Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, USA

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity USA 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 173-174. "'You don't want to believe in God.' Joss said it as a simple statement. 'You figure you can be a Christian and not believe in God. Let me ask you straight out: Do you believe in God?'

'The question has a peculiar structure. If I say no, do I mean I'm convinced God doesn't exist, or do I mean I'm not convinced he does exist? Those are two very different statements.' "

Christianity USA 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 248-249. "...and to Japan, where every component was systematically examined to understand how it worked, so far as was possible. Progress out of Hokkaido had been slow. " [Many refs. to Hokkaido in book, most not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1999 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 6. "'Christ was dead at thirty-three. So was Alexander the Great. How much more do you want him to do in the world?' "
Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 264. "'And thus I saw the horses in the vision, and them that sat upon them.'

--REVELATION 9:17 "

Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 280. "'For now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face.'

--1 CORINTHIANS 13:12 "

Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 297. "But Moses had wandered around in the wilderness for forty years following said pillar. And the star hadn't let the wise men to Bethlehem. It had led them straight into King Herod's arms. They hadn't had a clue where the newborn Christ was. 'Where is He that is born king of the Jews?' they'd asked Herod. "
Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 282. Pg. 282: "'By hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand, and seeing ye shall see and shall not perceive.'

--MATTHEW 13:14 ";

Pg. 295: "'And, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them. . . .'

--MATTHEW 2:9 ";

Pg. 300: "'For all these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet.'

--MATTHEW 24:6 ";

Pg. 306: "'Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign . . .'

--ISAIAH 7:14 ";

[Pg. 310: Revelation 22:15]

Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Inn " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 58. "Reverend Wall set the papers on the pulpit, looked rheumily out over the congregation, and said, ' 'And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judeo, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David. To be taxed with Mary, his espoused wife, being great with child.' ' " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB. Story is about a Christmas pageant in a Protestant church.]
Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. "Newsletter " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 214. "'The newsletter's going to have to be at least two pages. The girls just have too many awards--T-ball, tadpole swimming, Bible-school attendance.' "
Christianity USA 1999 Willis, Connie. Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 320. "Twelve Terrific Things to Read at Christmas "

1. The Original (Matthew Chapter 1:18-25, 2:1-18, Luke Chapter 1:5-80, 2:1-52):
The best Christmas story ever. This one's got everything you could ask for in a story: adventure, excitement, love, betrayal, special effects. Good guys, bad guys, narrow escapes, reversals, mysterious strangers, and a great chase scene. And the promise of a great sequel. "
Christianity USA 2000 Currier, Jameson. "Pasta Night " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 86. "I have often wondered why God spared me instead of others; wondered too, really, if there even is a God. Is it God who is so judgmental or his Christian followers? Is suffering the punishment of sin or is sin the punishment? "
Christianity USA 2000 Glave, Thomas. "Whose Song? " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 147. "Of four dark girls, or four hundred, on their way to lasting fire in Sunday School? "
Christianity USA 2000 Heim, Scott. "Deep Green, Pale Purple " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 149. "...Bible on the bookshelf, for two generations unstudied... "
Christianity USA 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 20. "'...I've been on this project for thirteen weeks. I've also heard of the Golden Rule, and the Ten Commandments, and the Constitution of the United States. But this is the survival of the human race we're talking about.' "
Christianity USA 2000 Mann, William J. "Say Goodbye to Middletown " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 251. "I smiled back. 'Thirty-three. Christ's age. When he was crucified.'

She shakes her head. 'Since when did you become religious?'

'I'm not. It's just a strange age, that's all. I remember the nuns talking about it, at St. John the Baptist. As if it were magical or something. The double threes. The Holy Trinity.' I smile. 'There are a lot of threes in Christianity.'

She shrugs. 'I don't believe in symbolism.'

'And I asked myself: What was my life been like in thirty-three years? What have I done, compared to Christ?' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 2000 Manrique, Jaime. "The Documentary Artist " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 276. "...about a movie called The Evil Mommy, which he... of those 42nd Street theaters he frequented. And at the end of the movie,' he said, 'as the boy is praying in the chapel to the statue of this bleeding Christ on the Cross... jumps off the cross...' " [More.]
Christianity USA 2000 Sheffield, Charles. Brother to Dragons. Riverdale, NY: Baen (1992); pg. 9. "'Happy New Year, everyone. Happy New Century!'

But in homes and bars and hotels and restaurants, in freezing log cabins and tall tents and stifling squat mud huts, in churches and chapels and synagogues, in hospitals and prisons and asylums... "

Christianity USA 2000 Woodson, Jacqueline. "The Other Half of Me " in Tomorrowland: 10 Stories About the Future (Michael Cart, ed.) New York: Scholastic Press (1999); pg. 152. [Character reads the file about the donor who is her biological father.] "My father -- he has never been hospitalized, the file says. He has a brother and two sisters. He eats at least two servings of fruit each day... He likes soccer, taking apart cars and putting them together again. He was born into Christianity. His hair is curly and his skin is dark. "
Christianity USA 2001 Schindler, Solomon. Young West. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times (1971; c. 1894); pg. 119. "I was the only one who took the whole matter in a more serious sway. Whenever I found an opportunity, I had some new question to ask Mr. Brandon, which he always answered in a most pleasant manner. He advised me to read several books, especially the religious text books of former times, among them, the Vedas, the Bible, and the Koran. I tried to read them but they were so uninteresting to me that I gave up the attempt.

What surprised me most in them was that they all advised to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, not to take what belonged to others, etc.

Had there ever been people who went without a meal or were lacking clothes? Were there ever people guilty of encumbering themselves with the personal property of others? "

Christianity USA 2001 Schindler, Solomon. Young West. New York: Arno Press & The New York Times (1971; c. 1894); pg. 120. "One of these books, the Bible, was full of narratives of wars in which one people destroyed the lives and properties of others. The stories ran, that God, by whom, I supposed then was meant a person of great power, helped them in their destructive work. Why did they destroy the ones whose help they needed to produce the good things of this life? I placed this question before Mr. Brandon and he told me that the people of that time had hardly emerged from barbarism and that they acted more like brutes than like human beings.

On the whole, I did not care for that class of literature, I returned the books to the library and not before many years did I touch them again. "

Christianity USA 2002 Ing, Dean. Single Combat. New York: Tor (1983); pg. 297. "'...And it cost Young three of his best men, including two instructors. They got good Christian burials--better'n they deserved...' "
Christianity USA 2002 Knight, Damon. Why Do Birds. New York: Tor (1992); pg. 90. "'...They won't call you by your Christian name straight away...' "
Christianity USA 2003 Knight, Damon. The Observers. New York: Tor (1988); pg. 93. "John Arthur Draffy, like two of his illustrious predecessors, had come to the White House from the rough and tumble of California politics. Draffy was a man of strong simple opinions, which he knew were the same opinions held by the vast majority of his compatriots. He knew in his heart not only that America was the greatest country in the world, but that the Christian religion and the free enterprise system had made it that way. He believed these things sincerely, and his sincerity was his strength. " [Also pg. 78.]
Christianity USA 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 55. Pg. 54-55: "'Want dinner?' he said...

Maren said, 'No. Want prayer.'

He stared at her. 'W-what?'

Calmly she said, 'I want to go to church and light a candle and pray. What's so strange about that? I do it a couple of times a week, you know that. You knew it when you first--' Delicately she finished, 'Knew me. In the Biblical sense. I told you that first night.'

'Candle for what?' Lighting a candle had to be for something.'

Maren said, 'My secret.' "

Christianity USA 2004 Dick, Philip K. The Zap Gun. New York: Bluejay Books (1985; c. 1965); pg. 115. "'Yes,' Kaminsky said. 'Never again. You and I--not individual you and I but ethnological totalities, East, West--rose from savagery and waste; we were smart; we became buddy-buddies, made deals, you know, hand-clasp on it, our words in the protocols of '02. We want back to being, what does the Jewish Christian Bible say? Without leaves.' "
Christianity USA 2008 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 177. "The cells floating in front of her have been tampered with by agents of the same God the sisters the Catholic girls high school she had attended in San Antonio believed in so fervently as the prime mover of all in the universe. She put her elbows on the desk and rested her head in her hands. Back at the apartment where she lived, holiday lights snaked around the buildings and up the naked trunks of palm trees. Christmas--a celebration of the birth of Lord Jesus, or just a myth sprung full-blown from a tangle of neurons, dendrites and axons? Where do the Holn fit into the Christian pantheon? Or--where does Jesus fit into the Holn pantheon? " [Many other refs. to Christianity, not in DB.]
Christianity USA 2009 England, Terry. Rewind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 228-229. [News report.] "'I understand there is a mixture of religious affiliations in the group'

'Eight Protestants of various stripes, three Catholics, two Jews, one who calls himself a New Age minister, three Mormons.'

'No Muslims...?'

'No Muslims, no Anglicans, no Unitarians.' "

Christianity USA 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 14. "Reading lights haloed the heads of the sleeping passengers, as though the small group were dozing away the miracle of Pentecost. "
Christianity USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "'Yes. They said he tempted the boys with some kind of fruit, I guess they meant from the Tree of Knowledge like it says in the Bible. And they said he came from a place called Bartorstown...' "; Pg. 29: "...and it had got connected in his mind with the Book of Revelations, grand and frightening. " [References to Christianity and the Bible throughout novel, particular to New Mennonites, and to a Christian-oriented opposition movement. Other refs. not in DB, or under 'Mennonite'.]
Christianity USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 70. [New Mennonites, the central group in this post-nuclear war novel.] "The examination was finished at last. The men conferred. At last Mr. Harkness said to Pa and Uncle David, 'I'm sorry that such a disgrace should be brought upon you, for you're both good men and old friends. But perhaps it will serve as a reminder to everybody that youth is not to be trusted, and that constant watchfulness is the price of a Christian soul.

He swung about very grimly on the boys. 'A public birching for both of you, on Saturday morning. And after that, if you should be found guilty a second time, you know what the punishment will be.' "

Christianity USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 106. [New Mennonites] "'You tell Mike Dulinsky,' he said, 'that I follow the words of the Good Book that forbid me to have any dealings with unrighteous men. And as for you, I'd advise you to do the same. But you're a young man, and the young are always sinful, so I won't waste my breath. Git.' "
Christianity USA 2010 Brackett, Leigh. The Long Tomorrow. New York: Ballantine (1974); pg. 163. "...children among them, peering with a normal childlike wonder and excitement at the strange men and the wagons. They wore goatskins, very much like old Bible pictures of John the Baptist... "
Christianity USA 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 47. "'Ah, go to hell!'

'That's a remarkably Christian attitude, Donald. Both meaningless and barbaric.'

'Stop trying to play on my WASP guilt feelings. Sometimes I wonder how you'd make out in a genuinely nonracial society.' "

Christianity USA 2010 Brunner, John. The Sheep Look Up. New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 105. "'...I'm a Christian and all Christians should believe--that we're the children of the Lord, made in His image, and no man is an island...' "
Christianity USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 106. "The wrapping was some kind of unbreakable plastic sheeting with a slick teflonesque feel to it, white and seamless as the robe of Christ. "
Christianity USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 514. "The wife of Tip McLane's vice-presidential candidate, during a speech to a conservative Christian group, stated... "
Christianity USA 2010 Bury, Stephen. Interface. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 572. "In his right hand he was carrying a thick black book with the words HOLY BIBLE printed on the cover in gold letters. A single sheet of typing paper was clasped to the front cover. " [More mention of the Bible, here at the swearing in of the new President of the United States.]
Christianity USA 2010 Stephenson, Neal. The Big U. New York: Random House (1984); pg. 98. "Finally out came the names of Martin Luther King, Jr., Marx, Gandhi, Che, Jesus Christ, Ronald Reagan, Hitler, S. S. Krupp, the KKK, Bob Avakian, Elijah Mohammed and Abraham Lincoln. "
Christianity USA 2010 Willis, Connie. "Samaritan " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1979); pg. 224. "The fundamentalist Charismatic movement had gained strength all through the eighties. They had been committed to the imminent coming of the End, with its persecutions and Antichrist. On a sultry Tuesday in 1989 they had suddenly announced that the End was not only in sight, but here, and that all true Christians must unite to do battle against the Beast. The Beast was never specifically named, but most true Christians concluded he resided somewhere among the liberal churches. There was fervent prayer on Methodist front lawns. Young men ranted up the aisles of Episcopal churches during mass. A great many stained glass windows... were broken. A few churches burned. "
Christianity USA 2011 Zubrin, Robert. First Landing. New York: Ace Books (2002; c. 2001); pg. 86. "Press Secretary Wexler cut in. 'we've got some static now with crazy demonstrators on the streets and Bible thumpers screaming at us from their pulpits. But if anyone thinks this is bad, wait till you see what the press does to this Administration if we chicken out and stab the crew in the back.' "
Christianity USA 2013 Anthony, Patricia. "The Last Light from Llano " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1993); pg. 224. "I seen a neat documentary, too, that counted up the deaths in the U.S.: eighteen million from starvation, and twenty million from the spotted fever that arrived later, like a horseman of the Apocalypse with a lame mount. "
Christianity USA 2015 Dick, Philip K. "Novelty Act " in The Minority Report and Other Classic Stories by Philip K. Dick. New York: Kensington (2002; c. 1963); pg. 192. "The room had almost filled and now Patrick Doyle... looking none too happy in his long white robe, raised his hands for silence. 'The opening prayer,' he called huskily, cleared his throat and brought forth a small card. 'Everyone please shut their eyes and bow their heads.' He glanced at Klugman and the trustees, and Klugman nodded for him to continue. 'Heavenly Father,' Doyle said, 'we the residents of the communal apartment building Abraham Lincoln beseech You to bless our assembly tonight. Um, we ask that in Your mercy You enable us to raise the funds for the roof repairs which seem imperative. We ask that our sick be healed and our unemployed find jobs and that in processing applicants wishing to live amongst us we show wisdom in whom we admit and whom we turn away... Anyhow, amen.' " [More.]
Christianity USA 2016 Stevens-Arce, James. "Scenes from a Future Marriage " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 77. "He was only seventeen, a virgin himself... What did he know about sex? What could he know with no father to teach him the sexual ropes, to tell him what was what between men and women, man to man? The Bible said multiply and fill the earth, but his Sunday School teachers had hammered home that he should keep himself pure in body and mind. "
Christianity USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 114. "'...To those that do listen, the Neuro-Enhancer will become the next Holy Grail--a thing of dreams and nothing more.' "
Christianity USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 129. "'When you called me 'brother,' I thought you might be a bible thumper. But we've been talking for few minutes and you haven't tried to save my soul, baptize me or get me to repent, so I'm not so sure now.' "
Christianity USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 138. "...she spotted a small, white-frame church at the end of the street. Unlike the buildings on either side of it, the church appeared to have survived the earthquake with little damage, which was itself a miracle. Even better, the lights were on in the building. Someone was inside.

Amy had never gone in much for religion. It was hard to have faith when you were homeless and on your own. Still, she believed in God and said her prayers ever night, even though she knew God was much too busy to bother with the problems of one little girl, especially a girl that didn't always tell the truth and had to steal occasionally in order to buy food. At least she hadn't killed the man who had tried to rape her, so God couldn't be mad at her about that. Or could He?

She hadn't killed him, but she had tried to kill him, which was just as bad. Maybe God was mad at her... " [More. She goes into the Catholic church, pg. 138-146.]

Christianity USA 2019 Burton, Levar. Aftermath. New York: Warner Books (1997); pg. 156. "'You used to be an Earthie. Don't they believe in clairvoyance and thought projection?'

'Believe in it? Yes. Can any of them actually do it? No. At least none of the ones I know. It's like the Bible thumpers who believe in God though they've never actually seen him.' "

Christianity USA 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 153. "The noble ideal, caritas, passes from the world. If we kill to prevent this, though, we betray it. It gets Zen-like here: Do nothing and the destroyer moves. Do something and you destroy it yourself. Yet you are charge to preserve it. How? The answer is supposed to be that it is a divine law and will out anyhow. I crack the koan simultaneously with an act of giving up on it. Then I am granted insight into its meaning. Or, in Christian terms, my will is empowered upon an especially trying occasion and I am granted an extraordinary measure of grace. "
Christianity USA 2020 Dick, Philip K. & Roger Zelazny. Deus Irae. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1976); pg. 155. "'I see. Aquinas cleaned up the Greeks for you, so Plato is okay. Hell, you even baptized Aristotle's bones, for that matter, once you found a use for his thoughts. Take away the Greek logicians and the Jewish mystics and you wouldn't have much left.'

'We count the Passion and the Resurrection for something,' Pete said.

'Okay. I left out the Oriental mystery religions. And for that matter, the Crusades, the holy wars, the Inquisition.'

'You've made your point,' Pete said. 'I am weary of these things and have trouble enough with the way my own mind works. You want to argue, join a debating team.' "

Christianity USA 2020 Filer, Burt K. "Eye of the Beholder " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 492. "Ahead was the final turn. Behind was Lukas. I the back seat, hugging the weightless, Christless Madonna in her lap [a statue], Cidi Osborn began to laugh. "
Christianity USA 2020 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 3. "I believed in the existence of everything: Heaven, Hell, the Angelic Host, demons and possession, redemption and growth, the value in spiritual terms of the suffering of the innocent, our place in the Universe and the Universe's place in Creation. I believed in God and His glory. I believed in the Immaculate Conception and Original Sin. I believed in something I called Original Sainthood. I believed in Santa Claus and that men had walked on the Moon. I believed that an educated man who does not believe in miracles is not a realist. I bought it all. Always had. Still do. My loss of faith derived from the continual reminder, on a moment-to-moment basis, to me and everyone I loved, that we were insignificant. It was about my realization that the imminent possibility of the loss of our lives and even our immortal souls did not matter a damn, either to God or to His emissaries on Earth.

It was a world without a Superman. " [Many refs., not all in DB.]

Christianity USA 2024 Ellison, Harlan. "A Boy and His Dog " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 23. "Blood and I crossed the street and came up into the blackness surrounding the building. It was what was left of the YMCA.

That meant 'Young Men's Christian Association.' Blood taught me to read.

So what the hell was a young men's christian association? Sometimes being able to read makes more questions than if you were stupid. "

Christianity USA 2024 Ellison, Harlan. "A Boy and His Dog " in Nebula Award Stories Five (James Blish, ed.) New York: Pocket Books (1972; 1st ed. 1970; story c. 1969); pg. 49. "Then everyone sort of stood around looking awkward, and finally Ira began yapping and yipping about get in the bedroom and get this unnatural filth over with so they could go to Church and pray the good Lord wouldn't Strike All Of Them Dead with a bolt of lightning in the ass, or some crap like that. "
Christianity USA 2025 Dick, Philip K. The Penultimate Truth. New York: Dell (1964); pg. 164. "It may be, he decided, what the Christian sect calls 'apostolic succession.' The process of reasoning would be this: before World War Three the military establishments of Pac-Peop and Wes-Dem held ultimate power... "
Christianity USA 2025 May, Paula. "Resonance Ritual " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 426-427. [Year estimated.] "We launder and lay out our sons' clothes, cook our sons' favorite foods, care for these poor souls as thy come to us in the hope that somewhere, some other woman is so caring for our own. We must keep them alive and well and searching, for surely one day one lost sheep will manage to return to his proper fold, and if one returns, then maybe they all will, and the universe will resound with homecomings. " [ "Lost sheep ": a Biblical reference.]
Christianity USA 2025 Stephenson, Neal. Snow Crash. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 63-64. "'It's definitely related to religion,' she says. 'But this is so complex, and your background in that area is so deficient, I don't know where to begin.'

'Hey, I went to church every week in high school I sang in the choir.'

'I know. That's exactly the problem. Ninety-nine percent of everything that goes on in most Christian churches has nothign whatsoever to do with the actual religion. Intelligent people all notice this sooner or later, and they conclude taht the entire one hundred percent is [crap], which is why atheism is connected with being intelligent in people's minds.' "

Christianity USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 28. "'The other thing I can quote besides poetry,' Pam told him, 'is the Bible. The King James Version. The prose is very rhythmical. But I have to sweat a little to get Bible verses to stick in my head.' " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout novel, only a few in DB. Some of the main characters are Christians. Most prominently featured denomination: Baptists, some positively portrayed, others are Fundamentalists and/or members of the Ku Klux Klan.]
Christianity USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 111. "Liam watched her alertly. After a while he said, 'So what happened? Did you go up and put a stick on the fire and give your whaddyacallit--your witness?'

'Testimony. As a matter of fact, I didn't,' said Pam. 'I jus sat there humming 'Only Believe,' but somehow or other things just kind of--came together. I can't explain it, or even describe it very well, but like I knew I belonged right there, with those people, and the reason was that we all cared so much about the same thing.'

'What thing?'

'God, I guess,' said Pam.

'I don't know what you mean by 'God.' '

Pam bowed her head and thought hard. How had she felt that night by the fire? 'God's the short answer. The long answer is, the Christian life. Living for Jesus. Living like Jesus, as much as you can. Not getting sidetracked by worldly values.'

Liam squirmed a little. 'Give me an example of a worldly value.'

'Money.' "

Christianity USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 211. "Printed on the outside in elegant capitals was FOR THE HEFN.

'Uh-oh.' Hastily Pam set the stack of mail on the ground and unfolded the piece of paper. On it someone had written out some Bible verses longhand. The handwriting was beautiful, almost calligraphic. Pam held the sheet so Liam could read over her shoulder:

And then shall that Wicked be revealed... " [Some Bible verses are quoted, along with the reference, verbatim: II Thes. 2:8-9; I Tim. 4:1-3; 1 John 2:18; Rev. 13:1.]

All around the wide margins, like a doily decoration, the same scribe had written: working of Satan--HEFN--all power--GAFR--doctrines of devils--HEFN--forbidden to marry--GAFR--little children--BTP APPRENTICES--many antichrists--HEFN--beast--GAFR--sand of the sea--EARTH--the sea--SPACE--

And at the very bottom of the page in red ink: Humphrey we know thee who thou art!

Pam turned the paper completely around. Liam looked at her... 'Am I paranoid, or is this really scary?' "

Christianity USA 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. 101-102. Pg. 101: "'The church officially disapproves of the Hefn, I told you that.'

'But 'carrying the witness'?'

'The Christian witness.' And when he still looked blank, 'I'll explain later. Don't worry about it.' "; Pg. 102: [Reproduction of an actual church hymn: 'There Is Power in the Blood' by L. E. Jones.]

Christianity USA 2029 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 127. "She called the senator 'poorly educated' and the notion of impending apocalypse 'an absurd mythology that abets the very process we're struggling to contain.' Lazar, a former Republican turned Federal Party hatchetman, called Sue 'an ivory-tower atheist' who needed to be 'weaned from the public teat.')

...Morris Torrance had resigned from the Bureau [FBI] rather than accept reassignment. Morris was a believer. He believed in the divinity of Jesus Christ, the goodness of Sulamith Chopra, and the veracity of his own dreams. " [Some other refs., some may not be in DB. Overall, minimal level of Christian refs.]

Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballantine (1991; c. 1953); pg. 38. Pg. 38: "'You know the law,' said Beatty. 'Where's your common sense? None of those books agree with each other. You've been locked up here for years with a regular damned Tower of Babel. Snap out of it! The people in those books never lived. Come on now!' ";

Pg. 50: "'We burnt copies of Dante and Swift and Marcus Aurelius.'

'Wasn't he a European?'

'Something like that.' " [More about Aurelius, pg. 151.]

Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballantine (1991; c. 1953); pg. 151. Pg. 151: "'...Here we all are, Montag. Aristophanes and Mahatma Gandhi and Gautama Buddha and Confucius and Thomas Love Peacock and Thomas Jefferson and Mr. Lincoln, if you please. We are also Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.' "; Pg. 152: "'...We are all bits and pieces of history and literature and international law. Byron, Tom Paine, Machievelli, or Christ, it's here...' "; Pg. 160-161: Ecclesiastes
Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 64. "'...Bigger the population, the more minorities. Don't step on the toes of the... doctors, lawyers, merchants, chiefs, Mormons, Baptists, Unitarians, second-generation Chinese, Swedes, Italians...' " [Various Christian denominations mentioned. Ballantine edition (1991): pg. 57.]
Christianity USA 2030 Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 77. "Professor Faber, I have a rather odd question to ask. How many copies of the Bible are left in this country? "

"I don't know what you're talking about! "

"I want to know if there are any copies left at all. "

"This is some sort of trap! I can't talk to just anyone on the phone! "

"How many copies of Shakespeare and Plato? "

"None! You know as well as I do. None! "

Faber hung up...

Montag showed her a book. "This is the Old and New Testament . . . "

"Don't start that again! "

"It might be the last copy in this part of the world. "

"You've got to hand it back tonight, don't you? Captain Beatty knows you got it doesn't he? " [Some other refs. not in DB, mostly in reference to the Bible as a valuable book, not to institutional Christianity. Ballantine edition (1991): pg. 76.]



Christianity, continued

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