audacity, and he entrusted the development of S & A to his successor, Blanton Young. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1998 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. ix. [Acknowledgments] "Legends pass from one hand to another... I must pay homage, in roughly reverse chronological order, to a number of fabulists and philosophers who--knowingly or not--worked to make what follows possible: Julius Schwartz and Mortimer Weisinger; Orson Scott Card and Isaac Bashevis Singer; Jerome Siegel and Joseph Shuster; Robert Montana and Stan Lee; Jack Kirby; Otto Binder and William Moulton Marston; Joseph Campbell and Edgar Allen Poe; Walter Elias Disney and Samuel Langhorne Clemens; Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin; Terence Hanbury White and Thomas Malory; Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekial, and John; Aristocles and Homer; and those whose hands and minds have contributed and passed the legends along... " [Card is LDS. See also pg. 215: reference to Salt Lake City's wide streets designed by LDS president Brigham Young; pg. 203: cold fusion]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 84. "He was wearing his high school baseball uniform. His spikes and glove--a Dale Murphy autograph--rested on the broken yellow vinyl of the only other kitchen chair. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 100. "'...You haven't read Thoreau?'...

'Excerpts from Walden, last year,' she offered.

'Oh,' he said. 'Well, it's like all that. You can't just accept the status quo. You have to keep evolving--finding new ways, better ways, or your morality stalls out. Emerson says, '. . . whoso would be a man, must be a non-conformist.' It's like, the human spirit needs to keep asserting its independence, to keep growing. It has nothing to do with taking drugs. Taking drugs is like an evolutionary step backward.'

'Emerson,' she said.

'Ralph Waldo,' he said. 'Self-Reliance.' Haven't you read that, either? Transcendentalists?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 101. "'You know,' she said, 'you're really kind of a surprise.'

'Yeah?' he said... 'Well, lately, everything is a surprise to me. Anyway, I guess what I'm saying is, when you start learning, everything--numbers, law, history, politics, science, whatever--it all follows, because it's all part of this huge organize whole. But it starts with finding your gifts. Shelly says, 'To ever man is given a gift . . . seek every good gift,' which is part of a long Mormon passage; Shelly worked the God out of it and kept the rest.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 103. "A female voice said, 'Fifteen minutes, and I've got the whole dang Relief Society--' Its owner--Casey's mother, of course--stopped dead at the doorway of the laundry room. She was an older version of Casey--golden-haired and gamine-faced--her eyes and mouth wide open at the moment. " [Casey's mother interrupts he conversation, announcing that women from the ward are coming over to the house. Casey, the book's main character, is LDS, but there are very few explicit refs. to this in novel. Refs. by name are in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 213. "'When you Americans were opening up your country--pioneers, Indian scouts, all that...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2000 Budrys, Algis (ed.) L. Ron Hubbard Presents The Best of Writers of the Future. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (2000); pg. 306. [Introduction to "On My Way to Paradise " by Dave Wolverton.] "Dave Wolverton is a Brigham Young University graduate, who has also been a prison guard, a Mormon missionary, a meat cutter, and an editor of The Leading Edge, a Provo-based semiprofessional SF magazine of high caliber. He entered L. Ron Hubbard's Writers of the Future Contest three times, with a semifinalist and finalist story; the third was 'On My Way to Paradise,' the strikingly accomplished story that follows.

Not only was it strikingly accomplished, it turned out to be the first part of a novel, which almost immediately got him a leading literary agent and a three-novel contract with Bantam Books. That was only the beginning. Since then he has been publishing an astonishing number of novels, under his own and other names. He has been a WOTF judge for many years now... he continues to serve as a judge.

He lives in Provo, with his wife, Mary, and a gang of children. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2000 Leavitt, David. "The Term Paper Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1997); pg. 198. "Altogether, with his carefully combed black hair and short-sleeve button-down shirt (pen in breast pocket), he reminded me of those Mormon missionary boys you sometimes run into in the European capitals, with badges on their lapels that say 'Elder Anderson' or 'Elder Carpenter.' And as it turned out, the association was prophetic. Ben was a Mormon, as I soon learned, albeit from Fremont, Calif., not Utah. No doubt in earlier years he'd done the very same European 'services,' handing out pamphlets to confused homosexual tourists who'd thought he might be cruising them. " [More about the character Ben, not all refs. to him in story. He is one of main characters.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2000 Leavitt, David. "The Term Paper Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1997); pg. 204. "'Strange, all this.'

'What?'

'Just . . . our sitting together.'

'Why?'

'I'm not sure quite how to explain. You see, in the church--did I tell you I'm a Mormon?'

'No.'

'Well, in the church we have this clear-cut conception of sin. And so I always assumed that if I ever committed a really big sin, like we're doing now . . . I don't know, that there'd be a clap of thunder and God would strike me dead or something. Instead of which we're sitting here in this courtyard and the sun's shining. The grass is green.'

'But what's the sin?'

'You know. Cheating.'

'Is cheating really a sing?'

'Of course. It's part of lying.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2000 Leavitt, David. "The Term Paper Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1997); pg. 205. "'So you're an atheist,' he said. 'I suppose I should have expected it. I suppose I should have guessed most homosexuals would be atheists.'

'Oh, some homosexuals are very religious. It wouldn't surprise me to find out one or two were Mormons.'

'Ex-Mormons.'

'A lot more than two of those. But to get back to what you were saying, I wouldn't call myself an atheist. Instead I'd say I'm a skeptical lapsed Jew, distrustful of dogma.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Dalton-Woodbury, Kathleen. "Signs and Wonders " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 162. "'It's not your job--or mine--to make a landing place for the City of Enoch, Grandpa.'

Grandpa waved away Tevita's statement. 'We've been over this before. You know what year it is. You know the Millennium didn't happen at the turn of the century.' Dark eyes narrowed at Tevita, and he couldn't look away. 'The Tongans accepted the gospel and came here [to Utah] and to Independence, Missouri, so we could meet the Lord when he came again. After all, the Tongans in Missouri are building houses for him. They know we are the people who must prepare the way... You give me a better reason for no Millennium. You show me that everything is ready for him to come back.'

'But we'll never be ready, Grandpa,' Tevita stood up. They had been over all this before... 'Maybe the Second Coming was all a big story anyway.'

...He was a sophomore on the varsity team... He didn't want any Second Coming to get in the way of that. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 5. "...the reigning Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day Saints. Now that a Mormon administration directed the rebuilding of an America whittled down by ravages of the SinoInd War... " [This is the premise of the entire book: an America ravaged by nuclear attack from India and China, in which the LDS Church and members emerged organized and had become the leadership of the country. The book is full of LDS references, only a few of which are included in the DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 12. "Blanton Young did not regard himself as a heretic. He took great pains to show that one could remain on the church's Council of Apostles while serving as the nation's chief executive. America was recovering; and as always during a reconstruction period, the government relaxed its restrictions on business and industry... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 13. "Like all regular S & R [Search & Rescue] pilots, Grenier disparaged the beauty of his sprint chopper and his expertise in flying it, as a good Mormon curb against excessive pride... For an S & R regular, the primary virtues were skill, unquestioning obedience, a good nature, and good looks--in that order. Rovers werea phylum apart. The rovers trained first with one team, then another. They seldom talked about their 'surveilance' sorties and were clearly not LDS in outlook. For a rover, good looks were secondary and good nature just about nonexistent. Rovers had been known to rage against a mission, to swill illegal hard liquor, even to grow combative. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 39. "President [Blanton] Young sought to save the American people from radio and holocasts that might interfere with his peculiar vision of a new, and uniformly Mormon, Zion. Since most LDS and gentile voters might not understand how necessary those measures were, the President elected to mask them in committee recommendations. Of course, a few seditious sons of perdition smuggled unscramblers in from Wild Country. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 39. "Ralph Gibson had nothing against Mormons--well, nothing much, anyway--in general. A... lot of them had bought his unscramblers, and a few were willing to joke about the unsaintliness of the 'Lion of Zion', [U.S. president] Blanton Young, whom one liberal Mormon had dubbed the Lyin' of Zion. But support for Young at the polls was the final punchline, and his reconstruction policies were... "


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.