Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Syria

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas 2013 Anthony, Patricia. "The Last Light from Llano " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 224. "...news special on the TV showing how the Antarctic ice-cap broke into big, glistening pieces that floated off around the sea, like fruit cocktail bobbing in Jell-O. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 35-36. "...it was never really quiet at the Dallas-Fort Worth transplex. Not with the confluence of the third busiest airport I the world, the ninth busiest spaceport... It was like running the gauntlet. Seven years in San Francisco had given Christopher a don't-bother-I'm-not-buying look which discouraged most ordinary panhandlers and deadweight. But DFW's parasites were bred for persistence. Discouraging look or not, Christopher was accosted four times--by a Mormon revivalist, by two canvassers for the Greens [an environmentalist group], and twice by joybirds working N Corridor's bed-box hotel. The revivalist was the hardest to brush off "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 5. "Somebody--it could have been Lori, but I really think it was Harry--snitched to the bishop.

Now that I had such an excellent computer, I wouldn't mind doing the ward newsletter, would I?

Mormons do not say no when the bishop tells them they wouldn't mind doing something.

So I went home, looked at the Microsoft Word the computer came with and the WordPerfect Harry had added to it, and said, 'Me? That?'... " [More. The protagonist is LDS, so there are many other refs, not all in DB. All refs. to the faith ('LDS', or 'Mormon') by name are thought to be in DB, however. See other entries as well.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 7. "A week? I thought dismally. Even beginning to learn 'all about computers' was likely to take ten years, particularly with my son around. When I said that to Harry, he pointed out that I have no son around during the day these days. Our nineteen-year-old, Hal, is on his mission, trying with notable lack of success to convert the entire state of Nevada to a religion that forbids smoking, drinking, gambling, and even coffee and tea. Our four-year-old, Cameron, is in play school in the morning an day care in the afternoon, now that Harry and I are once again both working all day.

I was defeated. With my husband, my bishop, and my captain all ganged up against me, what could I say or do? "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 7. "So I spent all day Friday buying computer manuals... I spent all day Saturday cleaning up the house... I spent all day Sunday going to church, feeding self and family breakfast and lunch, and lying in bed self-righteously reading my scriptures and my Sunday school lesson for next week, except of course for the time spent checking on and playing with my four-year-old, until it was time for dinner, which we were having at a daughter's house. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 9. "I... went and made myself a cup of Pero--that's a German coffee substitute made of wheat and rye and preferred by such Mormons as do not like Postum, of whom I am one--and went and turned the computer back on. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 112. "She and Hal are not officially engaged. The LDS Church does not forbid young men or young women from becoming engaged before leaving on their missions, though it strongly discourages it. But I was well aware that the gold CTR ring--the initials mean 'Choose the Right,' from a song that begins, 'Choose the right, when the choice is placed before you'--on the ring finger of her left hand was matched by one on Hal's left hand, as he trudged about trying to convert the entire state of Nevada. But his weekly letters home (required by all mission presidents of all missionaries, mission presidents being well aware of the propensity of young postadolescents to forget their parents exist) bubbled with optimism. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 135. "Unless there is a major emergency, missionaries are allowed one telephone call home a year, at Christmas, so mail was the only way I was going to hear from Hal. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Texas: Galveston 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 11. "'Coffee?' Laura said.

'No, thank you. I never take caffeine.'

'I see.' Laura put the pot aside. 'What can we do for you, Reverend?' " [The Reverend Morgan is not LDS, despite following a similar prohibition against caffeine.];

"'...what if you run out with some Jell-O in your pocket . . . dangerous Jell-O . . . patented Jell-O.' " [Not an LDS reference, but a reference to Jell-O.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Tidewater 2300 Swanwick, Michael. Stations of the Tide. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 129. "'...Here is where we store all the outdated, obscure, and impolite information that belongs nowhere else. Flat and hollow worlds, rains of frogs, visitations of angels. Paracelsus's alchemical system in one bottle and Isaac Newton's in another... It's all rather something of a lumber room now, but much of this information was once quite important. Some of it used to be the best there was.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Tonga 2050 Bova, Ben. Moonwar. New York: Avon Books (1998); pg. 151. "Killifer explained the series of events, tracing the break of the news blackout to Tamara Bonai in Kiribati.

'Kiribati?' General O'Conner's ravaged face glared at him. 'Where's that?'

'In the Pacific. Micronesia.'

The general seemed to sink in on himself, thinking. Then he started crackling.

'What's funny?' Killifer asked.

'I did missionary work out there when I was a kid.'

That surprised Killifer. 'You did?'

'Tonga. Fiji. I wore the black suit and tie and went out among the heathen.' He wiped at his eyes with a frail hand.

'They were good people. They listened to me and smiled and agreed with everything I said. Helped me build a church for them. They even attended services.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. -2. [Dramatis Personae] "Morrone, son of Morron--Companion to the Wanax Ganton. " [It is quite possible that the name 'Morrone' is derived from 'Moroni', and the name 'Morron' is derived from the name 'Mormon' from the Book of Mormon. In the book of Mormon, Moroni is the son of Mormon, and both are military officers, so the parallel is very close. This novel features extensive treatment of religious topics, and the author, Pournelle, has previously written extensively about Mormons. The characters Morrone and Morron are featured more in the novel, beginning on page 4.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 237. "Tylara fingered the Colt at her waist. I believe he would give his binoculars for her, though possibly not the Browning pistol, she thought. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom 1895 Asimov, Isaac. "The Ultimate Crime " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984; copyright 1976); pg. 341. "'Sherlockian activities... You see, the thing is that Conan Doyle wrote numerous Sherlock Holmes stories as quickly as he could because he hated them--'

'He did? In that case, why--'

'Why did he write them? Money, that's why. From the very first story, 'A Study in Scarlet,' the world caught on fire with Sherlock Holmes. He became a world-renowned figure and there is no telling how many people the world over thought he really lived. Innumerable letters were addressed to him at his address in 221B Baker Street, and thousands came to him with problems to be solved.' " ['A Study in Scarlet' featured Mormon missionaries as the story's 'bad guys'/antagonists.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "Virgin Resusitas " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 218. "'Hold on to your hat. I've joined the Church.'

'You--what church?' I stammered.

'Good grief! There's only one!'

'You have a lot of Mormon friends, and a few Lutherans on the side . . .'

'My God,' she cried. 'Catholic, of course.'

'Since when have you liked Catholics? I thought you were raised in an Orange family, family from Cork, laughed at the Pope!'

'Silly. That was then, this is now. I am certified.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom 2000 Stableford, Brian. "Tenebrio " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 146-147. "...he'd elected to destroy the village rather than the smaller hamlets, isolating the church. The church commissioners had refused to sell their own parcel of land but they hadn't been able to maintain the living. They'd closed the church and the cemetery and sold the vicarage with the proviso that its exterior aspect was preserved. When he'd bought it, Hazard had become the official keyholder of the church, although he had no more than a couple of inquiries a year from tourists wanting to look inside--mostly American Mormons hunting down scraps of evidence relating to the lives of their more remote ancestors. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom 2015 Willis, Connie. "Cat's Paw " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 183. "'It's got to be a fictional character,' Rutgers said. 'He admitted himself it's the hardest to guess.g

'No, his is always a fictional character. I needs to be someone real. And someone obscure. Anastasia!'

'I would hardly call Anastasia obscure,' I said.

'No, but if he asks 'Is the person living?' we can say we don't know, and he'll think it's a fictional character.'

'What if he's already asked if it's a fictional character and we've said no?'

'But it was a fictional character,' Leda said. 'I saw the Disney film when I was little.' " [Note: This wasn't actually a Disney film, but was a film produced and directed by famed LDS animator Don Bluth for Twentieth Century Fox.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 867 C.E. Harrison, Harry & John Holm. One King's Way. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 21. "Conforming to their code of forever seeking for new knowledge and supporting themselves and their religion by their working skills alone. Smiths, carpenters, hauliers... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 158. "'The pigeon,' said Archimedes, '...A dutiful child... a wise parent, she knows, like all philosophers, that the hand of every man is against her. She has learned throughout the centuries to specialize in escape. No pigeon has ever committed an act of aggression nor turned upon her persecutors: but no bird, likewise, is so skillful in eluding them... No other bird can estimate a range so well... the pigeons coo to one another with true love, nourish their cunningly hidden children with true solicitude, and flee from the aggressor with true philosophy--a race of peace lovers continually caravaning away from the destructive Indian in covered wagons. They are loving individualists surviving against the forces of massacre only by wisdom in escape.'

...Merlyn put his fingers together like Sherlock Holmes and replied immediately... " [Also, pg. 194-196.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 195-196. "' 'Well done,' exclaimed the Creator in delighted tones. 'Here, all you embryos, come here with your beaks and whatnots to look upon Our first Man. He is the only one who has guessed Our riddle, out of all of you, and We have great pleasure in conferring upon him the Order of Dominion over the Fowls of the Air, and the Beasts of the Earth, and the Fishes of the Sea. Now let the rest of you get along, and love and multiply, for it is time to knock off for the week-end. As for you, Man, you will be a naked tool all your life, though a user of tools. You will look like an embryo till they bury you... Eternally undeveloped, you will always remain potential in Our image, able to see some of Our sorrows and to feel some of Our joys. We are partly sorry for you, Man, but partly hopeful...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 27. "'I have no religion, but I do not drink.'

'Dad's a humanist. Very wet.'

'His humanism permits him to drink to excess?'

'What? Oh, wet. No, I meant creepy, boring, yuck. That's what humanism is, religionwise. I'm a latter-day Satanist, though I still have to attend school prayers. I sing the hymns backwards... Well let me tell you we latter-day Satanists worship the great Minus One...' " [The group identified as 'latter-day Satanists' has nothing to do with Latter-day Saints, but the similar-sounding name may be an quasi-humorous attempt on the part of the author to intentionally pick a name that sounds similar to 'Latter-day Saints.']

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "But we just made with the zoobies, flash flash flash, sat down, rang the bell, and waited for the boy to come. "; Pg. 116: "...showing all his white zoobies... "; Pg. 117: "and gulliver pains and aches in the zoobies and horrible horrible thirst... " ['zoobie' is a slang term for a BYU student, but that doesn't not appear to be Burgess's usage here. The 'Glossary of Badsat Language' at the back, pg. 188, says that 'zoobies' means 'teeth.']
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 114. [Chapter 27] [1] Chapter 27

IN WHICH PASSEPARTOUT UNDERGOES, AT A SPEED OF TWENTY MILES AN HOUR, A COURSE OF MORMON HISTORY

During the night of the 5th of December, the train ran south-easterly for about fifty miles; then rose an equal distance in a north-easterly direction, towards the Great Salt Lake.

Passepartout, about nine o'clock, went out upon the platform to take the air. The weather was cold, the heavens grey, but it was not snowing. The sun's disc, enlarged by the mist, seemed an enormous ring of gold, and Passepartout was amusing himself by calculating its value in pounds sterling, when he was diverted from this interesting study by a strange-looking personage who made his appearance on the platform.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 115. [Chapter 27] [2] This personage, who had taken the train at Elko, was tall and dark, with black moustache, black stockings, a black silk hat, a black waistcoat, black trousers, a white cravat, and dogskin gloves. He might have been taken for a clergyman. He went from one end of the train to the other, and affixed to the door of each car a notice written in manuscript.

Passepartout approached and read one of these notices, which stated that Elder William Hitch, Mormon missionary, taking advantage of his presence on train No. 48, would deliver a lecture on Mormonism in car No. 117, from eleven to twelve o'clock; and that he invited all who were desirous of being instructed concerning the mysteries of the religion of the "Latter Day Saints " to attend.

"I'll go, " said Passepartout to himself. He knew nothing of Mormonism except the custom of polygamy, which is its foundation.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 115. [Chapter 27] [3] The news quickly spread through the train, which contained about one hundred passengers, thirty of whom, at most, attracted by the notice, ensconced themselves in car No. 117. Passepartout took one of the front seats. Neither Mr. Fogg nor Fix cared to attend.

At the appointed hour Elder William Hitch rose, and, in an irritated voice, as if he had already been contradicted, said, "I tell you that Joe Smith is a martyr, that his brother Hiram is a martyr, and that the persecutions of the United States Government against the prophets will also make a martyr of Brigham Young. Who dares to say the contrary? "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 115. [Chapter 27] [4] No one ventured to gainsay the missionary, whose excited tone contrasted curiously with his naturally calm visage. No doubt his anger arose from the hardships to which the Mormons were actually subjected. The government had just succeeded, with some difficulty, in reducing these independent fanatics to its rule. It had made itself master of Utah, and subjected that territory to the laws of the Union, after imprisoning Brigham Young on a charge of rebellion and polygamy. The disciples of the prophet had since redoubled their efforts, and resisted, by words at least, the authority of Congress. Elder Hitch, as is seen, was trying to make proselytes on the very railway trains.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 115. [Chapter 27] [5] Then, emphasising his words with his loud voice and frequent gestures, he related the history of the Mormons from Biblical times: how that, in Israel, a Mormon prophet of the tribe of Joseph published the annals of the new religion, and bequeathed them to his son Mormon; how, many centuries later, a translation of this precious book, which was written in Egyptian, was made by Joseph Smith, junior, a Vermont farmer, who revealed himself as a mystical prophet in 1825; and how, in short, the celestial messenger appeared to him in an illuminated forest, and gave him the annals of the Lord.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 116. [Chapter 27] [6] Several of the audience, not being much interested in the missionary's narrative, here left the car; but Elder Hitch, continuing his lecture, related how Smith, junior, with his father, two brothers, and a few disciples, founded the church of the "Latter Day Saints, " which, adopted not only in America, but in England, Norway and Sweden, and Germany, counts many artisans, as well as men engaged in the liberal professions, among its members; how a colony was established in Ohio, a temple erected there at a cost of two hundred thousand dollars, and a town built at Kirkland; how Smith became an enterprising banker, and received from a simple mummy showman a papyrus scroll written by Abraham and several famous Egyptians.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 116. [Chapter 27] [7] The Elder's story became somewhat wearisome, and his audience grew gradually less, until it was reduced to twenty passengers. But this did not disconcert the enthusiast, who proceeded with the story of Joseph Smith's bankruptcy in 1837, and how his ruined creditors gave him a coat of tar and feathers; his reappearance some years afterwards, more honourable and honoured than ever, at Independence, Missouri, the chief of a flourishing colony of three thousand disciples, and his pursuit thence by outraged Gentiles, and retirement into the Far West.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 116. [Chapter 27] [8] Ten hearers only were now left, among them honest Passepartout, who was listening with all his ears. Thus he learned that, after long persecutions, Smith reappeared in Illinois, and in 1839 founded a community at Nauvoo, on the Mississippi, numbering twenty-five thousand souls, of which he became mayor, chief justice, and general-in-chief; that he announced himself, in 1843, as a candidate for the Presidency of the United States; and that finally, being drawn into ambuscade at Carthage, he was thrown into prison, and assassinated by a band of men disguised in masks.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 116. [Chapter 27] [9] Passepartout was now the only person left in the car, and the Elder, looking him full in the face, reminded him that, two years after the assassination of Joseph Smith, the inspired prophet, Brigham Young, his successor, left Nauvoo for the banks of the Great Salt Lake, where, in the midst of that fertile region, directly on the route of the emigrants who crossed Utah on their way to California, the new colony, thanks to the polygamy practised by the Mormons, had flourished beyond expectations.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 117. [Chapter 27] [10] "And this, " added Elder William Hitch, "this is why the jealousy of Congress has been aroused against us! Why have the soldiers of the Union invaded the soil of Utah? Why has Brigham Young, our chief, been imprisoned, in contempt of all justice? Shall we yield to force? Never! Driven from Vermont, driven from Illinois, driven from Ohio, driven from Missouri, driven from Utah, we shall yet find some independent territory on which to plant our tents. And you, my brother, " continued the Elder, fixing his angry eyes upon his single auditor, "will you not plant yours there, too, under the shadow of our flag? "

"No! " replied Passepartout courageously, in his turn retiring from the car, and leaving the Elder to preach to vacancy.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 117. [Chapter 27] [11] During the lecture the train had been making good progress, and towards half-past twelve it reached the northwest border of the Great Salt Lake. Thence the passengers could observe the vast extent of this interior sea, which is also called the Dead Sea, and into which flows an American Jordan. It is a picturesque expanse, framed in lofty crags in large strata, encrusted with white salt-- a superb sheet of water, which was formerly of larger extent than now, its shores having encroached with the lapse of time, and thus at once reduced its breadth and increased its depth.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 117. [Chapter 27] [12] The Salt Lake, seventy miles long and thirty-five wide, is situated three miles eight hundred feet above the sea. Quite different from Lake Asphaltite, whose depression is twelve hundred feet below the sea, it contains considerable salt, and one quarter of the weight of its water is solid matter, its specific weight being 1,170, and, after being distilled, 1,000. Fishes are, of course, unable to live in it, and those which descend through the Jordan, the Weber, and other streams soon perish.

The country around the lake was well cultivated, for the Mormons are mostly farmers; while ranches and pens for domesticated animals, fields of wheat, corn, and other cereals, luxuriant prairies, hedges of wild rose, clumps of acacias and milk-wort, would have been seen six months later. Now the ground was covered with a thin powdering of snow.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 117. [Chapter 27] [13] The train reached Ogden at two o'clock, where it rested for six hours, Mr. Fogg and his party had time to pay a visit to Salt Lake City, connected with Ogden by a branch road; and they spent two hours in this strikingly American town, built on the pattern of other cities of the Union, like a checker-board, "with the sombre sadness of right-angles, " as Victor Hugo expresses it. The founder of the City of the Saints could not escape from the taste for symmetry which distinguishes the Anglo-Saxons. In this strange country, where the people are certainly not up to the level of their institutions, everything is done "squarely "--cities, houses, and follies.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 118. [Chapter 27] [13] The travellers, then, were promenading, at three o'clock, about the streets of the town built between the banks of the Jordan and the spurs of the Wahsatch Range. They saw few or no churches, but the prophet's mansion, the court-house, and the arsenal, blue-brick houses with verandas and porches, surrounded by gardens bordered with acacias, palms, and locusts. A clay and pebble wall, built in 1853, surrounded the town; and in the principal street were the market and several hotels adorned with pavilions. The place did not seem thickly populated. The streets were almost deserted, except in the vicinity of the temple, which they only reached after having traversed several quarters surrounded by palisades.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 118. [Chapter 27] [14] There were many women, which was easily accounted for by the "peculiar institution " of the Mormons; but it must not be supposed that all the Mormons are polygamists. They are free to marry or not, as they please; but it is worth noting that it is mainly the female citizens of Utah who are anxious to marry, as, according to the Mormon religion, maiden ladies are not admitted to the possession of its highest joys. These poor creatures seemed to be neither well off nor happy. Some--the more well-to-do, no doubt-- wore short, open, black silk dresses, under a hood or modest shawl; others were habited in Indian fashion.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 118. [Chapter 27] [15] Passepartout could not behold without a certain fright these women, charged, in groups, with conferring happiness on a single Mormon. His common sense pitied, above all, the husband. It seemed to him a terrible thing to have to guide so many wives at once across the vicissitudes of life, and to conduct them, as it were, in a body to the Mormon paradise with the prospect of seeing them in the company of the glorious Smith, who doubtless was the chief ornament of that delightful place, to all eternity. He felt decidedly repelled from such a vocation, and he imagined--perhaps he was mistaken-- that the fair ones of Salt Lake City cast rather alarming glances on his person. Happily, his stay there was but brief. At four the party found themselves again at the station, took their places in the train, and the whistle sounded for starting. Just at the moment, however, that the locomotive wheels began to move, cries of "Stop! stop! " were heard.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1872 Verne, Jules. Around the World in Eighty Days. Translated by George M. Towle. New York: Bantam (1988; c. 1873); pg. 119. [Chapter 27] [16] Trains, like time and tide, stop for no one. The gentleman who uttered the cries was evidently a belated Mormon. He was breathless with running. Happily for him, the station had neither gates nor barriers. He rushed along the track, jumped on the rear platform of the train, and fell, exhausted, into one of the seats.

Passepartout, who had been anxiously watching this amateur gymnast, approached him with lively interest, and learned that he had taken flight after an unpleasant domestic scene.

When the Mormon had recovered his breath, Passepartout ventured to ask him politely how many wives he had; for, from the manner in which he had decamped, it might be thought that he had twenty at least.

"One, sir, " replied the Mormon, raising his arms heavenward -- "one, and that was enough! "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1875 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 73. "'You are a blasphemer, Mr. [Richard] Burton. I read about you in the newspapers, and I read some of your books about Africa and India and that one about the Mormons in the States. I also heard stories, most of which I do not believe, they made you out to be so wicked. Reginald was very indignant when he read your Kasidah. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 79. "there seems to be a powerful lot of ye. "

"Nigh unto ten thousand, " said one of the young men; "we are the persecuted children of God--the chosen of the Angel Moroni. "

"I never heard tell on him, " said the wanderer. "He appears to have chosen a fair crowd of ye. "

"Do not jest at that which is sacred, " said the other, sternly. "We are of those who believe in those sacred writings, drawn in Egyptian letters on plates of beaten gold, which were handed unto the holy Joseph Smith at Palmyra. We have come from Nauvoo, in the state of Illinois, where we had founded our temple. We have come to seek a refuge from the violent man and from the godless, even though it be the heart of the desert. "

The name of Nauvoo evidently recalled recollections to John Ferrier. "I see, " he said; "you are the Mormons. "

"We are the Mormons, " answered his companions with one voice. [Many refs., not all in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 79. "And where are you going? "

"We do not know. The hand of God is leading us under the person of our Prophet. You must come before him. He shall say what is to be done with you. "

They had reached the base of the hill by this time, and were surrounded by crowds of the pilgrims--pale-faced, meek-looking women; strong, laughing children; and anxious, earnest-eyed men. Many were the cries of astonishment and of commiseration which arose from them when they perceived the youth of one of the strangers and the destitution of the other. Their escort did not halt, however, but pushed on, followed by a great crowd of Mormons, until they reached a wagon, which was conspicuous for its great size and for the gaudiness and smartness of its appearance. Six horses were yoked to it, whereas the others were furnished with two, or, at most, four apiece... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 80. Beside the driver there sat a man who could not have been more than thirty years of age, but whose massive head and resolute expression marked him as a leader. He was reading a brown-backed volume, but as the crowd approached he laid it aside, and listened attentively to an account of the episode. Then he turned to the two castaways.

"If we take you with us, " he said, in solemn words, "it can only be as believers in our own creed. We shall have no wolves in our fold. Better far that your bones should bleach in this wilderness than that you should prove to be that little speck of decay which in time corrupts the whole fruit. Will you come with us on these terms? "

"Guess I'll come with you on any terms, " said Ferrier, with such emphasis that the grave Elders could not restrain a smile. The leader alone retained his stern, impressive expression.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 80. "Take him, Brother Stangerson, " he said, "give him food and drink, and the child likewise. Let it be your task also to teach him our holy creed. We have delayed long enough. Forward! On, on to Zion! "

"On, on to Zion! " cried the crowd of Mormons, and the words rippled down the long caravan, passing from mouth to mouth until they died away in a dull murmur in the far distance. With a cracking of whips and a creaking of wheels the great wagons got into motion, and soon the whole caravan was winding along once more. The Elder to whose care the two waifs had been committed led them to his wagon, where a meal was already awaiting them.

"You shall remain here, " he said. "In a few days you will have recovered from your fatigues. In the meantime, remember that now and forever you are of our religion. Brigham Young has said it, and he has spoken with the voice of Joseph Smith, which is the voice of God. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 81. THIS is not the place to commemorate the trials and privations endured by the immigrant Mormons before they came to their final haven. From the shores of the Mississippi to the western slopes of the Rocky Mountains they had struggled on with a constancy almost unparalleled in history. The savage man, and the savage beast, hunger, thirst, fatigue, and disease--every impediment which Nature could place in the way--had all been overcome with Anglo-Saxon tenacity. Yet the long journey and the accumulated terrors had shaken the hearts of the stoutest among them. There was not one who did not sink upon his knees in heartfelt prayer when they saw the broad valley of Utah bathed in the sunlight beneath them, and learned from the lips of their leader that this was the promised land, and that these virgin acres were to be theirs for evermore. [Much of this story takes place in Utah.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1956 Jones, Raymond F. "The Non-Statistical Man " in The Non-Statistical Man. New York: Belmont Books (1964; copyright 1956); pg. 48. [This story has no explicitly LDS refs., but parallels in some ways to early Joseph Smith/LDS Church history, and has themes applicable to the workings of the Holy Ghost/Holy Spirit. Compare JS Hist. 1:24 to the following passage.] "'I have said that the policy applications I referred to are of the same class as those previously mentioned; they will also be followed by quick claims.'

Sprock rose and came around the side of his desk. 'Mr. Bascomb, that is a thing you could not possibly know!'

Suddenly, an old, latent fury seemed to spring alive inside Bascomb's mind. What was this shriveled idiot trying to tell him? He knew--he knew beyond all question of doubt that what he said was true. It didn't matter that Magruder had predicted it. Magruder had nothing to do with this positive, insistent knowledge that burned in his mind.

He knew, in and of himself, that those policies would turn out as he said. An Sprock telling him he couldn't possibly know-- "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1965 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 113. "...because I don't think it would be proper to speak of the connection between SF and the '60s drug culture as though I had not been there... The risks were high, as has become increasingly apparent, although SF writers have had a lower mortality rate than rock stars, for perhaps the simple reason that paperback writers earn lower salaries and could not binge on pricey drugs to the same degree. Michael Moorcock, for instance, was no Jim Morrison; his wild excesses existed mostly on paper. Ballard drank, and drove, but drugs? I doubt it. Harlan Ellison was a virtual Mormon in that respect; liquor never touched his lips, never mind other controlled substances. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 165. "'...The Air Force and the Strategic Air Command and all other military departments of this government have been and continue to be under civilian jurisdiction... We are here to do a job, whatever job is deemed necessary by our civilian oversight, whether it was President Kennedy in 1962 or President Romney in 1972...' " [Pres. Romney is a Latter-day Saint, in this alternative history novel, which diverged from mainstream history with a nuclear war in 1962 between the U.S. and U.S.S.R. The book was written about when LDS candidate Mitt Romney almost unseated Ted Kennedy in the 1996 Massachusetts senatorial race. The election of Pres. Romney, from the politically prominent Romney family, who have in actual history been, at times, political rivals of the Kennedys, underscores the derision the Kennedys are held after the war. See, for example, pg. 83.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 166. "Colonel [Brigham] Jefferson leaned on the podium, as if emphasizing a point. 'But I will tell you this. When General Curtis appeared before the surviving members of congress in Philadelphia in '63 and said it was for the good of the country that we work together as one, that it made no sense for a full 10 percent of our workforce and brainpower and willing hands to be left behind while we were in the gravest crisis of our nation... And he made history that week, when Army units went into Alabama and George and Mississippi and elsewhere, and crushed the Klan and ended segregation. That's a history that I personally am grateful for. Sir, you asked about the state of racial affairs in this country. There is still work to be done, but you can thank one man for destroying segregation and Jim Crow in one day. Who's next?' " [Colonel Jefferson, who is black, may also LDS, thus 'personally grateful' because the KKK specifically targeted blacks and LDS people for persecution.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1975 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 138. "By the 1970s, Earl settled permanently into Lena's apartment in Paris. Panther exiles like Cleaver tried to make common cause with him and failed. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 158. "'...Here's something for you, Ralph... Gene Roddenberry has said he's scraping the treatment he'd prepared for a new Star Trek series. It was going to be like the first, with the huge space cruiser Enterprise with massive phaser banks, bigger and more powerful than anything they're likely to encounter. But he's changed his mind; he's been inspired by you guys, apparently. Now, Roddenberry says he's aiming for something called Star Trek: Explorer, about a small, pioneering band of humans and aliens in their fragile craft, going much farther than anyone has gone before...' " ['Pioneers' here not an explicitly reference to Latter-day Saints, but they're the group most frequently associated with the term. Also, the chapter on pages 182 - 188 takes place in Utah, and includes a limo driver who is apparently LDS. See citations under 'Utah.']
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 224. "The kind of phonograph constructed with 45 singles in mind--the ones made by the Osmonds, Leif Garrett, John Travolta, Shaun Cassidy. " [Also, note that Utah, Salt Lake City, and the LDS Church-owned Hotel Utah are mentioned frequently in the section between pages 750 and 800 (listed under 'Utah') in database.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 114. "'Down by the lake when the folks were off cornhusking? Under the bleachers in high school? At the back gate during lunch hour? In study hall?'

'During school hours? My dad'n tan my hide.'

'His dad. Hear that? Good old dad.' Lombard held out his half-finished tumbler of vodka and tomato juice. 'I mean I can't believe that you lived in the Land of the Free all your life and never touched an ounce of booze.' " [Clark Kent, Superman, apparently adhered to LDS-like values, including complete abstinence from alcohol.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 82. "Mama now, Mama is a Mormon, like us, no, like Ben maybe, not so much like me, though I am her only daughter, and Ben she didn't acquire until eight months ago when I wooshed off in the dress she made to a ceremony she and Dad couldn't even watch. She was glad she couldn't watch, that I'd done it up right [by marrying in the temple] with Ben rather than wrong with that pagan Eddie...

And Ben will die in his Sunday-go-to-meeting shoes. He does have such shoes. He has his Sunday shoes, his school/play sneakers, and... " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 84. "What can I say? I've got the perfect man. Even the head of our women's caucus would love him. A genuine independent. Mends his own socks. Better than I could. I'd stick the hole together on the sewing machine. He vacuums. Does the shopping. Gives great back rubs.

'Your Ben,' says Madeleine [her Catholic friend], 'is one in a million. He goes to church. You don't even have to drag him there.'

'Lots of Mormon men go to church without being dragged,' I say.

'And drink,' says Madeleine, 'he doesn't. Where did you find such a jewel?'

'Lots of Mormon men don't drink,' I say.

'And good to you--you're his night and day,' says Madeline.

'Good to me,' I say, 'he is. But his night and day--I'm more like his mid-afternoon.'

Saturday. One batch of final exams down. Two to go. Deadline Tuesday. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 85. "Spread all over the kitchen table is my Sunday school lesson. It'll probably take the whole day and most of the night. All my favorite resource books are heaped up on the end--stories that high school sophomores might respond to--they like best the struggling-across-the-plains stories, J. Golden Kimball anecdotes, and retold tales from the C. S. Lewis science fiction trilogy. I wish fervently the pioneers had spent another forty years crossing the plains, that J. Golden Kimball could squawk down a few reports from the Celestial Kingdom, that C. S. Lewis hadn't rudely gone and died. Those stories have a kind of sanction that the Sunday school presidency, marching in and out of classes and solemnly nodding--hey, I want to shout, this is not a job I'm seeking tenure for--approve of. I use other stuff too--Mishima's suicide story, Vonnegut's 'Harrison Bergeron'--that jiggles them a little. I have to. What's the point without a picture? "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1978 Rosenbaum, Karen. "Hit the Frolicking, Rippling Brooks " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1978); pg. 85. [Some specific names, full text not given here.] Pg. 85: Book of Mormon; Nephi; Laman; Lemuel. Pg. 86: J. Golden Kimball. Pg. 89: Nibley's Joseph Smith Papyri
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1980 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 19. "We argued a lot about what I got taught in school, because I saw no sense in arguing with teachers. I was perfectly willing to agree with Mama that it was all bourgeois lies, but I didn't see any reason why I should have to correct it. Not when I could quietly drift along in the back of the room, ignored by everyone, and keep my concentration on basic issues like saving up for a car out of my job at McDonald's. It was okay with me that we went to CP stuff all the time, and the demonstrations were kind of fun, but it was like being born a Witness or a Mormon--you weren't exactly like the people around you, but you weren't not like them, either. You just had a slightly different set of adult friends and links to different families than other kids did. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1980 Jorgensen, Wayne. "Born of Water " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1980); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "But there was his father too, not a member because of Grandma Wendell, whose father had been so fanatic, even his mother said... Grandma had nothing good to say about Mormons, and his father hardly talked about religion at all... "; Pg. 94: Primary, Sunday School.; Pg. 99: pioneers. Pg. 104: Twenty-fourth of July. Pg. 105: Cumorah. [Many other refs., throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1980 Jorgensen, Wayne. "Born of Water " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1980); pg. 95. "Brother Sharp talked about Jesus being baptized by John to fulfill all righteousness and the Holy Ghost coming down on him in the form of a dove and his father's voice saying, 'Thou art my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased.' Light flashed off the circles of his glasses as he told how Alma baptized his band of fugitives in the wilderness as a witness that they would serve the Lord and have the Spirit poured out upon them. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 163. "Ardmoore told Carmen Stavely, who'd been away in Idaho visiting family, that what happened that Sunday morning was absolutely confidential. The bishop had instructed all who'd been present to keep the matter strictly to themselves... As for himself he had not been present, had not, therefore, been warned or instructed by the bishop, and was reporting only what he could not help learning from the entirely unsolicited accounts of others... The incident had occurred on the fourth of the five Sundays in May and thus marked the fourth appearance of Brother Kevin Houston as the new gospel doctrine teacher. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 163-164. "The partitions in the multi-purpose room had been pushed back all the way and propped with metal folding chairs because, unfortunately (or providentially--here the opinions were as sharply as they were unevenly divided), Sister Reeva June Parish, who teaches gospel principles, had been home again with mono, and all her neophyte faithful and her missionary-surrounded investigators had come on over to hear Kevin. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 165. "In particular the militant and military-looking Marvin Chisolm led the counterattack. Marvin was the ward liberal, an unabashed Democrat rendered respectable by his brahman Utah roots and successful consulting business. He wore his expensive, Ivy League education openly with his mustache, his penny loafers, and his herringbone jackets. In church his schooled reverence for the rigors of academe took the general form of irreverence for the popular accommodations of faith. In a tone of purest acid he declared himself: (1) entirely satisfied with the present teacher and (2) categorically opposed to any change that might, in Marvin's own term, 'further abet the already rampant and reprehensible 'Koolaidization' of Mormon theology.' Even Ardmoore said, in a conciliatory tone, that it seemed to him a shame in a New Testament year to let go the only teacher in the stake who read Greek and who had some formal training in ancient scripture. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 166. Pg. 166: Journal of Discourses. Pg. 167: Church Building Committee in Salt Lake City. Pg. 169: Zion. [Main body of the story details a Sunday School class and a surprising benediction.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints USA 1984 Weiner, Andrew. "Distant Signals " (published 1984) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 526. "MACCOBY, VANCE (1938? - ). Actor. Born Henry Mulvin in Salt Lake City, Utah. Frequent spots in WAGON TRAIN, RIVERBOAT, CAPTAIN CHRONOS, THE ZONE BEYOND, etc. 1957-59. Lead in the 1960 oater STRANGER IN TOWN and the short-lived 1961 private eye show MAC PARADISE, canceled after 6 episodes. Subsequent activities unknown. One of dozens of nearly interchangeable identikit male stars of the first period of episodic TV drama. Maccoby had a certain brooding quality, particularly in b/w, that carried him far, but aparently lacked the resources for the long haul.

...--From The Complete TV Encyclopedia, Chuck Gingle, editor "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.