Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 212. "Then he pointed to my little box I kept beside my bed for my pocket watch and my daddy's old worn-out Bible and other things that were important to me. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1930 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 214. "'Who was he, Mama?' I asked, setting the figure on the table between us. 'Do you really think he was a wise man, traveling to find another Christ-child somewhere on another star?'

'We know there are worlds without number,' said my mother after thinking a moment. 'I find it impossible to stand under the sky and look at the stars and believe that there is no one else in the universe except us.' She tapped the little wise man with her finger. 'He wasn't all that different from us, was he, Brigham?'

'No, not so different. But Mama, if he was traveling to some other world, if a Christ-child was born somewhere else, what does it mean? Wasn't our world the first? I never thought it could happen again.'

'Or if the Savior came back again,' said Mama, almost as if she were talking to herself, 'why didn't he come back to our earth? Or is there more than one Savior? How many times, in how many places, has our old familiar story happened?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1950 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 215. "I never got real religious, even afterward, but I came to believe in many different things. I never forgot what my mother said that night in Reddyville. It troubled me, and does yet, to think that if he came back after he was here, that he didn't choose us again. And it's hard to feel lonely when you know you're not alone. A lot of people flat out deny that life could exist on the stars. And while they're doing it, standing on this little pinpoint of light we call Earth, there's probably a million other tiny little fools on other pinpoints of light saying the same thing, that they're the only ones in the whole big universe, like they're some bigshots running the whole show. Now just look up there at those stars, Betty Jean, shining down here in Idaho and all the rest of the whole world and who knows how many others. Some of them don't even exist anymore... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1993 Boyer, Elizabeth H. "A Foreigner Comes to Reddyville " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 202. Pg. 202: "My grandfather, B. Y. Green, died three years ago, so I can tell this story now. "; Pg. 216: "I just figure Grandpa B. Y. knew what he was doing when he decided not to tell any of his family his story, except me. He outlived his sisters, and none of the family knew what I was talking about when I asked what became of the manger scene with the four wise men. " ['B.Y.' stands for 'Brigham Young.' The characters in the story are predominantly LDS. Other refs., not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 39. "I call her Evon, because that's what she called herself. She once told me that as a teenager she'd undergone a period of religious passion, in which her complete devotion to God seemed to remove her from normal life, as if she'd acquired the power to levitate or leave her body behind. And now she felt something akin, a limitless stake in being Evon Miller. She'd burned the details into herself. Thirty-four. Mormon family. Born in Boise. Three years of college at Boise State. Married to her high school sweetheart, Dave Aard, a flight mechanic for United with whom she'd moved to Denver. Divorced since 1988... " [Evon is one of novel's two main characters. Some refs. to her Mormon background in novel; some not in DB. She was an Olympic medallist who became an FBI agent. The author does not appear to be particularly familiar with Mormonism, however, and the character's faith is not so much realistic as it is a vector for the author's plot concerns.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 204. "This Joshua had grown up in a small farming community in the deep woods of Idaho, a community that was very much a theocracy run by some elders who were part of a breakaway sect of the latter Day Saints and excommunicated by the big church for it, an act they did not recognize as valid. They were right wing, polygamists, calling themselves the Old Order Saints, and they enforced a kind of isolation and discipline. No television, little but religious literature, but, still and all, plenty of close family and a real rural upbringing. Boys were taught to read the Holy Scriptures and otherwise mostly did farming and manual labor. Joshua had little formal schooling and knew little beyond Idaho and an idealized United States established by God and a lifestyle revealed to Joseph Smith. " [More about Joshua, pg. 204-222, etc.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 214. "We didn't drink coffee or tea or Coke or anything like that. " [The character narrating at this point has already been identified as a Latter-day Saint.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 304. "'And that eldest girl of yours--she was in Idaho last I heard.'

'At Ricks College, yes, sir. The college is closed now, but she's still up there--at least last we heard.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2052 Bear, Greg. Slant [The title consists solely of the slant sign]. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 9. "Omphalos dominates Moscow, Green Idaho. It glows pale silver and gold like a fancy watch waiting to be stolen. A tetrahedron four hundred feet high, with two vertical faces and a triangular base, it is the biggest thing in town, more ostentatious than the nearby Mormon temple, though not so painfully white and spiky. " [Presently, there is not actually a temple in Moscow, Idaho, although there is one in Idaho Falls and one in Boise.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 28. "From where Loryn had parked the pickup, we could look down over the dry farms to Alma, the county seat, built on bluffs above the Snake River. The clouds above the city had broken, and Alma looked blessed in the light, the white houses and churches shining, surrounded by dark fields. " [This Idaho town is named after a figure from LDS scripture.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 30. "Loryn, Sam, and I drove back into Alma. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 199. "I'd been in the post office in Alma when the guys at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory out in Arco had some experiment go haywire and send a power surge over the lines no surge protector could blink at. All the computers and appliances... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Idaho 2198 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 240. "I waved back. Doing this gave me one moment of vertigo as I realized I was turning my back on Earth forever. I thought of my grandparents eight generations before me who had turned their backs on Switzerland to come to the wildernss that was Idaho, then, looking for Zion. Maybe they'd found it. I don't know. But Zion wasn't in Idaho anymore. The promised land was gone from the Earth. Maybe I was going to find a kind of Zion on this alien world with the help. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois 1952 Heinlein, Robert A. "Concerning Stories Never Written: Postscript " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981); pg. 212. "...this business of legislating religious beliefs into law has never been more than sporadically successful in this country--Sunday closing laws here and there..., the Prohibition experiment, temporary enclaves of theocracy such as Voliva's Zion, Smith's Nauvoo, a few others. The country is split up into such a variety of faiths and sects that a degree of uneasy tolerance now exists from expedient compromise; the minorities constitute a majority of opposition against each other. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois 1984 Tiptree, Jr., James. "Her Smoke Rises Up Forever " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1974); pg. 434. "All the agonies of earth, uncanceled? Are broken ghosts limping forever from Stalingrad and Salamis, from Gettysburg and Thebes and Dunkirk and Khartoum? Do the butchers' blows still fall at Ravensbruck and Wounded Knee? Are the dead of Carthage and Hiroshima and Cuzco burning yet? " [May (or may not) refer to the Carthage Jail Massacre in which Joseph Smith and his brother Hyram were murdered.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 52. "'Did you make the models?' asked Baedecker. Shelves were filled with gray plastic dreadnoughts from Star Wars, Star Trek, and Battlestar Galactica. Two large space shuttles hung from dark thread in a corner. " [Battlestar Galactica: The popular science fiction series by Latter-day Saint television producer Glen Larson famous for its many LDS undertones and motifs.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois 2001 Bradbury, Ray. From the Dust Returned. New York: HarperCollins (2001); pg. 81. Pg. 80-81: "'No! Give back my hands! Cleanse my mouth!'

'Enough,' said an inner voice, Philip.

'We're wasting time,' said Peter.

'Let's greet the young lady,' said Jack.

'Aye!' said the Mormon Tabernacle Choir from a single throat. Grandpere was yanked to his feet by unseen wires.

'Let me be!' he cried, and vised his eyes, his skull, his ribs, an incredible strange bed that sank to smother the cousins. 'There! Stop!' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois: Chicago 1934 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 105. [References to Special Agent Sam Cowley, a Latter-day Saint.] Pg. 105-106: "Every agent in the Bureau and the SIS had heard of Special Agent D. Some believed in him. These are the facts as I knew them:

At 10:30 P.M. on the night of July 21, 1934, the criminal John Dillinger and two women--one of them the infamous 'Woman in Red,' Ana Cummpanas, aka Anna Sage, who had betrayed the gangster--walked out of the Biograph Theater in Chicago. The squad of Bureau agents waiting in ambush for Dillinger was officially headed up by SAC Sam Cowley, but the real leader of the group was Melvin Purvis, who had already received more public attention than Mr. Hoover could tolerate in a subordinate... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois: Chicago 1934 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 106. [References to Special Agent Sam Cowley, a Latter-day Saint.] "Melvin Purvis was credited by the press and the public for the kill, and the fact that several other agents also fired was public knowledge. But what everyone in the Bureau had heard were the real details of the shooting: Purvis never pulled his gun, much less fired it. SAC Cowley--who was later gunned down by Baby Face Nelson--also did not fire. The four men who fired were Special Agents Herman Hollis, who missed; Clarence Hurt and Charles Winstead, who might have wounded Dillinger; and a fourth agent, referred to in reports only as 'Special Agent D,' who was thought to have fired only one shot--the fatal one. In later reports, Special Agent D had disappeared completely, and although Hoover's credit for killing Dillinger went to the late Sam Cowley and the unofficial credit went to Charles Winstead, rumors continued to spread about Special Agent D. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois: Chicago 1934 Simmons, Dan. The Crook Factory. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 106. [References to Special Agent Sam Cowley, a Latter-day Saint.] Pg. 106: "According to Bureau lore, Special Agent D... Also, according to this water-cooler myth, Special Agent D had been responsible in that bloody year of 1934 for the shootings of Pretty Boy Floyd and Baby Face Nelson, although once again credit went to the late Cowley and also to SA Herman Hollis, who also had been killed in the gunfight with Baby Face Nelson. "; Pg. 107: "The hairless humpback in his expensive suit did not smile. 'If you need us, Mr. Lucas, call room three-fourteen at the Nacional, any time, day or night. And be careful, Mr. Lucas. Be very careful.' He nodded to Mr. Cowley, the driver, and the Buick moved off. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois: Chicago 2100 Dickson, Gordon R. Necromancer. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1962); pg. 208. Pg. 20: "The clerk working the afternoon division, day shift, on the room desk of the Koh-i-Nor Hotel in the downtown area of the Chicago Complex... " [This name, repeated many times in the novel, is fairly different from the Book of Mormon character Korihor, and is probably not derivative.]; Pg. 208: "'Responsibilities. But not the sort you think. You've been the instrument of a revelation to me--the revelation of the New Jerusalem The future may hold more than many think.' " [May not be actual LDS references.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Illinois: Nauvoo 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 82. "The Townley boy, on summer hire from Nauvoo, Illinois... If the kid was from Nauvoo he was probably LDS, and it was almost a felony to say 'rebel' and 'LDS' in the same sentence. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints India 1974 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 115. "He jabbed Seven in the ribs with the muzzle of his Browning pistol... He kept a few feet away from Seven, with the point of his Browning never veering away from his prisoner's chest. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Iowa 2263 Carey, Diane. Best Destiny (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (1992); pg. 19. Pg. 19: "'We're pioneers,' he said. 'We're going straight up the Oregon Trail, just like the people who settled this country and put in the railroads and the towns like Riverside across this part of Iowa. Only instead of horses or steel, we're hopping the Stampede.' ";

Pg. 20: "'Hack through rain forests looking for the ancient Mayan city-states. Find out why they went extinct after a thousand years of--'

'They found those.'

Jimmy [Kirk] stopped. So did everybody else. The bridge shuddered.

'What?... What'd you say?'

Quentin clung to the ropes and blinked. 'They found them. The Mayan palaces. A long time ago. You know... how the twentieth-century archaeologists found lance heads in the walls, and later they proved that the city was under siege, and how the siege forced them to do all their farming behind the walls, and how the crop yields fell off, and how--'

'Where'd you hear all this?'

'It was . . . in our history of science book.' "; Pg. 75: Mt. Rushmore

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Italy 2000 Leavitt, David. "The Term Paper Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1997); pg. 216. "For one thing, his hair was both longer and messier, which suited him; also, he'd foregone his old Mormon uniform in favor of denim, down, hiking boots: ordinary clothes, boy clothes... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Japan 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 301. Pg. 300: "Jefferson Mahonrai Kendall... was one of 'Beaver's own.' He was born in '65... "; Pg. 301: "He was a missionary for two years because it, too, was real and because he had honestly heard God call him. He served his time in the Kobe-Japan Mission, speaking Japanese with that peculiar southern Utah drawl that occasionally thrilled or tickled the people he met in Kobe. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Kentucky 1954 offutt, andrew j. "For Value Received " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 110. [Introduction, author writes about his own life.] "Fall of '68 i had [insurance] agencies in three towns. Fortunately i was able to outgrow that, too. Oh, at around age 28 i also outgrew the Roman Church; Vardis Fisher helped a lot. " [Fisher was a Mormon atheist writer from Idaho.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Louisiana 2800 Gotschalk, Felix C. "Vestibular Man " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1985); pg. 303. "The men fired the ancient .22-caliber rifle, the 1906 rifle, the World War II Garand; the carbine; Browning automatic rifle... " [LDS inventor]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Luna 2024 Clarke, Arthur C. & Mike McQuay. Richter 10. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 326. "Later, back at the Moonbase Marriott, Crane and Hill sat at a table in the bar, Crane's back to the magnificent Earthrise shining through the huge, thick windows. The hotel was full, the area around the hotel beginning to look like a small city of domes and skydecks. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Lusitania 5268 Card, Orson Scott. Speaker for the Dead. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 307-308. "'You were baptized?'

'My sister told me that yes, Father baptized me shortly after birth. My mother was a Protestant of a faith that deplored infant baptism, so they had a quarrel about it.' The bishop held out his hand to lift the Speaker to his feet. The Speaker chuckled. 'Imagine. A closet Catholic and a lapsed Mormon, quarreling over religious procedures that they both claimed not to believe in.' " [Ender, and this discussion, are on Lusitania, estimated year 5268, but the time and place of his birth was long before: Earth, around the year 2120.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Maine 1998 King, Stephen. Bag of Bones. New York: Scribner (1998); pg. 422. "She turned to Rommie and George, who were standing side-by-side and looking like fellows who might want to explain all about the Mormon Church. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Malaysia 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 157. Pg. 157: "That night, he stayed in the Ifriti Marriott. Kulikov was unable to sleep... An oasis of Western liberalism in an ostensibly fundamentalist society, the Marriott served liquor, charging five times the normal hotel price for the privilege. "; Pg. 158: "Prince Salem invited Kulikov to his quarters in the palace. Kulikov left the coolness of the Marriott's atrium, took four steps through the sweltering Ifriti humidity, then settled down onto the white leather rear seat of a white Mercedes. ";

Pg. 160: "'You're doing okay at the Marriott?' the prince asked.

'Sure. Not quite as well as you do here.' [at the palace] "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mars 2001 Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles. New York: Bantam (2000; c. 1958); pg. 66. Pg. 66: "'...They knew how to combine science and religion so the two worked side by side, neither denying the other, each enriching the other.'

That sounds ideal.'

'It was. I'd like to show you how the Martians did it.' "; Pg. 67: "'It sounds as if the Martians were quite naive.'

'Only when it paid to be naive. They quit trying too hard to destroy everything, to humble everything. They blended religion and art and science because, at base, science is no more than an investigation of a miracle we can never explain, and art is an interpretation of that miracle. They never let science crush the aesthetic and the beautiful. It's all simply a matter of degree...' " [Although this aspect of Bradbury's description of Martian religion/culture seems particularly descriptive of Mormonism, many other characteristics are not.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Massachusetts: Boston 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 161. "In a science fiction bookstore in the Garage called Pandemonium, Angelo bought Amanda a book.

'I love this guy,' she said, pointing at a short story collection by Orson Scott Card, so he bought her the book. Looking at the table of contents, she pointed to 'Unaccompanied Sonata.' 'I never read this short story before. It must be new.'

'No it's not,' Everett looked over LaWanda's shoulder. 'It's pretty old. It's a great story.'

'This prompted a lengthy discussion of the relative merits of Card as they walked out onto JFK Street and headed back toward Harvard Square. As Angelo and Everett went back and forth as to what, exactly, the story was about (Angelo thought politics, Everett thought music)... " [Card is an LDS s.f. writer.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Massachusetts: Boston 1997 Lobdell, Scott & Elliot S. Maggin. Generation X. New York: Berkley (1997); pg. 161-162. "...they jagged to the left, crossing onto Brattle Street, following the girls to the left, crossing onto Brattle Street, following the girls toward the outskirts of the Square. Darkness had long since dropped over the streets of Cambridge and the four navigated by street light. The notion might have tripped into Skin or Synch's consciousness that they were wandering into a less-safe neighborhood. but these two had no practical reason to be afraid. They were actually enjoying showing off their smarts a little bit to these two college babes [by discussing the literature of LDS science fiction writer Orson Scott Card -- see previous page].

On a dark stretch of Brattle Street somewhere out past Radcliffe Yard before you could see the bright lights along Memorial Drive, Amanda wheeled around, grabbed Angelo--in the middle of a rant directed at Everett's critical acumen--by the front of his shirt... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Metropolis 1993 Stern, Roger. The Death and Life of Superman. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 178. [Superman's funeral] "It was a most ecumenical gathering. there were ministers and priests, rabbis and mullahs, and bishops and monks. Virtually every religion had sent a representative to invoke the deity on behalf of Superman. " [In the passage above, 'priests' represent Catholicism; 'ministers' represent Protestantism; 'rabbis' represent Judaism; 'mullah's represent Islam; 'bishops' represent Latter-day Saints; and 'monks' represent Buddhism.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 1. [1] [Harry Rex Brown, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Mexican officials had never been overly polite to Harry's kind of archaeologist, so on his latest expedition into the mountain wilderness of Southern Mexico, Harry Rex Brown simply changed his title. It was only a small fib, surely almost no deception in the eyes of God Almighty, for Harry to bill himself as an anthropologist in the field. Anthropologists only take notes; archaeologists dig, and take samples.

Harry knew very well that samples imply relics; and a conviction for the illegal export of Mexico's ancient Maya relics [could result in imprisonment] in some Mexican prison.

So Harry applied to no one, certainly not to Mexico's director of antiquities, for any sanction, because it made things simpler, and Harry liked to do things the simple way. " [Harry is a major character. Other refs. to him, pg. 1-5.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 1. [2] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Which was not say that Harry was a simple man. A Mormon with a graduate degree from BYU, good Spanish, and a decent command of Maya--still the first tongue of many Indios in Southern Mexico--Harry knew how to charm a village godfather. He could hire all the help he needed without the folderol of government documents. That is why it took Harry almost three months to get himself found, shot at, and chased all the way to Guatemala.

The chase moved slowly, both parties being afoot. No human could move very fast beyond the trails of the high rain forests of Chiapas, where a vine could grow six inches thick with thorns the length of a man's hand, and still fail to strangle the tree it climbed. Harry's porters avoided casualties because they were in better shape than their pursuers for climbing limestone ravines in a moist green hell. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 2. [3] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Harry's guide, Yaxpoc, thought perhaps the airplane that buzzed his little group was an arm of the Mexican Air Force.

'Then it should have the triangle insignia,' Harry replied, catching a good glimpse of what looked like an old Lockheed jet trainer as it swept away toward the sun.

'It has none at all, Senor Harry, murmured Yaxpoc, pointing with his chin in the old way. The Maya ways made a lot of sense when a man needed both hands to grip a limestone outcrop that looked like a head of gray broccoli and crumbled rather more easily. Harry nodded and kept on climbing, his sweat-soaked old snapbrim hat askew.

Although this was not the first time Harry had seen them muzzle flashes winking in his direction, Mexican troops were rarely this tenacious. Harry had learned early in life to take setbacks cheerfully in his pursuit of the Lord's work; but not his cheer became strained by suspicion. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 2. [4] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Only a genius of jungle travel or a certified damned fool will plunge through such a maze after dark. Harry said as much to Yaxpoc after they made camp, noting that the smudge of their pursuers' campfires was almost a mile behind them. 'After several expeditions with you,' he added, 'I think you may be the genius I need now.'

Yaxpoc, taciturn as always, inclined his head. 'What is your wish,' he asked softly.

'Could we get near enough to these federales to learn why they seem so determined? Near enough to hear them, I mean.'

Though he often paused to give a question time for consideration, Yaxpoc answered this one instantly. 'We could not, senor Harry, of a certainty. But alone, I think I could.'

Harry thought that over. Yaxpoc was of average height for a Maya, a full head shorter than Harry's six-foot-two; and his coppery skin blended matter into the shadows of the bosque, the high Chiapas rain forest. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 2. [5] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Better still, Yaxpoc's squarish little feet made no more noise than the shadows did. Best of all, he seemed willing, though it meant at least an hour each way in darkness that soon would be relived only by patches of moonlight.

Harry and the porters, none of them bloody-minded men, fingered their machetes and spoke little until Yaxpoc returned at moonset, and the little fellow scared them witless as he padded into camp bearing a strange tale. The troops were well armed, yet none wore uniforms; and their fires were not the careless fires of troops. Their accents, Yaxpoc thought, were not Mexican. He thought them perhaps taller than his own Maya people, with barrel chests... Yaxpoc knew why Harry was curious about the impatience of those pursuers... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 3. [6] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "It was at this point that Harry spoke with the porters, for the first time, of the recent plantings they had seen where corn would be expected. By tradition, only corn and coffee were grown on the steepest sides of volcanic slopes, sometimes so steep that it seemed the stuff must have been seeded with a howitzer to be harvested by monkeys. In his previous expeditions Harry had never observed coca bushes and would not have recognized them anyhow. Disturbed, fearing the answer, Harry asked: 'Is this the coca that men chew with ash to lend them energy?'

'I do not know,' Yaxpoc said. 'It has never been our way.'

...'I think,' said Harry, 'that these men are not federals at all. I think they were tending the seedlings we have see, and they do not wish us to speak of it. They may not stop at the border of Guatemala.' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 3. [7] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "'It is common talk in our parajes,' said Yaxpoc, using the local jargon for 'villages.' 'Now and again such men buy food from us. They say it is not yet time to become our friends.'

Harry arranged his bug net for sleep, a signal that the parley was at an end. 'If they are who I think,' he warned, 'we must be underway by dawn.'

That was all Harry needed to say. When the first of the morning toucans clacked his foolish greeting to the dawn, Harry's little group was a half-hour closer to Guatemala.

In passing the seedlings a few days before, Harry had given them little thought, noting only that underbrush had been cleared for shrubby young plants. He had been intent as ever on the overgrown mounds that sometimes proved to be ancient platforms and, in a few cases, temples of crudely dressed limestone. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 3. [8] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "If a man could discover a hidden passageway into a temple, it was just barely possible that he might find the kind of ceremonial place that had made Ruz Lhullier famous, midway through the century.

Even this, for Harry, was less important than finding a crypt that contained proof, proof, that the people who built it had been Nephites, men of the lost ten tribes of Israel. Nephites, many Mormons believed, had settled Central America many centuries ago. Harry Rex Brown was already convinced this was factual, but hard evidence would be a wonderful thing. If that evidence had to be improved somehow, well, Harry knew God pretty well, and felt that God would not allow him to do a thing unless God bloody well wanted him to. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. [9] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "On a previous expedition, Harry had found not only a temple north of Tzimol but a mighty pyramid under its age-old blanket of trees and vines. Not as high as Pelenque, maybe, but high enough for Harry. He had found the passageway he sought, or at least Yaxpoc had, but the steep stairwell had been found centuries before by someone who left the tip of a Toledo steel blade between blocks of cut stone while forcing entry. Harry had taken the artifact, reasoning that it was not truly a relic.

Harry might have taken more artifacts on that trip, using whatever reasoning he could dream up, except that someone had beaten him to it. The only things of value left inside were the classic Maya carvings and wall murals, which Harry copied with rubbings and Polaroids after studying the carvings for a week in vain. The evidence of Nephite presence that Harry was looking for was a Star of David. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. [10] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Copies of the Polaroids, rubbings, and even that Spanish swordtip, had brought enough money in the States to finance Harry's next expedition after he refreshed his wife's bank account in Orem, Utah. Private collectors cared about such details and they were as secretive as they were barmy, but they paid huge sums for a museum piece.

The money was not Harry's bottom line, of course. He felt certain that even if his methods were subject to sharp criticism in certain stodgy corners--which included virtually the entire field of archaeology--the name Harry Rex Brown would echo down the corridors of history, or at least the corridors of Brigham Young University, once he found proof of the Nephites in Chiapas. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. [11] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] "Of all the embattled notions of Mormonism, the most romantic is the idea that ancient Israelites of the Nephite persuasion settled Central America. No proof of this idea had ever been found--for the excellent reason, said some, that the idea was terminally weird.

In his sacred quest, Harry felt that it was a confounded nuisance to be rousted by terrorists a thousand miles from their killing fields, but this was obviously what was happening. For Harry, who kept up with current events as well as anyone, quickly realized why his pursuers seemed so unusual by Mexican standards.

They were not Mexicans at all. They were leftist guerrillas of the Sendero Luminoso, the Shining Path. They came from the highlands of Peru and called themselves Maoist Communists, though Mao himself had repudiated them as bizarre savages. And the only known friends of the senderistas were the Colombians, the drug lords of Cali and Medillin. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 4. [12] [Harry, a Latter-day Saint character.] Pg. 4-5: "Harry did not know how these crazies got to Mexico, and he cared less. But if prior behavior was any guide, and if Harry's group didn't stir their stumps at double-time, none of Harry's people would live to puzzle it out. Senderistas liked to torture people, and they were determined as only zealots can be.

At Yaxpoc's heels, Harry trotted toward the Guatemalan village of Quingua with fresh motivation. If he paid his team well, and managed to reach Guatemala City without getting waylaid by the local brand of thugs, he could climb aboard a Boeing before the senderistas knew it.

Harry's luck held. Two days later, settling into an airliner seat for takeoff, he allowed himself to relax and to hope he would never encounter senderistas again. In this, he was destined to be disappointed. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 266. "Shortly after four in the afternoon, Harry Rex Brown swept his arm forward in a gesture Mike had seen many times on reruns of Wagon Train.. " [More about Harry, a Latter-day Saint archaeologist. Also, Wagon Train was about Latter-day Saint pioneers and was directed by a Latter-day Saint director.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 315. "That is how Harry and Taxpoc managed to inspect that pyramid without hindrance. Their roundabout route let them in near-darkness by the time they reached the first of the roots, thick as a man's thigh, that anchored trees into limestone blocks dragged there by people who did not use wheels or mortar, a thousand years before. Harry ignored the fallen monoliths that stood sentry beneath strangler vines; he knew what he was looking for, and knew that the lost Nephites of Israel would have hidden the best for his coming. God would have insisted. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 337. "Once they lugged the body down inside, Harry dismissed Yaxpoc. Harry had studied Maya pictographs for so long he could grind the colors and formulate paints himself, rendering the fats from small game to yield lamp oil and paint base without help.

Besides, if Yaxpoc did not see Harry drawing those pictures, God would be his only witness. And that is how it happened that the Great True Man of the Highland Maya came to rest in a pyramidal temple in Chiapas, awaiting discovery in the sweet by and by, surrounded by pictographs with prominent Stars of David. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 1998 Modesitt, Jr., L.E. The Ghost of the Revelator (alternate history novel). New York: Tor (1998); pg. 56-57. "Of greater concern was the 'clarification' referring to the trade language in the Doctrine and Covenants laid out by first president Taylor more than a century earlier... Although this trade proscription had often been honored in the breach for nearly half a century, the clarification langauge was seen by some observers as easing the way to permit significant synthetic diesel and kerosene exports to Columbia. New France had never been classified as a 'Gentile' or an unfriendly nation, possibly because it supported Deseret against Columbia in the Utah War and again in the Caribbean Wars... and because it harbors the Colonia Juarez and Dublan enclaves. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Mexico 2047 Harmon, Charlene C. "Pueblo de Sion " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 186. "'You came in the Mormon Migration didn't you?'

'Yes. The prophet said come, so we did. We sold everything we couldn't carry.'

'You walked? Why didn't you drive? Surely, with your father's position . . .'

'Yes, we walked. Along with most of the others. The border patrol was turning away anyone without the proper papers. My father didn't bother to get them. He said it would take too long. He didn't think the government would let him leave anyway. They didn't want a major exodus, and my father was 'too valuable' to be allowed to immigrate. He knew they wouldn't let him go. They would just come up with excuses, paperwork, anything to keep him from leaving. My father also didn't want to let them know he was planning on leaving, or they would have stopped him.'

'How could they have stopped him if he was determined?'

'Oh, the government has ways. Many people have disappeared because they didn't do what the government wanted...'

Marisa nodded... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Minnesota 1998 Erdrich, Louise. The Antelope Wife. New York: HarperCollins (1998); pg. 98. "...a trembling beauty alive with Jello-O light, surrounded by a radiance of filtered sun... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 2. [In Wendover, Nevada.] "Anita has a list of Mormon relatives as long as her left arm... She says Mormon angels aren't like that, that they don't even have wings, that they look just like we do. " [The LDS Church and its members are a central thematic element in this novel. Most references are not in DB.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 18. "Someone told a joke about the difference between Jews, Catholics, and Mormons: Jews don't recognize Jesus, Catholics don't recognize Hanukkah, and Mormons don't recognize each other in the liquor store. They all laughed.

Am I the only Mormon here? Chalotte said, and a quiet descended.

It made them nervous to have her among them... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 53. [In Wendover.] "I had not noticed that she wore a CTR ring on her thin finger... I thought only little Mormon girls wore CTR rings, I said.

She smiled, at last. Is a person ever too old to choose the right? she said.

...I had a boyfriend once, she said. He went away on a mission.

A secret mission? I said.

You know what I mean. A church mission. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 116. [Inside the Las Vegas Temple foyer.] "She turned away from the long desk and walked toward the paintings and pamphlets, the plaques on the walls. There wasn't much room for visitors here; this temple was all business--doors led to secret rooms for marriages, blessings, baptisms for both living and dead.

Are you all right? one of the brothers said.

I'm beyond that, she said, swaying back and forth in front of the paintings. Brigham Young hung next to Moses, as always; the young Joseph Smith was talking to an angel... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 120. [Charlotte is talking with LDS missionaries.] "Are there still miracles, she said.

Now?

Yes.

If God once performed miracles, then He must still. He doesn't change.

Is that a yes or a no? she said.

You're familiar with the gospel? he said.

Of course I am.

Well, there's your answer. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 148. [A non-LDS Nevada resident is thinking.] "The Mormons are so organized they have three levels of heaven and plenty of distinctions inside them. Celestial, Terrestrial, Telestial Kingdoms. Don't worry, we'll do all right--even the lowest level is better than anything we can imagine, and you don't even have to be a Mormon to get there. Even I have hope, even a fool like Texas, that car-jacker, will be all right upthere. It is a nice thought, I admit, seeing Charlotte, being together with her in the Celestial Kingdom. It would take some sacrifice--I would have to convert, we would have to marry--but we would share the highest of heavens, all weightless and dressed in white, surrounded by fountains. We could have celestial children, never ceasing. Our skin would be perfectly smooth. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 149. "It is a miracle that anything thrives out here--yet I must admit that all things strike me as miraculous. The circling of vultures, the spacing of the cacti and cows, the bones in my fingers, the truth in everything I have to say. We are spinning around the sun, a ball of fire falling through the sky. What if the world was to spin loose? Is it happening now? Would it make a difference? What would loose be? As if the world that is spinning could be set still, measured and organized.

These people would have it so. In the early days, before Brigham Young took over, Joseph Smith sensed all this, he felt the spinning and movement in all things. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 151. [The non-LDS main character, an elderly man obsessed with a 19-year-old Mormon woman, is thinking:] "The front seat of my car was covered in books. I'd been reading all I could on the Mormons, as I figured it might be useful. First, I found a copy of the Book of Mormon, atop a whole stck of them on the counter at Taco Burger. Inside the ront cover was a color photograph of the owner and his family. They wanted me to have that book; they were sure it would change my life... The Book of Mormon was the same, word for word, as the one Charlotte carried. I wanted to think like her, anticipate her moves and, yes, to trick her if it came to that. Perhaps that's a sin in itself, taking someone's beliefs only to use them as weapons against them--yet I also ran the risk of being taken in, of being turned into a believer. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Nevada 1987 Rock, Peter. This Is the Place. New York: Doubleday (1997); pg. 152. [The non-LDS main character is thinking:] "Anita was right. Mormon angels do look like you and me. Stranger still, three of the twelve Mormon apostles were given power over death and they're walking the earth today. When they are thrown into prisons, the prisons cannot hold them; they are cast into furnaces that cannot burn them; they play with the wild beasts sent to rend them limb from limb. They are known as the Three Nephites and I know how they feel, to be so old, to know so much and still to be treated with such condescension. It's especially frustrating when one is only trying to do good, to brin gabout what is right. "


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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