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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, world

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 64. Pg. 64: "What she saw, through their eyes, was a monster. The Christian-Islamic Church and the Scientific Legate--their fear did not resemble her fear; hers had to do with... "; Pg. 67: "The Christian-Islamic Church did not approve of transmuting the Bible into a colorcoded hologram, and forbade the manufacture and sale. "; Pg. 71: "The Christian-Islamic Church, of course, wanted both the Bible and the Koran frozen forever. If Scripture escaped out from under the church its monopoly departed. " [More, about the 'Christian-Islamic Church', pg. 71, 79, 116, etc.]
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 80. "A solemn prayer vigil had been formally called into being but nonetheless Bulkowsky continued to decline... Bulkowsky, as not only Cardinal Harms but the entire curia knew, was a devout Christian. He had been converted by the evangelical, charismatic Dr. Colin Passim who, at his revival meetings, often flew through the air in dramatic demonstration of the power of the Holy Spirit within him. "
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 105. "Strange, Harms thought. He knew of the Essenes. Many theologians had speculated that Jesus was an Essene, and certainly there was evidence that John the Baptist was an Essene. "
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 107. "'...Do you want to hear Galina's dream? I'd like your opinion about it, since it seems to have religious overtones.'

'Shoot,' Harms said.

'A huge white fish lies in the ocean. Near the surface, as a whale does. It is a friendly fish. It swims toward us...[Much more about the dream.]'

'The fish is Christ,' Cardinal Harms said, 'who offers his flesh to man so that man may have eternal life.' "

Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 113. "'...Your wife, then, is Jewish and you are not?'

'Well,' Herb Asher said, 'she is C.E.C. but--' He paused. He sensed himself moving step by step into a trap. It was patently impossible that a husband would not know his wife's religion. They are getting into an area I do not want to discuss, he said to himself. 'I'm a Christian,' he said, then. 'Although I was raised Scientific Legate. I belonged to the Party's Youth Corps. But now--' "

Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 97. "'The Torah is the Law?' Herb said.

'It is more than the Law. The word 'Law' is inadequate. Even though the New Testament of the Christians always uses the word 'Law' for Torah. Torah...' "

Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 238. "'Perhaps we all may be.' And then she sang for Herb Asher one of the Dowland songs. It was the song the Fox traditionally sang on Christmas day, for all the planets. The most tender, the most haunting song that she had adapted from John Dowland's lute books.

When the poor cripple by the pool did lie
Full many years in misery and pain,
No sooner he on Christ had set his eye,
But he was well, and comfort came again. "

Christianity world 2150 Pohl, Frederik. "Hatching the Phoenix " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 247. "'Come on, Hypatia! Human being are meat people, too, and we don't go tearing halfway around the world just to kill each other!'

'Oh, do you not? What a short memory you have, Klara dear. Think of those twentieth-century world wars. Think of the Crusades, tens of thousands of Europeans dragging themselves all the way round the Mediterranean Sea to kill as many Moslems as they could. Think of the Spanish conquistadors, murdering their way across the Americas. Of course,' she added, 'those people were all Christians.'

I blinked at her. 'You think what we're looking at is a religious war?' "

Christianity world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 28. "'Lying?' asked Yama. 'Who asked you to lie about anything? Quote them the Sermon on the Mount, if you want. Or something from the Popul Voh, or the Iliad. I don't care what you say. Just stir them a bit, soothe them a little. That's all I ask.' "
Christianity world 2150 Zelazny, Roger. Lord of Light. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1967); pg. 225. "'Yes, chaplin. For I am Jan Olvegg, captain of the Star of India.'

'Olvegg. That seems moderately impossible.'

'True, nevertheless. I received this now ancient body the day Sam broke the Lords of Karma at Mahartha. I was there.'

'One of the First, and--yes!--a Christian!'

'Occasionally, when I run out of Hindi swear words.'

'Nirriti placed a hand on his shoulder. 'Then your very being must ache at this blasphemy they have wrought!' "; Pg. 239: "'I lied. I never believed in it myself, and I still don't. I could just as easily have chosen another way--say Nirriti's religion [Christianity]--only crucifixion hurts...' "; Pg. 241: "'...You know I am a Christian sympathizer.' "

Christianity world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 86. "This was by no means the first time he had been on ground once sacred to some great religion. He had seen Notre-Dame, Hagia Sophia, Stonehenge, the Parthenon, Karnak, Saint Paul's, and at least a dozen other major temples and mosques... The faiths that had created and sustained them had all passed into oblivion, though some had survived until well into the twenty-second century. "
Christianity world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 180. "...Personal Interest File.

Most men updated their PIP on New Year's Day or their birthday. Morgan's list contained fifty items; he had heard of people with hundreds. They must spend all their waking hours battling with the flood of information, unless they were al like those notorious pranksters who enjoyed setting up news alerts on their consoles for such classic improbabilities as:

Eggs, Dinosaur, hatching of
Circle, squaring of
Atlantis, re-emergence of
Christ, Second Coming of
Loch Ness monster, capture of

or, finally

World, end of "

Christianity world 2160 Clarke, Arthur C. The Fountains of Paradise. New York: Ballantine (1980; 1st ed. 1978); pg. 295. "There seemed to be a continuous spectrum between absolute fantasy and hard historical facts, with every possible gradation between... At the other extreme were Zeus and Alice and King Kong and Gulliver... But what was one to make of Robin Hood and Tarzan and Christ and Sherlock Holmes and Odysseus and Frankenstein? Allowing for a certain amount of exaggeration, they might well have been actual historic personages. "
Christianity world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 645. "'Let's see. Samisen. A Japanese instrument with three strings. The Triple Revolution document and the Trinity again. Trinity? Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. Mother the thoroughly despised figure, hence, the Wholly Goose? Well, maybe not...' " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 662. "The cows, sheep, and horses are in stalls at the end of the cave. Some are looking with horror at Mary and the infant. Others have their mouths open, evidently trying to warn Mary. Chib has used the legend that the animals in the manger were able to talk to each other the night Christ was born.

Joseph, a tired old man, so slumped he seems backboneless, is in a corner. He wears two horns, but each has a halo, so it's all right. " [More.]

Christianity world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 664. "'Why is it such an insult, Doctor Ruskinson?' the fido man says. 'Because it mocks the Christian faith, and also the Panamorite faith? It doesn't seem to me it does that. It seems to me that Winnegan is trying to say that men have perverted Christianity, maybe all religions, all ideals, for their own greedy self-destructive purposes, that man is basically a killer and a perverter. At least, that's what I get out of it, although of course I'm only a simple layman and . . .' "
Christianity world 2175 Anderson, Poul. Fleet of Stars. New York: Tor (1997); pg. 154. "Chuan shook his head as if it had gone heavy. 'I--we, if you insist--on behalf of civiization and life, I beg you to consider the all too real possibility that your dream will turn into a nightmare. How often in the uncontrolled, randomly happening past did it so occur? Christ preached God's love; Christians massacred unbelievers and burned heretics in the name of it. Reformers called for universal equality, and tyrannies came forth to enforce--the name of it.'

'You needn't go on,' Fenn growled. 'I know. But I also know, we're here today because people were not content with things as they were.' "

Christianity world 2176 Dietz, William C. Steelheart. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 159. "'Though misinformed regarding the nature and identity of God, your ancestors had some wonderful ideas, not the least of which were the Crusades.'

Though of lower rank than Jantz, Maras had the better education and knew something about history. The Crusades had originally been armed pilgrimages. In fact, the word 'crusade,' had its origins in the Latin word 'crux,' or 'cross.' when the Arab Muslims conquered Palestine, which included numerous locations sacred to Christians, the Christians responded with a series of eight military expeditions between the years A.D. 1096 and 1270. These Crusades included kings, nobles, and thousands of peasants. They had two goals--to gain permanent control of the holy lands, and to protect the Byzantine Empire with which they were aligned.

The Christians did gain control of the holy lands for a time, but they were ultimate unable to hold onto the territory and were eventually forced out. " [More, pg. 159-160.]

Christianity world 2179 Sawyer, Robert J. Golden Fleece. New York: Time Warner (1990); pg. 161. "She's probably not a Jew, and that's fine with me. Sorry, Mom, but it is. Anyway, she'll find out soon enough. Circumcision has fallen out of favor among Christians, after all. "
Christianity world 2182 Cowper, Richard. "Out There Where the Big Ships Go " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 133. "He [Henderson] wrote a book which he called The Game of Games and prefaced it with a quotation taken from 'The Paradoxes of the Negative Way' by St. John of the Cross--

In order to become that which thou art not,
Thou must go by a way which thou knowest know . . .
"

Christianity world 2198 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 458. "'A.D. 2198
You have to understand that Christianity has always been built on certain primal mythic elements. Fundamentally there is the Holy Family, in the shape of the Father, Mother and Child. And the character of the Child, Jesus, has always been at the forefront of Christian consciousness. As in other myth structures the Child represents renewal--the springlike rebirth of life after death, here of course standing for the renewal we all hope for in the arms of God, as further symbolized by Christ's resurrection after his own physical death.

But, it seems, we are a generation doomed to live in the end of time. We live in a world without hope or renewal: ten more springs, and then the final winter will descend on us all, leaving us without hope. "

Christianity world 2198 Baxter, Stephen. Manifold: Time. New York: Ballantine (2000); pg. 459. "'A.D. 2198... Where, then, is the relevance of the Christian mythos for us, whom God has abandoned?

The relevance is in the character of Mary, Mother of Jesus.

Mary stood and mourned at the foot of the Cross. Even as Her Son gave His life for humankind, so He abandoned His Mother.

So, today, we reject the grandiose and selfish ambitions of the Son, and embrace the grief of Mary, the Mother He abandoned.

For we, too, have been abandoned. We draw strength from Mary's dignity in betrayal. We are no longer Christians. We are Marians.

Let us pray. "

Christianity world 2200 Anderson, Poul. Starfarers. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 48. [Year is estimated.] "Alvin was their single child, apparently wanted more by the father than the mother; she was dutiful, as the New Christian Church commanded women to be and the Advisor commanded citizens in general to be. "
Christianity world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 160. "'...All the old mysteries that the prophets spoke about. Black Elk and the Buddha. Jesus and Mother Charity. They all tell us the same thing. No matter how much you struggle and strive, you'll never get out of this world alive. So why struggle? And why strive? Do what you have to. Take what you need. Be thankful and be mellow.' "
Christianity world 2200 Arnason, Eleanor. A Woman of the Iron People. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1991); pg. 400. "'No mice,' said one of the biologists. 'Except in the labs, and they aren't a problem.'

'They will be,' said Marina. 'Someone will lose a few. They'll get in the gardens. We'll hava a plague, just like in the Bible. Mice and hemorrhoids.'

'What?' said the third biologist he was huge and almost certainly Polynesian.

'The Philistines stole the Ark of the Covenant, whatever that might be, and the Lord Almighty afflicted them with mice and hemorrhoids. I'm not lying. It's in the Bible.' "

Christianity world 2200 Heinlein, Robert A. Double Star. New York: Ballantine (1986; first ed. 1956); pg. 156. "I realized later--he represented the Lapps, including all the reindeer and Santa Clause, no doubt. He was also ordained in the First Bible Truth Church of the Holy Spirit, which I had never heard of, but which accounted for his tight-lipped deacon look. "
Christianity world 2200 Heinlein, Robert A. Double Star. New York: Ballantine (1986; first ed. 1956); pg. 172. "The Empire medley followed me down, the music sliding from 'Kong Christian' to 'Marseillaise' to 'The Star-Spangled Banner' and all the others. "
Christianity world 2200 Lee, Tanith. "The Sky-Green Blues " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 471. [Year estimated] "The shore was covered by peoples, humans of all races, like something biblical, I thought, gathered tribes, the end of the world. "
Christianity world 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 130. "'Yes. Procrustes like to give people a chance to measure themselves against a standard, to be testted, and possibly to redeem themselves. He is most Christian in this regard.' "
Christianity world 2250 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 59. [Year is estimated.] "About two centuries after the formation of the first World State, the President of the World declared that the time was ripe for a formal union of science and religion, and called a onference of the leaders of these two great disciplines.... the heads of Buddhism, Mohamedanism, Hinduism, the Regenerate Christian Brotherhood and the Modern Catholic Church in South America, agreed that their differences were but differences of expression. One and all were worshippers of the Divine Energy, whether expressed in activity, or in tense stillness. One and all recognized the saintly Discoverer as either the last and greatest of the prophets or an actual incarnation of divine Movement. "
Christianity world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 168. "'But... you are dressed as a Christian cleric. I realize that my understanding of these things may be imperfect, but these eldritch lands seem to be far older than Christianity. How did you find yourself here?'

'My father followed the custom of the times, and having more sons than he knew how to employ, he sent me--for I had shown some talent for reading and ciphering--into the clergy. I did well in my education and after being ordained arranged to be sent home again. There I could have done well but for my pride... I lorded my collar and my education over my less formally educated brethren. In time, they grew tired of me and one full moon near the spring equinox they brought me to this place...' " [Some more here, and some other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 182-189.]

Christianity world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 184. Pg. 184: "For a brief moment, Ayradyss thought that the Christian charm was working. The guardian drew into itself, becoming opaque, claws and fangs falling into solidity. But even as she thought it was beginning to retreat... "; Pg. 186: "'Your many names, Lady Ayradyss... The charm came to me in the dreaming channels as I rehearsed the charm taught to us by the Lady of the Gallery and fretted as to whether a Christian charm would be efficacious against a pagan creature.' "
Christianity world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 269. Pg. 269: "Jay tried to decide if any other of the religions he had sampled had made such a blatant claim. Voudon's possession by a loa was the closest he could recall; all the other faiths contended themselves with some version of Christianity's 'Where two or three are gathered in my name, there will I surely be' or... "; Pg. 546: "'The Judeo-Christian tradition says that all the earth was created in seven days,' Desmond Drum added. "
Christianity world 2250 Zelazny, Roger & Jane Lindskold. Donnerjack. New York: Avon (1998; c.1997); pg. 479. "The Hierophant of the Church of Elish (at last poll now one of the four major religious traditions in the Verite--although only if one counted all of the Christian sects as one group)... "
Christianity world 2267 Carey, Diane. Invasion! Book One: First Strike (novel excerpt) in Star Trek: Adventures in Time and Space (Mary P. Taylor, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1999); pg. 29. "The doctor scowled. 'I'm not saying that humans or Klingons went out into space and met these people, but I'm wondering if somehow these people ended up on our planets a long time ago and affected our beliefs. If a shipload of Vulcans showed up on Earth in the fourteen-hundreds, they'd sure be taken for devils... we'd better get used to carrying pitchforks,' McCoy said, 'because I think that's the conclusion... Unless they killed a human in the past twelve hours and somehow made this bone appear to my readouts as if it were four to six thousand years old. I think we got that mythological stuff from our Greeks and Egyptians and druids, but I think the Greeks and Egyptians and druids got it from them... It's not just a coincidence that these people look like our legends and myths of evil. They are our legends and myths of evil!' "
Christianity world 2290 Bear, Greg. "Scattershot " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1981); pg. 109-110. "Since he'd mentioned Jesuits, he almost had to use the standard Christian Era dating.

'Year of Our Lord 2345,' he said.

Sonok crossed himself elegantly. 'For me 2290,' he added. " [Other refs., not in DB. Some refs. under 'Catholic - Jesuit']

Christianity world 2300 Jeter, K. W. Farewell Horizontal. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 244. "'My--Jesus Christ, it's good to see you.' " [There are many, many examples of explicitly Christian profanity in this novel, not in DB. But no apparent refs. to Christians or Christianity by name, or even any examples of items such as churches, ministers, etc.]
Christianity world 2300 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 65. [Year is estimated.] "The accident that the form of the aeroplane was reminiscent of the main symbol of the ancient Christian religion lent flying an additional mystical significance. For though the spirit of Christianity was lost, many of its symbols had ben preserved in the new faith. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity world 2300 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 70-71. [Year is estimated.] "A very large number of persons never passed the test which sanctioned sexuality. These either remained virgin, or indulged in sexual relations which were not only illegal but sacrilegious. The successful, on the other hand, were apt to consummate sexually every casual acquaintance.

Under these circumstances it was natural that there should exist among the sexually submerged part of the population certain secret cults which sought escape from harsh reality into worlds of fantasy. Of these illicit sects, two were most widespread. One was a perversion of the ancient Christian faith in a God of Love. All love, it was said, is sexual; therefore in worship, private or public, the individual must seek a direct sexual relation with God. Hence arose a grossly phallic cult, very contemptible to those more fortunate persons who had no need of it. "

Christianity world 2301 Bester, Alfred. The Demolished Man. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1953); pg. 7. Pg. 1: "Oh God! The Man With No Face! Looking. Looming... Oh Christ! The Man With No Face. Looking. Looming... "; Pg. 17: "'What? Oh Christ! The nightmares! Still? You God damned peeper. How did you get that?...' "; Pg. 44: "'Father!' she screamed. 'For God's sake! Father!... 'No!' she cried. 'No! For the love og Christ! Father!' "; Pg. 45: "Where was the girl? in all that black silence where was she? And the gun! Christ! The tricked gun! " [Profanity is used fairly frequently in the book, offering linguistic evidence of the religious heritage of the society. Much of the profanity is fairly generic, with reference to 'God', but specifically Christian profanity is also common (references to 'Jesus', 'Christ', etc. Only a few examples are recorded here.]
Christianity world 2301 Bester, Alfred. The Demolished Man. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1953); pg. 96. "Powell stood quietly, enjoying the spectacle.It was like an illustration from a primitive Bible. Sam, an ill-tempered Messiah, glowering at his humble disciples. Around them the glittering silica stones of the rock-garden, crawling with the dry motley-colored Venus plants... "
Christianity world 2301 Bester, Alfred. The Demolished Man. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1953); pg. 117. "There was a faithful reproduction of the Notre Dame Cathedral in the center of the cemestary. It was painstakingly labeled: Ye Wee Kirk O Th' Glen. From the mouth of one of the gargoyles in the tower, a syrupy voice roared: 'SEE THE DRAMA OF THE GODS PORTRAYED IN VIBRANT ROBOT-ACTION IN YE WEE KIRK O TH' GLEN. MOSES ON MT. SINAI, THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST, MOHAMMED AND THE MOUNTAIN, LAO TSE AND THE MOON, THE REVELATION OF MARY BAKER EDDY, THE ASCENSION OF OUR LORD BUDDHA, THE UNVEILING OF THE TRUE AND ONLY GOD GALAXY . . .' Pause, and then a little more matter-of-factly: 'OWING TO THE SACRED NATURE OF THIS EXHIBIT, ADMISSION IS BY TICKET ONLY. TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED FROM THE BAILIFF.' "
Christianity world 2314 Steele, Allen. Chronospace. New York: Ace Books (2001); pg. 33. "...the barrier existed... Therefore, the future was just as invisitable as the distant past. Just as no expeditions would ever be sent to witness the crucification of Christ or the destruction of the Library of Alexandria... "
Christianity world 2369 Taylor, Jeri. Pathways (Star Trek: Voyager). New York: Pocket Books (1999; c. 1998); pg. 264. "Ihlara . . . the Peristrema Gorge, where ancient Byzantine churches were carved into canyon walls, replete with crumbling frescoes of various saints and religious figures, a holy place of the long past. Tom looked, and felt nothing.

Lahore, and the famed Shalimar gardens . . . Kathmandu... "

Christianity world 2389 Ellison, Harlan. "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1965); pg. 478. "But down below, ah, down below, where the people always needed their saints and sinners, their bread and circuses, their heroes and villains, he was considered a Bolivar; a Napoleon; a Robin Hood;... a Jesus; a Jomo Kenyatta. "
Christianity world 2436 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 45. "'UNKNOWN APPROACHING D...'

'What in God's name is he up to?' Black Rod exclaimed.

'You are ware of my rule, sir,' Presteign said coldly. 'No associate of the Presteign clan may take the name of the Divinity in vain. You forget yourself.' " [Presteign, the wealthiest man on Earth, is evidently very serious about the Commandment that prohibits profanity.]

Christianity world 2438 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 245. "Two centuries before, when organized religion had been abolished and orthodox worshippers of all faiths had been driven underground, some devout souls had constructed this secret niche in Old St. Pat's [St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City] and turned it into an altar. The gold of the crucifix still shone with the brilliance of eternal faith. At the foot ofthe cross rested a small black box of Inert Lead Isotope. "
Christianity world 2438 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 185. "'For Christ's sake, let me die.'

'You were aboard 'Vorga'?'

'Yes.'

'You passed a wreck out in space. Wreck of the 'Nomad.' She signaled for help and you passed her by. Yes?'

'Why?'

'Christ! Oh Christ help me!'

'Why?'

'Oh Jesus!'

'I was aboard 'Nomad,' Kempsey. Why did you leave me to rot?'

'Sweet Jesus help me! Christ, deliver me!' " [More.]

Christianity world 2438 Bester, Alfred. The Stars My Destination. New York: Berkley Publishing (1975; c. 1956); pg. 188. "'...Think of yourself . . . Are you turning into a white-livered Cellar Christian turning the other cheek and whining forgiveness? Olivia, what are you doing to me? Give me strength, not cowardice . . .' "
Christianity world 2500 Boulle, Pierre. Planet of the Apes. New York: Ballantine (2001; c. 1963). Translated by Xan Fielding.; pg. 250. "I have seen him. He's a splendid baby. He was lying on the straw like a new Christ, nuzzling against his mother's breast. He looks like me, but he also has Nora's beauty. "
Christianity world 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 34. "...and where was Odysseus, where was Job, where were Jupiter and Gotama and Jesus? Whist--and those specks of antique dirt called Athens and Rome, Jerusalem and the Middle Kingdoms--all were gone... Requiem; whisk, Symphony; whisk . . .

There were those strange rumours of old forbidden books hidden in a safe in the Controller's study. Bibles, poetry--Ford knew what. "

Christianity world 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 51. Pg. 51: "There was a thing, as I've said before, called Christianity... All crosses their tops cut and became T's. There was also a thing called God. "; Pg. 52: "There was a thing called heaven; but all the same they used to drink enormous quantities of alcohol... There was a thing called the soul and a thing called immortality. " [Hundreds of years before this novel takes place, Christianity died out as the worship of Henry Ford became the dominant religion in the world.]
Christianity world 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 103. "'...Christianity and totemism and ancestor worship...' "
Christianity world 2555 Barton, William. Acts of Conscience. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 303. "'That's what they say. But one person never matters, even if that person turns out to be Jesus, or Kali Meitner, or something.'

'You have a sense of history in your head, Gaetan du Cheyne. A fascinating human history of isolates interacting.'

I almost didn't hear its words muttering, 'Not to mention Hitler and Napoleon, Temujin and Attila, Wang Mang, Sargon the so-called Great . . .'

Across the way, the wolfen were whispering and grinning together, facing the dollies, dollies on their knees, whispering prayers like some flock of ancient Christians facing . . . By God, Brother Flavius. I think that beast has my name on it! "

Christianity world 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 164. "'...And I did stumble into the Socinian Heresy, Sol. That was the first of my sins.'

Sol's gaze was level. 'And the last of your sins?'

'Besides pride?' said Dure. 'The greatest of my sins was falsifying data from a seven-year dig on Armaghast. Trying to provide a connection between the vanished Arch Builders there and a form of proto-Christianity. It did not exist. I fudged the data. So the irony is, the greatest of my sins, at least in the [Catholic] Church's eyes, was to violate the scientific method. In her days, the Church can accept theological heresy but can brook no tampering with the protocols of science.' "

Christianity world 2786 Clarke, Arthur C. The Songs of Distant Earth. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 184. "Jonathan Cauldwell and his dwindling but still vocal band of followers proclaimed ever more desperately that all would be well, that God was merely testing mankind as He had once tested Job. Despite everything that was happening to the Sun, it would soon return to normal, and humanity would be saved--unless those who disbelieved in His mercy provoked His wrath. And then He might change His mind . . . "
Christianity world 2954 Stableford, Brian. "Mortimer Gray's History of Death " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 196. "Gray was particularly fascinated by the symbology of the Christian mythos, which had taken as its central image the death on the cross of Jesus, and had tried to make that one image of death carry an enormous allegorical load. He was entranced by the idea of Christ's death as a force of redemption and salvation, by the notion that this person died for others. He extended the argument to take in the Christian martyrs, who added to the primal crucifixion a vast series of symbolic and morally significant deaths. This, he considered, was a colossal achievement of the imagination, a crucial victory by which death was dramatically transfigured in the theater of the human imagination--as was the Christian idea of death as a kind of reconciliation: a gateway to Heaven, if properly met; a gateway to Hell, if not. Gray seized upon the idea of absolution from sin following confession, and particularly the notion of deathbed repentance... "
Christianity world 2977 Stableford, Brian. "Mortimer Gray's History of Death " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 203. Pg. 203: "...particularly in respect of the Christian world of the Medieval period and the Renaissance. It had much to say about art and literature, and the images contained therein... on the topics of momento mori and artes moriendi. It had long analyses of Dante's Divine Comedy, the paintings of Hieronymus Borsch, Milton's Paradise Lost, and graveyard poetry. "; Pg. 204: "Gray also dealt with the persecution of heretics and the subsequent elaboration of Christian Demonology, which led to the witch-craze of the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries. " [More.]
Christianity world 2977 Stableford, Brian. "Mortimer Gray's History of Death " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 204. "Just as the Protestants were trying to replace the Catholic Church's centralized authority with a more personal relationship between men and God, Gray argued, the creative artists of this era were trying to achieve a more personal and more intimate form of reconciliation between men and Death, equipping individuals with the power to mount their own ideative assaults. He drew some parallels between what happened in the Christian world and similar periods of crisis... "
Christianity world 3000 Charnas, Suzy McKee. Walk to the End of the World. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 81. Pg. 81: "Of all things, Eykar was outlining an esoteric theory that the Holy Book of the Ancients [the Bible] had actually been written by clever fems using men's names. "; Pg. 82: "...mushy morals and anti-hierarchical sedition, cloaked in a manly-seeming tale of a Son justly punished for trying to supercede his Father, 'God,' as lord of men. There was also supposed to have been an older book of much sterner import, which this newer one imitated... 'But the meaning of the story,' he said... 'is a manly one: that by challenging his Father's authority--and by the false, famishing mush he taught, as you say--the Son drew down on himself the rightful anger of his Father. Doesn't he accept his punishment, at the end of the story?' " [More about the Holy Book, the Bible, pg. 82.]
Christianity world 3000 Charnas, Suzy McKee. Walk to the End of the World. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "He searched out the four stars that marked the cross-sign and traced it o his own chest. It signified the opposed wills of Father and Son. Though the old religion was discredited, the sign had survived as a recognition and acceptance of its one great truth. "; Pg. 20: "'Christ-God-Son!' cursed d Layo. 'Shut the door...' "; Pg. 22: "The sons of the Ancients had risen against their fathers and brought down the world; even God's own Son, in the old story, had earned punishment from his Father. Old and young were natural enemies; everyone knew that. "; Pg. 38: "'Ah, Christ,' Kelmz said, with deep disgust... " [cursing] [Some other minimal Christian refs., not in DB.]
Christianity world 3000 Clarke, Arthur C. "The Songs of Distant Earth " in The Sentinel. New York: Berkley Books (1983; c. 1979); pg. 202. "...of the last moments of beloved earthscapes and artifacts (e.g., the Taj Mahal, St. Peter's, the Pyramids, etc., melting down "
Christianity world 3000 Silverberg, Robert. "Nightwings " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1968); pg. 736. "There were more beggars in here--licensed ones, holding hereditary concessions--and also throngs of Pilgrims, Communicants, Rememberers, Musicians, Scribes and Indexers. I heard muttered prayers: I smelled the scent of spicy incense; I felt the vibration of subterranean gongs. In cycles past this building had been a shrine of one of the old religions--the Christers, Gormon told me, making me suspect once more that he was a Rememberer masquerading as a Changeling.. "
Christianity world 3000 Strugatsky, Arkady & Boris Strugatsky. Tale of the Troika in Roadside Picnic and Tale of the Troika. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co. (1977); pg. 230. [Year estimated.] Pg. 230: "What was left of the commandant when I could see, hear, and think again could not accurately be called the commandant anymore: a few bones, an empty stare, and a weak mumble: 'As God is. . . . In the name of Jesus Christ. . . .' "; Pg. 235: "The commandant took a deep breath and wailed. 'Holy Mother of God. In the name of the twelve original Apostles.' " [A few other refs., but not at all extensive.]
Christianity world 3000 Williamson, Jack. Terraforming Earth. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 88. "In olden days, she told me darkly, my errant soul might have been cleansed with divine fire. in these more enlightened times, fortunately for me, those who attempted to misuse the Holy Book were regarded as either psychotics in need of treatment or sinners deserving eternal torment. "


Christianity, continued

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