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34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

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Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity world 2037 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 356. "The Reunionists have launched themselves against the hypothesis that there are legitimate concepts such as the first world, second world, third world, nonaligned world, developed and underdeveloped world, Christian and Moslem world, the East, West, North, an South. "
Christianity world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 472. "Forty years ago, everyone was in a froth over the millennium. Especially many Christians, who thought surely the end of days would coincide with the two thousandth anniversary of Jesus's birth. I was one who saw the portents back in '99. I, too, thought the time was at hand. Looking back, I see how foolish I was... After all, why should the Time come at the millennium of His birth? The events from Gethsemane to Crucifixion to Resurrection were what mattered then. So must the anniversary of those events! See my calculations... which show beyond any doubt that it must be this very year! No wonder we see signs everywhere! The time's at hand! It is now! "
Christianity world 2038 Brin, David. Earth. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 559. "Meanwhile, Christians and Jews and Muslims made noises much like the Gaians'--only they seemed to hear the low voice of a 'father'... "
Christianity world 2039 Jones, Gwyneth. White Queen. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 156. Pg. 156: "'I see you're interested in our Samaritan.'

Braemar had been trapped before she could get out of sight. The drunk jerked his head at her. 'Barearse Wislon.'

'I thought she was British.'

He laughed. 'I thought you Americans read the Bible. Our Samaritan, she doesn't quite worship on the right mountain. But she's generous when a chap's in need. You'll be all right there.' ";

Pg. 197: "...had decided it was her Christian-Sustainable-Developmentalist duty to make do with just one cleaning product. "; Pg. 235: "'...I'm no Christian, nor Hindu. But I want to do right in my own terms; and I'm afraid, in my own terms, of what will happen to me if I do wrong.' " [Some other refs.]

Christianity world 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 48. [Aboard the ship taking the first 100 colonists, all scientists, to Mars.] "John said, 'You must know that the gospels were written decades after the event, by people who never met Christ. And that there are other gospels which reveal a different Christ, gospels that were excluded from the Bible by a political process in the third century. So he's a kind of literary figure really, a political construct. We don't know anything about the man himself.'

Phyllis shook her head. 'That's not true.'

'But it is,' John objected... 'Look, there's a history to all this stuff. Monotheism is a belief system that you see appearing in early herding societies. The greater their dependence on sheep herding, the more likely their belief in a shepherd god. It's an exact correlation, you can chart it and see...' "

Christianity world 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 48. [Aboard the ship taking the first 100 colonists, all scientists, to Mars.] "'Look, there's a history to all this stuff. Monotheism is a belief system that you see appearing in early herding societies. The greater their dependence on sheep herding, the more likely their belief in a shepherd god. It's an exact correlation, you can chart it and see. And the god is always male, because those societies were patriarchal. There's a kind of archeology, an anthropology--a sociology of religion, that makes all of this perfectly clear--how it came about, what needs it fulfilled.'

Phyllis regarded him with a small smile. 'I don't know what to say to that, John. It's not a matter of history, after all. It's a matter of faith.'

Do you believe in Christ's miracles?'

'The miracles aren't what matter. It's not the church or its dogma that matters. It's Jesus himself that matters.'

'but he's just a literary construct,' John repeated doggedly. 'Something like Sherlock Holmes...' "

Christianity world 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 49. [Aboard the ship taking the first 100 colonists, all scientists, to Mars.] "'Whenever scientists say they're Christian,' Sax said, 'I take it to be an aesthetic statement.'

'The church of the wouldn't-it-be-pretty-to-think-so,' Frank said...

Sax said, 'They feel we're missing a spiritual dimension of life that earlier generations had, and they attempt to regain it using the same means.' " [Other refs. to Christianity in book, not all in DB.]

Christianity world 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 48-49. [Aboard the ship taking the first 100 colonists, all scientists, to Mars.] "'...And you didn't answer my question about the miracles.'

Phyllis shrugged. 'I consider the presence of the universe to be a miracle. The universe and everything in it. Can you deny it?'

'Sure,' John said. 'The universe just is. I define a miracle as an action which clearly breaks known physical law.'

'Like traveling to other planets?'

'No. Like raising the dead.'

'Doctors do that every day.'

'Doctors have never done taht.'

Phyllis looked nonplussed. 'I don't know what to say to you, John. I'm kind of surprised. We don't know everything, to pretend we do is arrogance. The creation is mysterious. To give something a name like 'the big bang,' and then think you ahve an explanation--it's bad logic, bad thinking. Outside your rational scientific thought is an enormous area of consciousness, an area more important than science. Faith in God is part of that...' "

Christianity world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 106. [Year estimated.] "'...How can religion influence engineering?'

'I spoke with him after Jesse gave us the news on the vessel's return. I got the impression at the time that he feels we were tampering in the province of the Almighty by attempting the creation of an artificial intelligence. That our creation should go mad was only appropriate, being the work of imperfect man. He seemed to feel that it would be fitting if it had come back for retribution, as a sign of judgment upon us.' "

Christianity world 2040 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 108. [Year estimated.] "'We were doing something we had no business doing.'

'That being . . .?'

'For one thing, attempting to create an artificial intelligence.'

'Why had you no business doing that?'

'A man with a name like yours shouldn't have to ask.'

I chuckled.

'If I were a preacher,' I said, 'I would have to point out that there is no biblical injunction against it--unless you've been worshiping it on they sly.'

He shook his head.

'Nothing that simple, that obvious. Times have changed since the Good Book was written, and you can't hold with a purely fundamentalist approach in complex times. What I was getting at was something a little more abstract. A form of pride, not unlike the classical hubris--the setting up of oneself on a level with the Creator.'

'Do you feel that--pride?'

'Yes.' " [More on this topic, not in DB.]

Christianity world 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 61. "Yet on Earth, Rhoma has risen to destroy Karkhedon--Carthago in the Latin language--ending that trading empire's history a century and a half before the birth of the little-known Ioudaian Messiah Jeshua, or Jesus. Karkhedon would never have gone on to colonize the New World, and Nea Karkhedon would never have rebelled from its mother country and asserted itself on the Atlantian Ocean, to become, along with the Libyans and Nordic Rhus, one of the enemies of the Oikoumene. "
Christianity world 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 109. "'Jesus,' Lanier said almost automatically. The name had lost considerable power in the past few decades. After all, the miracles at the foundation of Christianity were almost all duplicated weekly in the Terrestrial Hexamon. Technology had superseded religion.

But what was Mirsky, that his reappearance should supersede even the abilities of the Hexamon? Had wonders gone full circle, back to the realm of religion again? "

Christianity world 2046 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 112. "'How's Karen? Have you been keeping up with Lenore and Larry?'

'Karen's fine. She might be here now. She's working with Suli Ram Kikura on a social project.' He swallowed. 'Lenore is in Oregon now, I believe. Larry died a few months ago.'

Hoffman's mouth made a surprised O. 'I hadn't heard . . . Damn. That's a Christian for you.' "

Christianity world 2047 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 153. Pg. 153: "There was one man. We, who are still sinners, cannot attain this title of praise, for each of us is not one, but many . . . See how he thinks himself one is not one, but seems to have as many personalities as he has moods, as also the Scripture says, 'A fool is changed as the moon.'

--Origin, In Librum Regnorum ";

Pg. 156: "Where there are sins there is multitude.
--Origen, In Ezechialem Homilae "

Christianity world 2048 Bear, Greg. Queen of Angels. New York: Warner Books (1994; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 348. "'But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.'

--The New Testament, Romans 7:23 "

Christianity world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 14. "'I think that if God gets blamed for accidents and natural disasters, the people who claim to represent God ought to be willing to pay the damages,' Sam said gleefully, over and again. 'It's only fair.'

The media went into an orgy of excitement. Interviewers doggedly tracked down priests, ministers, nuns, lamas, imams, mullahs, gurus of every stripe and sect. "

Christianity world 2050 Bova, Ben. "Acts of God " in Sam Gunn Forever. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1995); pg. 38. "'Another thing,' Sam added. 'You guys have been working for a century or so to heal the rifts among other Christians. Imagine how the Protestants will feel if they see the Vatican getting special treatment from the World Court.'

'Finding the Vatican innocent of responsibility for your industrial accidents is hardly special treatment,' said Pope William.

'Maybe you think so, but how will the Swedes feel about it? Or the Orthodox Catholic in Greece and Russia and so on? Or the Southern Baptists?' "

Christianity world 2050 Ellison, Harlan. "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream " in A Pocketful of Stars (Damon Knight, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971; c. 1967); pg. 111. "Ellen and Nimdok were returned to us later that night which became a day abruptly as the heavenly legion bore them to us with a celestial chorus singing, 'Go Down Moses.' The archangels circled several times and then dropped... "
Christianity world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 264. "He had even pretended to pray before they had sex, currying favor because of her crucifix... "
Christianity world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 272. "'...He could take your condemnation and laugh at it. He couldn't take Ellie's Christian charity and lovingkindness. Or, for that matter, my own professional detachment.' "
Christianity world 2050 Haldeman, Joe. Forever Peace. New York: Ace Books (1998; first ed. 1997); pg. 322. "She didn't drive either, other than pushing a button. She read from an old-fashioned paper Bible... "; "The driver put her Bible down and got out and opened Thurman's door. 'Please follow me sir.'... A Bible-thumper, not his type. "
Christianity world 2050 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1975); pg. 197. "'If I were a preacher,' I said, 'I would have to point out that there is no biblical injunction against it--unless you've been worshipping it on the sly.'

He shook his head.

'Nothing that simple, that obvious, that explicit. Times have changed since the Good Book was written, and you can't hold with a purely Fundamentalist approach in complex times. What I was getting at was something a little more abstract. A form of pride, not unlike the classical hubris--the setting up of oneself on a level with the Creator.'

'Did you feel that--pride?'

'Yes.'

'Are you sure it wasn't just enthusiasm for an ambitious project that was working well?'

'Oh, there was plenty of that. A manifestation of the same thing.'

'I do seem to recall something about man being made in the Creator's image, and something else about trying to live up to that...the Divine Ideal, if you'd like.' " [More on this topic, and other refs. not in DB.]

Christianity world 2050 Zelazny, Roger. "Home is the Hangman " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1975); pg. 224. "But here in one of Mencken's hangouts, I could not but recall some of the things he had said about controversy, such as, 'Did Huxley convert Wilberforce? Did Luther convert Leo X?' "
Christianity world 2057 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 373. "'The Arabs don't believe in original sin... They believe that man is innocent, and death natural. That we do not need a savior... It is a humanist correction of Judaism and Christianity, in that sense...' "
Christianity world 2059 Morrow, James. "Spelling God with the Wrong Blocks " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 90. "'The testaments,' said Miss Basilides.

'The Old Testament? The New Testament?'

'The First Testament of the prophet Darwin,' said Mr. Meracleon. 'Notes on the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life.'

'And the Second Testament,' said Miss Basilides. 'The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex.' "

Christianity world 2071 Delany, Samuel R. Babel-17. Boston: Gregg Press (1976; first ed. 1966); pg. 93. "'Neurotics proceed with delusions of grandeur. Napoleon Bonaparte take the lead. Jeasus Christ bring up the rear.' "
Christianity world 2075 Baker, Virginia. "Rachel's Wedding " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 132. "'Listen. When I was in Jerusalem, during the debates for disbanding the Mossad, we used to bait the Hasid kids with quotes. We went at them like Baptists--quoting form the New Testament. We'd say things that sounded like the commentaries, and the Hasids would get confused...' "
Christianity world 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 61. "'The Pope . . . he was, er, sympathetic to your cause?'

'To our methods, no,' Rebeckah admitted quietly. 'But our aims . . .' She shrugged.

'Your aims?'

'We've always been Free Staters. Even though America is a theocratic republic, at least there's still a pretense of the representational government model. Christendom is a badly disguised oligarchy.'

'But isn't the Pope the leader of Christendom?' Rebeckah's political jargon made my head ache again.

'He is now. Innocent had a plan to decentralize his power and give it back to the people.' " [More.]

Christianity world 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 76. "No group has claimed responsibility for the Paris attack, but Christendom spokesperson Shelia McEvers believes this to be the work of the LINK-terrorist group known as Malachim Nikamah [Hasidic Jews]... 'The method is very similar,' she said. 'Cruelty like this could only come from a non-Christian group like the Malachim shel Nikamah. Who else would do this kind of crazy, destructive thing?'

The Nation of Islam cautioned the Vatican regarding issuing broad statements against non-Christians, but joined in denouncing today's attack. Both superpowers donated extensively to the relief fund. "

Christianity world 2076 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 243. "'Pardon me, but I don't think that Jesus has anything to do with angels. I have to agree with the Father. Angels have existed in traditions other than, and older than, Christian. But, what I'm most shocked to discover, if the LINK-angels are a true sign from above, is that they're all so white. The neo-Nazis and white supremacists are going to have a field day with this little tidbit. Made in His image, eh?' "
Christianity world 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 97. "'To me, God is All; He favors no particular sect. The Holy Order of Vision is not a sect in that sense; we seek only for the truth that is God, and feel that the form is irrelevant. While we honor Jesus Christ as the Son of God, we also honor the Buddha, Zoroaster, and the other great religious figure; indeed, we are all children of God...' "
Christianity world 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 236. "The rite of passage, he thought. Any new religion had to pass through sufficient hazing to justify its existence, and when it became strong enough to fight back, as early Christianity had, it became legitimate and started hazing the religion that came next. "
Christianity world 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 67. "He was surprised when I quoted the King James Bible at him: 'The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament showeth his handiwork.' That's how I learned English, reading that old translation of the Bible: my father had learned that way, and he wanted to share it with me. When he died, I continued. "
Christianity world 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 126. "It did cost less than a twentieth of what we'd paid in the Conch Republic, an indeed it was clean, ozone-smelling. Small, windowless, a hard bed with a picture of Jesus nailed over it... While Maria was using [the bathroom], I checked the one drawer. Gideon Bible with the cover torn off, decorated with some obscene cartoons, pretty well done. Feeling vaguely guilty for being amused by it, I put it away before Maria came out. "
Christianity world 2082 Haldeman, Joe. Buying Time. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1989); pg. 152. "This love confuses me. Can you, should you, separate your body from your mind from your heart? Your spirit. Other times in my life I've felt there were different kinds of love working at the same time: I could love a man with my mind and loins, and separately love Christ with my spirit, and when the two loves clashed later, in the confessional and penance, there was a righteous and a comfort to that; even to the guilt. This love with Dallas is disturbing in its pervasive unity, even while it's exhilarating; almost as if he were invading the place that holds my love of God. " [More, not in DB. Some significant characters are Christian, apparently Catholic.]
Christianity world 2086 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 134. Since [Mike] had almost finished the encyclopedia, he had read articles on 'Religion', 'Christianity', 'Islam', 'Judaism', 'Confucianism', 'Buddhism', and related subjects. "
Christianity world 2087 Heinlein, Robert A. Stranger in a Strange Land. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1961); pg. 290. "She came back to their flat one day to find him doing nothing, surrounded by books--many books: The Talmud, the Kama-Sutra, Bibles in several versions, the Book of the Dead, the Book of Mormon,... the Koran, the unabridged Golden Bough, the Way, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, sacred writings of a dozen other religions major and minor... "
Christianity world 2093 Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 233. "'I wanted to wish you happy holidays,' he said. 'Are you going to do anything special?'

'I don't celebrate winter holiday anymore, Christopher,' she said with a politely tolerant smile. 'I didn't believe in most of it, and the rest has been a disappointment. It's rained for Solstice Moon three years running. Santa Claus is just a nice old man with whiskers, and I'm still waiting for Jesus to decide he wants me. Hardly any point, wouldn't you say?' "

Christianity world 2094 Sladek, John. Tik-Tok. London: Victor Gollancz Ltd. (1985; 1st printed 1983); pg. 82. "His smugness was unbearable. it was the smugness of certain Christians in their Christian certainy, th smugness of Deacon Cooper. " [Many refs. to Christianity throughout book, most not in DB. Some listed under 'televangelism' and other specific categories.]
Christianity world 2100 Boucher, Anthony. "The Quest for Saint Aquin " (first published 1951) in Other Worlds, Other Gods: Adventures in Religious Science Fiction (Mayo Mohs, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1971); pg. 212. "Joe turned back. 'Yeah, tha's right. Been a rumor about some robass [a robotic steed] got into the hands of Christians.' He spat on the dusty road. 'Guess I better see an ownership certificate.'... The guard's eyes remained blank as he watched this furtive version of the sign of the cross. Then he looked down. Thomas followed his gaze to the dust of the road where the guard's hulking right foot had drawn the two curved lines which a child uses for its sketch of a fish--and which the Christians in the catacombs had employed as a punning symbol of their faith. "
Christianity world 2100 Card, Orson Scott. "Unaccompanied Sonata " in Nebula Winners Fifteen (Frank Herbert, ed.) New York: Harper & Row (1981); pg. 211. [Year is estimated.] 'Christian' is the name of the main character in the story, and the story is told from a Christian worldview. But there may be no explicity references to Christian religion by name. An oblique musical reference on pg. 211: "'Rock my soul in the bosom of Abraham!' sang the road-crew man who had learned to sing when his family got together with guitars. "; Pg. 214: "As the man who believed sang 'God of Our Fathers,' Sugar sang softly along. And as the man who loved folk songs sang, 'Swing Low, Swee Chariot,' Sugar joined in with a strange, piping voice... "
Christianity world 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 12. Pg. 12: "'...So instead of giving up his apt he elected to divorce his wife and let her move, taking their child. And then later on apparently he decided he made a mistake and he got embittered; he blamed himself, naturally, for making a mistake like that. A natural mistake, though; for God's sake, what wouldn't you and I give to have an apt in 33 or 34? He never remarried; maybe he's a Neo-Christian. But anyhow when you go to try to sell him on your ceramics, be very careful about how you deal with the feminine angle; don't say 'these will appeal to the ladies' or anything like that...' "; Pg. 13: "...he gripped his display case tighter and tensed himself and, although he was not a Neo-Christian, he mumbled a prolix prayer. "
Christianity world 2100 Pohl, Frederik. Gateway. New York: St. Martin's Press (1977); pg. 101. [The main character describes his sessions with a therapist. It is not clear if he uses 'Christian' here in a literal sense.] "'But I don't ever remember anything at all about my dreams.'

'I think it's worth a try, Bob.'

Well, I did. And, you know, I actually did begin to remember my dreams. Little tiny fragments, at first. And I'd write them down, and sometimes I would tell them to Sigfrid and they would make him as happy as anything. He just loved dreams.

Me, I didn't see much use in it. . . . Well, not at first. But then something happened that made a Christian out of me.

One morning I woke up out of a dream that was so unpleasant and so real that for a few moments I wasn't sure it wasn't actual fact... "

Christianity world 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 41. "Then his father went on the English Quaker, Arthur Eddington, the man who had figured out the connection between physics--stuff that people studied in laboratories on Earth--and the stars, the things that interested astronomers. You might even say, Pal Soricaine told his son, that Eddington invented the science of astrophysics. Then there were Ernst Mach and Bishop Berkeley, and the geometers Gauss and Bolyai and Riemann and Lobachevski, and Georges Lemaitre, the Belgian priest; and Baade, Hoyle, Gamow, Bethe, Dicke, Wilson, Penzias, Hawking . . . "
Christianity world 2100 Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 73. "It would have been a marvel for them if they could even have detected any of those particles, though they had sought them as long, and as unsuccessfully, as any medieval knight had sought the Holy Grail. "
Christianity world 2100 Stapledon, Olaf. Last and First Men. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher, Inc. (1988; first published 1930); pg. 58. [Year is estimated.] "On the side of Christianity a very similar legend was concerned with the same individual. The Regenerate Christian Brotherhood, by now overwhelmingly the most powerful of the Western Churches, regarded the Discoverer as the Son of God, who, in this his Second Coming, had proposed to bring about the millennium by publishing the secret of his divine power; but, finding the peoples still unable to put in practice even the most primitive gospel of love which was announced at his First Coming, he had suffered martyrdom for man's sake, and had entrusted his secret to the scientists. "
Christianity world 2100 Wolfe, Gene. "The Death of Doctor Island " in Nebula Award Stories Nine (Kate Wilhelm, ed.) New York: Harper & Row (1974); pg. 60. [Year is estimated.] "'About a hundred years ago Dr. Harlow experimented with monkeys who had been raised in complete isolation--no mothers no other monkeys at all... Dr. Harlow tried, you see, to get the isolate monkeys to breed--sex is the primary social function--but they wouldn't. Whenever another monkey of either sex approached they displayed aggressiveness, which the other monkeys returned. He cured them finally by introducing immature monkeys--monkey children--in place of the mature, socialized ones. These needed the isolate adults so badly that they kept on making approaches no matter how often or how violently they were rejected, and in the end they were accepted, and the isolates socialized. It's interesting to note that the founder of Christianity seems to have had an intuitive grasp of this principle--but it was almost two thousand years before it was demonstrated scientifically.' "
Christianity world 2103 Silverberg, Robert. Tom O'Bedlam. New York: Donald I. Fine, Inc. (1985); pg. 166-167. Pg. 166: "Senhor Papamacer... latest and perhaps last in a long line of prophets. Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Senhor Papamacer. The Senhor liked to bracket himself with them: Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Senhor Papamacer. ";

Pg. 167: "'...Mohammed, he drive camels, Moses he was a shepherd, Jesus a carpenter. And Papamacer a taxi-man.'

There they were again, the big four. Moses, Jesus, Mohammed, Papamacer... "

Christianity world 2110 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 179. "' 'Then God said: I have set my rainbow in the clouds, and it will be the sign of the covenant between me and the Earth. . . . Never again will the waters become a flood to destroy all life. Strange that I should have remembered that--I've not looked at the Old Christian bible since I was a boy. I only hope it's good news for us, as it was for Noah.' "
Christianity world 2114 Dick, Philip K. The Man Who Japed. New York: Ace Books (1956); pg. 44. "In the highly moral society of 2114 A.D., the weekly block meetings operated on the stagger system... Here, official nosing and snooping originated. In this room a man's business was everybody's business. Centuries of Christian confessional culminated when the block assembled to explore its members' souls. "
Christianity world 2118 Card, Orson Scott. Ender's Shadow. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 143. "'We make our lives of service to the larger causes of humanity. The Savior already died for sin. We work on trying to clean up the consequences of sin on other people.'

'An interesting religious quest,' said Anton. 'I wonder whether my old line of research would have been considered a service to humanity, or just another mess that someone like you would have to clean up.' "

Christianity world 2118 Card, Orson Scott. Ender's Shadow. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 148. "'An eye for an eye? How Christian of you.'

'Unbelievers always want other people to act like Christians.' "

Christianity world 2119 Card, Orson Scott. Ender's Shadow. New York: Tor (1999); pg. 304. "'Sister Carlotta, I'm on a leave of absence right now. That means I've been sacked...'

'Sacked! A miscarriage of justice. You ought to be shot.'

'If the Sisters of St. Nicholas had convents, your abbess would make you do penance for that un-Christian thought.' "

Christianity world 2120 Card, Orson Scott. "Ender's Game " in Analog: Readers' Choice: Vol. 2 (Stanley Schmidt, ed.) New York: David Publications (1981; story copyright 1977); pg. 258. "Graff nodded and closed his eyes. 'Oh, indeed, you're right, but statistical proof and by all the important theories, and dammit they work and the system is right but all the same Ender's older than I am. He's not a child. He's barely a person.'

'If that's true, sir, then at least we all know that Ender is making it possible for the others of his age to be playing in the park.'

'And Jesus died to save all men, of course.' Graff sat up and looked at Anderson almost sadly. 'But we're the ones,' Graff said, 'We're the ones who are driving in the nails.' "

Christianity world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 27. "'A nation that takes that attitude toward other nations,' said Father. 'Several self-consciously Islamic nations have the character to make such a play, but they'd never kidnap a Christian girl to lead their armies.' "
Christianity world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 68. "'Ten of you. Only two missing from the glorious victory. Ender, the great one, the genius, the keeper of the holy grail--he's off founding a colony somewhere...' "
Christianity world 2130 Clarke, Arthur C. Rendezvous with Rama. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1973); pg. 76. "To all his shipmates, Lieutenant Boris Rodrigo was something of an enigma. The quiet, dignified communications officer was popular with the rest of the crew, but he never entered fully into their activities and always seemed a little apart--marching to the music of a different drummer.

As indeed he was, being a devout member of the Fifth Church of Christ, Cosmonaut. Norton had never been able to discover what had happened to the earlier four, and he was equally in the dark about the church's rituals and ceremonies. But the main tenet of the faith was well known. Its members believed that Jesus Christ was a visitor from space, and an entire theology had been constructed on that assumption. " [Other refs. not in DB. But essentially all references to Christianity in this book are in relation to the fictional Church of Christ, Cosmonaut.]

Christianity world 2131 Resnick, Mike. Kirinyaga: A Fable of Utopia. New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 54. "Once before we [Kikuyu] had lived in harmony with the land, many long years ago. Then had come the printed word. It turned us first into slaves, then into Christians, and then into soldiers and factory workers... We had come to the world of Kirinyaga to create a perfect Kikuyu society, a Kikuyu Utopia. Could one gifted little girl carry within her the seeds of our destruction. I could not be sure, but it was a fact that gifted children grew up. They became Jesus, and Mohammed, and Jomo Kenyatta... "; Pg. 265: "'I am told that they ahve a doctor to cure the sick, and a Christian minister to tell them how to worship the god of the Europeans...' " [Some other passing references to Christianity are in book, but not in DB.]
Christianity world 2135 Dick, Philip K. Our Friends From Frolix 8. New York: Ace Books (1970); pg. 45. "'...His death isn't going to end that. Remember the famous revolutionary of the twentieth century, Che Guevara. Even though dead, the diary which he left behind--'

'Like Christ,' Barnes said. He felt depressed; he had begun to brood. 'Kill Christ and you get the New Testament. Kill Che Guevara and you get a diary that's a book of instructions on how to gain power all over the world. Kill Cordon--' "

Christianity world 2135 Dick, Philip K. Our Friends From Frolix 8. New York: Ace Books (1970); pg. 108. "' 'Believe it'? I know it's true; God is alive; that carcass they found in deep space back a few years ago, that wasn't God. You don't find God under such circumstances, that's Medieval thought. Do you know where you find the Holy Spirit? It's not out in space--hell, it created space. It's here.' He pointed to his chest. 'I--I mean, we--have a portion of the Holy Spirit within us. Look at your decision to come and give us help--you get nothing from it, perhaps injury, or some kind of destruction that the military has but which we haven't heard about.' "
Christianity world 2140 Swanwick, Michael. "Scherzo with Tyrannosaur " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 339. "...Home Base, year 2140... There was a Time Safety Officer waiting for me... The good news was that the Old Man wasn't there. If it had been something big and hairy--a Creationist bomb, or a message from a million years upline--he would have been. "
Christianity world 2150 Bear, Greg. "The Wind from a Burning Woman " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1978); pg. 17. [Year estimated] "'What were you afraid of? Some irrational desire to pin the butterflies down? Jesus God, Farmer, the Naderite beliefs don't allow anything like this...' " [Christian-based profanity, but not apparently a reference to Christianity as a religion. Some similar refs., not in DB.]
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 30. "'Is it true that the Clems used to worship a pagan deity on this little hill?'

'Apparently so,' he said. 'Called Yah.'

'Hallalujah,' Rybys said.

'What?' she said, startled.

'It means 'Praise ye Yah.' The Hebrew is Halleluyah.'

'Yahweh, then.'

'You never say that name. That's the sacred Tetragrammaton, Elohim, which is not plural but singular, means 'God,' and then later on in the Bible the Divine Name appears with Adonay, so you get 'Lord God.' You can choose between Elohim or Adonay or use both together but you can never say Yahwey.'

'You just said it.'

Rybys smiled. 'So nobody's perfect. Kill me.'

'Do you believe all that?'

'I'm just stating matters of fact.' She gestured. 'Historic fact.'

'But you do believe it. I mean, you believe in God.'

'Yes.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 50. "There existed two heads of the best, the religious one, a Cardinal Fulton Statler Harms, and then a scientific one named N. Bulkowsky. But these were phantoms. To Emmanuel the Christian-Islamic Church and the Scientific Legate did not constitute reality. He knew what lay behind them. Elias had told him. "
Christianity world 2150 Dick, Philip K. The Divine Invasion. New York: Timescape (1981); pg. 56. "'...Is that what your unconscious fantasies consist of? And you're Yahweh's spokesperson?' She blanched. 'I spoke the Sacred Name. Sorry.'

'Christians speak it all the time,' Elias said.

Rybys said, 'But I'm a Jew. I would be a Jew; that's what got me into this. If I was a Gentile Yah wouldn't have picked me...' "



Christianity, continued

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