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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

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back to Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, California: Los Angeles

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 31. Pg. 26: "...had made the difficult transition to talking pictures only to die of throat cancer three months after his first talkie opened at Graumann's Chinese Theater. "; Pg. 31: "'...You were going to be another Julie Andrews in that cheap... rip-off of The Sound of Mucus. Only you weren't--and this isn't the flower child sixties, it's the... eighties and I'm not your agent or anything. Ms. Berrington, but I'd say that Momma and the crew have poled you pretty far up... creek as far as your film career goes. They're trying to turn you into a Marie Osmond type . . . yeah, yeah, I know you're a member of the Church of the L.D.S. . . . so what? You were a class act on the cover of Vogue and Seventeen and now you're close to pissing it all away. They're trying to sell you as a twelve-year-old ingenue and it's too late for that kind of sh--.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 32. "Shayla did not move. Her mind was racing, but she could think of nothing to say. Her impulse was to tell this malignant little troll to drop dead, but no words came and she continued to sit on the edge of the bubbling pool. Her future depended upon the next few minutes and her mind was a muddle.

Harod climbed out of the water and padded across the tiles to a wet bar among the ferns he poured a tall glass of grapefruit juice and looked back at Shayla. 'Want anything, kid? I've got everything here. Even some Hawaiian punch if you're feeling especially Mormon today.'

Shayla shook her head. " [A significant character in novel, Shayla Berrington, is a fictional LDS actress. Many more refs., not in DB. Chapter 2 is almost entirely about her and her meeting with the movie producer Harod, who has the novel's thematically central mind-bending 'Ability'.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 98. [Receiving a letter from Latter-day Saint actress Shayla Berrington.]

"The final letter was in a small, pink envelope postmarked Pacific Palisades. Harod tore it open. The stationery matched the envelope and was softly perfumed. The handwriting was tight and heavily slanted with childish circles above the 'i's.'

Dear Mr. Harod,

I do not know what came over me last Saturday. I will never understand it. But I do not blame you and I forgive you even if I cannot forgive myself. [Harod used his mind control powers on her.]

Today Loren Sayles, my agent, received a packet of contractual forms relating to your film proposal. I told Loren and my mother that there had been a mistake. I told them that I had spoken to Mr. Borden about the film just prior to his death but that not commitment had been made... " [More.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 98. [Letter from Latter-day Saint actress Shayla Berrington, continued.]

"...I cannot be associated with such a project at this point in my career, Mr. Harod. I am sure you can understand my situation. This does not mean that we may not work together on some other film venture in the future. I trust that you understand this decision and would remove any obstacles--or any embarrassing details--which might damage such a future relationship.

I know that I can depend upon you to do the right thing in this situation, Mr. Harod. You mentioned last Saturday that you are aware that I am a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. You must understand that my faith is very strong and my commitment to the Lord and His Laws must come above all other considerations.

I pray--and know in my heart--that God will help you see the proper course of action in this situation.

Yours most sincerely,
Shayla Berrington "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 876. [1] "He was almost asleep again... when he heard the sound of high heels in the access hall.

Harod's eyes shot open and he set the cigarette in his mouth and pulled his arms in, ready to rise and move quickly if he had to...

For a second he did not recognize the attractive young woman in the simple white dress who entered carrying his mail, then he focused on the nymphet eyes in the missionary face, the pouting Elvis underlip, and the model's walk.

'Shayla,' he said. 'Sh--, you scared me.'

'I brought your mail in,' said Shayla Berrington. 'I didn't know you belonged to National Geographic, too.'

'Jesus, kid, I've been meaning to call you,' Harod said quickly. 'To explain and apologize about that terrible mix-up last winter.' Still not entirely comfortable, Harod considered using her. No. This was a fresh start. He could do without that crap for a while. " [Shayla Berrington: the fictional Latter-day Saint movie star who was the focus of chapter 2.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 876. [2] "'That's all right,' said Shayla. Her voice had always been soft and dreamy, but now it seemed even more somnolent. Harod wondered if the poor Mormon kid had discovered drugs in the months she hadn't been working. 'I'm not mad anymore,' Shayla said distractedly. 'The Lord got me through all that.'

'Hey, great,' said Harod, brushing cigarette ash his chest. 'And you were dead right about Slaver not being the vehicle for you. It's real schlock, light-years below you in class, kid, but I was just talking to Schu Williams this morning and he's been kicking around a project for Orion that you and I are perfect for. Schu says that Bob Redford and some kind named Tom Cruise have agreed to do a remake of the old . . .'

'Here's your National Geographic,' interrupted Shayla, holding out the magazine and a stack of letters in his direction. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 876. [3] "Harod put the cigarette in his moth and reached for the mail to keep it from getting wet. The silver pistol that suddenly appeared in her hand was so small that it had to be a toy; even the five pops it made were toylike, sounding like a kid's cap pistol echoing off tile.

'Aw, hey,' said Tony Harod, looking down at the five small holes in his chest and trying to brush them away. He looked up at Shayla Berrington [the fictional Latter-day Saint movie star] and his mouth fell open, the cigarette bobbing away on the whirlpooled currents. 'Oh, [expletive],' said Tony Harod and sat back carefully, fingers slipping and heavy eyelids closing as his face slid slowly beneath the agitated surface of the water. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1981 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 877. [4] "Shayla Berrington [the fictional Latter-day Saint movie star] watched without expression for ten minutes as the white-frothed water turned first pink and then bright red, clearing eventually as the jets poured fresh water in and the filters did their job. Then she turned and walked slowly away, posture perfect, head high, her polished high-heel shoes echoing above the sound of the water jets. She switched off the overhead lights as she left. The shuttered room remained quite dim, but scattered sunlight bouncing from the Jacuzzi threw random patterns of light on the white stucco wall, rather like a movie screen when the film has ended but the projection lamp still burns through random frames of imageless celluloid. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 80. "...movie posters on the side of the fourplex... two theaters showing David Lynch's Black Easter, and a reissue of The Black Cauldron. " ['Black Cauldron', the Disney film directed by LDS director Richard Rich.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1988 Freeman, Judith. "Family Attractions " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 213. Pg. 213: "'That was Mom's idea of heaven.' He was about to tell them what color the boats were, a bright blue, and how his mother liked to row to a monastery on the far side of the lake where, near a statue of Christ, they sat on a marble bench and ate their picnic lunch... "; Pg. 218: "...George's company, LAYTON HEATING AND PLUMBING, painted on the doors. " [The story is about an LDS family from Utah on vacation in Los Angeles.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1989 Willis, Connie. "At the Rialto " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1989); pg. 433. [Author's introduction.] "...So she definitely was a star and deserves her square at Graumann's Chinese along with Freddie Bartholomew and Trigger. " [Refers to theatre owned by Ted Mann and Rhonda Fleming.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1996 Powers, Tim. Expiration Date. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 40. "On the south side of the street stood a new McDonald's restaurant that looked like an incongruously space-age Grecian temple, but at least the Chinese Theater was still there in all its battered black and red byzantine splendor at Highland. " [Famous theater in Hollywood, owned by the Ted Mann and his wife, Latter-day Saint actress Rhonda Fleming.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 1997 Sawyer, Robert J. Illegal Alien. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "In the evening, a reception was held at Mann's Chinese Theatre, with a select guest list. Steven Spielberg was there, taking a possibly justifiable pride in having to some degree prepared the human race for the arrival of peaceful, friendly aliens. "; Pg. 48: "It contained a black-and-white photograph of Kelkad making his foot impressions at Mann's Chinese Theatre. " [This theatre also mentioned pg. 142-145. Theatre owned by Ted Mann and his wife, Latter-day Saint actress Rhonda Fleming.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 26. [1] "Rick had met Jerry Pilling on a midnight flight from New York to Los Angeles. Returning home from his one-man show at a Soho gallery, Rick was solvent and optimistic for the first time in a year. Seatmates in the back of the plane, the two of them struck up a conversation, or rather, Rick listened across the dark heartlands of America as tiny bottles of Smirnoff's accumulated on Jerry's tray table. 'Meg and I are Mormons,' Jerry told him, shaking the last drops of alcohol into has plastic tumbler, 'so we aren't allowed to drink. But I bend the rules depending on the altitude.' He touched Rick's arm and his breath, as pungent as jet fuel, sterilized the air between them. 'I'm terrified of flying.' This was the first of Jerry's confessions; soon they came with escalating candor, the consonants softened by booze. 'Do you know any Mormons?' asked Jerry. 'Personally, I mean.'

'Only impersonally,' laughed Rick. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 26. [2] "'Well, take it form me, not all of us are polygamists who bathe in our holy undergarments. There's lots of ways to be a Mormon; at least, that's the way I see it.'

'There's a guy at my gym,' ventured Rick, 'who wears the garments under his workout clothes, even in summer.'

'Or proselytize on our bicycles.'

'I'm sorry?'

'Not all of us proselytize on our bicycles.'

Rick pictured Jerry listing from a Schwinn.

'Listen,' said Jerry, giving Ricmk a let's-lay-our-cards-on-the-tray-table look. 'Are you by any chance . . . I don't mean to be presumptuous, so forgive me if I'm wrong, but you haven't said anything about a wife, and I was wondering if you're . . .'

'Gay?'

'I knew it!' blurted Jerry, slapping his armrest. 'I have a sick sense--sixth sense--about these things. I am too!' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 27. [3] [Rick talks with Jerry, a gay Mormon.] "To Rick's way of thinking, Jerry was unduly excited by this coincidence, as if he'd discovered they shared the same mother. Still, he found something ingenuous about the portly, balding stranger beside him. He eyed Jerry's wedding ring, and with no prompting whatsoever, Jerry launched into the story of his marriage. 'I only recently told Meg that I fooled around with men in college. Groping a housebrother, that sort of thing.' This piqued Rick's interest... 'The point,' continued Jerry, 'is that I wanted to write off my college flings as trial and error, youthful confusion. But after six children and twenty years of marriage, I couldn't ignore my thing for guys. College men, especially. Studious types...' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 27. [4] [Rick talks with Jerry, a gay Mormon.] "'The more I tried to pray it away, the stronger it got... We counseled with the church elders, Meg and me, and they thought that male companionship--strictly platonic of course--would help me 'scratch the itch,' as they put it. So we decided to stay married and faithful, and I'm going to make some homosexual friends.' Jerry brightened. 'We'll have to have you over for dinner.'

'The church wants you to have gay friends?'

'Hey,' said Jerry... 'They didn't say homosexual or not. But 'male companionship' is open to interpretation, don't you thing?' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 27. [5] "'According to the church, if me and Meg get divorced, old Jerry here wanders around heaven for time immemorial, a soul without a family.'

It was delicate: Rick didn't want to mock Jerry's religious beliefs, but he found this punishment cruel and unusual. Not to mention superstitious. 'Do you really believe that's what would happen?'

'The idea scares me whether I believe in it or not. An outcast even after I'm dead. Lifelong bonds coming to nothing. Estranged from my very own kids... I joined Affirmation, a group of gay Mormons, and they say the church is run by humans, and humans don't know everything there is to know about the creator's plan; only one judgment matters in the end, and at least He'll know what made me tick and how I tried to do what's right...' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 28. [6] "'...But Rick,' said Jerry... 'here's where I part company with the folks at Affirmation: They're skeptical about a man staying married.'

'You mean about a gay man staying married?'

'Isn't that what I said? Anyway, living in a family makes me happy. My kids are turning into people I like, and the little ones shriek and swamp me every time I walk through the door. Chalk it up to my having been an only child, but even when they're fighting and crying, the chaos is kind of cozy, you know?' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2000 Cooper, Bernard. "Hunters and Gatherers " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000; c. 1995); pg. 51. "It was one of those Xeroxed family newsletters sent out at Christmas... Other than parental hyperbole, the highlights of Meg's and Jerry's year were reserved for the last two sentences: We visited the big island of Hawaii in September, where we glimpsed the fury of a live volcano. Upon our return, Jerry assumed a position on the church's high council. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 219. "'Coffee?' Rydell asked hopefully.

'I'm sorry, the fat man said, 'but Butch left at twelve and I don't know how to operate the machine. But I can bring you some nice tea.'

'Yeah,' Chevette said, urging Rydell along with elbow-jabs. 'tea.'

The fat man took them down a hallway and into a little room with a couple of wallscreens and a leather sofa. 'I'll just get your tea.' he said, and shuffled out, jingling...

Rydell put his Samsonite down and sat on the couch. 'So we can stay here?'

'Yeah, as long as we keep calling up flash.'

'What's that?'

...The fat man came back with a couple of big rough mugs of steaming tea on a little tray. 'Yours is green,' he said to Chevette Washington, 'and yours is Mormon,' he said to Rydell, 'because you did ask for coffee . . .' "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: Los Angeles 2005 Gibson, William. Virtual Light. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 220-222. Pg. 220: "'Um, thanks,' Rydell said, taking the mug he was offered.

'Now you two take plenty of time,' the fat man said, 'and you want anything, just call.' He went out, tray tucked under his arm, and closed the door behind him.

'Mormon?' Rydell sniffed at the tea. It didn't smell much of anything.

'Aren't supposed to drink coffee. That kind of tea's got ephedrine in it.'

'Got drugs in it?'

'It's made from a plant with something that'll keep you awake. Like coffee.'

Rydell decided it was too hot to drink now anyway. Put it down on the floor beside the couch. "; Pg. 221: "Maybe there really was something in the fat man's Mormon tea, or maybe Rydell had just crossed over into that point of tiredness where it all flipped around for a while and you started to feel like you were more awake, some ways, than you usually ever were. But he wound up sipping that tea and listening to her... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1927 Powers, Tim. Earthquake Weather. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 108. "'It always starts with this,' said Pete, visibly tenser now. 'That's Mary Pickford, the old silent-movie star. A guy named Philo T. Farnsworth was the first guy in the American West to transmit images with a cathode-ray tube, in San Francisco in 1927, and he used this repeating loop of Mary Pickford as a demo.' He sighed shakily. " [Farnsworth: the Mormon from Utah who invented the television.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 334. [1] The city of San Francisco is certainly my city! I wouldn't live anywhere else than :The Port of Zion " for anything in the world. Perhaps my favorite worldly spot--next, of course, to Golden Gate Park--is the Embarcadero. Only two people have ever known how much thanks is due to one of them (now passed from Time into Eternity) that the sailors and seafarers have helped spread the Restored Gospel throughout the seven seas to the four corners of the earth. Of course its spread was inevitable, but I do think that if we Saints had stayed in, say, Missouri, our message would have been much slower in making its way around the world. [Story first published ~1971.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 334. [2] Not that I mean for a moment to indicate anything but the most whole-hearted approval for the work done by our regularly appointed young missionaries, but of course nothing can equal the zeal and energy of sailors! And, walking down the Embarcadero and seeing the vigor with which they toss their Orange Julius drinks down their thirsty throats, I think how different the scene must be in (for example) the terribly overgrown and misnamed large city in Southern California, where seafarers may be seen abusing their systems by the use of alcohol, tobacco, tea, and coffee -- all, of course, forbidden by The Word of Wisdom of the Prophet Joseph.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 335. [4] To sum it up: He [Grandpa] and I both tended to stammer, both were interested in Mormon history and genealogy, both loved to consider mechanical devices.

It was a combination of these characteristics of Grandpa's that brought about a certain incident which I feel can now, safely, and should now, properly, be made known to one and all. And above and beyond that, my grandfather specifically (though in veiled language) asked me in his will to speak out on this matter at this particular time.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 335. [5] Grandpa was a peach. Perhaps it was the very enthusiasm of his devotion to the Latter Day Saints (though Grandma drew the line when he dutifully considered taking a second wife) that accounted for his unfailing good humor and zest even when he was quite old. Needless to say that he was a respected and responsible citizen, having for many years been mechanical supervisor for the various industries operated by the Latter Day Saints Church, and was valued for his circumspection as well as for his technical competence. Unfortunately (or fortunately: let History decide) his circumspection failed him at one crucial point in his life when --

But let me simply state the facts.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 335. [6] Grandpa had left England with a party of emigrants (all converts like himself) as an already full-grown young man of fifteen, crossed the plains to Great Salt Lake City, and within a short time was hired by President Brigham Young to copy letters in his clear and graceful longhand. His promotion in the Church was rapid, and after fifty years of remarkable service, he retired to his own three-story home on First North Street. Grandma had passed from Time into Eternity years before, and all the children had homes of their own; a neighbor lady acted as part-time housekeeper, leaving him free to follow his own inclinations in his own now fully free time.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 335. [7] The inspiration for the chief of these inclinations arose out of the only real regret that he had ever had. Much more out of his reverence for Mormon history than personal pride, he wished so much that he had not missed by only a year or so having been present on that great day when Brother Brigham led the weary pioneers to the bluff overlooking the great Utah valley and announced that they would stay and make the desert bloom like a rose. In his retirement, Grandpa Spence secretly determined to build a device which would transport him back to that decisive moment.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 336. [9] Grandpa had not calculated on finding a smooth or barely downy chin instead of the full beard his hand automatically sought to stroke in satisfaction, but after a moment he realized what had happened: He had traveled back in time so successfully that he was a stripling once again! Fortunately he had always been moderate in diet & his 20th-century clothes were only slightly loose. Unfortunately he no longer had the gravity and patience of his former years and soon became overanxious and restless. And as the pilgrim travelers approached, his excitement drew him away from the machine, which was well hidden by the bushes on the bluff above the new arrivals. He was recklessly determined to get as close as possible to the principals of this historic moment & to hear the historic words, This is the place! And in moving toward the travel-worn Saints, creeping along in the low bushes, he accidentally dislodged a stone, which tumbled down the slide, gaining momentum.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 336. [10] Forgetful of all else, he stood up to warn them out of the way, but in his excitement he found his speech impediment rendered him unable to release a sound . . .

The stone rolled and bounced and hit Brigham just above the worn and dusty boot on his right leg. The square, heavy face winced and swung around and saw the still-speechless stranger above on the bluff. All the weariness and travel of the long journey west, all the tragedy of the Mormon martyrdom, all the outrage of the persecuted were in Brigham's roar of pain and astonishment. "Look ye there! " he cried. "Who's that? Not a speck of dust on him! Throwing stones already! I thought this place was empty and I see that the Gentles have got here before us! " And while poor young-again Spence struggled vainly to give utterance, regret, and denial, Brigham turned and swung his arm in a great, determined arc.

"This is not the place! " he cried. "Onward! "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 337. [12] [Brigham Young dictates a letter.] "...Dear Sister Simpson, It cannot have escaped your attention that I have observed with approbation your -- no, make that -- the modesty of your demeanor, equally with your devotion to the doctrines and covenants of the Latter Day Saints, which is of far greater importance than the many charms with which a benign Nature has adorned your youthful person... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 337. [13] [Brigham Young dictates a letter.] "...My advanced years will always assure you of mature advice, and in my other seventeen -- is it seventeen? or nineteen? -- pshaw, boy! -- a man can't keep all these figures in his head -- my other eighteen wives you will find a set of loving sisters. Since it is fitting that we be sealed for Time and Eternity, kindly commence packing now in order to depart with the next party of Saints heading for our original destination which as you know was tentatively the peninsula called San Francisco in Upper California. Yours & sic cetera, B. Young, Pres., Church of J.C. of L.D.S. -- sand it well, son for I hate a blotty document. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 337. [14] You've all read you history and must certainly have often felt thankful that Brother Brigham did not yield to the momentary impulse he admitted he had, and that he did not stop in Utah. Despite its impressive name, Great Salt Lake City is just a tiny town with a pleasant enough view, but even that can't compare with the one from my window alone. It's a pleasant thing to sit here in my apartment atop the hill on Saint Street, sipping a tall, cool lemonade, and admire the view To the west is the great span of Brigham Young Bridge across the Golden Gate, with its great towers and seven lanes of cars; to the east is the Tabernacle, its other-worldly shape gracing the Marina Green, with the stately Temple nearby. I see a network of wide, dignified streets feathered with light green trees, giving the city the look of a great park. And, being truly a Mormon city, it is undisfigured by a single liquor saloon, tearoom, tobacconist, or coffee house.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 337. [15] And Grandpa? After his retirement, he sold his house on Joseph Smith Esplanade and moved to the fine apartment in the Saint-Ashbury district where I now live. Having decided to leave well enough alone the second time around, he devoted his last last years entirely to the study of Latter Day Saint genealogy. He felt right at home, as do I, and why not? After all, the Saint-Ashbury can boast of more lemonade and Postum stands per square block than anyplace in the U.S.A., and one is always seeing and hearing those inspiring and exciting initials: L.D.S.! L.D.S.! L.D.S.!
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 334-335. [3] When I speak of the role played in this by one of the only two people who know the whole, true story, I am referring to my maternal grandfather. I am the other. And I suppose I'm a chip off the old block -- or, perhaps, stated more exactly, a chip off the stalwart old Mormon family tree, so well set up (on paper, of course) by Grandpa Spence during the later years of his retirement. How he spent the earlier years, we will see very shortly. As is usual among L.D.S. people, I take a great interest in my ancestors, but most of all in Grandpa Spence. It may be because I inherited (if such things be hereditary) both his interest in genealogy and inventions, as well as that slight speech impediment which becomes troublesome only at moments of excitement. I have always said to myself, "Nephi Spence Nilsen, your grandfather rose above this, and so will you. " It invariably helps. Grandpa was aware of all that and it constituted another bond between us.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 335-336. [8] "I was born in the age of the covered wagon, " he declared to himself, "and have lived to see the age of the flying machine. Eternity is one thing, but Time is another, and surely to a Saint nothing is impossible! " He was of course not certain of being able to return--he might even be scalped by an unconverted Lamanite--but to these considerations he gave but a shrug and a smile. His enormous dedication to the idea of fulfilling himself in this singular way enabled him to work like a steam engine (he had helped drive the Golden Spike at Promontory Point--Utah!--incidentally); he was a vigorous man with great inventive ability, and he was inspired. He completed the machine one bright May morning and got to Observation Bluff one hour and seventeen minutes before Brother Brigham and his advance party arrived.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1971 Goldstone, Cynthia & Avram Davidson. "Pebble in Time " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 336-337. [11] Not for a moment did anyone dream of controverting the word of the President, Prophet, Revelator, and Seer. Onward! they echoed. And onward they went. And the conscience-stricken young stranger, where did he go? Well, where could he go? He went after them, onward, of course. Of course they couldn't make heads or tails of his stammering explanations, nor even of the ones he attempted to write. But they understood that he was sorry. That was enough. Mormons have suffered too much to be vindictive. And that night when the band camped, he was brought to the leader's wagon, where a small lamp burned.

"Young man, " said Brigham, "they tell me that you have expressed a seemly contrition for having raised your hands against the Lord's Anointed; therefore I forgive you in the name of Israel's God. They also say you write a good, clear hand. Sit down. There's a pen and ink and paper... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints California: San Francisco 1986 McIntyre, Vonda N. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. New York: Pocket Books (1986); pg. 109. "She let the Rover ease forward to keep up with him. 'Where're you fellas heading?'

'Back to San Francisco,' Kirk said.

'That's a long way to come, just to jump in and swim with the kiddies.'

'There's no point in my trying to explain what I was doing. You wouldn't believe me anyway.'

'I'll buy that,' Gillian said. She nodded toward Spock. 'And what about what he was trying to do.'

'He's harmless!' Kirk said. 'He had a good reason--' He cut himself off. 'Look, back in the sixties he was in Berkeley. The free speech movement and all that. I think . . . well, he did too much LDS.'

'LDS? Are you dyslexic, on top of everything else?' She sighed. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Canada 1997 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 298-299. "It became clear to the Collier administration that we could keep Alaska and Hawaii but we would--temporarily of course--lose Washington, Oregon, Montana, most of Idaho, North Dakota, and so on to the shrewdly sympathetic Canadians. But there was hope for future reparations because, for one thing, Mormons had a solid toehold in western Canada. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints China 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 25. "The Vickys [Neo-Victorians] wouldn't take him in a million years, of course. Almost all the other tribes were racially oriented, like those Parsis or whatever. The Jews wouldn't take him unless he [was circumcised] and learned to read a whole nother language... There was a bunch of coenobitical phyles--religious tribes--that took people of all races, but most of them weren't very powerful and didn't have turf in the Leased Territories. The Mormons had turf and were very powerful, but he wasn't sure if they'd take him as quickly and readily as he needed to be taken. Then there were the tribes that people just made up out of thin air--the synthetic phyles--but most of them were based on some shared skill or weird idea or ritual that he wouldn't be able to pick up in half an hour. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints China 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 336. "this was the Coastal Republic... Every tribe in the world seemed to have its own skyscraper here. Some, like New Atlantis were not actively recruiting and simply used the size and magnificence of their buildings as a monument to themselves. Others, like the Boers, the Parsis, the Jews, went for the understated approach, and in Pudong anything understated was more or less invisible. Still others, the Mormons, the First Distributed Republic, and the Chinese Coastal Republic itself--used every square inch of their mediatronic walls to proselytize. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints China 2050 Stephenson, Neal. The Diamond Age. New York: Bantam (1995); pg. 411. "A mile past the checkpoint, at another small intersection, Hackworth found a pair of very makeshift crucifixes fashioned from freshly cut mulberry trees, green leaves still fluttering from their twigs. Two young white men had been bound to the crucifixes with gray plastic tie, burned in many places and incrementally disemboweled. From the looks of their haircuts and the somber black neckties that had been ironically left around their necks, Hackworth guessed they were Mormons. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Colorado 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 77. "We have passed the Pawnees, and there are no other tribes until we cross the great mountains. "

"Shall I go forward and see, Brother Stangerson? " asked one of the band.

"And I, " "And I, " cried a dozen voices.

"Leave your horses below and we will await you here, " the elder answered. In a moment the young fellows had dismounted, fastened their horses, and were ascending the precipitous slope which led up to the object which had excited their curiosity. They advanced rapidly and noiselessly, with the confidence and dexterity of practised scouts. The watchers from the plain below could see them flit from rock to rock until their figures stood out against the sky-line. The young man who had first given the alarm was leading them. Suddenly his followers saw him throw up his hands, as though overcome with astonishment, and on joining him they were affected in the same way by the sight which met their eyes.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Colorado 1974 Disch, Thomas M. Camp Concentration. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1968); pg. 130. "...I release the safety catch of my Browning. " [Reference to the Browning rifle, invented by and named after the Latter-day Saint gunsmith.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Colorado 1986 Claremont, Chris. New Mutants, Vol. 1, No. 41: "Way of the Warrior ". New York: Marvel Comics Group (July 1986); pg. 9. [Danielle Moonstar is visiting Arcadia Mall north of Denver. Panel 2 shows a variety of stores, including one with the last part of its sign showing: "Cookies. " Apparently this is a Mrs. Fields Cookies store.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Colorado 1991 Willis, Connie. "In the Late Cretaceous " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1991); pg. 307. "'...and Dr. Albertson's giving a lecture on 'The Impactization of Microscopic Fossils on Twentieth-Century Society.' '

'Which is what?'

'I have no idea. When I was in there, he was showing a videotape of The Land Before Time' " [A film by famed LDS animator/director Don Bluth.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Colorado 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 72. "'Now, the guy thing,' he said, 'would be to go out and have a cocktail, bury the hatchet. Can you handle that?'

'I don't drink.' She stood up and adjusted her skirt... 'I'm Mormon.'


She was not a Mormon. Her father had been raised in the Church and she might have been, too, if her mother had kept her word to her in-laws. But you have to go along in life, her mother said, and figure what's right for you. By the time Evon's oldest sister, Merrel, had been born, her mother'd turned her back on all of it. She held no doubt by then, apparently, whom Evon's father would choose.

They were from near Kaskia, Colorado, a little Rocky Mountain town that, in effect, had been seized from slumber during Evon's lifetime, awakened by the arrival of resorts and malls and multiplexes... "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Coruscant -99927 B.C.E. Wolverton, Dave. The Courtship of Princess Leia. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 326. "...then made his way to the White Room, opened one of its many doors.

The room had an enormous vaulted ceiling, ornately carved from one monolithic stone, and brilliant lights reflected from the dome, bathing everything in a soft, celestial glow... In the front row, Teneniel Djo and Prince Isolder sat together next to Artoo and Chewbacca...

Luke stood at the back, staring at the marble altar where Han and Leia knelt across from one another, holding hands across the alter. The officiator stood in his emerald robes of office, leading Leia in her vows.

She turned and glanced at Luke, the diadems in her veil flashing in the light, and Luke could feel that she was not angry at him for having arrived late, only grateful that he had made it. And at that moment Leia was more serene, more content, than she had ever been in her life. And perhaps she was as filled with joy as anyone could be. "

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Denmark 1875 Sorenson, Virginia. "Where Nothing is Long Ago " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1963); pg. 1-10. "You'll probably remember Brother Tolsen...,' my mother wrote me recently Her fat script traveled the whole way around the photograph and obituary she had clipped from our Mormon newspaper...

Remember Brother Tolsen? I looked at his square jaw and his steady eyes, and it was as if I had seen him yesterday. Well, I thought, another one is gone; soon there won't be a real Danish accent left in the whole valley. Mormon converts from Denmark came to Utah by the thousands during the second half of the nineteenth century. Now there were only a few survivors. Not long before, it had been old Bishop Petersen himself who had died. " [Other refs., not in DB, throughout story.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Diaspar 1000000000 Clarke, Arthur C. The City and the Stars. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1956); pg. 16. "'Tell me, Alvin,' he said, 'have you ever asked yourself where you were before you were born--before you found yourself facing Etania and Eriston at the Hall of Creation?'

'I assumed I was nowhere--that I was nothing but a pattern in the mind of the city, waiting to be created...'...

'You are correct, of course,' came the reply. 'But that is merely part of the answer--and a very small part indeed...' " [Many LDS themes in this novel. Alvin, the novel's main character, is apparently named after Alvin Smith, the older brother of Joseph Smith. An article by Mike Stone (Irreantum, Winter 2001) discusses Clarke's use of Joseph Smith's history in this novel.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 187-217. [The name of this story 'A Scarletin Study' is a variation on 'A Study in Scarlet,' the first ever Sherlock Holmes story -- a story which featured Mormon missionaries as the principle antagonists. 'A Scarletin Study,' however, does not appear to contain LDS references.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Florida 1981 Bishop, Michael. No Enemy But Time. New York: Timescape (1982); pg. 253. "He... had never heard of Jomo Kenyatta, Steve Biko, Robert Mugabe, or Eldridge Cleaver. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Florida 1994 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "Carol finished the redundant transfer of the videotape through the modem to Joey Hernandez in Miami and then called another number. She was sitting in one of the private cubicles inside the large new communications room at the Key West Marriott. The screen in front of Carol indicated that the connection for her new number had been made, but there was not yet any picture. She heard a woman's voice say, 'Good morning, Dr. Michaels' office.' "; Pg. 14: "The oyster story was abruptly discontinued in medias res and the screen dissolved to the interior of a large executive office. Dale Michaels was sitting on a couch, across the room from his modern desk, looking at one of three video monitors that could be seen in the room. 'Good morning again, Carol,' he said enthusiastically. 'So how did it go? And where are you? I didn't know that they had videos in the Marriott rooms yet.' " [Pg. 13-18 takes place in a Marriott hotel.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Florida 1994 Clarke, Arthur C. & Gentry Lee. Cradle. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 15. "Carol was quiet for a moment. 'I guess I can see what you're saying,' she said finally, 'but it hurt to see them so helpless. Oh, well, anyway, I got the story on video too. Incidentally, the new integrated video technology is superb. The Marriott here just installed a new higher data rate modem for video and I was able to transfer the entire eight-minute piece to Joey Hernandez at Channel 44 in only two minutes. He loved it. He does the noon news, you know. Catching it if you can and tell me what you think.' "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 295. "One of the guards stepped to the side, and a form--a human--was shoved into the room... 'From Jabba,' the near guard grunted. 'Enjoy her.'

Fett... looked down on Lei Organa, Princess of Alderaan.

She scrambled to her feet and backed up into a corner... 'You touch me--' Her voice failed her, and she stood there, shivering, and finally said, 'Touch me and one of us is going to die.'

...'Cover yourself. I'm not going to touch you.'

Organa moved slightly to the side... 'You're not?'

Fett shook his head... 'Sex between those not married,' said Fett, 'is immoral.'

'Yeah,' said Organa. 'So's rape.'

Fett nodded. 'So is rape.'... He had never so much as held a woman in his arms... but in Fett's mind his chastity made him no less a man... " [Fett is not LDS, but exhibits LDS/Christian values and morality here in his proscription of promiscuity, his consideration for women, and avoidance of drugs or ingested stimulants (pg. 298).]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Moran, Daniel Keys. "The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 297-298. "'...But Solo? He's a brave man, yes; he's also a mercenary... who's never done a difficult thing that somebody wasn't paying him for. He's smuggled banned substances--'

'He ran spice!'

Fett found himself on his feet and yelling.

'Spice is illegal! It's a euphoric, it alters moods, and the use of it leads to the use of worse substances, and a man who will run spice... will run anything!... And If I had been using spice tonight, Leia Organa, perhaps you would not be safe with me in this room.' " [Fett is not LDS, but his distaste for mood-altering substances mirrors LDS values.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy -99936 B.C.E. Tyers, Kathy. "The Prize Pelt: The Tale of Bossk " in Star Wars: Tales of the Bounty Hunters (Kevin J. Anderson, ed.) New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 159. "A fiance. Tinian tried to keep he image of Daye Azur-Jamin out of her mind's eye. Daye's had been a gentle face full of intelligence, with an odd silver streak marking one eyebrow. He'd been sensitive to the Force, a shrewd judge of character. Hard-working, too. And loyal to the death. Daye had sacrificed himself to help her escape the Imperial takeover of her grandparents' armament factory. Sine that day, she had dedicated her life to helping bring down the Empire. The sooner she died, the sooner she'd rejoin Daye. " [These characters, part of the Star Wars fictional universe. are not LDS, but Tinian's belief in rejoining her mate after death reflects LDS teachings.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1367 C.E. Banks, Iain M. Consider Phlebas. New York: St. Martin's Press (1987); pg. 104. "'Ghalssel,' Now. Horza could feel the light, short-haired head nod against the skin of his arm. 'Yeah, he'll be there, if he possibly can be. He'd burn out the motors on the Leading Edge to get to a major Damage game, and the way things have been hotting up in this neck of the woods recently...' " [The Leading Edge is the name of the science fiction magazine published by Brigham Young University, owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Nothing in the passage indicates whether or not the ship was named by the author after that magazine, but given the date of publication, it seems unlikely.]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1975 Jones, Raymond F. Renegades of Time. Don Mills, Ontario: Laser Books/Harlequin (1975); pg. 125-126. "'What you don't understand is that there is no end of worlds. Worlds are infinite...'

...'...When I told you we could not police the entire universe I was telling you the truth. The universe is infinite. We don't need every corner of it. Worlds are cheap [i.e., extremely plentiful]... And there are thousands of races like the Bakori...' " [The author, Jones, is LDS, and the position that there are 'worlds without number', pivotal to the plot of this book, reflects LDS scripture and teaching.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1982 Adams, Douglas. Life, the Universe and Everything. New York: Harmony Books (1982); pg. 158. "Wait,' said Trillian.

The Elder made a small motion. The robot halted. Trillian suddenly seemed very doubtful of her own judgment.

...'You're very different, aren't you,' said Trillian to the Elders... " [Despite the use of the term 'Elders,' this is not actually a reference to LDS missionaries.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1992 Adams, Douglas. Mostly Harmless. New York: Ballantine (2000; c. 1992); pg. 122. "At the beginning, it was a problem even trying to explain what a month was. This had been a pleasantly simple matter for Arthur, here on Lamuella. The days were just a little over twenty-five hours long, which basically meant an extra hour in bed every single day, and, of course, having regularly to reset his watch, which Arthur rather enjoyed doing.

He also felt at home with the number of suns and moons which Lamuella had--one of each... " [There is no indication that this planet is named after Lemuel, from the Book of Mormon. It almost certainly is not.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1994 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 7. [Author's Note] "Add to this mix some recently discovered parchments containing the writings of ancient holy men. They believed God presided over an interplanetary society--worlds without number... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 33-34. "Rebecca snapped to her feet, bristling despite herself. 'I do not! God is not 'part' of anything! Everything, everything that lives, everything that exists is part of Him!'

'I'm sorry,' Diana said, 'but that does not entirely make sense. There are many tales that go back to the beginning of the Universe, to the moment when Time and Space sprang forth from nothingness. All the gods, in one form or another, were born of that moment, of that timelessness. They are as much a part of the Universe as we. Vastly more powerful, many times wiser, but not separate, not outside. How could we worship them, how could we even comprehend them, if it were otherwise?' " [This discussion takes place in Chicago. Diana (Wonder Woman) is speaking to Rebecca, an Evangelical preacher.]

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints galaxy 1999 Perry, Anne. Tathea. Salt Lake City: Shadow Mountain (1999); pg. 505. "The Book

Child of God, if your hands have unloosened the hasp of this Book, then the intent of your heart is at last unmarred by cloud of vanity or deceit.

Know this, that in the beginning, through the dark reaches of infinity, was the law by which every intelligence has its being and fulfills the measure of its creation.

When God was yet a man like yourself, with all your frailties, you needs and your ignorance, walking a perilous land as you do, even then was the law irrevocable.

By obedience you may overcome all things, even the darkness within, which is the Great Enemy. The heart may be softened by pain and by yearning until love turns towards all creatures and nothing is cast away, nothing defiled by cruelty or indifference. The mind may be enlightened by understanding gained little by little through trial and labor and much hunger to perform great works. Courage will lift the fallen, make bearable the ache of many wounds... "



Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, continued

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