Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, world

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity world 1984 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 57. [The devil is dismayed at the decline of evil within Christianity.] "But he is not happy. Everywhere he looks, Christianity is in decline. It no longer burns Geordano Bruno for saying the earth moves past the sun, or Michael Servetus for saying blood moves through the lungs. The slaughter of the Aztecs is a mute memory, the fight against smallpox inoculation is a vanished dream, the Index Librorum Prohibitorum a forgotten joke, the Malleus Maleficarum out of print. From pole to pole, Christians are feeding the hungry and clothing the naked. Just last week, Wyvern heard a Baptist minister say it was wrong to kill.

True, the sect called Revelationism holds some promise, but the devil doesn't trust it. 'Revelationism,' he tells the snagged fish, 'is a flash in the pantheon. No, there must be a new religion, a faith as apocalyptic as Christianity, fierce as Islam, repressive as Hinduism, smug as Buddhism. There must be a church of Julie Katz. "

Christianity world 1985 Bear, Greg. "Dead Run " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1985); pg. 154. "His shirt was pastel blue and there was a big Rembrandt Bible on his desk, sitting on the glass stop next to an alabaster. " [Other refs. not in DB..]
Christianity world 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 175. "'...In England they are killing all migratory birds, whether the come from North America or not. Some groups want to kill all birds. There is much savagery, and not just against animals, Michael. Americans eveywhere are being subjected to great indignities, even if they have lived in Europe for decades. Some religious groups believe Christ has established a base in America and is about to march on Europe to bring the Millennium. But you'll have your news over the terminal this morning, as usual. You can read about it all there. "
Christianity world 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 267. "'Who am I going to meet?'

'Gustav Mahler and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart,' Michael answered.

Edgar smiled warily. 'Napoleon, too? Maybe Christ?'

Michael shook his head. Edgar's smile vanished. 'Jesus. Crooke said he'd dreamed about Mahler...' "

Christianity world 1986 Bear, Greg. The Serpent Mage. New York: Ace Books (1987; 1st ed. 1986); pg. 292. "He stumbled over an image of the mage's youth, when the child Manus had wandered through a grove on old Earth, surrounded by large trees beside which sequoias were puny--trees of no shape Michael had ever seen, with trunks like rubbed ivory and leaves as translucent as glass.

Tumbling after this came memories of the meeting with the last serious human candidate. Manus had used all his remaining powers to cast a shadow, appearing to the Nazarene on a rocky hill in Judea, almost two thousand years before.

Michael saw the face of Christ, strong and fine-boned, eyes black but hair brown almost to red, his eyes drawing almost all attention away from the body, which was broad-shouldered and of medium height. " [More.]

Christianity world 1986 Blumlein, Michael. "The Brains of Rats " (published 1986) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 637. "One of our daughter's school teachers, a Church woman, told her that Christian girls don't wear pants. I had a dream last night that our next child is a boy. "
Christianity world 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 65. "Robin forgets, I think, that her own religion involved human sacrifice. She is a practicing Christian. She partakes of Holy Communion, the body and blood of Jesus Christ, the human son of God who died and rose from the dead o bring back to word of his Father. She believes in the Resurrection, but only as something that happened long ago in a distant land, far removed from her day-to-day life. She believes in God, the Father Almighty. On the other hand, if her next-door neighbor were to claim that God had spoken to him in a visino, she would think him eccentric and possibly dangerous. Her God is a distant patriarch who demands that she attend church and follow a set of ten rules, but he does not deign to pass along new rules through common people. She is accostomed to a God who keeps his distance. "
Christianity world 1986 Murphy, Pat. The Falling Woman. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 131. "'...There's a number of religions in the United States whose worship centers on a particular human sacrifice.'...

'Jesus Christ on the cross,' I said slowly.

'Certainly. Thousands of people consume Christ's body and blood each Sunday.'

'That's different.'

She shrugged. Not really. Christ died long ago in a faraway place, and that might make it seem different. His worshipers claimed he was God incarnate, but the Aztecs claimed the same for the god-king they sacrificed. It happened only once, and that speaks for moderation on the part of the Christians, but that's not a fundamental difference, just one of degree.' She smiled, obviously enjoying herself... 'The fundamental bloodiness of the act is the same--whether it's the Roman soldiers hammering the nailsinto Christ's hand or the h'menob slicing out the heart of a captive soldier. Blood has a power to it...' "

Christianity world 1986 Palwick, Susan. "The Neighbor's Wife " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; poem copyright 1985); pg. 163. "'Reminding her what she forgot in Heaven,' he tells us, but she has not remembered speech, this new Marella who is purple and... who surely came from somewhere, if not from God. "
Christianity world 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 44. [1] "Right to the end, he believed with all his heart that his own government had done him in with radiation. He said to Mary, and to the doctor and the nurse who were there because the end could surely come at any moment. now: 'If only it had been just God Almighty who was mad at me!'

Mary took that to be his curtain line. He certainly looked dead after that.

But then, after ten seconds, his blue lips moved again. Mary leaned close to hear his words. She would be glad for the rest of her life that she had not missed them.

'I'll tell you what the human soul is, Mary,' he whispered, his eyes closed. 'Animals don't have one. It's the part of you that knows when your brain isn't working right. I always knew, Mary. There wasn't anything I could do about it, but I always knew.'

And then he scared the wits out of Mary and everybody in the room by sitting up straight, his eyes open wide and fiery. 'Get the Bible!' he commanded... "

Christianity world 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 44. [2] "This was the only time anything to do with formal religion was mentioned during the whole of his illness. He and Mary were no churchgoers; or prayers in even dire circumstances, but they did have a Bible somewhere. Mary wasn't quite sure where.

'Get the Bible!' he said again. 'Woman, get the Bible!' He had never called her 'woman' before.

So Mary went to look for it. She found it in the spare bedroom, along with Darwin's The Voyage of the Beagle and A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens. "

Christianity world 1986 Vonnegut, Kurt. Galapagos. New York: Delacorte Press (1985); pg. 45. [3] "Roy sat up, and he... commanded, 'put your hand on the Bible and repeat after me: 'I, Mary Hepburn, hereby make two solemn promises to my beloved husband on his deathbed.' '

So she said that. She expected, and in fact hoped, that the two promises would be so bizarre, perhaps having to do with suing the government, that there would be no possibility of her keeping either one. But she was not to be so lucky.

The first promise was that she do her best to get married again as soon as possible, and not waste time in moping and feeling sorry for herself.

The second was that she go to Guayaquil in November and take 'the Nature Cruise of the Century' for both of them.

'My spirit will be with you every inch of the way,' he said. And he died. "

Christianity world 1987 Anthony, Piers. Being a Green Mother. New York: Ballantine (1987); pg. 54. "'You know that the Tzigane are only nominally Christian, just as Gypsies in Moslem lands are only nominally devotees of Mohammed. We truly honor no belief but our own.' " [Book has some other references to Christianity, especially in relation to Gypsy/Roma history and culture.]
Christianity world 1987 de Lint, Charles Jack the Giant Killer. New York: Ace Books (1987); pg. 179. "'Do you know the actual meaning of that word? 'Divine Wind.' Perhaps you should call on the gods to help you.'

'I don't believe in God. At least I don't think I do,' she added, hedging.

'The desert god your people hung from a tree couldn't help you here anyway,' Kerevan replied. 'This is the land of the Manitou...' "

Christianity world 1987 Kress, Nancy. "Cannibals " in The Aliens of Earth. Sauk City, Wisconsin: Arkham House Publishers (1993; 1st pub Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, May 1987); pg. 74. "'Art shows us to ourselves, and until we look, we don't know what we are. Not fully. We don't see our own greatness, or our own guilt. The artist--from Genesis on-- has taken on that burden of human guilt nobody else can yet bear to assume, in order to make it assumable. Socrates, Christ, Sakharov, Pollidena--the performing artist has held a mirror to our guilt...' "
Christianity world 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "...gave him a sad, ardent look such as you might find in an Old Master's rendering of a saint about to die of wounds gotten for the love of Christ. His irises were not yet showing a trace of green. "; Pg. 15: "Church quiet, with the pious, sedated air common to sickrooms and funeral homes. "
Christianity world 1988 Bear, Greg. Eternity. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 2. "But the angels do not listen. And then from the Bible Lands and points east, from the Lands of the Book and out of the People of the Book comes rebellion. "
Christianity world 1988 Foster, Alan Dean. To the Vanishing Point. New York: Warner Books (1988); pg. 174. "'...I have... sat at the feet of all the prophets, trying to learn from them. Jesus and Buddha, Moses and Mohammed, Zoroaster and confucius: all of them.'

'Have you?' was all she could say.

'They like to get together and argue. Sometimes they get excited, but they never fight. That would be unbecoming to prophets.' "

Christianity world 1989 Anthony, Mark. "A Walk by Moonlight " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 268. "then Nick saw the old black man. He was... playing something on a tenor saxophone. It might have been 'Amazing Grace' he was playing, but then it might have been 'When the Saints go Marching In.' But it was hard to tell... "
Christianity world 1989 Martindale, Steve. "A Ghost in the Matrix " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 356. "Clayton Beaudine looked as though his Christian skepticism had grown wings and flown away. And Jack, who had searched so manfully for the truth of the ghost, gazed at it quietly... "
Christianity world 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 73. "But that was history. History was replete with oppression. More important than that, lately, Christendom itself seemed threatened. Islam had swept like a brushfire through northern Africa, fomenting revolution against the Dutch, the French, the British; the Russians were battling rebellions Moslems on their southern borders. The Oriental races had evicted the military forces of the Novus Ordo from their Pacific outposts and banned commerce with the West. There were small wars everywhere and larger ones seemed inevitable.

All the portents were ominous. On Palm Sunday in 1982 the image of the Prince of Darkness had appeared in a cloud of trichlorophenol above San Pedro in Vincoli--hundreds had been hospitalized... "

Christianity world 1990 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 36. "'And the genetic engineers of the thirty-first millennium set themselves to bring forth a race of supermen, bred to adventure on the cosmic frontier,' Shalten said once, 'and lo, they found they had begotten Lucifer.' He sometimes talks in that vaguely Biblical style. Otherwise nothing about him is vague. "
Christianity world 1990 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 63. "'Imagine. Bactria falls to Antiochus, early on... Although he himself is tolerant, a descendant of his attempted to crush Judaism in palestine, as you may read in First and Second Maccabees. Given total power in Asia Minor, that attempt may well succeed. If so, then Christianity never arises. Therefore the entire world that brought you and me into being is a phantom, a might-have-been, which, conceivably, an alternate Time Patrol keeps suppressed.' "
Christianity world 1990 Anthony, Piers. And Eternity. New York: William Morrow and Company (1990); pg. 215. "Should I think about how the world was made in six days? Jolie thought... 'Jolie thought of the Biblical creation of the universe,' Orlene explained to Roque. 'So that must be--'

That's crap! Vita thought. It took millions, maybe billions of years to make the world!

The globe flashed again.

'Don't tell me, let me guess!' Roque said, growing animated. 'Vita thought of science! And what Nox seeks is a resolution to the debate between Creationism and Evolution!' " [Other refs. not in DB. This section about Creationism and Evolution is quite long.]

Christianity world 1990 Anthony, Piers. And Eternity. New York: William Morrow and Company (1990); pg. 320-321. ; Pg. 320: "'No, My turn is past,' JHVH said. 'A Christian will have to be appointed...' "; Pg. 321: "Roue explained... 'All over the world, wherever those who follow the Christian God hold sway, the vote has been taken... Those who follow other Gods have not participated, but are watching with interest, because it is the warlike Christian forces that are generating the pressures leading toward World War Three. That war would destroy the non-Christians, too...' "; Pg. 322: "'...But there are those who doubt the inevitability of war, and those who hope to make some significant pofit from it... An ad hoc coalition has formed in oposition to this move. Its elements are remarkable: many leaders of Christian denominations, and those who support Satan. They prefer the existing order and distrust any change--and I cannot say that their concern is unjustified.' "
Christianity world 1990 Bear, Greg. Heads (fiction). New York: St. Martin's Press (1990); pg. 101-102. "I had dipped into records of past prophets during my Earth research. Zarathustra. Jesus. Mohammed. Shabbetai Tzevi... Al Mahdi, who had defeated the British at Khartoum. Joseph Smith... and Brigham Young... And all the little ones since, the pretenders whose religions had eventually foundered, the charlatans of small talent, of skewed messages... "
Christianity world 1990 Dick, Philip K. The Man in the High Castle. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1962); pg. 76. "Like that joke about Goring . . . the one where Goring buys Rome and had it shipped to his mountain retreat and then set up again. And revives Christianity so his pet lions will have something to-- "
Christianity world 1990 Egan, Greg. "Learning to Be Me " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1990); pg. 148. "The Philosophy Department... They talked about Plato and Descartes and Marx... They talked about St. Augustine and... Sartre... "
Christianity world 1990 Turtledove, Harry. A World of Difference. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 210. "'Mother of God!' Lopatin shouted. He had called on the devil's relatives often enough in his [KGB] career, but could not remember the last time he had named any of the Deity's. "
Christianity world 1991 Knight, Damon. A Reasonable World. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 81. [At beginning of chapter, verse from New Testament is quoted.] "For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. --I Timothy 6:10 " [Also, on page 203, at the beginning of chapter 26, Proverbs 27:14 is quoted.]
Christianity world 1992 Powers, Tim. Last Call. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1992); pg. 127. [Epigraph] ". . . if they shall say unto you, Behold, he is in the desert; go not forth. . . .

--Matthew 24:26 "

Christianity world 1992 Tepper, Sheri S. Sideshow. New York: Bantam (1993; c. 1992); pg. 228. "'And you think this one little world is worth . . .'

'You are not the only student of ancient human Scripture. Even long dead religions have had truths written in their names. Think of the ninety and nine in the fold and the shepherd abroad in the windy night, seeking the lost sheep on the lonely hills. . . .' "

Christianity world 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 214. "'I was getting to that. you see, Persian mythology incorporates a lot of stuff that's central to the entire sweep of Indo-European culture. The rots are in Persia. It was a watershed that fed Indian, Euro-pagan, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures. That takes in just about everything...' " [Also pg. 217.]
Christianity world 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 216. "'I hear your skepticism, my friend. Okay, I can understand that. He's no the orthodox Christian devil, though. H's the Manichaean devil. Coeval with God, not created by God. Equal and opposite.' " [More.]
Christianity world 1993 Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 5. [Frontispiece] "Qui credit in Filium, habet vitam aeternam; qui autem incredulus est Filio, non videbit vitam, sed ira Dei maner super eum.

He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him.

--John 3:36 "

Christianity world 1993 Harrison, Harry. The Hammer and the Cross. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 5. [Frontispiece] "Augusta est domus: utrosque tenere non poterit. Non vult rex celstis cum paganis et perditis nominetenus regibus communionem habere; quia rex ille aeternus regnat in caelis, ille paganus perditus plangit in inferno.
The house is narrow: it cannot hold both. The king of heaven has no wish to have fellowship with damned and heathen so-called kings; for the one eternal king reigns in Heaven, the other damned heathen groans in Hell.

--Alcuin, deacon of York, A.D. 797


The greatest disaster ever to befall the West was Christianity.
Gravissima calamitas umquam supra Occidentem accidens erat religio Christiana.

--Gore Vidal, A.D. 1987 "

Christianity world 1993 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 171. [Julie asks the devil if particular people are in Hell. Everybody but four people are in Hell.] "'Gandhi?' she suggested weakly.

'A Hindu.'

'Martin Luther King?'

'His sex life.'

'Saint Paul?'

'The feminists wanted his ass.'

The Madonna?'

'A rock star.'

'No, the Madonna.'

'A Catholic.'

'Jesus?'

'The last time I saw Jesus, he was working in some hospice in Buenos Aires. I think we should count Jesus as missing in action.' "

Christianity world 1993 Neason, Rebecca. Guises of the Mind (Star Trek: TNG). New York: Pocket Books (1993) [Frontispiece]

"Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace.
Where there is hatred, let me sow love.
Where there is injury, pardon,
Where there is doubt, faith,
Where there is despair, hope,
Where there is darkness, light. . . .

--Saint Francis of Assisi "

Christianity world 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 321-322. "'Lots of answers... As many answers as there are people. Sometimes it was religious faith. Though not as often as you might think. People say they believe in this or that. But on the deepest level, where the Travellers spoke, words are only words. People call themselves Christians or Moslems, but only a vanishing few held those beliefs so deeply that they turned down immortality.' "
Christianity world 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 26. "'Our soul liaison, keeping Van Horne on his appointed path. The man's no Catholic, you see. He's barely a Christian.' " [Other references to Christianity in book, not in DB.]
Christianity world 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 41. "'The Lord was lookin' out for him.' The freckled sailor slipped a tiny gold chain from beneath his polo shirt, glancing at the attached cross like the White Rabbit consulting his pocket watch.

Neil winced. This wasn't the first time he'd encountereda Jesus aficionado. As a rule, he didn't mind them. Once at sea, they were usually diligent as hell, cleaning toilets and chipping rust without a whimper, but their agenda made him nervous. Often as not, the conversation got around to the precarious position of Neil's immortal soul. On the Stella, for example, a Seventh Day Adventist had somberly Neil that he could spare himself the 'trouble of Armageddon' by accepting Jesus then and there. "

Christianity world 1995 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 3. "Rebecca begins to feel now an even greater certainty that she is being given a mission. A holy mission. She does not know its form just yet, but each night for the past week, perhaps as long as ten days, as the dream has played itself out before here, the notion, the conviction has grown stronger and stronger in her breast. She is being taken to see something, she is to be shown something, made to understand something. And she knows, without ever having seen it, that it will be a pagan, obscene ritual, the hideous mockery of a normal, natural act. Putting, if true, the lie to everything she believes, all she holds sacred. If she accepts, for even an instant, that what she will witness could have been, even might have been, then she has been wrong. Her entire life. The things she preaches. The Bible she believes to be the Gospel, the word of God. All wrong. "
Christianity world 1995 Foster, Alan Dean. The Dig. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 60. Pg. 59-60: "'It stems from when I was six. My father dragged the family to the top of Koln cathedral. I was forced to 'enjoy' the view. It is a fear [fear of heights] that has been with me ever since...' ";

Pg. 181: "'A planetarium.' Brink spoke as if in a cathedral. In a sense, it was--a place to worship astronomy. "

Christianity world 1995 Jonas, Gerald. "The Shaker Revival " in The Ruins of Earth: An Anthology of Stories of the Immediate Future. (Thomas M. Disch, ed.) New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons (1971); pg. 279. "Q. There's been a lot of controversy lately about whether your movement [New Shakers] is really Christian--in a religious sense. Would you care to comment on that?
A. You mean like 'Jesus Christ, the Son of God'? Sure, we believe that. And we believe in Harry G, the Son of God and Richard F, the Son of God and--what's your name, star?--Raymond Senter, the son of God. That's the Gift. That's what it's all about. Jesus found the Gift inside. So did Buddha, Mother Ann, even Malcom X... "
Christianity world 1995 Niven, Larry; Jerry Pournelle & Steven Barnes. The Legacy of Heorot. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 345. Quotes at the beginning of a chapter:

"Thou hast covered my head in the day of battle.

--The Book of Common Prayer "

Christianity world 1995 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 115. "No credence whatever is to be given to the opinion . . . that the demons act as messengers and interpreters between the gods and men to carry all petitions from us to the gods, and to bring back to us the help of the gods. On the contrary, we must believe them to be spirits most eager to infict harm, utterly alien from righteousness, swollen with pride, pale with envy, subtle in deceit . . .

--Augustine
The City of God, VII, 22 " [This quote is at a chapter head. Other quotes from Augustine and other early Christian sources are at many other chapter heads.]

Christianity world 1995 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 125. "Some chiliasts held that the imminent arrival of the Third Millennium would be accompanied by the return of Jesus or Buddha or Krisha or The Prophet, who would establish on Earth a benevolent theocracy... "
Christianity world 1995 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 135. "...and Valerian had a deep, quiet, bu sophisticated Christian faith. If they were lucky enough to coming anywhere near cracking the Message, she was willing to deliver it personally to... Drumlin... "
Christianity world 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 453. "'Rock of a-a-a-ges . . .'

The singing had taken a slightly frantic tone, sharper, higher, more disturbing... "

Christianity world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "The Ghost in the Machine " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 165. "'...If you had arrived next year, you might have found me in the churchyard...' "
Christianity world 1996 Bradbury, Ray. "The Other Highway " in Quicker Than the Eye. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 253. "It was like being in a great green church, a cathedral, the trees so high that the people and cottages were lost far down below. "
Christianity world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 39. "You report the facts. Shared humanity has the job of interpreting them. Same with science. It wasn't Darwin's problem that God didn't create Adam and Eve, it was the bishop's problem. Don't blame the messenger, she'd say calmly... "
Christianity world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 68. "I'm not saying you have to kneel in awe, proffering bowls of frankincense and jars of myrrh... "
Christianity world 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 70. "Can you have a midlife crisis at twenty-four?... How can you tell if that's freakish or usual? No one ever says. The ceaselessly expanding Christian Societies in the university would tell you that it was a sign you needed room for Christ in your life. That your ache was a vacuum in the soul. Yeah, right. Sure. It was the same voids that drugs filled, I supposed... The longings of a creative spirit then? Maybe my soul craved expression in Art? But: can't draw, can't write, can't sing, can't play. Great. Where does that leave me? "
Christianity world 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 154. "Other countries of the AIC [Muslim nations] might permit the UN to mediate the newly vexed Jewish Question, but not Libya. To her junta it seemed clear that Christians and Jews had turned the UN into one enormous Swiss-based conspiracy... "
Christianity world 1996 Morrow, James. "Bible Stories for Adults No. 46: The Soap Opera " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 165. "He slips a vest-pocket King James Bible from his suit and opens to the Book of Job. " [This story, and pretty much every story in this anthology, refer to Christianity frequently, which should be no surprise given the title of the book. Most refs. are not in DB, and most refs. are to Christianity and religion in general, not to specific denominational groups.]
Christianity world 1996 Morrow, James. "The Covenant " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 127. " 'No gods except me'--right? " says the Son of Rust as we stride down South Street.

"Right, " I reply.

"You don't see the rub? "

"No. "

My companion grins. "Such a prescription implies there is but one true faith. Let it stand, Domine, and you will be setting Christian agains Jew, Buddhist against Hindu, Muslim against pagan. . . "

"An overstatement, " I insist.

Christianity world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 19. "Helena shook her head... 'The early Christians accepted the existence of the gods their faith supplanted,' she said, lapsing for a moment into the tone of voice Cassie thought of as her mother's 'lecture mode.' As the chief curator of the Gateway City Museum of Cultural Antiquities, Helena had an unfortunate habit--in the eyes of her teenaged daughter--of turning everything into some reference to her work. 'They accepted the existence of the Greco-Roman gods,' Helena said. 'They simply chose not to worship them. Eventually, they even turned some of them into the prototypes for their images of demons and goblins. Pan in particular seemed to hold a special fear and fascination for them. He became the blueprint for less sophisticated pictures of the Devil, and even gave us the word panic.' " [By the way, Byrne has pointed out that Gateway City is really just San Francisco with a different name.]
Christianity world 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 142. "[Father] Morris shook his head in disbelief [at Diana's story]. 'It is all so utterly different from anything I was raised to believe. And yet, if there is room in this for the Christian God, if there is a place for Him before all this, still as the progenitor of Creation, perhaps there is still an answer to my questions.' "
Christianity world 1997 Ing, Dean. Flying to Pieces. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (1997); pg. 114. "'The guy's got a scooter left over from Biblical times...' " [Also pg. 232.]
Christianity world 1997 Koja, Kathe & Barry N. Malzberg. "In the Last Chamber " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 123. [Year unknown.] "...the just and patient tyrants of calumny or prayer, meat or the divine, turning, turning the wheels of my own mortality toward that greater union, further judgment: mene, the cast letter in the light, letters like fire in the banquet hall... Father, forgive them. They have been wanting. Father, forgive them again. They have been wanting. They fall and they fall and they fall, priests and troops and vestals and sisters, Tiberius and Germanicus and poor, bleeding Caligula through the arc of time to the stones of definition and it is here, in the palace, in the cusp of waiting centuries, that the soul, fluttering free, confronts its own Ascension below. Weighed, balance, upharsin, wanting.

And from Caligula then: prayer, remission, faith and healing: the blood and the water, the Prince of Peace. "

Christianity world 1997 Morrow, James. Only Begotten Daughter. New York: William Morrow & Co. (1990); pg. 185. "'There are Christians in every corner of the globe.'

...'There are who?'

'Christians. The people who worship you. The ones who call you Christ.' "

Christianity world 1997 Sheffield, Charles. Tomorrow and Tomorrow. New York: Bantam (1998; c. 1997); pg. 389. [Appendix] "Before 1800, that was not a worry. The universe was believed to be only a few thousand years old. Archbishop Ussher of Armagh, working backward through the genealogy of the Bible, had announced in 1654 that the exact date of the Creation was 4004 B.C. Through the eighteenth century, that scriptural timeline prevented anyone worrying much about the age of the Sun. If it started out ver hot in 4000 B.C., it probably hadn't had time to cool down yet. "
Christianity world 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 19. "...affronted in their bourgeois myth by avatars of Christ, Mohammed, Buddha. " [Many refs. in book to Christianity, most not in DB.]
Christianity world 1997 Watson, Ian. God's World. New York: Carroll & Graf Publishers (this ed. 1990; copyright 1979); pg. 21. "The political trigger fingers are orthodoxly Christian, or their orthodox Marxist antitype: bedfellows in defence of established history. "


Christianity, continued

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