Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Nevada

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 115-116. "The sun rose and far away, at the foothills of the mountains, its light caught the golden Angel Moroni atop the Las Vegas temple. He blew his horn, calling the saints, but he kept a safe distance from the casinos, just keeping them in sight. The temple could not compete in the darkness, as if God would see the night for the sake of the day, as if He could not master the neon hours.

Charlotte had been to the temple the first week in the city she'd been afraid and felt drawn there, believing it might be closer to where she belonged... There was a huge parking lot at the temple, but there were very few cars. On the front of the building, in gilded gold letters two feet high, it said HOLINESS TO THE LORD. THE HOUSE OF THE LORD. She pulled open the heavy glass doors and went inside.

Music was playing so softly she doubted it was playing at all. She was the only visitor. The people behind the desk, the brothers and sisters, waited for her. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 118-119. [In Las Vegas.] "When she opened the door of the trailer, the two missionaries were standing there, smiling at her.

I'm Elder Larsen, one said. We'd like to share what we believe... We'd like to tell you about our church, he said.

That's my church, too, Charlotte said.

You're a member?

'I know it's true, she said. Of course I am.

An active member? he said.

In my way, she said... It's funny there are missionaries here, she said.

We're needed here, Elder Larsen said. Did you know we have chapels in some of the larger casinos?

Very functional, she said.

We're the most feared men in Vegas, he said, trying to joke. People lock their doors when they see us coming. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 147-148. [A non-LDS Nevada resident is thinking.] "God organized, but did not create us, for we are as old as He. So the Mormons believe. I was pleased to know that, also reassured to read that miraculous power did not disappear after the biblical days, that it is among us. Of course it's among us! How would we ever let it escape? What would we do without it?... Yes, if anyone could bring miracles into the daylight, if anyone could organize miracles it would be the Mormons. They are an organizing people--they like to make sense and straighten things. They track down their ancestors to posthumously baptize them, save their souls; they have all the names of everyone's, safe and dry in caves where the temperature and humidity never changes; they store enough food in their basements, cans and cands, to outlast any apocalypse. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 172-173. [The non-LDS main character, an elderly man obsessed with a 19-year-old Mormon woman, is thinking:] "As she walked, I was driving to Vegas, I was swimming in mirrors, I was reading the Book of Mormon to get ahead of her and lay in wait. yes, I knew when I had found it. I almost tore the page from the book. The Mormons believe God still talks to man, that He lays revelations down.

Charlotte wanted conversation with God, unmediated. Myself, I hear voices and I've never even been baptized; I've seen and felt things I cannot explain. I have never understood if you trade your sins when you are baptized, or if the water just saves your body and your soul needs fire. This is what I suspect. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1991 Barber, Phyllis. "At the Talent Show " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 227. "When I was nine years old, the bishop of the Boulder City Ward, who happened to be my father, asked me to be the organist for Primary. Mormon children met together at Primary on Wednesday afternoons to study the restored gospel and sing such things as 'The Handcart Song,' about pioneers who walked across the plains singing 'Some must push and some must pull'

'It's time to share the talent God gave you,' my father said.

I said yes. I went to work. And of course I thought I sounded good. The primary teachers told me so. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1991 Barber, Phyllis. "At the Talent Show " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1991); pg. 228. "Sister Floyd had six children who never sat still at church. The youngest threw themselves onto the floor in tantrums when they couldn't drink every cup in the sacrament tray. They grabbed handfuls of bread when they were only supposed to take one piece of the Saviour's flesh. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 2367 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 230. "Nearby was another, equally pristine lake, smaller, which would forever remain linked with the tragic fate of the family that gave it its name: Donner. Even now, five hundred years later, the tale of the pioneers who had suffered so cruelly the ravages of nature and of each other had the ability to tantalize the imagination. There was still a shrine to the intrepid wagon train of long ago: a huge boulder had served as a cabin wall for one family, the Breens, and a plaque there commemorated their travails during the bitter winter of 1846.

Tom was the only one of the group who knew of that ancient catastrophe. To Odile and Bruno it was an obscure event in the history of another country... Tom was pleased, as they stood by the huge boulder, that they seemed moved by his reverential account of the Donners, the Reeds, the Breens, and the others of that ill-fated group. " [Although dating to the same period as Latter-day Saint pioneers, the Donner pioneers were not LDS.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada: Las Vegas 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 116. "'Funo quickly folded himself into the Porsche and drove across Third and parked behind a Pioneer Chicken restaurant, then walked inside and sat at a table from which, through the tinted glass, he could watch the gas station. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Jersey 3417 Farmer, Philip Jose. Dayworld Rebel. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1987); pg. 33. "What have we here? Duncan thought. A latter-day Saint Francis of Assisi?

The man... dropped the crucifix... " [This isn't actually a reference to the LDS Church -- the phrase 'latter-day Saint' is here by accident, as part of a Catholic meaning which uses an LDS term by coincidence.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 196. "Tubac rowsed under the relentless sun of the western part of New Mexico Territory. It had been a Mexican village, adobe houses clustered around a Catholic church which was also adobe and whitewashed. Then it had ben a Mormon settlement, one of the may sprouts from the main tree in Utah. Since the War of Secession, unending raids by Apaches and by Mexican and white bandits had left it a sad shadow of its former self.

That left Jeb Stuart, whose army was camped nearby, something short of brokenhearted. 'Mormons,' he said to his aide-de-camp. 'You ask me, the damnyankees are welcome to them.'

Major Horatio Sellers nodded and said, 'Yes, sir.' His principal bugbear, though was not the Mormons, of whom only a handful were left hereabouts, but the Apaches... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 29. [The seventeen adults who have been regressed to childhood by the alien Holn introduce themselves to each other.] "'Myra Caslon, Salt Lake City.' Short brown hair, round face, receding chin. 'I had come out representing a church committee studying the Holn for ourselves.' She grimaced. 'Bad timing.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 34. "'...Mr. Aragon spoke only in Spanish, mostly obscenities, for most of the first three days. Then he asked for and received a Bible. He apologized for his behavior and has spent the rest of the time reading the Bible. Ms. Caslon has wept quite a bit, not over her condition, but over her family. She also has spent much time praying and reading the Book of Mormon.' " [Many other refs., not all in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 1880 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. "That had been the town's first destruction [by Apache Indians, driving out settlers from Mexico], but not its last. Long after the Apache wars had been won, in the 1920s, Atocha had been destroyed again, when the copper pit engulfed the town. Atocha had been rebuilt twelve miles to the west, and all the old-nineteenth-century town that Loren had seen in photographs, all the neat brick Victorian buildings with their pillars and stained glass, gables and towers and widow's walks, the little identical side-by-side houses that the early Mormon polygamists had built for their wives. . . all had been destroyed. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 8. "Loren left the building, got in his Fury cruiser, and drove down West Plaza to Central. He turned right, then turned left again at the big LDS church, which had its own monument, an obelisk of Utah granite, marking the resettlement of Atocha in the 1870s by Mormons sent at the command of Brigham Young. They had established a small farming community along the Rio Seco in the face of the Apache terror, intended as a way station in case the Saints' simmering disagreements with the federal government forced them to evacuate to Mexico. Before long, the Mormons had been submerged by miners brought in by the silver and gold strikes, but they were still a powerful presence. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 25. "'I don't wanna say anything about you guys [Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene] or the Mormons,' he said, 'but I'm a Catholic, and we say you're both cults.'

Loren glared at him. 'You don't want me to tell you what my religion says about the Pope.'

'Loren,' said Coover, 'that nice steak of yours is getting cold.'

'One of the great minds of the sixteenth century,' Loren said.

Sandoval looked offended. Byrne turned to him. 'I'm a Lutheran,' he said. 'Am I a cultist, too?'

'You're okay, ese,' Sandoval said. 'You're justa heretic.'

He and Byrne cackled. Byrne took a flask out of his pocket and added whiskey to their coffee cups. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 59. "The Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene as Atocha's largest church. The Apostles, unlike the Saints and the Holy Romans, had been imported specially in the 1880s, when Riga Brothers began their copper operation. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 92. "Eloy rose. 'You knew the guy, Chief?'

'Randal Dudenhof. I grew up with him.' A rancher, Loren knew. Good ole boy, a jack Mormon. His wife was named Violet... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 126. "'Birthplace?'

'New Delhi, India.'

...'Someone told me you were Pakistani.'

'I was born in India. My grandparents were killed by Hindus in a riot following the death of dictator Indira Gandhi. My surviving family fled to Rawalpindi, in Pakistan.'

The words were matter-of-fact, said with a slight smile. Loren tried to picture Atocha divided along those kinds of bitter ethnic lines, with Apostles [members of the Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene] battling the LDS over their varying interpretations of early Mormon history, and armed Knights of Columbus cruising the plaza armed with shotguns, blasting Baptist heretics with iron pellets... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 151. "'Do you know what happened to his wife?'

'Violet? She hung onto the ranch for a few years, then sold out to Luis and moved to Utah.'

'I knew that.'

'Provo, I think. Remarried and raised a lot of little Mormons.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 151. "It wasn't even illegal back then. You had to be some kind of communist to suggest a guy shouldn't have a few drinks on his drive home. The jack Mormons and the other good ole boys could handle their liquor and... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 152. "Suddenly Loren wished he had a cigarette. He'd never smoked--at the age when most kids in Atocha took up smoking or snuff, he'd been on the football team under a strict Mormon coach who would cut a player for drinking, smoking, Loren had never taken up smoking--drinking and strangling the goose were something else--and in Korea he used to give his free G.I. cigarettes away to the locals. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 253. "The title ended up by the end of the twentieth century in the hands of Mormon land developers from Utah "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 334. "Another millennium postponed. Joseph Smith and Samuel Catton had both announced the momentary end of the world in the impending cry of Gideon's trumpet; somehow the world had avoided its judgment and finale. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 360. "...the other Randal, Randal-1, went on home... to his every-faithful, ever-hopeful Mormon wife, never knowing of his rendezvous with the sharp end of a steering column in the not-too-distant future. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 371. "...the past that held the county in the grips of its unseen field--the Hohokam and Apaches, the miners delving for silver and copper, the unseen Anaconda, the Mormon polygamists and Spanish patrons, the upright Apostles singing psalms as they came on the train from Pennsylvania... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 222-223. "The Dudenhofs' grave marker was easy to find, marked by a gray weathered Mormon angel with a trumpet, a copy of the gold Moroni atop the Salt Lake City temple. Loren brough the backhoe up to the grave, reading the carved words in the light of its headlights. HERMAN, the stone read. FATHER. PATRICIA, MOTHER. ADAM, SON. RANDAL, SON. And dates. And little white headstones marking the grave of each.

...Only three children. Small for a Mormon family. And all died young. The graves were untended by anything except dead brown grass. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New Mexico: Atocha 2010 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 24-25. "'What I wanna know,' said Bob Sandoval, 'is which of these revelations we're supposed to believe in.' He wasn't wearing his upper plate and his words were slurred by more than alcohol. 'God told one thing to Joseph Smith and something else to Sam Catton, so which one do we believe in?'

'They both agreed on the subject of the Masons,' Byrne said.

Loren looked over one shoulder to make sure that no Mormons had come in while they were talking. None were in sight. 'I don't say anything about the LDS,' said Loren, 'but my working hypothesis is that I wouldn't choose a religion whose founder went and got himself lynched.'

'Like Jesus Christ?' Byrne said.

Loren was speechless. Sandoval laughed at his expression. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York 1831 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 14. "That meeting [the one which led to the foundation of the fictional 'Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene'] took place in Palmyra, New York, where a thirty-one-year-old Pennsylvanian, Samuel Catton, had gone to hear the preaching of Joseph Smith. (Mormon historians claimed that Catton had briefly been appointed apostle in the Church of Christ, as the LDS was then known, but Catton's followers denied it.) A that meeting, Catton found himself sitting next to a quiet, eagle-eyed, smooth-faced gentleman in gray broadcloth, a man who led him away and took him on a tour of the universe. He was known to Catton's followers as the Master in Gray, though Joseph Smith later identified him simply as Satan... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York 1831 Williams, Walter Jon. Days of Atonement. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 14-15. "Catton [Samuel Catton, founder of the book's fictional 'Church of the Apostles of Elohim and the Nazarene'] was preferred over Smith by those who thought their prophets should be grave and serious. Smith laughed and joked, and stripped off his coat and wrestled any challenger; drinking beer and wine--Catton did none of those things... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Enchantment. New York: Ballantine Publishing Group (1999); pg. 89. "It dawned on Ivan that he wasn't going to be able to beg off the way he might have done in back in Tantalus, politely turning down an invitation to have dinner with a new acquaintance or attend the Mormon pageant at Palmyra. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York 2000 Datlow, Ellen (ed.) Vanishing Acts. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 166. [Introduction to story by Shunn.] "William Shunn holds a degree in computer science from the University of Utah and works as a programmer for the Children's Television Worskshop. His short fiction has been published in F&SF, Science Fiction Age, and Realms of Fantasy. He recently completed his first novel and is at work on a memoir of his two years as a Mormon missionary. Born in Los Angeles and raised in Utah, he now lives in New York City. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 159. "'Good morning,' the Air Force officer said. 'I am Colonel Brigham Jefferson, the base commander here at the Tyler Air Force Station. I'm also one of two deputy commanders for the New York Military District. I'd like to welcome you to this two-day tour of Manhattan and its surrounding communities, and I also welcome your participation and cooperation. Before I begin this briefing about our mission and status, I must settle a couple of ground rules.' " [Colonel Jefferson continues this speech, and his introduction about the area and military operations there, on pages 159 to 166. Jefferson is apparently is black. It's possible he was named after 2nd LDS leader Brigham Young.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 1976 Leigh, Stephen. "Strings " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 360. "All of the Democratic candidates made an appearance near the stricken area, to be photographed with concerned, stern expressions as they gazed at the burnt-out shell of a building or spoke with a not-too-misshapen joker. Kennedy, Carter, Udall, Jackson--they all made certain they were seen and then took their limos back to the Garden [Madison Square Garden], where the delegates had cast two inconclusive rounds of votes for the candidacy. " [Morris. K. Udall - an LDS congressman from Arizona.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 1976 Williams, Walter Jon. "While Night's Black Agents to Their Preys Do Rouse " in Wild Cards IX: Jokertown Shuffle (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 193. "Summer 1976. Hartmann and Carter and Udall and Kennedy all slugging it out in the Garden [Madison Square Garden], cutting little deals with each other... " [This is a reference to the Democratic convention. Hartmann is a fictional senator from the Wild Cards series. The others mentioned here are Jimmy Carter, Ted Kennedy and Morris K. Udall, an LDS congressmen from Arizona.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 172. "A pioneer, " she reminded herself. [Not an actual reference to Latter-day Saint pioneers.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 1994 Williams, Walter Jon. "Feeding Frenzy " in Wild Cards: Book II of a New Cycle: Marked Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Baen (1994); pg. 192. [Straight Arrow, a Mormon superhero who works for the government, is credited with apprehending 'the Racist', a racist bad guy.] "He called himself the Racist in the same way that John Wayne was the Shootist--he was fast, supposedly capable of two hundred miles per hour on the straights--but he was a racist in the other sense of the word, too, a member of the Aryan Brotherhood. Some of his tattoos were swastikas. He'd been an ordinary stick-up man until he'd volunteered in prison for an experiment with the wild card virus, and to everyone's surprise he'd drawn an ace and escaped prison. Not that he'd stayed out of the slams for long--Straight Arrow had caught up with him and held him in a cage of fire. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 2015 Sullivan, Tricia. Someone to Watch Over Me. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 265. "I take out cash, pay the driver, and take another cab to Times Square. See how easy? I get a room in the Marriott among the businessmen and tourists, and lock myself in. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 47. "Zo's big draw was his marital status: single. Unattached Mormon males were at a premium. That's how he hooked into his first spiritual partner, Tooley. She was surplus. bright, beautiful, wealthy--but surplus just the same. Tooley grew up in New England. Schooled in Boston. But because Mormons were scarce in the east, she rarely met Mormon men. And she was determined to hold out for the eternal partner, that 'one-and-only' her girlhood Sunday school teachers had talked so much about. He would come . . . some day. They promised. So Tooley turned down date after date from the gentile men around her, and she waited. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 47. [Tooley, a devout single LDS woman from Boston, living in New York.] "During those quiet evenings and long nights, Tooley tapped into her creative motherlode: designing trinkets to hide in breakfast-cereal boxes. She later confided to Zo that her talent for conceiving just the right cereal-box surprise was not talent at all--it was a spiritual gift. The gadgetry she invented--high tech but low budget--was nothing short of revelation. Kellogg's was her first major account; their sales skyrocketed. Then it was Nabisco. Soon every cereal maker in America was wining and dining her. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints New York: New York City 2035 Fogg, B. J. "Outside the Tabernacle " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 47. "Then Zo came along. He'd just finished a hot-air balloon safari through the last of the Kenyan game preserves when he opted for a layover at JFK on his way back to Utah. A two-day layover, time to rediscover the city. That Sunday morning in New York, Zo gathered with the Mormons in Manhattan. Tooley sat next to him, quite by accident; she shared her hymnal with him, quite on purpose. She smiled. Took Zo home. Fed hi. Gave him her razor to shave with. She pressed a seam into all his jeans before he could say good-bye.

After a weak in Utah, Zo returned to New York. To Tooley of course. The bishop there authorized the temporal marriage. Zo wed Tooley in the temple and moved into her apartment. The whole thing was fast, but no one objected--not Zo's parents, not his home-congregation bishop. Zo was after all thirty-seven years old. And the marriage arrangement was after all only temporary. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 32-33. "I took a plastic bag we'd gotten in Vattani's and walked behind the freeze-shack to pick a bagful of alma leaves. Alma was a pungent little plant Sam and I grew on the wood slats of the freeze-shack's back wall. The leaves were an almost-black dark green, as long and wide as my fingers. We always took a bagful with us into the pantano and dried them on the raft. The Brazis had convinced us to do this: they thought the leaves were rich in iron and vitamins. We'd crumple the dry leaes over our beans and rice; it gave them a kind of nutty taste. I felled the bag with alma leaves and turned to see what was left of the orchard we'd tried to grow. " [It is probably a coincidence that this plant has same name as figure from LDS scripture.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1846 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 240. "The first prophet had definitely been both a man of vision and a shrewd politician, so shrewd I had to wonder how he'd gotten himself murdered... Bad luck? Either could happen to anyone. There's always someone smarter and tougher, and luck doesn't necessarily favor the skillful or the bold, and Smith had to have been bold, whatever else he had or hadn't been. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1850 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 141. "The synthetic fuel plants were just another far-reaching result of the unfortunate Colfax incident, or the circumstances that led up to it, really. Prophet Young, the second and apparently greatest Saint prophet, had set up fur-trading stations on the eastern side of Deseret, all along the Colorado River and well into the Kansas territory... [during] civil war over the slavery issue. The saints had used that time of unrest to consolidate their hold on the wilderness... The Saints had rejected the protest and sought aid from Santa Anna and his French advisors... "; Pg. 142: "...the Saints retained most of the former Kansas territory west of the Continental Divide--except that Columbia [i.e., the Dutch-settled Eastern part of North America] had held onto the headwaters and the first fifty miles or so of the Colorado River. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1857 *LINK* London, Jack. The Star Rover. Copyright 1915. [In this novel, a character apparently uses astral projection to travel to a few select historical events.] Chapter 12: "While they were away, other men, strangers, inhabitants of desert Nephi, came into camp and stalked about. They were white men, like us, but they were hard-faced, stern-faced, somber, and they seemed angry with all our company. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1857 London, Jack. The Star Rover. Copyright 1915. [Chapter 12:] "I guess you've got good reasons to deny where you come from, " he next said, "you that drove the Lord's chosen people from Missouri. "

Mother made no reply.

" . . . Seein', " he went on, after the pause accorded her, "as you're now comin' a-whinin' ant a-beggin' bread at our hands that you persecuted. "

Whereupon, and instantly, child that I was, I knew anger, the old, red, intolerant wrath, ever unrestrainable and unsubduable.

"You lie! " I piped up. "We ain't Missourians. We ain't whinin'. An' we ain't beggars. We got the money to buy. "

"Shut up, Jesse! " my mother cried, landing the back of her hand stingingly on my mouth. And then, to the stranger, "Go away and let the boy alone. "

"I'll shoot you full of lead, you damned Mormon! " I screamed and sobbed at him, too quick for my mother this time and dancing away around the fire from the backsweep of her hand. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1857 London, Jack. The Star Rover. Copyright 1915. [Chapter 12:] As for the man himself, my conduct had not disturbed him in the slightest. I was prepared for I knew not what violent visitation from this terrible stranger, and I watched him warily while he considered me with the utmost gravity.

At last he spoke, and he spoke solemnly, with solemn shaking of the head, as if delivering a judgment

"Like fathers, like sons, " he said. "The young generation is as bad as the older. The whole breed is unregenerate and damned. There is no saving it, the young or the old. There is no atonement Not even the blood of Christ can wipe out its iniquities. "

"Damned Mormon! " was all I could sob at him. "Damned Mormon! Damned Mormon! Damned Mormon! "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1857 London, Jack. The Star Rover. Copyright 1915. [Chapter 12:] "Then we're quit of them, " said my father. "Cedar City is the last settlement. We'll have to go on, that's all, and thank our stars we are quit of them. Two days' journey beyond is good pasture and water. They call it Mountain Meadows. Nobody lives there, and that's the place we'll rest our cattle and feed them up before we tackle the desert. Maybe we can shoot some meat. And if the worst comes to the worst, we'll keep going as long as we can, then abandon the wagons, pack what we can on our animals, and make the last stages on foot We can eat our cattle as we go long. It would be better to arrive in California without a rag to our backs than to leave our bones here; and leave them we will if we start a ruction. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1857 London, Jack. The Star Rover. Copyright 1915. [Chapter 12:] With final reiterated warnings against violence of speech or act, the impromptu meeting broke up. I was slow in falling asleep that night. My rage against the Mormon had left my brain in such a tingle that I was still awake when my father crawled into the wagon after a last round of the nightwatch. They thought I slept, but I heard Mother ask him if he thought that the Mormons would let us depart peacefully from their land. His face was turned aside from her as he busied himself with pulling off a boot, while he answered her with hearty confidence that he was sure the Mormons would let us go if none of our own company started trouble. [Other refs. not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 279. "'Sir, since you asked my opinion, I think rooting out disloyal elements has a very high priority. If our next move against the enemy [fails], it might be on account of... subversion.'

'Oh, for Christ's sake!' Morrell exploded. 'All right, you hunted through the pay records. We have in this battalion'--he glanced down at the list Craddock had given him--'four, count them, four Mormons. Has any one of them ever given the slightest sign of disloyalty?'

'No, sir,' Craddock said. 'But you never can tell, not with these people you can't. They looked loyal to the USA, too, till this Deseret rebellion kicked up. They might be laying low.'

'Lying,' Morrell corrected absently.

'Yes, sir, they might be lying, too,' Craddock agreed with earnest ignorance. Morrell [sighed]... 'All right, Bill. Bring the Mormons to me and I'll have a talk with them.' He didn't think a Kentucky forest the ideal spot for this sort of procedure, but this as where he happened to be. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 279. [Soldiers stationed in Kentucky:] "[Craddock] soon returned with a young, towheaded private who looked confused and worried. Morrell would have looked the same way if he'd suddenly been hauled up before his commanding officer. The soldier came to stiff attention. 'Dinwiddie, Brigham,' he said, rattling off his pay number.

'At ease, Dinwiddle,' Morrell said. 'You're not in trouble.'... Dinwiddie was from the company he'd commanded. He'd always thought of the youngster as too good to be true. Dinwiddie didn't drink, didn't smoke, he didn't gamble, he wasn't out to lay every woman he set eyes on, and he obeyed every order promptly, cheerfully, and bravely. What little Morrell knew about Mormonism made him think it was a pretty silly religion, but it had to have something going for it if it turned out people like Dinwiddie. Picking his words with care, Morrell asked, 'What do you think of what's going on in Utah these days, son?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 280. "Dinwiddie looked horrified. If he was an actor, he belonged on stage. 'Sir, what the Rebs do to Latter-Day Saints in the CSA [Confederate State of America]-- You hear stores about what the Russians do to Jews. It's like that, sir. They don't want any of us, and they don't make any bones about it.'

Morrell wondered what things were going to be like for Momons in the USA after the Army finished crushing the Deseret revolt. They hadn't been easy before; they'd get harder now. It had been more ruppression than persecution. What it was going to be. . . Well, if Brigham Dinwiddie hadn't thought of that for himself, no point doing the job for him. 'All right, Dimwiddie--dismissed,' Morrell said. 'Go on back to your unit.'

The Mormon saluted and left. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 280. "The Mormon saluted and left. Lietenant Craddock said, 'Sir, forgive me, but I didn't think that was a very thorough interrogation.'

''Neither did I,' Morrell said. 'The way I see it is, if I rake these people over the coals when they haven't done anything, I'll give them a reason to be disloyal even if they didn't have one before. No go fetch me Corporal'--he checked the list--'Corporal Thomas.'

Corporal Orson Gregory Thomas--who made apoint of asking to be called Gregory--echoed Brigham Dinwiddie's comments almost word for word... Morrell found it natural--put two men with the same beliefs in the same awkward situation and you could expec to get the same kind of answers out of them. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 281. "Homer Benson, another private, again gave almost the same set of responses... Dick Francis, still another private, was the last man on the list Craddock had so laboriously compiled. He looked enough like Dinwiddie to ahve been his first cousin, and shared his diffident manner. But when Morrell asked him what he thought about the Mormon uprising in Utah, he said, 'I hope they kick the Army out of there, sir. That's our land. All the United States ever did was give us grief.'

Morrell pointed to the green-gray uniform Francis had on. 'What are you doing wearing that, then?'

'Sir, I was rendering unto Caesar,' the private answered. 'When the Prophet and the Elders said that, since we were part of the United States, we should take part in this war, I obeyed: it was a teaching inspired of God. But now that they see things differently, I won't lie and say I'm sorry. I think Deseret should be free, so we can worship as we please.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 281. "'...I think Deseret should be free, so we can worship as we please.'

'Want a whole houseful of wives, do you?' Lieutenant Craddock said, a nasty leer on his face.

'That will be enough Lieutenant,' Morrell said sharply.

But the damage was already done. 'You see what I mean, sir?' Francis said. 'Why should I love a government that looks at us like that? The way we get treated, we're the...

Morrell rubbed his chin. 'What the devil am I supposed to do with you, Francis?' he asked. He hadn't expected this problem, assuming all the Mormons in the battalion would stay loyal...

Dick Francis shrugged. 'Why are you asking me, sir? You're the United States Army officer.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 281. "'I'm going to send you back to divisional headquarters,' he said. 'I don't want any man on the front line whose first loyalty isn't to his country and to the men on either side of him.'

He didn't know what Division HQ did with people like Francis. The Mormon soldier did; he'd lhad more incentive to learn such things. 'Detention camp for me, then,' he said, sounding not a bit put out. 'I'll pray for you, sir. For a gentile, you're a good man.'

Not knowing what to do with such faint praise, Morrell turned to Craddock. 'Take him back to Division,' he said. 'Tell him he doesn't feel in good conscience he can go on being a soldier.' He tried not to think about what lay in store for Francis. he hadn't made a point of learning about detention camps, either, but they bore an evil reputation. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1963 Simak, Clifford D. Way Station. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Robert Bentley, Inc. (reprinted 1979; copyright 1963); pg. 18. "'I've never seen anything like it in my life,' said Hardwicke. 'Not that I'm an authority. I really know little at all in this field.'

'You can put your mind at rest. It's nothing that anyone knows anything about. It bears no resemblance, not even the remotest, to any language or any known inscription. I checked with men who know. Not one, but a dozen of them. I told them I'd found it on a rocky cliff. I am sure that most of them think I'm One of those people who are trying to prove that the Romans or the Phoenicians or the Irish or whatnot had pre-Colombian settlements in America.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 18. "She smiled and nodded again. 'An invitation, a contract... to sing in the great concert hall of Deseret...' ...

The cover letter praised her performance in New Bruges and extended the invitation to perform in Great Salt Lake City. It was signed by a Bishop Jacob Jensen, on behalf of the Prophets' Foundation for the Arts in Deseret.

I'd never cared much for the Saints of Deseret, even as I'd admired their ability to carve an independent nation out in the western wilderness between New France an Columbia. These days... Deseret scarcely qualified as a wilderness, not with its coal and iron, its synthetic fuels technology... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 20. "A young man there was from the University of Deseret. He was a Saint missionary, but a good bass. The arrangement of the Perkins piece 'Lord of Sand,' he provided that, and I wrote Doktor Perkins. You remember, n' est-ce pas? "

I nodded. Perkins had written a note back, sending several other arrangements and professing enthusiasim about her singing his work.

"This Doktor Perkins, he is known everywhere. "

"Well known enough to get you a contract, or to want to? "

"Non... but could he not recommend? "

A noted Saint composer--yes, he could recommend, and the Saints were so hidebound they probably had sent someone to double-check...

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 57. "Heber City, Deseret (DNS). 'The ideals of the first Prophet must not fall to the Lamanites of the spirit,' cautioned First Counselor Cannon in opening the annual Latter-Day Saints conference. 'Nor must we cease in brining light to a darkened continent or in our efforts to return those of Laman into the fold of God. Our kingdom is of God, and it shall stand forever.' Cannon went on to praise the role of the arts in opening man to understanding the need for the coming of Zion to the entire world. . .

Cannon's language turned more practical in his assessment of the state of Deseret. 'Energy and technology are the keys to the next century, and the wise use of water facilitates both. We will continue with the headwaters project.' The First Speaker went on to pledge additional funding for the advanced natural gas liquification plants, for water reuse technology, and for additional support of the cotton mission initiatives. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 141. "Below were the dry lands, another of the flat plateaus of eastern Deseret, and a thin strip of green that was a river I didn't know. In the shaded places and on the north sides of the low hills were patches of snow.... 'Are we over Deseret yet, Johan?' asked Llysette... 'I think so. Deseret starts before the Rocky Mountains actually end. In fact,' I pointed back eastward, 'all of that is part of Deseret.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 142. "At the time, no one had known of the oil, coal, and natural gas held there--and now the area accounted for most of the liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon production of Deseret. The Saints had become pioneers in another way, in the development of producing liquid hydrocarbons from both coal and natural gas.

Of course, it hadn't hurt at all that the arms genius John Moses Browning had been a Saint and poured his considerable ingenuity into weapons development.

'Johan, qu'est-ce que c' est?'

'Oh, sorry. I'm just thinking about history. How things could have turned out very differently.'

'You think that Columbia, it might have conquered Deseret?'

I had to laugh at that. 'Non. If New France had been weaker, Deseret might control much of Tejas and all of California. Somehow, I can't see Deseret and Columbia in the same political system.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 175. "...On each side of the fireplace were built-in bookcases.

I scanned the titles, those I could read, starting with the shelves on the left side. The few titles I could read told of the subject matter clearly enough--History of the Latter-Day Saints, witness of the Light, Sisters in Spirit, The Gathering of Zion, Brigham Young: American Moses, and several volumes entitled Doctrine and Covenants.

The books on the right side were radically different: Principles of Voice Production, Dynamics in Scoring, A Brief History of Music, The Complete Pianist, Vondel: A Guide, Henry Purcell, and two shelves of what looked to be scores, some handbound. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 176. "'How many children do you have?'

'Three,' answered Jilian. 'Two boys and a girl.'...

I must have frowned slightly.

'You wonder about the stories of large Saint families? And multiple spouses?' asked Perkins with a smile.

'It had crossed my mind,' I admitted...

'Deseret is no longer a farming nation. We're growing, and we need more hands, but they have to be guided by an educated mind. Minds take longer to train than bodies.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 198. "I experimented with the videolink set... Abruptly the screen shifted to a happy family, five children gathered around a table, with a clean-scrubbed woman serving them and the beaming bearded father.

'For that special family time. . .'

From the family image, the screen shifted to a blue book lying on a white cloth. The gold letters proclaimed The Book of Mormon: Another Testimony of Jesus Christ.

'Help your family better understand the eternal truths of the Book of Mormon.'

The screen shifted to an oblong box, bearing a stylized figure in a white robe and anothe rset of gold lettering: The Book of Mormon Family Game.

'Bring the values of faith into your home in a fun and cheerful game the entire family can play. The Book of Mormon Family Game. Sold at LDS Bookstores everywhere. Here's how to bring the Scriptures to life for the whole family.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints North America 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 199. "Another video cut revealed still one more family, this time with four children, two boys and two girls, all blond, all seated around a table, caught laughing with bowls of popcorn in their hands, and an open blue-covered book on the table. A set of chimes rang, and a cheerful voice proclaimed: 'Family. . . more important now than ever.'

With that, the video flicked back to the news studio and a bespectacled man in a dark blue sit...

'That classical concert at the Salt Palace last night?... it almost exceeded that of gospel music in the Cannon Center...' "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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