Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, world

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity world 1969 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969) [Frontispiece]

"The cattle are lowing,
The Baby awakes.
But the little Lord Jesus
No crying He makes. "

Christianity world 1970 Dick, Philip K. A Maze of Death. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1970); pg. 7. [Excerpts from Author's Forward] "The theology in this novel is not an analog of any known religion. It stems from an attempt made by William Sarill and myself to develop an abstract, logical system of religious thought, based on the arbitrary postulate that God exists. I should say, too, that the late Bishop James A. Pike, in discussions with me, brought forth a wealth of theological material for my inspection, none of which I was previously acquainted with...

'Tekel upharsin' is Aramaic for, 'He has weighted and now they divide.' Aramaic was the tongue that Christ spoke. There should be more like him. "

Christianity world 1971 Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 1. [Frontispiece: Bible quote: Revelation chapter 8, verses 6 through 13 quoted in their entirety.] "And the seven angels which had the seven trumpets prepared themselves to sound... And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice, Woe, woe, woe, to the inhabiters of the earth by reason of the other voices of the trumpet of the three angels, which are yet to sound! "
Christianity world 1972 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 287. "In the Army he had sometimes wondered--especially in Vietnam and in California--if this day, if this particular day, was going to be his last. If on this day, the Jesus bolt at the top of the helicopter engine assembly would let loose and he would die in a rice paddy as the copter crashed in. "
Christianity world 1972 Heidenry, John. "The Counterpoint of View " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 3. "...William Shakespeare was indeed among the company of translators assigned by James I of England in the early 1600's to work out a new version of the Scriptures, so that 'it may speake like it selfe.' He enlisted as one of his five proofs the translation of Psalm 46, where undeniably Shakespeare had signatured his composition with the forty-sixth words counting from both beginning and end. " [More about the Bible.]
Christianity world 1973 Bear, Greg. "Webster " in Tangents. New York: Warner Books (1989; story c. 1973); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "The dictionary and Bible sat small and tightly noncommittal in buckram and black leather.

'Help me,' she asked the dictionary, gently pushing the bible aside. 'Book of all books, massive thing I can hardly lift, every thought lies in you, all human possibilities. Everything I can feel can be expressed through the words you hold...' "; Pg. 93: "Would it thunder? Only silence. The dictionary trembled and the bible looked somber in shadow. "; Pg. 95: "He probably did not have a name, not a Christian name at any rate. "

Christianity world 1973 Sagan, Carl. Cosmic Connection: An Extraterrestrial Perspective. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2000; c. 1973); pg. 67. Pg. 67: "...Biblical Near East... King James Bible... "; Pg. 243: St. Augustine [More, pg. 91.]
Christianity world 1973 Watson, Ian. The Embedding. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1973); pg. 47. "...and he was seven years old again, standing up in Sunday School to pipe out the same nursery rhyme as part of a Harvest Festival. He'd fluffed his lines... " [More here. Some other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity world 1973 Watson, Ian. The Embedding. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1973); pg. 100. "'I resent it, Chris. I feel like an atheist confronted by the Second Coming in the grand style--angels blowing silver trumpets in the sky.' "
Christianity world 1974 Dick, Philip K. "A Little Something for Us Tempunauts " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1974); pg. 421. "'...We all go to one place, he thought, as the Bible says. but . . . for the three of us, we have been there already...' "
Christianity world 1974 Dick, Philip K. Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said. New York: Doubleday (1974); pg. 17. [Christian-based profanity is used frequently in book. Some examples are here.] "'I don't know where I am. In the name of Christ come and get me...' "; "What the hell did I do to him, for chrissakes? "
Christianity world 1974 Ellison, Harlan. "The Deathbird " in Nebula Award Stories Nine (Kate Wilhelm, ed.) New York: Harper & Row (1974); pg. 153-154. [Year is estimated. Most of Genesis chapter 3, versus 1 through 15 are quoted verbatum in this story, followed by exam questions on the reading with questions such as:] "Traditionally, the apple is considered to be the fruit the serpent offered to Eve. But apples are not endemic to the Near East. Select one of the following, more logical subsitutes, and discuss how myths come into being and are corrupted over long periods of time: olive, fig, date, pomegranate. " [Many other references to Christianity in this story, but not in DB.]
Christianity world 1974 Niven, Larry & Jerry Pournelle. The Mote in God's Eye. New York: Simon and Schuster (1974); pg. 11. On a page before the beginning of the book, the authors quote Matthew 7:3, which is the source of the title of the book: And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
Christianity world 1975 Plauger, P. J. "Child of All Ages " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1975); pg. 103. "George Foster, Jr., sensed that the seemingly innocent child sitting across from him was waiting them out... One thing he was sure of was that if this child were indeed older than Christendom he didn't have much chance against her in intellectual games. "
Christianity world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 38. "...as Christ had to die before he could become the Father, as (in Vedanta) the false 'self' must be obliterated to join the great Self. "
Christianity world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 61. Pg. 61: "'...They had excellent reasons, from their viewpoint, to preach the Christian ethic to the masses, you know...' "; Pg. 81: "...and Santa Claus and Laughing Buddha Jesus and a million million birds... "
Christianity world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 87. "'He's actually talking in Norwegian or Italian, whichever language he knows best. he's using what I call the Pentecost Gommick. It's described in the Acts of the Apostles as the gift of tongues. After the death of Jesus the Apostles were sitting together on the feast of Pentecost, when tongues of fire appeared over their heads. Then they went out and preached to a crowd of people from many different countries, and each person heard the sermons in his own language and in the form most likely to persuade him. They made tens of thousands of converts to Christianity that way. I was the one who laid the trick on them, though they never knew that.'

'Speaking in tongues!' said George in wonderment. 'They used to preach about it in Bible class: 'And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions and your old men shall dream dreams.' ' "

Christianity world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 158. "Hagbard had removed all Christian decorations and redesigned it in classical Greek... "
Christianity world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 188. "The Illuminati date for anything is always a higher number than that in any other calendar, since the Jews (and, oddly, the Scotch Rite masons) date everything from 240 A.M., Confucians from 312 A.M., Christians from 4000 A.M., Moslems from 4580 etc. Only Bishop Usher, who dated everything from 4004 B.C. (or -4 A.M.), produced an older starting point than the Illuminati. "
Christianity world 1975 Zelazny, Roger. "Some Science Fiction Paramaters: A Biased View " in Unicorn Variations. New York: Timescape (1983; story c. 1975); pg. 210. "True epics of course are few and historically well spaced, but that slightly more mundane ingredient, the speculative impulse, be it of Classic, Christian or Renaissance shading, which ornamented Western literature with romances, fables, exotic voyages and utopias, seemed to me basically the same turn of fancy exercised today in science fiction... "
Christianity world 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 1. "...the western doors of the longest nave in Christendom... it could scarcely have been a more distinguished assembly at any time: the young King William V himself; the kings of Porugal, of Naples, of Sweden, of Lithuania and a dozen other realms; the Crown Prince of Muscovy and the Dauphin; the brother of the Emperor of Almaigne; the viceroys of India, New Spain and Brazil; the High Christian Delegate of the Sultan-Calif of Turkey; the Vicar-General of the Emperor-Patriarch of Candia; the incumbent Archbishop of Canerbury, Primate of United England; no fewer than twelve cardinals, together with less pre-eminent clergy from all over the Catholic world--these and thousands besides had congregated for the laying to rest of His Most Devout Majesty, King Stephen III of England and her Empire. " [Many refs. to Christianity throughout book, nearly always to Catholicism, because in this alternative reality, there was no Protestant Reformation.]
Christianity world 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 66. "'No compulsion would be necessary.Master Anvil is an exceedingly devout Christian, and is known to be one. A word from the right quarter acquainting him with the divine will in this business, and that would be the end of it.' "
Christianity world 1976 Kotzwinkle, William. Doctor Rat. New York: Marlowe & Co. (1976); pg. 178. "I try to backpedal, to stall. 'Surely you know St. Paul was against homosexuality. It's not Christian.'

His tail touches mine.

'I can show you biblical proof!'

'Don't be alarmed. I'm a Christian minister.'

'You are?'

'I am.' He pushes me onto the stairs. Other paws grab me from behind.

'What sort of debate is this anyhow? I can quote you from my paper--'

'My friends and I have a private room upstairs. Come on. . . .'

His friends are--two sailors! Covered with tattoos. I'm swept up the stairs with them. " [More.]

Christianity world 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 91. Pg. 90-91: "'My father's house has many mansions, Chris,' he said. 'For instance, you'll find, in the hereafter, the particular heaven of each theology.'

'Which is right then?' I asked, completely baffled now.

'All of them,' he said, 'and none. Buddhist, Hindu, Moslem, Christian, Jew--each has an after-life experience which reflects his own beliefs. The Viking has his Valhalla, the American Indian his Happy Hunting Ground, the zealot his City of Gold. All are real. Each is a portion of the overall reality.' "

Christianity world 1976 Matheson, Richard. What Dreams May Come. New York: Tor (1998; c. 1978); pg. 247. "I looked across the hall in startlement as a man began to shout. 'I'm a Christian and a follower of my Saviour! I demand to be taken to my Lord! You have no right to keep me here! No right!' "
Christianity world 1977 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 186. "Those who read the standard editions of the Bible may wonder why there is a gap of two or three hundred years between the Old and New Testaments. Did the old scholars, historians, philosophers, and prophets simply stop creating for a time? As it turns out, this was not the case. Material was recorded, and was known to the scholars of Jesus' time, and perhaps to Jesus himself, but it was not incorporated into the Bible. In the succeeding millennia, much of it was buried in old libraries and largely ignored. Then, in 1947, the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls transformed the picture, for the documents, dating from the time of Jesus, contained much of this same material, authenticating it. Now the story of the lost years could be unraveled " [More, pg. 186-187.]
Christianity world 1977 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 186. "After Alexander the Great conquered the world, many Jews were scattered from Israel to all the countries of the Mediterranean. This was the Diaspora--not the first or the last Jewish dispersion, for a number of conquerors used this method to deal with these intractable people--significant because it happened to make a cutoff date f about 300 B.C. for the assorted books of the Bible. Many displaced Jews now spoke Greek rather than Hebrew, and there were actually more Jews in Alexandria than in Jerusalem. But only narrowly defined Hebrew-language texts were accepted for the Bible as it now stands. Thus much material was excluded by both Jews and Christians, although it was generally recognized to be parallel to the included books. The complete assembly consists of the 39 books of the Old Testament, 14 books of the Apocrypha (meaning 'hidden'), about 18 books of the Pseudepigrapha ('false writings'), and 27 books of the New Testament. That makes the record continuous. "
Christianity world 1977 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 231. Pg. 231-231: Frontispiece quotes Acts IX:1-9, from King James Bible [passage about Saul on the road to Damascus, becoming Paul.]
Christianity world 1977 Merle, Robert. Malevil. New York: Simon and Schuster (1973; original French ed. pub. 1972); pg. 68. "And another thing needs to be said. Nothing, absolutely nothing, in the weks preceding Zero Day made it possible to predict it. There were wars, of course, and famines and massacres. And here and there a few atrocities. Some of them flagrant (in the underdeveloped countries), others less obvious (in the Christian countries). But nothing, taken all in all, in any way different from what we had been seeing for the past thirty years. "
Christianity world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 150. "'Genghis Khan, Joan of Arc, Einstein...' "
Christianity world 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 179. "It seemed probable to Superman that this particular event was at least as significant as stories of visions and prophecies and such as they were recorded in sacred writings of the various religions. He often wondered if the people in those stories were as forthright and no-nonsense in there dealings with one another as the writings made them out to be.

In the Bible, for example, nobody messed around. If somebody wanted to say something to someone, there was a big fight, no preliminaries to waste time. No wonder these people lived so long...

There was another thing that never seemed to happen in Bible stories: somebody was confused by something someone else said. "

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 16. "Chaney felt the weight of the book in his lap. He hadn't been aware of the woman placing it there.

The legend on the red dustjacket was as familiar as the back of his hand. From the Qumran Caves: Past, Present, and Future. The line of type next below omitted the word by and read only: Dr. Brian Chaney. The bright jacket was an abomination created by the sales department over the inert body of a conservative editor; it was designed to appeal to the lunatic fringe. He detested it. Despite his careful explanations, despite his scholarly translation of a suspect scroll, the book had stirred up twice the storm he'd expected and aroused the ire of righteous citizens everywhere. String up the blasphemer! " [This is Chaney's translation of the book of Revelations. There are refs. to this and to Qumran, and Dead Sea Scrolls throughout novel, most listed under 'Essenes,' although, in reality, there were not NT books among Dead Sea Scrolls.]

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 23. "'Mr. Chaney authored a book on the Qumran scrolls.'

Major Moresby reacted. 'That Chaney?'

...Arthur Saltus stared at him with round eyes. 'I've heard about you, mister! William has your book. They want to hang you up by your thumbs!'

Chaney said amiably: 'That happens every now and then. St. Jerome upset the Church with his radical translation in the fifth century, and they were intent on stretching more than his thumbs before somebody quieted them down. He produced a new Latin translation of the Old Testament, but his critics didn't exactly cheer him. No matter--his work outlived them. Their names are forgotten.'

'Good for him. Was it successful?'

'It was. You may know the Vulgate.'

Saltus seemed vaguely familiar with the name, but the Major was reddened and fuming. "

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 23. "'Chaney! You aren't comparing this poppycock of yours to the Vulgate!'

'No, sir,' Chaney said... He now knew the Major's religion, and knew the man had read his book with loose attention. 'I'm pointing out that after fifteen centuries the radical is accepted as the norm. My translation of the Revelations only seems radical now. I may have the same luck, but I don't expect to be canonized.' "

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 53. "'I've published only one book [new translation of Revelations]. There wa no doom.'

...'Old William said you were bent on destroying the foundations of Christianity. You must have done something, mister. Did you chip away at the foundation?' "

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 61. "'...Mr. Seabrooke believes it will be a profitable alternate. It is under active study.' She hesitated and droped her gaze to the table. 'The general location in Palestine is or was a site known as the Hill of Skulls.'

...Chaney said quietly: 'Seabrooke has picked a very hot alternative. If we can't go up there [to the year 2000] for the survey, our team is going back to film the Crucifixion.' "

Christianity world 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 89. "'If you were looking for prophetic visions, yes. If you were interested in a biblical curiosity, no. The future should bring some great debates on that Revelations scroll; a dozen or so aplecarts have been upset.' "
Christianity world 1979 Willis, Connie. "And Come from Miles Around " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 138. "'They come for the same reason the pilgrims went to Canterbury, Teddy Roosevelt went to Yellowstone, the astronauts went to the moon. To see the show.' "
Christianity world 1980 Adams, Douglas. The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. New York: Harmony Books (1980); pg. 188. "'It's there for us to eat. Either it's good or its bad, either they want to feed us or to poison us. If it's poisonous and we don't eat it they'll just attack us some other way. If we don't eat, we lose out either way.'

'I like the way you're thinking,' said Ford. 'Now eat one.'

Hesitantly, Arthur picked up one of the things that looked like pears. "

Christianity world 1980 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 244. [An alternate history because the timeline has been changed.] "And the Inquisition busy in western Christendom. God! I believed my twentieth century was pretty grim. "
Christianity world 1980 Anthony, Piers. Faith of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (10th printing 1986; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 82. "'...But of course there are many Christian religions who do not follow the pope, so in that sense it is more confused than ever.' "
Christianity world 1980 Baxter, Stephen. Voyage. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 263-264. "The next voice was Phil Stone's.

'Abide with me; fast falls the eventide
'The darkness deepens; Lord, with me abide.
'When other helpers fail and comforts flee,
'Help of the helpless, o abide with me . . .'

Stone's voice, made harsh by the radio link, was slipped, brisk, almost efficient. Next came the heavily accented tones of Solovyov, high and nervous.

'Swift to its close ebbs out life's little day;...
'Change and decay in all around I see;
'O thou who changest not, abide with me . . .'

What in hell is Muldoon doing? When the Apollo 8 astronauts had done a Bible reading from lunar orbit, NASA had actually been sued by an atheist, for violating constitutional prohibitions against the establishment of religion. The Soviets had banned religion altogether!--and now here's a cosmonaut reading out some old hymn form an American space station. My God. What a mess.

And yet--and yet . . . "

Christianity world 1980 Benford, Gregory. Jupiter Project. New York: Avon (1998; c. 1980) [Frontispiece.] "Father of all! in every age
In every clime ador'd,
By saint, by savage, and by sage,
Jehovah, Jove, or Lord!

--ALEXANDER POPE "

Christianity world 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 115. "'I have heard of C. W. Saturn,' Luthor said, 'and I have also heard of the Easter Bunny and the Tooth Fairy...' "
Christianity world 1980 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Miracle Monday. New York: Warner Books (1981); pg. 205. "Why, the reader will ask, did Luthor not want this to come about? Remember Hamlet. In Hamlet, the hero hates his uncle King Claudius so much that he avoids killing him while Claudius in praying in church, because Hamlet believes that anyone, no matter how sinful, who dies while he is praying, will go to his reward in Heaven rather than Hell. He hates Claudius enough to let him live, rather than assure him of entry to Heaven, no matter how painful that entry may be. " [More.]
Christianity world 1980 Simak, Clifford D. "The Grotto of the Dancing Deer " in Immortals (Jack Dann & Gardner Dozois, eds.) New York: Ace Books (1998; c. 1980); pg. 138. "'...You heard first hand of Attila. You skulked along on Crusades...' "
Christianity world 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 426. "A Level Three person was fixated on rules. 'I followed orders.' Level Four ethics were dictated by the majority. A Level Five person devoted his or her life to creating and defending the laws that best served the widest common good, while defending the legal rights even of those whose views the Level Five person could not accept... Level Sixes were able to transcend the legalistic fixation of Level Fives, focusing on the common good and higher ethical realities across national, cultural, and societal boundaries. Level Sevens responded only to universal principles. Level Sevens appeared to be represented by the occasional Jesuses, Gandhis, and Buddhas... Christ handing his legacy to the Level Three Paul... "
Christianity world 1980 Vinge, Joan D. The Snow Queen. New York: Dial Press (1980); [8 pages before page 1]; pg. -8. [Not part of novel, but on a page between the cover page and the 1st page of the narrative, there is a verse from the New Testament and a quote from Emerson.] "'. . . strait is the gate and narrow the way which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.'
--New Testament, Matthew 7:14

'You shall have joy, or you shall have power, said God; you shall not have both.'
--Ralph Waldo Emerson. "

Christianity world 1980 Waldrop, Howard. "Ugly Chickens " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1980); pg. 485. "...wandering around during their owner's music lessons, or stuck with Adam and Eve in some Edenic idyll.

...who may have discovered the Mascarenes before the Europeans cranked themselves up for the First Crusade. "

Christianity world 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 346. "'...But in fact that Emperor, despite his birth and his name, was no German. He was Emperor of all the world, or at least all Christendom. He was heir to French Charlemagne and Roman Caesar...' "
Christianity world 1982 Asimov, Isaac. "Introduction " in Dragon Tales. New York: Ballantine (1982); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "The Greek god Apollo slew one [a dragon] in establishing his temple at Delphi. The Teutonic hero Siegfried slew one, and so did the Christian hero St. George... Or they could be the embodiment of evil, for in the Bible, the dragon is mentioned two or three times as a primal enemy of God... "; Pg. 13: "The description of the Leviathan in the Book of Job is almost surely inspired by the crocodile. "
Christianity world 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 330. "Happy Easter, Miss Rennet and Master Bryerly.' The hidden implication, which they had probably not even registered, was that professing Christians ought to behave in a more loving manner than Miss Rennet had just done. Tomorrow was the ostensible anniversary of her Savior's Resurrection, but she acted as if she had no deep belief in the debatable historic event. "
Christianity world 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 333. "'O my fellow Americans,' she said, 'what an aspicious morning this is. If you're a Christian, we in the White House wish you all the most joyous blessings of the Savior's Resurrection. If you're of some other religious or metaphysical persuasion, the day remains an auspicious one.' "
Christianity world 1982 Bova, Ben. "A Slight Miscalculation " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 139. "There was a Biblical crack of lightning and the ultimate grinding, screaming, ear-shattering roar. "
Christianity world 1982 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 219. "All around him, the other worlds sheaved away in layers of gray mist. There were worlds in which the Chinese had colonized North and South America, in which the Christian religion did not exist, in which giant sloths and tapirs roamed the Great Plains. "
Christianity world 1982 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984); pg. 226. "'...We can't get three billion people in ten years that way. This has to be a movement that anybody can belong to, Christian, Jew, Moslem, whatever.' " [Some refs. not in DB.]
Christianity world 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 354. Pg. 354: "'Charles has a good heart, basically. He doesn't want Harry to suffer--my brother is what I guess you have to call a Christian gentleman.'

'A Christian gentleman,' Judy said... 'Are there still such creatures?'

'In the ranks of fifty-eight-year-old heads of law firms, I guess.' ";

Pg. 472: "'...A Christian man doesn't drink beer. My Karl never touched a drop of liquor...' " [More.]

Christianity world 1983 Willis, Connie. "The Sidon in the Mirror " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1983); pg. 148. "...next door to her abbey, had christened the little string of buildings we could see in the distance St. Pierre after the patron saint of tappers, and all the time the bottoms of her feed fried like cooking meat and she never said a word. " [Other refs. not in DB. Many refs. to the 'abbey,' without mentioned any church specifically.]
Christianity world 1984 Farmer, Philip Jose. "A Scarletin Study " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 190. "Its canvas bears, among other things, the images of Sherlock Holmes, Christ coming from the tomb, Tarzan, a waistcoat... "
Christianity world 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 1. Pg. 0: Frontispiece: Job 5:17 quoted; [All other refs. listed here are epigraphs quotes.] Pg. 1: Isaiah 43:2; Pg. 11: Ecclesiastes 1:9; Pg. 23: Proverbs 20:1; Pg. 32: Job 5:6-7; Pg. 43: Proverbs 28:1; Pg. 53: Isaiah 22:13; Pg. 61: Job 6:28; Pg. 75: Jonah 1:15; Pg. 84: Matthew 25:35; Pg. 95: Genesis 3:19; Pg. 107: Genesis 29:20;Pg. 122: Revelation 11:13; Pg. 140: Ecclesiastes 1:14; Pg. 154: Ecclesiastes 9:11; Pg. 173: Proverbs 27:1; Pg. 191: Job 4:17 and Job 6:24; Pg. 213: Job 23:8-10; Pg. 226: Job 1:7; Job 11:7; Pg. 245: 1 Kings 21:20; Pg. 254: Proverbs 28:1; Pg. 266: Revelation 8:13-15; Pg. Job 38:7; Pg. 303: Job 30:20; Pg. 315: Job 23:3-4; Pg. 322: 1 Kings 11:3; Job 4:17; Pg. 336: Job 30:29; Pg. 342: Ecclesiastes 1:18; Job 3:2-3; Pg. 355: Matthew 7:7; Pg. 373: Ecclesiastes 1:11
Christianity world 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 103. "Minor theological note: Many people seem to believe that the Ten Commandments forbid lying. Not at all! The prohibition is against bearing false witness against your neighbor--a specific, limited, and despicable sort of lie. But there is no Biblical rule forbidding simple untruth. Many theologians believe that no human social organization could stand up under the strain of absolute honesty. If you think their misgivings are unfounded, try telling your friends the ungarnished truth about what you think of their offspring--if you dare risk it. " [Extensive refs. to Christianity in novel, not in DB. The novel is largely an exploration of Christian (and other) theology.]
Christianity world 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 113. "But her disdain for Biblical authority concerning the legality of one man having two wives was so sharp that I asked he about it later--not about polygamy; I stayed away from that touchy subject; I asked her how she felt about the authority of Holy Writ in general. I explained that the church I was brought up in believed in strict interpretation--'A whole Bible, not a Bible full of holes'--Scripture was the literal word of God . . . but that I knew that other churches felt that the spirit rather than the letter ruled . . . some being so liberal that they hardly bothered with the Bible. yet all of them called themselves Christian. " [More.]
Christianity world 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 113. "'Margrethe my love, as deputy executive secretary of Churches United for Decency I was in daily contact with members of every Protestant sect in the country and in liaison association with many Roman Catholic clerics on matters where we could join in a united front. I learned that my own church did not have a monopoly on virtue. A man could be awfully mixed up in religious fundamentals and still be a fine citizen and a devout Christian.'

I chuckled as I recalled something and went on, 'Or to put it in reverse, one of my Catholic friends, Father Mahaffey, told me that even I could squeeze into Heaven, because the Good Lord in His infinite wisdom made allowances for the ignorance and wrongheadedness of Protestants.' "

Christianity world 1984 Knight, Damon. The Man in the Tree. New York: Berkley Books (1984) [Frontispiece has two quotes: From New Testament, Acts 5:30, "The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew and hanged on a tree "; and quote from "Book of James, or Protevangelium, XVIII:2 "
Christianity world 1984 Miller, Calvin. War of the Moonrhymes. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1984); pg. 68. [Epigraph mentions Eden.]

"No virtue is safe
    With a scoundrel.
Each Eden is
    Paradise frail.
No Heaven was
    Ever too lofty
For devils with
    Ladders to scale. "



Christianity, continued

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