Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 166. "'The Danites wear green, and I would'nt be surprised if Brother Jensen's driver were a Danite.' He turned to Llysette. 'The Danites were the original militia in the first Saint war back in Columbia. Now. . . they're more of a...'

According to Jerome's briefing papers, they were far more than a fraternal order, more like a paramilitary order, if not a secret but official arm of the church.

I didn't have to force the frown. 'That seems odd.'

Perkins laughed. 'Why would it be odd? Deseret is surrounded by Columbia and New France. Until comparatively recently, Columbia kept trying to annex us, and now Marshal DeGaulle has the same idea. We can't afford a large standing army. That's why the First Presidency has always supported the Danites...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2002 Waldrop, Howard. Them Bones. New York: Ace Science Fiction (1984); pg. 124. "[Colonel] Spaulding laughed, a different tone. 'From what I remember, those theories about the lost Romans and such came about because the early white settlers who found the mounds and earthworks couldn't believe the Indians had built them. The only Indians they knew were the ones still in the area, who hadn't moved there in many cases until fifty years before the whites got there. The Indians didn't know where the mounds came from, either. So the settlers thought they predated the Indians themselves. And were a much more advanced civiliation than the Indians could have had. So they searched around for examples of Old World civilizations who had ever used mounds and high fortifications. That was nearly everybody, of course--Welsh, Mongol, Roman, Egyptian, all of them came in for their turn as the original Moundbuilders.'

'These people we're fighting are certainly better at warfare than we thought they would be,' I said. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2002 Waldrop, Howard. Them Bones. New York: Ace Science Fiction (1984); pg. 123-124. "'When I was a boy,' he said, taking a book out of his personal locker, 'this book was it.' It was The Book of Mormon.

'You were raised a Mormon?'

'The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints,' he said, almost automatically. 'I still do that, listen to me. And I haven't been to services in thirty years.'

'Yes, sir?'

'Well, you've probably never read it,' he said. 'Most pople never have, never will. But parts of it keep coming back to me.

'See, there are a couple of narratives within narratives. It took me a long time to realize that as a kid. The golden plates were supposedly found at Cumorah, but they also recapitulate earlier records buried there, from an even earlier time.'

'Yes?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2002 Waldrop, Howard. Them Bones. New York: Ace Science Fiction (1984); pg. 123-124. [Characters have travelled into past from post-apocalyptic year 2002, and one is telling about contents of the Book of Mormon, wondering if it relates to the peoples they've encountered.] "'Well, the earliest migration involved prophets who sailed from Jerusalem and came to America. They built great cities here, but fell to fighting among themselves. They divided into the Lamanites and the Jaredites [sic]. The Lamanites were punished, their skins turned red, and all their cities fell to waste and ruin.'

'Those are the Indians?'

[Colonel] Spaulding laughed. 'I know, sounds like the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, or lost Phoenicians, or Egyptians, doesn't it? When I was a kid, I was hot on archeology. But I've forgotten most of it, like I thought I'd forgotten most of The Book of Mormon. Seems some stuck with me, though.'

'It [their military mission] would be a lot easier if it were true,' I said. 'Maybe Arnstein can go speak with them?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2002 Waldrop, Howard. Them Bones. New York: Ace Science Fiction (1984); pg. 124-125. "'These people we're fighting are certainly better at warfare than we thought they would be,' I said.

'The old adage is that primitive doesn't mean stupid,' said Colonel Spaulding.

'Shooting at us is one thing,' I said. 'But I think it was the radio business that really upset everybody.'

'Well, we deserve it,' said Spaulding... 'We've disrupted their lives. We killed them as surely as if we held weapons to their heads. They can't understand we didn't want it to happen.' He went quiet, staring down at his desk.

'We've seen enough killing. We've seen the whole world killed. Now we're killing the past, too. None of us wanted this, least of all the Indians.' He picked up The Book of Mormon again, opened it.

I stood up. 'I'd better check the guard.'

'Certainly, Marie,' he said. 'Send Putnam over here, will you?'

I saluted and left. Sometimes Spaulding was hard to figure out. " [Characters went to past from post-apocalyptic year 2002.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2030 Sawyer, Robert J. Flashforward. New York: Tor (2000; c. 1999); pg. 157. [Things that happened by the year 2030] "Smoking was now illegal in all public areas, including outdoor ones, in the United States and Canada. A coalition of Third World countries was not suing the United States at the World Court in the Hague for willfully promoting tobacco use in developing nations. " [The author here predicts that by the year 2030 the LDS practice of forbidding tobacco use will be much more universal in the U.S.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2050 Card, Orson Scott. "America " (published 1987) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 665. [Year is estimated.] "Sam Monson and Anamari Boagente had two encounters in their lives, forty years apart... The second was for only an hour near the ruins of the Glen Canyon Dam, on the border between Navaho country and the State of Deseret.

When they met the first time, Sam was a scrawny teenager from Utah... When they met the second time, he was governor of Deseret, the last European state in America... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2050 Card, Orson Scott. "America " (published 1987) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 685. "The State of Deseret had only sixteen helicopters... So Governor Sam Monson rarely risked them on government business... They had come to the last stronghold of European science, the University of Desert [sic] at Zarahemla... The Mormons raised crops enough to feed five times their population. That was the European mindset... Plant more, grow more, you'll need it tomorrow. "; Pg. 686: "The negotiations were delicate but simple. Sam had authority to speak for Deseret, and she obviously had authority to speak to her son. The grain was refused as a gift, but accepted as taxes from a federated state. Deseret would be allowed to keep its own government, and the borders negotiated between the Navahos and the Mormons eleven years befoe were allowed to stand. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2100 Pohl, Frederik. Gateway. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977); pg. 228. "Sick societies squeeze adventurers out like grape pips. The grape pips don't have much to say about it. I suppose it was the same with Columbus's seamen or the pioneers manhandling their covered wagons through Comanche territory; they must have been scared witless, like me, but they didn't have much choice. " [A character in the future is making a historical reference.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2175 Anderson, Poul. Fleet of Stars. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 176. Pg. 176: "His search brought Fenn back to the Foresters of Vernal. "; Pg. 178: "That left only North America, more or less above the 35th parallel--the polity of Vernal. It looked hopelessly large and diverse. "; Pg. 179: "Like every adult Forester, he had the title of caretaker; but mainly he cultivated a patch of ground, fished, hunted, and occasionally guided a tourist of a sportsman through the woods... 'He's married again, did you know?' To a woman who had had her own quota of offspring. " [There is no explicit identification of the Foresters of Vernal as Mormons, but contemporary Vernal is a Mormon community, and the brief description of this people in the book seems to match Mormons most closely.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 2175 Anderson, Poul. Fleet of Stars. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 180. "This woodland lacked the scenic grandeur of Yukonia, but it gave the same sense of freedom and life, the same spaciousness, from the Rockies to the Alleghenies, from southern prairie to northern tundra. The Foresters who had scattered their little settlements and isolated steadings throughout it were practically a polity to themselves within the Vernal Republic, keeping to folkways bequeathed them by ancestors whose lifespans had filled centuries. Their stubborn selfhood always pleased him. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 127. "She began to understand what Jenny was talking about, though, when her lesson was over and it was time for the sisters to bear their testimonies. The lesson had gone very well. It was about testimonies, and after telling several stories she got to her main point, that each sister had to have her own relationship with the Son of God. 'The only mediator between us and our Father in heaven is Jesus Christ, and no one else, not the bishop, not our husbands, can stand between us and the Lord. Your testimony of the Lord is the one thing that you will be judged by at the last day, not someone else's. As the Savior said, it is the words that we speak, not the words that we hear, that can damn us--or lift us up. Your husband's testimony can't possibly carry you into heaven.' They nodded, many of them, when she said that. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 203. "'What if they're bad all the way through? What if they got no spark?'

'Well, it's like Alma and Amulek. The Lord wouldn't let the evil people harm them, even though a lot of other people got killed. They finished giving their message and then they left.'

'The bad guys burned Abinadi,' said Stevie.

'Yes,' said Step. 'But not until he finished naming their sins. And that's what eventually stopped the wicked people from doing their wickedness. Telling the truth about them. They can only do their evil when they think that nobody knows.'

'But Abinadi was dead.'

'Son, I guess he knew and the Lord knew that death isn't the worst thing in the world. The worst thing in the world is knowing that something really bad is going on and not doing anything about it because you're afraid. So when Abinadi died, death tasted sweet to him.'

'Burning to death?'

'No, I don't think that was sweet. but then it was over...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 219. "'So we do her job,' said DeAnne.

'Hey, it's the Lord's work and it needs to be done and we can do it.'

'You're more of a Christian than I am.'

'So do you want to make the salad or the casserole?'

'I'd like to make the biscuits.'

'Not a chance,' said Jenny. 'You don't know how to make southern biscuits yet and I don't have time to teach you.'

'They just look like Bisquick drop biscuits to me,' said DeAnne.

'Don't ever say Bisquick around the women of the ward. Might as well sew a scarlet B on your dress after that.'

'Salad, then,' said DeAnne.

So instead of resting, DeAnne made a Jell-O salad and put it in the fridge to set. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 221. "'I can see you've never been to a shrink. They think religious people are crazy.'

'Not true,' said DeAnne, thinking at once of Sheila Redmond back in Vigor. 'I knew a therapist and she and her husband were serious Christians. Not Mormon, but they certainly didn't think it was crazy to be religious.' " [Many other refs. to Latter-day Saints, most of which are not in database. The main character is LDS.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 231. "'Brother Weeks here is new in the Church,' Step explained. 'I don't think he's suggesting that Brother Highsmith isn't in heaven, I think he's asking a doctrinal question.'

'Oh, yes,' said Lee. 'I didn't think of it that way--no, of course he's in heaven. I mean, even people who open hot dog franchises can still go to heaven, right?' He laughed, and Sister Highsmith and Step politely laughed along, though Step was meanwhile thinking, OK, let's get this boy out of here. Apparently Mommy hasn't given Lee much chance to learn what you do and don't say, and what you do and don't joke about. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 232. "'Yes,' said Step, 'and now his spirit has left his body behind and he lives on with those of his family who died before him. But Lee, becoming holy and perfect enough to fully share in God's work is very rare and when it does happen it would happen only after long development and a long, long time after death and to most people it never comes at all. It's not like becoming a colonel.' And then, to help Lee realize that the discussion shoul now end, Step added, 'And it's not a doctrine that we discuss much.' Or at least, if we have any sense of proportion we don't discuss it much. We don't even understand what Joseph Smith meant by it, for heaven's sake! Much better to concentrate on things like loving your neighbor and trying not to screw up your life and the lives of everybody around you than to get into mysterious doctrines. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 232. "'Well, Step said. 'it was wonderful to meet you, Sister Highsmith. Can we have a word of prayer before we go?'

'Oh, do you have to go already?' she said.

Step cringed again, waiting for her to say the obligatory Don't go, wait awhile, it's early yet.

But she didn't say it. 'Well, how sweet of you two to come by. And I'd be glad if you'd say the prayer, Brother Fletcher.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 235. "But there was plenty of time, if he stayed in the Church. A lot of people came into the Church with serious misconceptions about the gospel--no matter how clear the missionaries were, people were going to filter ideas through their own preconceptions and come out with something skewed at least a little bit. If they stuck with it, though, and realized that correct opinions about doctrine weren't anywhere near as important as learning to serve other people, to accept responsibility, then eventually they'd loosen up enough to come around and change their beliefs, too, or at least not be upset that most Mormons didn't see things the same way. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 235. "Outsiders usually seemed to think of Mormons as automatons, obeying a charismatic prophet the way Jim Jones's followers obeyed him in Guyana. The reality was almost the opposite--stubborn, self-willed people going off every which way, with bishops and other ward leaders barely able to hold them all together, all the while tolerating a wide range of doctrinal diversity as long as people would just accept their callings and then be dependable. There was room even for Lee Weeks, who seemed to be obsessed with a rather inflated view of his own divine potential; given that the 1st Ward already had Dolores LeSueur, Lee's ambitions could certainly be taken in stride. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 231-232. "'And the answer to your question is no, Sister Highsmith does not believe that her husband is a god. He's a man, and a good man--am I right, Sister Highsmith?'

'The very best sort of man,' she said. 'He became a colonel before he retired.'

'Yes,' said Step, 'and now his spirit has left his body behind and he lives on with those of his family who died before him...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2000 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 364. [Afterword by author.] "...took part in my online communities at http://www.hatrack.com, http://www.frescopix.com and http://www.nauvoo.com...

...within the small community of his family, of school friends... and of church friends in the Greensboro Summit Ward... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 143-158. Pg. 143: "Bean stood in front of the Wiggin house. Ender had never spoken of it... But it was exactly what Bean had expected. A tree in the front yard, with wooden slats nailed into the trunk to form a ladder to the platform in the high crotch of the tree. A tidy, well-tended garden. A place of peace and refuge. What did Ender ever know of fear?

...A woman came out of the front door of the house. Mrs. Wiggin?

'Are you lost? she asked...

'Is this where Ender Wiggin grew up?'

A cloud passed across her face, just momentarily, but Bean saw how her expression saddened before her smile could be put back. 'Yes, it is,' she said. 'But we don't give tours. " [Pages 143 to 158 describe Bean's first meeting with Mrs. Wiggin, Ender's mother, who is a Latter-day Saint/Mormon. Although her denomination is not mentioned by name, there are many references in this section to her religious background. Ender's mother also appears in chapter 10, pg. 160-164, 178-179.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 147. "'Not careers that we'd hate to give up. What we had was only jobs. You see, we're religious people.'

'There are lots of religious people in the world.'

'But not in America,' said Mrs. Wiggin. 'Not the kind of fanatic that does something so selfish and antisocial as to have more than two children, just because of some misguided religious ideas. And when peter tested so high as a toddler, and they started monitoring him--well, that was a disaster for us. We had hoped to be . . . unobtrusive,. To disappear. We're very bright people, you know.' " [Mrs. Wiggin is LDS.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 148. "'I didn't mean it as an attack,' said Bean. '...You really believe in your religion, and you resent the fact that you had to hide it from others. That's all I was saying.'

'Not religion. religions,' she said. 'My husband and I don't even share the same doctrine. Having a large family in obedience to God, that was about the only thing we agreed on. And even at that, we both had elaborate intellectual justifications for our decision to defy the law. For one thing, we didn't think it would hurt our children at all. We meant to raise them in faith, as believers.' " [Mrs. Wiggin is LDS, her husband is Catholic.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 149. [Mrs. Wiggin is LDS; her husband is Catholic.] "'...So do you cast off your firstborn child in order to give birth to a fourth or fifth or sixth? Peter seemed sometimes not to have any conscience at all. If ever anyone needed to believe in God, it was Peter, and he didn't.'

'He probably wouldn't have anyway,' said Bean.

'You don't know him,' said Mrs. Wiggin. 'He lives by pride. If we had made him proud of being a secret believer, he would have been valiant in that struggle. Instead he's . . . not.'

'So you never even tried to convert him to your beliefs?' asked Bean.

'Which ones?' asked Mrs. Wiggin. 'We had always thought that the big struggle in our family would be over which religion to teach them, his or mine. Instead we had to watch over Peter and find ways to help him find . . . decency. No, something much more important than that. Integrity. Honor...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 150. "'We taught him as best we could,' said Mrs. Wiggin. 'Comments at meals. We could see how he tuned us out, how he despised our opinions. It didn't help that we were trying so hard to conceal that we knew everything he'd written a Locke; our conversations really were . . . abstract. Boring, I suppose. And we didn't have those intellectual credentials. Why should he respect us? But he heard our ideas. Of what nobility is. Goodness and honor. And whether he believed us at some level or simply found such things within himself, we've seen him grow... we've seen signs of honor. We've seen him do things that were very hard, but that seemed to be not just for show, but because he really believed in what he was doing...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 16. "Lee was close to Roth, closer than anyone else in the research part. She had felt drawn to him almost immediately . . . before she had ever spotted the Standard Works sandwiched between genetics and computer science on his bookshelf. She had liked him from the very beginning--his drive, his genius, his boundless enthusiasm--and had admired him just as quickly. And, for some unknown but supremely gratifying reason, Lee detected that Roth felt much the same way about her. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 17. "'What do you think it means?' he grinned.

The scriptures were open to Deuteronomy next to her plate. She swallowed a bite and scanned the column for the passage in question. They had run across it during one of their late-night scripture-study-and-shoot-the-Gospel-breeze sessions the previous evening. They had brushed over it without comment then. But the words had come back to her while she had been dressing that morning.

'Well, obviously it refers to the Lost Tribes, don't you think?'

'He nodded with the same grin. 'I think so, yes.'

She stopped her finger at verse four. 'So here's what it says: 'If any of thine be driven out into the outmost parts of heaven, from thence will the Lord thy God gather thee, and from thence will fetch thee'.' She looked up at him. He raised his eyebrows. " [Many other refs. throughout novel. Most not in DB. The two main characters are LDS.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 17. "'Just like the Enquirer article, huh Sis?' He usually called her that. It had evolve from 'Sister McKesson', a tongue-in-cheek nickname that was too long to stick in original form.

She winced and grinned back. The Enquirer article was a sore point with Hoeksberg. It was seldom mentioned above a whisper. 'No. Not the Enquirer article. But there are people who seem to think the tribes were zapped out into space or something. Maybe this scripture is where they got the idea in the first place. I just wondered what you think it means.' Her eyes narrowed, feigning outrage at the expression on his face. 'And stop giving me that smirk, unless you'd like a cup of reconstituted grapefruit juice all over it.'

He laughed. His laugh always warmed her. 'I think the passage simply means that the Lord is very determined to gather the tribes. And that he has more than enough power to do the job, no matter how difficult it might seem.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 58. "And something else as well... It was trust. After all, she was his friend. And they shared the gospel. She, of all people, should know where he was coming from. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 76. "Now all she had left were the microdiscs. And whatever was encoded on them.

That was the big question. What? In three day's time, Lee had devised a lot of crazy answers to that question. But only one of those answers had demanded any real attention. It kept coming back, nagging, refusing to stay to stay away. And it was the craziest answer of all.

The Lost Ten Tribes of Israel were on those discs. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 76. "What if the Israelites, captured so long ago by the Assyrians, carried away into the lands of north, had managed to maintain a cohesive society? Like the children of Israel enslaved by Pharaoh. And what if, like the children of Israel, they had managed to engineer a mass exodus under divine guidance? Let's say they fled northward again, clear into the upper reaches of what centuries later would be called Scandinavia. And then, still pursued by their relentless overlords, they fled even further, into the frozen islands off the Norwegian coast. Into hiding.

Into the Corridors.

...a runaway civilization struggling for survival against the arctic wasteland. Weeks into months, months into years, years into decades. And, like the desert wanderings of the children of Israel, the prolonged hardships eventually brought about a kid of purification among the refugees. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 77. "But, unfortunately, for them there was no land of milk and honey waiting just over the horizon. Only endless glacial fields and excruciating cold. And, just a few decades away, impending extinction.

But extinction wasn't in the master plan. No, because according to scripture, the tribes would some day be brought back from the lands of the north to claim their rightful inheritance. So the plan had to include some means of preservation, some way to keep the tribes alive and well--for centuries upon centuries--until the time came for the fulfillment of ancient prophecy. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 94. "Simultaneously, a hand touched his shoulder and a voice whispered in his ear: 'And it shall come to pass in that day that the Lord will set his hand a second time to recover the remnant of his people. And the ransomed of the Lord shall return.'

The passage was from the Old Testament. But the voice was from the caves of Nordaustlandet...

Roth turned. The eyes meeting his were kind, expectant, the eyes of a friend. It was the old man from the first dream. It was also, Roth knew now, the prophet Isaiah.

'And soon it will come to pass, Isaiah nodded. 'Will it not?'

Roth just nodded back silently. He was certainly in no position to disagree...

'Good,' Isaiah beamed. 'Thine errand will soon be fulfilled, I trust.' And before Roth could respond, the prophet turned, gazing out and down. Firelight glistened in his eyes.

'God's chosen are not lost, my brethren,' he declared reverently. 'They gather on paths of iron, before the gate of time...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 118. "Here she was lying behind locked doors, under siege , awaiting a call on the phone that would initiate the fulfillment of heavenly prophecy.

The whole thing was very storybook.

And why her?

This wasn't the first time she had pondered that one. She'd thought about it a lot. If the Lord was going to choose a servant, it seemed like there were others around with much better qualifications. Lee had flunked out of early-morning seminary because the hour and her temperament never mixed very well back then. She liked singing in the choir, didn't care for giving talks. She studied the scriptures pretty regularly, her personal prayers had their ups and downs, and she hadn't gone much out of her to proselyte among her co-workers, which she supposed made her something of a lukewarm missionary. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 129. "So she had begun singing hymns. A Mighty Fortress. Abide With Me. The Lord Is My Light. I Need The Every Hour... How Firm A Foundation... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 10-12. "Since they were the only two Mormons on the expedition, she and Roth had spent a lot of time together. They had shared conversation over meals for the first few months.. Dr. Derek Roth hunkered down. He chiseled carefully at the frozen earth, a humming laserflare overhead. Next to him an air tractor bobbed slowly, almost imperceptibly, scarcely six inches off the ground. It was loaded nearly to overflowing with an assortment of pots and other earthen vessels, a heap of clay fragments, and a smattering of stones. Each was imbedded with a microscopic collection of organic matter which was Roth's stock-in-trade. Because, unlike most of his colleagues, Dr. Roth's specialty was not archeology per se, but zoology. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 77-78. "Somewhere like the ten gold-plated iron rings imbedded in Roth's urn.

Ten rings.

Ten tribes.

...For three days she had reflected upon the idea, at first a little embarrassed to consider it with any seriousness at all. But the more she had meditated, the less uncomfortable she had felt. Finally she had gone to her knees requesting a definite confirmation.

Had she received it?

Not really. Not yet. But there was an answer though, of sorts, although it wasn't what she had wanted. She had felt a stirring inside, but she was afraid to let it out. It wasn't a yes, and it certainly wasn't a no. It was more like . . .

Try it and see. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 93-94. "Sleep claimed him almost at once.

Sometime later, from the depths of REM, came the dream.

...Around him gathered a handful of old men--robed, bearded men with faces creased like dried fruit. All watched and listened in heavy silence. Prophets, Roth observed. Amos was there, as were Jeremiah and Daniel and Malachi. They seemed oddly familiar, like professional acquaintances made at some long-ago symposium. Roth realized almost immediately what they were witnessing.

'And I scattered them among the heathen,' one of the old men brooded, 'and they were dispersed through the countries.' Roth recognized the words. The old man was Ezekiel.

'Because they had despised my statutes, and polluted my sabbaths, and their eyes were after their fathers' idols.'

Roth glanced at Ezekiel's face for just a second before flipping his gaze away again. The prophet was obviously not in the best of moods. No sense making eye contact with an irate seer. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 99-100. "They laughed together for a moment. The [sic] she grew serious again.

'In the meantime, you pray for me, okay? I think I'm gonna need all the help I can get.'

'I already have. You do the same for me, huh?'

She nodded.

'You just take care of yourself tomorrow. Be careful. Really careful.'...

'What's on those discs?' she asked. 'What's going to come up on the pad when we send it through?' Her voice had distilled down to nearly nothing. 'It's . . . it's the Lost Tribes, isn't it? The Lost Tribes of Israel.'

There was no hesitation, no doubt.

'That's right, Lee,' Roth said... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Oklahoma 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 84. "'Debra-Jo,' Jory said. 'She was named after my great grandmother. Real pioneer stock, she was, a genuine sooner.'

'You from Oklahoma?'

Jory nodded. 'Tulsa...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 30. "'Nothing is outside the scope of science,' he [Hollus] said firmly... '...We do not believe--what is the term you use?--we do not believe that [God] simply waves his hands and wishes things into existence. We live in a universe of physics, and he must have used quantifiable physical processes to accomplish his ends...' " [Hollus, the alien scientist visiting the Earth, here expresses philosophy identical to that which Joseph Smith taught in Smith's rejection of the traditional ex nihilo arguments taught by Protestants and Catholics, as well as Joseph Smith's emphasis on scientific/rational thought and harmony between science and religion.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 43. "As usual, I was carrying a Zip disk with work-related files in my briefcase... " [Zip drives and disks: created by Latter-day Saint engineers at Iomega, based in Roy Utah.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 155. "But I haven't given that up. People used to say, is there marriage in heaven? well, this isn't exactly heaven. But I think there will still be marriage. People are people, Daddy. They're each unique...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 157. "In the name of survival--and in the name of the 'Restored United States'--the people of Corvallis... all hurried to obey. " [This novel, which takes place after a nuclear war, does not mention Latter-day Saints, but contains many themes that may be of interest to them. There are frequent references to the 'Restored United States', which phraseology is similar to the 'Restored Gospel.' Other themes of possible interest include the formation of a new religion in a frontier society, and the creation of a Constitution for the new (restored) country. The title character comes to be revered like a prophet in many ways, and is sometimes described as such (pg. 47: "She looked at him as if he were some sort of visiting prophet, or at least a hero out of a story book. ") ]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Paradise: Provo 2170 Knight, Damon. "Strangers on Paradise " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1986); pg. 13. Pg. 2: "...waiting to get to the place he had dreamed of with hopeless longing all his life: a place without disease, without violence... The Paradisans had pumped out his blood and replaced it with something that, they assured him, was just as efficient at carrying oxygen but was not an appetizing medium for microbes. "; Pg. 13: "They passed mile after mile of growing crops--corn, soybeans, then acres of beans, squash, peas... The forests stopped at the borders of the fields as if they had been cut with a knife.

Provo was now a town of about a hundred thousand; when Eleanor Petryk had first lived there, it had been only a crossroads at the edge of the boonies. Selby got off the tube in the late afternoon. " [Many apparent (but not explicit) LDS refs. Last third of story takes place in a town called 'Provo', apparently named and modeled after Provo, Utah. Replacement of blood with another substance before going to planet called 'Paradise' may also be derivative.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 8-9. Pg. 8: "'...Anyway, Andrew will just say, very patiently, 'Well, we're here, which ought to be impossible, so we have to assume we're meant to survive here; if we're meant to, we will; if not, we won't, and it's as much as I can do to concentrate on every day as it comes along--the rest is up to Providence.' Now, I'm as clear about all that as--well, as you are yourself, George, but Andrew feels it the way you do. He's honestly content to work and wait upon the Lord. Me, I' have to keep yanking myself up short. I wish I knew how you chaps do it...' "; Pg. 9: "'Just for the record, though, Andrew's perfectly right. Why should we be here, if not to mend our fences somehow, and act as a buffer between the Sixers and the hrossa? And survive? The Mormons had it worse, didn't they? And lived to populate a desert and a dozen space colonies? What would George Fox and Margaret Fell think of all this fussing and bitching, hmm? Not much!' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Realm 1984 Bear, Greg. "Book One: The Infinity Concerto " (c. 1984, substantially rewritten for this edition) in Songs of Earth & Power. New York: Tor (1996; 1st ed. 1994); pg. 117. "Michael shook his head. 'What is it?'

'An abortion. A creature to inconsistent to match up with the Realm.'

'One of Adonna's mistakes?'

'Gods don't make mistakes,' Biri said solemnly, with no touch of irony... 'I've seen them many times,' Biri said. 'They are mostly harmless to a Sidhe... Only humans are susceptible...'

'Can it hurt me?'

'It can do worse than kill you. Whenever a human child is born, one of these is liberated. The child has no reservoir of waiting souls from which to draw, so its search allows certain patterns within one of these to enter the Pact Lands. The child is branded. The same could happen to you if you slept here outside a circle.'

'You mean I'd be possessed?'

'These are not intelligences. They are abortions. You would e more eaten than possessed...' [Latter-day Saints do not have abortions, of course, and abortion is used here in a non-standard sense anyway. Given Bear's other writing, this may be LDS-influenced.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Samoa 1944 Horne, Lewis. "The People Who Were Not There " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1973); pg. 61. "Finding a box in the bottom of a pile, he told us to pull it out: mission. Opening it, he handed us a small smelly Bible. We couldn't read it.

'That is printed in Samoan,' he said. 'My mission was to Samoa. Look at this picture.'

He showed us six white-suited men, standing on a beach, palm trees behind. The young men stared, stiff, composed, and steady-eyed.

'That one... that one is me...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Scandinavia 1960 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 115. "From what little I'd heard, the esteemed Doktor Perkins was less than the perfectly conventional Saint. He'd waited to get a doctorate before undertaking his mission, then been asked to leave Finlandia during that mission because he insisted on playing music rather than trying to convert locals. From Vyborg he'd gone to the Netherlands, where he'd dug Vondel's plays out of the depths of the libraries and started turning them into operas, again ignoring the preaching business. After receiving an award an some solid cash from Hendrik... Perkins had trundled home to Deseret, where he had married his childhood sweetheart... He'd been periodically quoted, from what I'd been able to dig out of the Vanderbraak State University library, as saying that music was his mission. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Solar System 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 32. Pg. 32: "No one knew why, yet all previous attempts to open Morris-Thorne bridges that extended beyond the mid-1300s failed when the tunnels through the spacetime foam collapsed in upon themselves. " [The 'Morris-Thorne' bridges, i.e., the wormholes used to travel through time, are partially named after Latter-day Saint astrophysicist Kip Thorne. Note also the explicit reference to Thorne by his full name on page 309.] Pg. 320 [Sources]: "Thorne, Kip S. Black Holes & Time Warps. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1994. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Solar System 2354 Ferguson, Brad & Kathi Ferguson. The Haunted Starship (Star Trek: TNG: Starfleet Academy). New York: Pocket Books (1997); pg. 15. Pg. 15: "'...Even the twentieth-century Pioneer and Voyager probes made it through the Belt without harm...' "; Pg. 15-16: "'I'd like to have seen the Belt back in the early days. They say Ceresville used to be quite a place before it became a ghost town. It was supposed to be a lot like the Ancient West.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Solar System 2436 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 23. "...face peered at him. Cheeks, chin, nose, and eyelids were hideously tattooed like an ancient Maori mask. Across the brow was tattooed JOSEPH. The 'O' in JOSEPH had a tiny arrow thrust up from the right shoulder, turning it into the symbol of Mars, used by scientists to designate male sex.

'We are the Scientific Race,' Joseph said. 'I am Joseph; these are my people.'

He gestured, Foyle gazed at the grinning crowd surrounding his littler...

'You are the first to arrive alive in fifty years. You are a puissant man. Very. Arrival of the fittest is the doctrine of Holy Darwin. Most Scientific.'

...'Choose,' Joseph said. 'The Scientific People practice Natural Selection. Be scientific in your choice. Be genetic.' " [As Joseph Smith is regarded as the first Darwinian religious prophet, did Bester here name the leader of the quasi-religious group known as the Scientific People after him?]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South America 2249 Carey, Diane. Best Destiny (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 10-11. "'What're we gonna do when we get to South America?' Quentin Monroe asked.

'Anything we... please.' Jimmy [young James T. Kirk] glanced... to see how Quentin was doing... 'Maybe we'll become archaeologists,' he said... 'Hack through rain forests looking for the ancient Mayan city-states. Find out why they went extinct after a thousand years of--'

'They found those.'

Jimmy stopped... 'What?' he snapped. 'What'd you say?'

'Quentin clung to the ropes and blinked. 'They found them. The Mayan palaces. A long time ago. You know . . . how the twentieth-century archaeologists found lance heads in the walls, and later the proved that the city was under siege, and how the siege forced them to do all their farming behind the walls, and how the crop yields fell off, and how--'

'Where'd you hear all this?'

'It was . . . in our history of science book.' " [The Mayan history mentioned could easily have come from the narrative of the Book of Mormon.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Carolina 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 278. "His face had a craggy-reflective quality which Natalie found reminiscent of a younger Morris Udall. " [A reference to the famed Latter-day Saint senator from Arizona.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 168. "'Listen, Jack, in my family we've got more hard noses than Mount Rushmore...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 1993 Ellison, Harlan. Mefisto in Onyx. Shingletown, CA: Mark. V. Ziesing Books (1993); pg. 89. "You could've been Alexander Hamilton and helped found the Manumission Society in New York. You could've discovered radium, carved Mount Rushmore, carried a baby out of a burning building. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 1998 York, J. Steven. Generation X: Crossroads. New York: Berkley (1998); pg. 55. Pg. 55: "'You've been to Yellowstone?'

Jono glanced his way. 'So, this is like a rerun for you?' Angelo flipped through the book. 'How about Mt. Rushmore?'

Everett nodded. "

[Not an explicit LDS reference, but Mt. Rushmore was carved by a Mormon sculptor. The famous monument is featured on the cover of this book, and later in the novel.]

Pg. 140: "'...The objective is Mt. Rushmore.' "; Pg. 149: Picture of Mt. Rushmore.; Pg. 152: "...for a few days before going on to Rushmore. "; Pg. 155: "...on the way to Rushmore. "; Pg. 156: "Jono... considered the irony, that he, a man without a face, was on his way to see four of the largest, most beloved faces in America. He had mixed feelings about it personally, especially about Washington and Jefferson... " [Jono is from England. More about this on pg. 156. Extensive scene at Mt. Rushmore on pg. 158 to 177, and referred back to later on 192, etc.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 1999 Cerasini, Marc. Godzilla 2000. New York: Random House (1997); pg. 236. Pg. 236: "The image on the central monitor changed. It now showed a familiar landmark--Mount Rushmore, with the faces of America's four most revered leaders carved into its cliff face; George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. "; Pg. 257: "Dr. Max Birchwood watched the nest on Mount Rushmore from a hill several miles away. It was as close as anyone was permitted to get to Rodan, who had remained in its lair, minding its single egg, for days now, atop the magnificent sculptures carved over decades by the artist Gutzon Borglum. " [Referring to the monument carved by Mormon sculptor Gutzon Borglum.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 2000 Cadnum, Michael. "Bite the Hand " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 270. "But Raymond got that stubborn little Mount Rushmore expression on his face... " [Referring to the monument carved by Mormon sculptor Gutzon Borglum.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 2039 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 208. "'Do you by any chance have a record of Jessye Norman on top of Mount Rushmore singing the 'Battle Hymn of the Republic'?' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints South Dakota 3131 Simmons, Dan. The Rise of Endymion. New York: Bantam (1998 mass market edition; first ed. 1997); pg. 317. "...near the Golden Gate Bridge, at the edge of the Grand Canyon, atop the stone faces at Mount Rushmore [a monument created by Mormon sculptor Gutzon Borglum], beneath the rusted girders of launch gantries at the Kennedy Spaceport Historical Park... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Switzerland 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 229. "'Don't you mean Basel?'

'Basel?'

'In Switzerland. And your attack was a massive infarction that would have left you a cardiac cripple.

Forcing himself to grin, Underwood waggled a finger at the younger man. 'Carter, you've been watching the tabloids! They exaggerate everything.'

'You were flown to Basel and operated on by Dr. Wilhelm Zimmerman, one of the few doctors left who still deals with nanotherapy.'

'That's not so!'

With a patient sigh, Eldridge asked, 'Do you want me to recite the flight number to you? Your room number at the Basel Marriott? The date and hour on which Zimmerman operated on you?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Syria 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 119. "Her family background was similarly run-of the mill. Her mother and father were fairly active. Her older brother, always exemplary, had served a mission in Syria. "


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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