Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, USA

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 78. [Pg. 78:] Mildred's mouth twitched. "See what you're doing? You'll ruin us! Who's more important, me or that Bible? " She was beginning to shriek now, sitting there like a wax doll melting in its own heat.

[Pg. 79:] Now as the vacuum-underground rushed him through the dead cellars of town, jolting him, he remembered the terrible logic of that sieve, and he looked down and saw that he was carrying the Bible open. There were people in the suction train but he held the book in his hands and the silly thought came to him, if you read fast and read all, maybe some of the sand will stay in the sieve. But he read and the words fell through...

Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 82. "Montag gave him the book.

'It's been a long time. I'm not a religious man. But it's been a long time.' Faber turned the pages, stopping here and there to read. 'It's as good as I remember. Lord, how they've changed it in or 'parlors' these days. Christ is one of the 'family' now. I often wonder if God recognizes his own son the way we've dressed him up, or is it dressed him down? He's a regular peppermint stick now, all sugar-crystal and saccharine when he isn't making veiled references to certain commercial products that every worshiper absolutely needs.' Faber sniffed the book... Faber closed the Bible. " [Ballantine edition (1991): pg. 81.]

Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 138. "'What have you to offer?'

'Nothing. I thought I had part of the Book of Ecclesiastes and maybe a little of Revelation, but I haven't even that now.'

'The Book of Ecclesiastes would be fine. Where was it?'

'Here,' Montag touched his head.

'Ah,' Granger smiled and nodded.

'What's wrong? Isn't that all right?' said Montag.

'Better than all right; perfect!' Granger turned to the Reverend. 'Do we have a Book of Ecclesiastes?'

'One. A man named Harris in Youngstown.'

'Montag... Walk carefully. Guard your health. If anything should happen to Harris, you are the book of Ecclesiastes. See how important you've become in the last minute!' "

Christianity USA 2030 Disch, Thomas M. On Wings of Song. New York: St. Martin's Press (1978); pg. 56. "Of course the actual product the Super-King were selling wasn't hamburgers and such, it was an idea--the idea of Jesus, the Super-King. All products, Van Dyke insisted, were only ideas, and the most mind-boggling idea was the idea of Jesus who was both God and an ordinary man and therefore a complete impossibility. Therefore, since He represented the best possible bargain, everybody should buy that product, which was basically what had happened over the last two thousand years--the rise of Christianity being the same as the success of the Super-King chain. "
Christianity USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 19. "...but now I hear him reading from the twenty-fifth chapter of Matthew, quoting the words of Christ:

'For the kingdom of Heaven is as a man traveling into a far country who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his goods. And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightaway took his journey.'

My father loved parables--stories that taught, stories that presented ideas and morals in ways that made pictures in people's minds. He used the ones he found in the Bible, the ones he plucked from history, or from folk tales, and, of course, he used those he saw in his life and the lives of people he knew. He wove stories into his Sunday sermons, his Bible classes, and his computer-delivered history lectures... " [MANY other refs. to Christianity, most not in DB.]

Christianity USA 2032 Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Talents. New York: Seven Stories Press (1998); pg. 58. "The Noyers were nominal Christians--a Catholic mother, an Episcopalian father, and kids who had never seen the inside of a church. "
Christianity USA 2040 Alexander, Eitan. "Beneath the Planet of the Compulsives " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 2. [C.A.A.C.A.A., a twelve-step program for recovery from homosexual sex addiction.] "After the chapter is finished, we discuss it. It's kind of like Bible study, although it's not supposed to be religious at all, it's supposed to be 'spiritual.' but all the references to God and prayer make that a little difficult to figure out. Some people in the program still haven't or don't want to.

Like this guy from the program that I dated once. C.A.A.C.A.A. doesn't encourage dating between members, but it's acceptable if you've been in the program for a while; you're just supposed to discuss it reasonably first. His idea of a date turned out to be a service at this 'nondenominational church. It wasn't an ideal first date, but it was OK. There was an incredible choir... " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 2040 Bova, Ben. Moonrise. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 228. "Eldridge hunched forward a little in his chair. 'As you know, Congressman, I represent a coalition of religious organizations--'

'The Christian Brethren, I know.'

'Not merely the Brethren,' said Eldridge. 'Not anymore. We have several Orthodox Jewish groups with us now. And the Muslims as well.'

Underwood suppressed a gasp of surprise. Instead, he let himself chuckle. 'Well, if you can keep those people together you're a better politician than I am.'

'The Lord moves in mysterious ways, Congressman.' " [Because it is a coalition, the 'Christian Brethren' mentioned here is apparently not a denomination that really exists, but a fictional group imagined by the author.]

Christianity USA 2040 Pohl, Frederik. Man Plus. New York: Random House (1976); pg. 32-33. "The Sunday after Thanksgiving, the family was driving back from church. "
Christianity USA 2040 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 49. "Christianity was still a major force in Americ, and elsewhere. If word got around back home that John Boone [a leader of the colonists to Mars] was anti-Christian, it could give them problems. And that wouldn't be such a bad thing for Frank. "
Christianity USA 2044 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 127. "Traffic in Alabama was snarled by manic Christian tent-revival shows, 'breathing fresh life into the spirit' with two-hundred-beat-per-minute gospel raves. "
Christianity USA 2044 Sterling, Bruce. Distraction. New York: Bantam (1998); pg. 141. "The EcFreeds pulled a twelve percent voter share, putting them well ahead of their bloc's junior partners, the Christian Democratic Union and the antifeminist Ladies' Party. Oscar considered the EcFreeds to be profoundly mistaken politically... "
Christianity USA 2050 Anthony, Patricia. "Bluebonnets " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1989); pg. 70. "On the way to church, Mama finally looks down, down, and down, like those cartoons where the person seems big as a mountain... Mama hisses. Don't you have a comb in your purse? Your hair's all falling in your face. And, God, didn't you iron that dress? " [More about attending church.]
Christianity USA 2075 Morehouse, Lyda. Archangel Protocol. New York: Penguin Putnam (2001); pg. 55. "Excerpted from the LINK-angel site, 2075

LINK-ANGELS, A BUDDHIST'S VIEW:

Buddhism demands that we have no blind faith.

Therefore, I think it unwise to dismiss the LINK-angels completely without first applying the tenets of wisdom and compassion. The term 'angel' and their traditionally Christian appearance are somewhat disconcerting to many Buddhists. Yet their message, the idea of a Second Coming, is not unknown to our philosophy. "

Christianity USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 21. Pg. 21: "'...This, in a very real sense, is what the Holy Order of Vision is all about. 'Holy' as in 'Whole,' 'Vision' as in the vision of Saint Paul on the Road to Damascus, that converted him to Christianity. He is not to be confused with Saint Paul the Hermit...' "; Pg. 31: "He had not always been a Brother, but like the Apostle Paul to whom he owed his Order name, he had set his savage prior life behind him...' "; Pg. 41: "As Saul of Tarsus had witnessed the grandeur of God on the road to Damascus, and become Christian. "
Christianity USA 2077 Anthony, Piers. God of Tarot. New York: Berkley (1982; c. 1977); pg. 23. "'...Perhaps other forms of expression would serve our purpose as well, but he wave a system that we feel works... We feel that God has found no better tool than the Bible to guide us, but perhaps one day--'

'Crap,' the surly boy remarked. 'God doesn't exist, and the Bible is irrelevant. It's all superstition.'

Now the gauntlet had been thrown down. They all watched Brother Paul to see how he would react.

They were disappointed. 'Perhaps you are right,' he said, without rancor. 'Skepticism is healthy. Speaking for myself alone, however, I must say that though at times I feel as you do, at other times I am absolutely certain that God is real and relevant. It is a matter for each person to decide for himself--and he is free to do so within the Order...' "

Christianity USA 2080 Dick, Philip K. The Crack in Space. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 19. "Historically, the original defective 'scuttler had belonged to an employee of Terran Development named Henry Ellis. After the fashion of humans Ellis had not reported the defect to his employers . . . or so Rick recalled. It had been before his time but myth persisted, an incredible legend, still current among 'scuttler repairmen, that through the defect in his 'scuttler Ellis had--it was hard to believe--composed the Holy Bible.

The principle underlying the operation of the 'scuttlers was a limited form of time travel. Along the tube of his 'scuttler--it was said--Ellis had found a weak point, a shimmer, at which another continuum completely had been visible. He had stooped down and witnessed a gathering of tiny persons who yammered in speeded-up voices and scampered about in their world just beyond the wall of the tube. "

Christianity USA 2080 Dick, Philip K. The Crack in Space. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 20. [How, according to the Jiff-scuttler legend, the Bible was composed.] "Who were these people? Initially, Ellis had no known, but even so he had engaged in commerce with them; he had accepted sheets--astonishingly thin and tiny--of questions, taken the questions to language-decoding equipment at TD, then, once the foreign script of the tiny people had been translated, taking the questions to one of the corporations big computers to get them answered. Then back to the Linguistics Department and at last at the end of the day, back up the tube of the Jiffi-scuttler to hand tot he tiny people the answers--in their own language--to their questions... According to the legend, the tiny people were from Earth's own past; the script, of course, had been ancient Hebrew. Whether this had really happened Rick did not pretend to know... "
Christianity USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 16. "'The whole thing is shameful!'

'Really? I imagine King Solomon had to use some such system; he had even more women on his neck than the Holy One has [referring to the leader of a Evangelical/Protestant-based theocratic regime in control of the U.S.]. Thereafter, if you can come to some mutual understanding with the Virgin involved, it is just a case of following well known customs. There is a present to be made to the Eldest Sister, and to be renewed as circumstances dictate...'

...'Ignore them,' he went on. 'Look, John, a little casual fornication is no threat to the Church--treason and heresy are...' " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout story, most not in DB.]

Christianity USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 102. "Somehow she was not naked, but merely unclothed, like Mother Eve. " [Many other refs. to Christianity (a fictionalized form) throughout story, most not in DB.]
Christianity USA 2095 Heinlein, Robert A. "'If This Goes On--' " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 129. "Beside our own simple powder-blue dungarees there were several other uniforms around, volunteer brigades from outside the country and some native American outfits. The Mormon Battalions had their own togs and they were all growing beards as well--they went into action singing the long-forbidden 'Come, Come, Ye Saints!' Utah was one state we didn't have to worry about, now that the Saints had their beloved temple back. The Catholic legion had its distinctive uniform... The Onward Christian Soldiers dressed differently from us because they were a rival underground and rather resented our coup d'etat--we should have waited. Joshua's Army from the pariah reservations in the northwest (plus volunteers from all over the world) had a get-up that can only be described as outlandish. "
Christianity USA 2100 White, Lori Ann "Old Mickey Flip Had a Marvelous Ship " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 264. [Year estimated.] "It had been the name of botht he ship, X-T-H Skimmer the Seventh Veil, and her Pilot, Mickey Flipi, but he was certain neither of them had worded the transmission. " [Name of the ship: Seventh Veil, is a possible Biblical reference. This ship is mentioned many times, throughout the story.]
Christianity USA 2105 Heinlein, Robert A. "Coventry " in Revolt in 2100. New York: Baen (1981; story copyright 1940); pg. 157. "All three states had one curious characteristic in common--each one claimed to be the legal government of the entire United States, and each looked forward to some future day when they would reclaim the 'unredeemed' portion; i.e., outside Coventry. To the Angels, this was an event which would occur when the First Prophet returned to earth to lead them again. In New America it was hardly more than a convenient campaign plank... "
Christianity USA - South 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 224. "...reminded Fran of the signs you sometimes came upon down South, painted across barn roofs--JESUS SAVES or CHEW RED INDIAN. "
Christianity USA - South 1989 Martindale, Steve. "A Ghost in the Matrix " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 336. [Year uncertain. Alt. history.] "'Of course, I would not expect a gentleman like yourself, from San Francisco, to understand my position, nor the finery of Southern ways. But I should hope that as a Christian man, you would agree that it simply would not do to manumit the Negro. The Lord intended for the Negro to serve the white race, but the automation your profession intends would give the white race no choice but to free the Negro of servitude, for there would then be no need for his labor.'

'You're quite right about the results of automation,' said Jack... 'However, you are incorrect about the feelings of a Christian. I, myself, am a praying man, but my feeling is that slavery is an institution which should have ended years ago. The slave States have had the means to produce far more cotton and tobacco through automation alone for two centuries, yet they persist in using slave labor to do the work.' " [Other refs., not all in DB.]

Christianity USA - South 1989 Martindale, Steve. "A Ghost in the Matrix " in Writers of the Future: Volume V (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1989); pg. 346-347. "'Mr. Delaplane!... I am still not happy to be traveling with you, in view of your unsettling opinions on the proper place of the Negro; however, I find there are more important matters now to occupy my thoughts than that...'

...'I am not one to doubt proper Christian teaching; yet I feel I may be of a mind with that dear lady. As Hamlet said, 'There are more things I heaven and earth, Horatio, than exist in your philosophy.' Thus, I shall reserve judgement until a later time.' "

Christianity USA - South 1992 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 29. "But I was really fleeing my parents' hermetic world in southern Virginia, escaping from my mother's relentless social pretensions and, even more, from my father's call to the inviolable credos of a Southern Gentleman. A lawyer before me, my father adhered to what he regarded as the right things--Christ and country, family, duty, and the law. He found late in life, as he watched less able and principled colleagues promoted to the spots on the bench which he craved, that unwavering virtue marked him in many eyes, probably including his son's, as a bit of a fool. "
Christianity USA - Southwest 1992 Anthony, Patricia. "Blue Woofers " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1992); pg. 167. "Reading lights halo the heads of the sleeping passengers, as though the small group is dozing away the miracle of Pentecost. "
Christianity USA - Southwest 2043 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 113-114. "Prayer. She used to get into arguments with Erzulie over prayer. Maggie could never bring herself to pray in the Christian sense of asking for this or that. If she prayed to anything, it was to something larger, more amorphous, and certainly less gender-bound than either the old-guy-in-the-sky of the Judeo-Christian tradition or the Goddess that Erzulie prayed to... You could see why Christians and Muslims and Hindus got hooked on their avatars and saints--little ombudsmen who bridged the gap to the Unknown.
Christianity Utah 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 167. Pg. 166-167: "Gordon was puzzled. 'You mean Heaven?'

'No, I mean the Sixth World.' West rolled over and got up on an elbow again.

'You belaga'ana got shortchanged. You only got kicked out of the Garden of Eden. The People [Navajo] believe we were kicked out of four other worlds before we got to this one--the Fifth World...' "

Christianity Utah 1888 Doyle, Arthur Conan. "A Study in Scarlet " in A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. New York: Berkley/Penguin Putnam (1994; c. 1888); pg. 92. "...He's a likely lad, and he's a Christian... " [Many ref. to Christianity throughout much of this story, primarily to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (although much of Doyle's depiction of the Latter-day Saints/Mormon was based on inaccurate anti-Semitic and anti-Mormon propaganda circulated at that time).]
Christianity Utah 1974 Kump, Eileen Gibbons. "Sayso or Sense " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1974); pg. 79. "As Grandpa began to pray, Amy's heart churned for a miracle. She had to have it! 'Father, we dedicate into Thy watchcare and keeping this beautiful home.' Oh Father, it is beautiful, it's beautiful regardless! 'Bless this good family. Thou knowest the intents of their hearts are righteous, Father.' Thou knowest how men are, Father. Help me to take no delight in their folly. 'Bless every comfortable from, bless every child who grows there. Bless the timbers that the elements--' Bless me never to mention my basement again. Remove bitterness, doubt. 'Within these walls let Thy Holy Spirit abide in peace always, we pray Thee, in Christ's name, Amen.' In peace. In peace. Oh, please! Amen. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Christianity Utah 1991 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 1. "In the mornings Tana worked as a pretrial consultant for the Utah State Attorney General's Office, sorting men and women... At age 28 she had her Ph.D. At age 28 she had a job that would have bewildered Solomon. " [Solomon: a Biblical reference.]
Christianity Utah 2005 Bell, M. Shayne. "The Shining Dream Road Out " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 75. "'...I always did all of my homework well when I was in high school so I could get good grades and get accepted into a Utah college that doesn't really care about grades, it just wants to know if you'll go to church every Sunday you're enrolled with them so you can sit and hear people talk about being a Christian, never asking, 'What would a Christian's life actually be like?'...' " [This is a reference to Brigham Young University, a university run by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.]
Christianity Utah 2010 Sheffield, Charles. "Phallicide " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 391. "In every class in Bryceville's school, biblical authority was cited for these matters. At home, my mother and... father drove home the same message... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 2. "He, the priest, hated bugs, too many odd kinds, thrust up overnight from the fal't [fallout] . . . so he loved the predators who fed on the chitinous crawlers, loved his flock of--amusing to think of--birds! Not men.

But men arrived, at least on the Holy Day, Tuesday--to differentiate it (purposefully) from the archaic Christian Holy Day, Sunday. " [Many refs. to Christianity, and many of main characters are Christians. Most refs. not in DB.]

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 7. "'You could wish,' Father Handy said, 'that you had already died.'

'Yes.'

'So death, as we teach the Servants of Wrath--we teach that it is a solution. Not an adversary, as the Christians taught, as Paul said. You remember their text. 'Death, where is thy sting? Grave, where is thy victory?' You see my point.' "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 8. "At the stove, Ely said, 'Fire him.'

To her, Father Handy said, 'I fire no one. A pun. Fire: their hell, the Christians. We don't have that,' he reminded her. And then to Tibor he said the Great Verse of all the worlds, that which both men understood and yet did not grasp, could not, like Papagano with his net, entangle, He spoke it aloud as a bond holding them together in what they, the Christians, called agape, love. But this was higher than that: this was love and man and beautifulness, the three: a new trinity. "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 10. "Now, Father Handy and Tibor needed a power--mekkis, Father Handy thought to himself--to come from Above and aid them . . . on this, the servants of Wrath agreed with the Christians: the good power lay Above... "
Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 17. [After World War III holocaust. Characters in Charlottesville, Utah, near Wyoming.] "To Father Handy [of the Servants of Wrath] she said, 'I finally made up my mind. 'I'm joining the Christian Church.'

Hoarsely guffawing, McComas shook, belly-wise, not Santa Claus belly but belly of hard, grinding animal. 'Is there a Christian Church anymore? In this area?'

Lurine said, 'They're very gentle and kind, there.'

'They have to be,' McComas said. 'They have to plead to get people to come in. We don't need to plead; they come to us for protection. From Him.' [Deus Irae/Carleton Lufteufel]... "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 18-19. "...Father Handy sat with Lurine.

'Why?' he asked.

'Shrugging, Lurine said, 'I like kindly people. I like Dr. Abernathy.'

He stared at her. Jim Abernathy, the local Christian priest in Charlottesville [in Utah]; he detested the man--if Abernathy was really a man; he seemed more a castrato, fit as put in Tom Jones, for entry in the gelding races. 'He gives you exactly what?' he demanded. 'Self-help. The 'think pleasant thoughts and all will be--'

'No,' Lurine said.

Ely said dryly, 'She's sleeping with that acolyte. That Pete Sands. You know; the bald young man with acne.'...

'Okay!' Lurine said angrily.

'See?' Ely said to her husband.

He saw; it was true and he knew it.

'So he's not a gesunt,' Lurine said. Gesunt--a healthy person. Not made sick or maimed by the war...

'But why come here?' Ely asked Lurine. 'To announce you're going to revert, is that it? Who cares? Revert. In fact, sleep with Abernathy; a lot of good it'll do you.' "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 20. "Trying to sound wise, Father Handy said to Lurine, 'Have you thought it over carefully? There's a stigma attached [to joining the Christians]; after all, you do live by sewing and weaving and spinning--you depend on goodwill in this community, and if you join Abernathy's church--'

'Freedom of conscience,' Lurine said.

'Oh god,' Ely moaned.

'Listen,' Father Handy said. Reaching out, he took hold of both of Lurine's hands... He explained, then, patiently, 'Just because you're sleeping with Sands, that doesn't force you to accept their religious teachings. 'Freedom of conscience' also means freedom not to accept dogma; do you see? Now look, dear... They believe for two thousand years in a good god. And now we know it's not true. There is a god, but he is--you know as well as I do; you were a kid during the war... "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 21. "'...If perhaps one could believe in a god of death . . . but unfortunately--'

'Maybe there is one,' Lurine said abruptly.

'Pluto?' He laughed.

'Maybe God releases us from our torment,' she answered steadily. 'And I may find him in Abernathy's [Christian] church. Anyhow-- I won't worship a psychotic ex-official of the U.S. ERDA as a deity; that's not being realistic; that's... It's wrong.' " [Many other refs. throughout novel, not in DB. This is a particularly religious-oriented novel, even for PKD and Zelazny.]

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 24. Pg. 24: "Today she had told Father Handy that she intended to join the Christian Church, but she had not told either Pete Sands or Dr. Abernathy. As usual, she was having it both ways . . . an instinct kept her from making the terminal move. "; Pg. 25: "'...In the old days, as for example when the King James scholars wrote the phrase 'Death where is thy sting?' they meant it in the old sense. Which is... Like being stung by a remark. Do you get it? Stung, for instance, into rage, hurt by a remark. It meant to be pierced by a dartlike point. In dueling, for instance, they stung each other... So Paul didn't mean that death stung the way a scorpion stings, with a tail and a sac of poison, an irritant; he meant a piecing.' "
Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 30. "He saw a figure, suddenly, with laughing eyes, whom he supposed to be Jesus. It had to be. The man, with white-thatched hair, wore a toga and Greek greaves. He was young, with brawny shoulders, and he grinned in a gentle, happy way as he stood clutching to his chest an enormous and heavy clasp-bound book. Except for the classic greaves, he might--from the wild cut of his hair--have been Saxon.

Jesus Christ! Pete thought.

The white-haired brawny youth--my god, he was built like a blacksmith!... "

Christianity Utah 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 35. "'You heard about the Pilg I've got to go on.'

'Yep.'

Tibor said, aware and thinking out his words, knowing intensely the meaning of them, 'Sir, if I become a convert to Christianity, I wouldn't have to go.'

At once Dr. Abernathy glanced up and said, scrutinizing him, 'Are you really that much afraid?'

...Tibor said nothing. He waited with the intention of lasting it out, however unpleasant and protracted it might be. Priests, after all, were generally odd, intense people, especially the Christian ones. "

Christianity Utah 2030 Bell, M. Shayne. "Jacob's Ladder " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 21. "We'd been coming up in the second to the last car for newsmen--neither of Salt Lake's papers had the pull of CBS, Newsweek, or The New York Times. We crammed into the car with reporters from Vancouver, Lima, and Sapporo... to inaugurate the story of the century: the elevator to space. Man's ladder to the stars, Jacob's ladder to Heaven, as it was called... " [ "Jacob's ladder " is a Biblical/Christian reference. The character is from Utah. The space elevator is anchored in Brazil. The author is from Idaho and Utah.]
Christianity Utah 2054 Harmon, Charlene C. "Pueblo de Sion " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 191. "Mel had brought out his Book of Mormon and his Bible as if he wanted to continue the debate... " [References to Christianity throughout this story, specifically to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and to prophesies about the Second Coming, which some characters has occurred when there is a nearby accidental nuclear blast.]
Christianity Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 27. "He stood, suddenly erect and with great dignity, clutching his weathered piece of carefully carved wood as though it were the tablets from Mount Sinai. He spoke in great sonorous and self-important tones. His audience of despair was drifting past him.

'Welcome to the promised land.' " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout novel.]

Christianity Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 254. "They had risen like Lazarus from the dead. "
Christianity Utah: Beaver County 2010 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 291. "Weston set down the dog-eared paperback Bible on the small altar before him. 'Thus we see that Job was a perfect man--a man who had done no wrong in the sight of God! Yet the narrative goes on, for the Lord has in mind a test for poor Job.' " [Much more to this sermon, pg. 291-296.]
Christianity Utah: Kanab 2000 Gates, John. Brigham's Day. New York: Walter & Co. (2000); pg. 154. "He opened it and found an old Bible, a large family edition, bound in black leather with faint gold letters on the bottom that read Josiah Lamb.

'Inside the Bible,' Zolene said.

Bybee opened the book and pulled out a folded piece of paper... he folded it and put it back inside the Bible... Bybee stared at the Bible... He slipped the Bible, with the letter inside, back into the leather valise and closed it... Bybee picked up the valise, took the Bible from it, an tucked it under his arm. " [References to Christianity, specificially to LDS Christianity, throughout book. Other refs. not in DB or under 'Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.']

Christianity Utah: Richfield 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 81. "Tibor said, 'What's the story on this apple tree? Is this the tree from which the Christian-Jewish idea of the serpent in the garden of eden come?'

'It's our understanding that the Garden of Edem [sic] is located around a hundred miles to the east,' Jackson said. 'You're a Christian are you?' Tibor nodded. 'And that picture you showed us--'

'A Christian deity,' Jackson said. "

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 132. "[Abraham] Lincoln spent that Sunday morning by himself, reading Pilgrim's Progress. Though he believe din God and reckoned himself a Christian, he'd been disappointed by too many preachers who smugly accepted things as they were to attend church regularly. Walking through the wilderness of the world with Bunyan suited him better: he'd known the valley of Humiliation, and many times had to fight his way out of the slough named Despond. " [See also pg. 201, 213, 293, 317, 340, 357, 363, 374-375.]
Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 111. "Rendella... began to recite. 'First: We believe in God, the Eternal Father, and in his Son Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. Second: We believe that men will be punished for their own sins, and not for Adam's transgressions. Third: We believe--'

'That's excellent,' Sherman interrupted with an admiring exhalation of breath. 'It looks like you have every one of them down pat.' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 115. "Yet his fine face beamed with kindness and good sense. The man-of-arms within him was tamed to Christian purposes; he was tuned entirely to the pastoral services of his calling. He forgave the sinful, comforted the bereaved, sustained the wavering. He prayed for himself and his people a proper testing, a sufficient trial to keep them alert, spiritually fecund, resistant to the softening which comes with abundance and blessings. "
Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1982 Peterson, Levi S. "The Christianizing of Coburn Heights " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1982); pg. 116. "'That's the talk I like to hear! That's what I like about you, Art, and always have. You're Christian all the way through, and you've got drive and guts and energy. Go do'er, man! Keep up your courage, say your prayers, and tear into it. You can't fail!' "
Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1986 Kessel, John. "The Pure Product " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1986); pg. 557. "The Kansas plates on the car I'd taken from a different car in a parking lot in Salt Lake City. Salt Lake City was founded by the Mormons, whose God tells them that in the future Jesus Christ will come again. "
Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1993 Shunn, D. William. "Rise Up, Ye Women that Are at Ease " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 105. As I started the Impala, a powerful but quavering female voice blasted me from the AM radio: "And in this our eleventh hour, my sisters, can we ignore the challenge in the prophetic words of Isaiah? 'Rise up, ye women that are at ease!' proclaimed that ancient seer. 'Hear my voice, ye careless daughters! Give ear unto my speech! Many days and years shall ye be troubled, ye careless women, for the vintage shall fail; the gathering shall not come!' But the gathering has come, my-- "

Heart pounding, I... then punched the dial over to...CNN... [Hearing] the newsman, my pulse began to slow. The apocalyptic voice that had scared the bejesus out of me had belonged to Sister Sophia, the octogenarian doom-and-gloom prophetess who terrorized the airwaves with her prerecorded harangue for four hours every Saturday morning on KSFH, the local Christian radio station. Kjirsten must have tuned the station in as a joke when she got home from work that morning.

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 1999 Bezzant, Pat. "Finale " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 265. "'...In fact, judging from the sitting bill you ran up doing Christmas shopping, I'm surprised Erica remembers who you are.'

She gave his arm another squeeze. 'Well, it is an 'End of the World' party. We'll just tell everyone we wanted to all go out together!'

...'Jessie, you've never been religious. When did you start worrying about Armageddon?'

'It's not just the evangelists. Almost every day there is a guest on one program or another--' "

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 2002 Dalton-Woodbury, Kathleen. "Signs and Wonders " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 160. [Latter-day Saint/Mormon Tongan contemplates which image he construct on the Bonneville Salt Flats.] "'We can go up to Idaho and get lava--Max Morrison has acres of it--and spread it out on the salt flats. We'll make what--a fish? Something big enough to be seen from space.'

'Why a fish, Grandpa?'...

'Early Christian symbol--fishers of men.' "

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 2010 Doering, David. "Snooze " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 218. "When Saturday came the mansion was crowded with guests. Someone called it the city's social event of the year. (Okay, so I was the one who said it.) Even the mayor showed up. The minister finally called the house to order with a 'Brothers and Sisters, let us begin.'

...No sooner had I gotten comfortable in the wooden seat than I felt the vibration of my purse phone. I eased myself out and found a vestibule. "

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 2025 Baker, Virginia Ellen. "Songs of Solomon " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 173. "The scene shifts... and I am slammed into: a meeting house. It is huge; an eternity of walls that go on forever. Windows everywhere.

The tabernacle on Temple Square.

I'm sitting in a pew, right up front. The Christus, the... statue of Christ... stares down at me. The hollow eyes are stern. They have moved him there, out of the Visitors' Center (where anyone could come to him) and into the tabernacle. I don't know why.

He stands behind the old wooden pulpit. It's much too small for him.

The sacrament table is just below. It is covered with a white cloth... I wonder just what it is that this sacrament represents.

The Christus intones, though his mouth does not move, 'Take. Eat. This is the flesh of my body. My blood.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity Utah: Salt Lake City 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 122. "He showed me some places in Salt Lake he'd nearly finished [re-creating in virtual reality]. The famous Mormon temple was almost complete, as well as the not-as-famous Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine nearby. Gus said these were a combination of old photos, paintings, and memories. They were beautiful. "
Christianity Utah: Utah County 1991 Wolverton, Dave. "Wheatfields Beyond " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 3. "A car pulled into the lot... Through the double-paned glass she heard a man say quite distinctly, 'Jesus.'

Tana looked up and saw a sagging belly of a man who sat behind a desk all day, white shirt and tie under his suit coat... Clean folks... Citizens out for a bite after an evening movie.

Mr. Belly dipped into his wallet and pulled out a $20 bill, shoved it in the derelict's hand, and said, 'Excuse me, garblegarblegarble eat?'

The derelict looked at the money as if pondering the relevancy of currency to his life, crumpled it, and just held it, staring vacantly at Mr. Belly, who finally either got tired or embarrassed and brought his daughter inside. "



Christianity, continued

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