Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, USA

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity USA 1994 Bishop, Michael. Catacomb Years. New York: Berkley (1979); pg. 19-20. "In 1994 the American Republic ceased to exist. For more than twenty years the nation had been doing a drunkard's walk toward collapse. The Jeremiahs who foresaw the end harped on different strings, usually plucking out monotones that were drowned in the full orchestral resonance to which their partisans remained unbelievably deaf.

The threat, argued these one-note prophets of doom, was (choose one, and only one) Communism, fiscal irresponsibility, military unpreparedness... or spiritual decay. If the People didn't (choose one, and only one) reassert the values of the Founding Fathers, restore the credibility of the Dollar, restock the nation's nuclear and paranuclear arsenals, reject the temptations of machine and computer, return to Nature, or rededicate their souls to Christ, the United States would fly apart like an ill-made wheel.

As it happened... the Republic collapsed not so much because things fell apart as because the center could not hold. "

Christianity USA 1995 Chalker, Jack L. The Cybernetic Walrus (Book One of The Wonderland Gambit). New York: Ballantine (1995); pg. 144. "'...If magic worked, what would be the effect on the development of science? What if the Greeks or Romans had really developed the steam engine instead of considering it a toy? What if Christians really had to be Christians? And so on. It's endless.' "
Christianity USA 1995 Freedman, Nancy. Joshua Son of None. New York: Delacorte Press (1973); pg. 188. "'One thing I can predict, this will outsell the Bible.' "
Christianity USA 1995 Hand, Elizabeth. Waking the Moon. New York: HarperPrism (1995); pg. 245. "'How bad can it be, for women to learn how to stick up for themselves, to be assertive and all that stuff? I think your friend Angelica is onto something--I mean, there really is this dark aspect to goddess-worship that everyone has ignored for all these centuries. It's like being a Christian and refusing to acknowledge the Inquisition.' "
Christianity USA 1995 Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien on the Planet. New York: Scholastic Inc. (1995); pg. 59. "John Steinbeck... East of Eden turned out to be a sort of dust bowl Cain and Abel story -- set in the rural American midwest about sixty years ago. The Abel brother was good and virtuous and hardworking, and everybody loved him. The Cain brother was misunderstood, and therefore resentful, envious, and violent. One perfect -- the other not able to please anybody, including himself. You didn't really get to side with anybody because you had to grieve for all. Fun. A real fun experience.

About two thirds of the way through, there was an accident, and the Abel brother was killed... "

Christianity USA 1995 Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien on the Planet. New York: Scholastic Inc. (1995); pg. 83. "Then the movie started. It was great -- you got to root for right and truth and innocence and, in the end, virtue and love came through triumphant, just the way they always should and hardly ever seem to. And when the lights came up, Smitty was still sitting there. I felt the best I had in a long, long time -- at peace with the world, knowing God's in his Heaven, believing in True Love, the Triumph of Simple Goodness, and the Ultimate Unity of Mankind, and thinking it might actually be possible for things to turn out all right in the end. "
Christianity USA 1995 Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien on the Planet. New York: Scholastic Inc. (1995); pg. 101. "But I found I didn't want to show it [the poem] to her. I didn't even want to sit around and chat, just then. I had this quiet feeling inside of me, the way you do when you've been in a church or something. "
Christianity USA 1995 Randle, Kristen D. The Only Alien on the Planet. New York: Scholastic Inc. (1995); pg. 26-27. "We made a religion out of Friday nights at the university's Classic Film Society -- old movies are another of the Christianson obsessions -- and every Sunday, we all went to Caulder's church. "
Christianity USA 1995 Siddoway, Richard. The Christmas Wish. New York: Harmony Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 17. "'Will, you're the man of the house now. Please say a blessing on the food, and thank the Lord for all the good things He's given us this year.' She placed the vase of yellow roses in the middle of the table and quietly bowed her head.

Will cleared his throat and offered a prayer of thanksgiving. When he finished he looked at his grandmother's face and saw the hint of a tear in her eye. He began to carve the turkey. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1995 Siddoway, Richard. The Christmas Wish. New York: Harmony Books (1998; c. 1995); pg. 46. Pg. 46: "Tonight I held a small, red-faced baby. With his head in my hand his feet barely reached to my elbow. As I gazed at him, his eyes opened and he struggled to focus on my face. I wondered how much he remembered of the God and Father of us all, who had sent him here so recently. He has tiny fingernails, perfectly formed. I do not remember inspecting Samuel so closely. I am struck by the fact that immortality is in this child. Through him, Samuel and Carol live as Ruth and I live through Samuel. Truly 'Man is that he might have joy.' "; Pg. 47: "How can we help Will to understand? He is too young to be expected to know the magnitude of his loss. Ruth and I have pledged to raise him as our son. But we know we will never be able to replace his parents. with faith in God we hope the three of us can get over this terrible, terrible loss, but for now our hearts reside in an unfilled pit of mourning gray. "
Christianity USA 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 26. "East Coast News Network interview with Terrence Jacobi, lead singer for the HardWires, September 30, 1996:

ECNN: Mr. Jacobi, your group's music has consistently preached--so to speak--the coming of the Apocalypse, from a rather radical Christian perspective. With two songs in the Top 40 and three records totaling ten million sales, you've probably hit a nerve with the younger generation. How do you explain your music's popularity?

Jacobi (Laughing, then snorting and blowing his nose): Everybody knows, between the ages of fourteen and twenty-two, you've got only two best friends: your left hand and Christ. The whole world's out to get you. Maybe if the world went away, if God wiped the slate clean, we could get on with just being ourselves. God's a righteous God. He will send his angels to Earth to warn us. We believe that, and it shows in our music. "

Christianity USA 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 180. "'He doesn't listen to Carl or David or Irwin . . . or me. He's obsessed. He has been reading the Bible. The crazy parts of the Bible, Mr. Hicks. The book of Revelation. My husband was not like this a few weeks ago. He's changed.'

'I'm very sorry.'

'He's called Cabinet meetings. They're discussing economic impact. Talking about making an announcement after the election...' "

Christianity USA 1996 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 199. "'I am way out of my depth here, Mr. Hicks. This is not clear-cut. We're certainly not dealing with angels with flaming swords. We're not dealing with anything predicted in apocalyptic literature.'

'Not in religious literature,' Hicks corrected.

'I don't read science fiction much,' [Rev.] Ormandy said pointedly.

'More's the pity.'

...'And I'm not in the mood to cross knives with you or anybody else. What I'm saying is, I'm not sure I can present this to my people in a way they'll understand. If I tell them it's God's will . . . How can I be sure of that?'

'As you said, there seem to be godlike forces at work,' Hicks offered...

'My people still think in terms of angels & demons, Mr. Hicks. They dearly love halos of light and brillliancies, thrones & powers & dominations. They eat it up. They're like children. And no one can deny there is beauty and power in that kind of theology. But this . . . This is cold and political, deceptive...' " [More.]

Christianity USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "'My Christian name is Kathleen. And yours?' "; Pg. 44: "...proclaimed that his Christian name was Harrington. "; Pg. 117: "'Superiors can call inferiors by their Christian names, but not the other way round...' " (similar refs. pg. 252, 277, 333)
Christianity USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 171. "'George Washington is very important to the Hodenosaunee, too, sir,' the bellhop said... 'Those of us who follow Hawenneyu, the Great Spirit, and not your Christian God... we say Washington is the only white man who has joined Hawenneyu in his heaven.' " [More.]
Christianity USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 192. "'The smoke from the tobacco wafts the prayer up to the heavens. Incense served a similar function in Christian worship at one time, I believe.'

Bushell didn't know enough about such things to say whether he was right or wrong. He asked, 'How many of your people have kept the old ways, and how many have gone over to Christianity?'

'We're about evenly divided,' the Iroquois answered. " [More.]

Christianity USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 362. "The promise meant he had to mollify the assistant administrator's secretary, who seemed to feel that, while his using the telephone once was a possibly forgivable breach of etiquette, using it twice clearly violated one if not several of the more obscure canons of the Council of Nicaea. "
Christianity USA 1996 Dreyfuss. Richard & Harry Turtledove. The Two Georges. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 376. "'Our Lord said, 'Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's; and unto God the things that are God's.' Doing one's duty renders unto Caesar, but doing what is right renders unto God.' "
Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 172. "Rudy: What bout Isaiah? 'But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid his face from you, that he will not hear.'

Finckley: Do you have a question, Rudy?

Rudy: Yes, why do you have this inhuman blasphemer on your show, this fr--

[LINE DISCONNECTED]

Finckley: I'm terribly sorry about this, Warren.

Worthington: It's all right. I knew it might happen.

Finckley: Still, it an [sic] unconscionable thing to have to endure.

Worthington: 'Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings.' Psalms, chapter 8, verse 2. Remember earlier in this show when I said there wasn't anything universal to mutants. Actually, I take that back. Mutants do have a common element--bozos like that.

Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 174. "Worthington: I know that Stryker doesn't represent a majority of Americans, or a majority of Republicans, or a majority of Christians, or a majority of anybody. Still, I wish more people who are marginally on his side would take him to task for being a bigot. "
Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 174. "Finckley: What about the argument that superhuman powers are on loan from God and only God is the source of all power?

Worthington: Okay, let's take that point of view for a second, in fact, let's take it a step further. I, Warren Worthington III, am blessed by the Lord God Almighty, and further have been given the appearance of a cherubim to help spread the Lord's word as foretold in Exodus 23:20. 'I send an Angel before thee, to keep thee in the way.' Luke 2:10: 'And the angel said unto them, Fear not: for, behold, I bring you great tidings of joy, which shall be to all people.' And I preach tolerance from Malachi 2:10, 'Have we not all one father? Hath not one God created us?'

Man, it sure doesn't seem to be working, does it?

Finckley: Guess not.

Worthington: Granted, I'm not pushing the metaphor hard--you wouldn't believe how many quotes there are regarding angels in Revelations. "

Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 175. "Worthington:... I wish we hadn't lost the connection with the last caller, I would have loved to match him on scripture. I think the next verse in Jude is, 'But these speak evil of those things which they know not: but what they know naturally, as brute beasts, in those things they corrupt themselves.' "
Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 171-172. "Finckley:... Next caller, Rudy..., hello.

Rudy: Archer, I want to ask you a question.

Finckley: Go ahead.

Rudy: Are you familiar with the book of Jude?

Finckley: Nope, can't say that I am.

Worthington: I don't have it memorized cold.

Rudy: 'And the angels which kept not their first estate, but left their own habitation, he hath reserved in everlasting chains under darkness unto the judgment of the great day.

'Even as Sodom & Gomorrah, and the cities about them in like manner, giving themselves over to fornication, and going after strange flesh, are set forth for an example.

'Likewise also these filthy dreamers defile the flesh, despite dominion, & speak evil of dignities.'

Worthington: I believe that's followed by 'Yet Michael the Archangel, when contending with the devil he disputed about he body of Moses, durst not bring against him a railing accusation, but said 'The Lord rebuke thee'.' "

Christianity USA 1996 Hauman, Glenn. "On the Air " in The Ultimate X-Men (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley (1996); pg. 173-174. "Worthington: When a man takes out a loaded gun in the middle of Madison Square Garden on public television and gets ready to shoot it at friends of mine, I get disgusted. And more, I get scared.

Finckley: Scared?

Worthington: Are you kidding? The people who scare me the most, at least on the domestic political front, are the people who think nothing about doing exactly that, shooting us down to win an argument, and their various banner-carriers, including Stryker and his ilk. They scare me because they want to make Christianity the national religion, and my experience with monotheocracies is that they are intolerant, hypocritical, and often violent. The founding fathers, I think it was specifically Jefferson, said that the reason the first thing in the Bill of Rights was the Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion was 'in order to avoid the very tensions that have kept Europe awash in blood for centuries.' "

Christianity USA 1996 Hickman, Tracy. The Immortals. New York: ROC/Penguin Books (1997; c. 1996); pg. 11. [Frontispiece] "'Then Peter said, Silver and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk.

And he took him by the right hand, and lifted him up: and immediately his feet and ankle bones received strength

And he leaping up stood, and walked, and entered with them into the temple, walking, and leaping, and praising God.

And all the people saw him walking and praising God;

And they knew that it was he which sat for alms at the Beautiful gate of the temple: and they were filled with wonder and amazement at that which had happened unto him.'

--Acts 3:1-10 "

Christianity USA 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 118. Pg. 118: "We are told that we used to have a third eye in the tops of our heads and that it later migrated into the brain and became the pineal gland, a story that I find harder to believe than the Resurrection, but if we did have an eye up there at one time, I think we lost it because it kept getting poked out by twigs. "; Pg. 126: "'...Or the Logos in a basket, either way, that's Our Lord Jesus Christ who made the sun and the stars. But it isn't just any basket, now, it's a reed basket, and that sounds like Moses, doesn't it? His mother laid him in a papyrus basket daubed with pitch and bitumen...' "
Christianity USA 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 173. [Epigraph] "We walk by faith, not by sight.

--II Corinthians 5:7 ";

Pg. 350: "A faithful friend is a strong defense.

--Ecclesiasticus 6:14 "

Christianity USA 1996 Swanwick, Michael. "Covenant of Souls " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1986); pg. 165. [Year estimated.] Pg. 165: "She still could not remember arriving at the church or what--if anything--had come before... "; Pg. 166: "'No, this is the church,' Peter said. 'The reason I'm calling is . . .' "; Pg. 173: "Peter explained that their usual handyman didn't like working for churches, which were notoriously slow to pay... "; Pg. 177: "'You'll have to go to the church office,' she called back. 'We don't open this door during school hours.' " [Some other refs, not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1996 Swanwick, Michael. "Covenant of Souls " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1986); pg. 181. "A deadpan little man in very clean clothes stood on the steps and shouted, 'The Bible tells of the scarlet whore that is Babylon that is the beast that has put her foot on the serpent! She has swallowed up the seventh seal and has loosed the horrors of the Rocky Mountain arsenal. If you have faith the size--' "
Christianity USA 1996 Swanwick, Michael. "Covenant of Souls " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1986); pg. 193. [At the very end of the story, the following Biblical reference is provided, though the text of the verse is not given: Mark 4:30-32.]
Christianity USA 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 246. "And in some company or research institute or college, an overqualified mail clerk who is overweight or wears fur or carries a Bible will be hired, and the scientists therein would do well to remember their childhood fairy tales. "
Christianity USA 1996 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 20-21. "'What else is on the reserve list?'

'The new John Grisham, the new Stephen King, Angels from Above, Brushed by an Angel's Wing, Heavenly Encounters of the Third Kind, Angels Beside You, Angels, Angels Everywhere, Putting Your Guardian Angel to Work for You, and Angels in the Boardroom.'

None of those counted. The Grisham and Stephen King were only best-sellers, and the angel fad had been around for over a year.

'Do you want me to put you on the list for any of those?' Lorraine asked. 'Angels in the Boardroom is great.' "

Christianity USA 1997 Bear, Greg. The Forge of God. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 331. "...would he still get to the Army Valhalla and toss off a few with all the dead heroes? Or would he be turned away, sent to the showers? Wash off that stink of fear, soldier.

He didn't want Valhalla. He wanted Clare and William. He wanted to say good-bye in more words than he had put in the letter. In person.

Please God, let me be calm,' he said hoarsely. He flattened his cupped hands into a gesture of prayer, pinching the tip of his nose between his index fingers, closing his eyes. It might have been easier if he had brought a pistol along. 'Jesus Jesus Jesus Christ.'

Don't let me [screw] this one up. Dear God keep my hand from that switch. Hit them back hit them back in the face. God I know you don't take sides but I'm a soldier God and this is what I have to do. Take care of the please Lord of all of us and help us save our home our world. Let this mean something please God. " [Other refs., not all in DB.]

Christianity USA 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "A Woman Is a Fast-Moving Picnic " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 205. Pg. 205: "The ducks they all gaggled and even the hog
Wept Christian salt-tears for Moll sunk in the bog--
";

Pg. 206: "'You must admit that the various bogs are the one place the Church puts no dainty toe. But also a place where a girl, representing the need, and out of her mind, must test her will...' "; Pg. 208: "'Why, Christ himself,' said someone in the sweating biking mob, 'might not make it across!' "; Pg. 212: "For Father O'Malley stood on a rise in the road, his bike clenched in his vengeful fists, so it looked like his skinny sister, straddled and lost

For a third time, Father O'Malley tossed the bolt and split the air. 'You and you and you! What are you up to?'

...'Out, out!' shouted the priest, waving one arm like a scythe. 'Away!' he blathered. 'Go, go, go...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1997 Bradbury, Ray. "Night Train to Babylon " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 8. [Also, title refers to Babylon.] Pg. 8: "'Lookit all the biblical/Egyptian names. Memphis, Tennessee. Cairo, Illinois? Yep? And here's one just ahead. Babylon.' "
Christianity USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 23. "Diana's tone and the expression in her bright eyes were genuinely troubled. 'I understand that the God of the Christians is more obtuse, less obvious in His manifestations than Zeus. That does not trouble me. I do not dispute His existence.' "
Christianity USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 24. "'Yep. And in a way I can almost understand her. Faith is a difficult beast at best. Gods aren't supposed to walk the earth anymore. Maybe having you saying you met Zeus, that you got your powers from Hermes and Athena and Hestia and the rest, maybe that reminds Rebecca Chandler that some of those Old Testament stories are not so very far removed from the myths and legends of the Greco-Roman gods. In fact there is a distinctly Greek feeling to a whole bunch of stuff in the Old and New Testaments. Jesus smiting the fig tree and all that. Very Olympian.'

'...But I can see where Rebecca Chandler would be bothered. God made Adam from the dust of the earth. Your mother made you from clay... It would probably have been best if you'd kept that part to yourself.' "

Christianity USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 32. "'We are a Christian nation, Judeo-Christian, as some will insist. There is only one true God, and his Son, Jesus Christ.' "
Christianity USA 1997 Byrne, John. Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing (1997); pg. 139. "...there was nothing in what Diana said and did that was intended as an assault on Christianity, or anything else Rebecca believed in. "
Christianity USA 1997 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "images of the Christ child cast in wax "; Pg. 22: "Jack always thought of the picture of Christ driving the moneylenders from the Temple: Grandmother wielding a cat-o'-nine-tails... "; Pg. 31: "..was bought and released by a Xian subsidiary of GFI Worldwide early in 1998.The album was called LIVE FROM GOLGOTHA. Trip stole the title from an old banned book in the hard stacks at Olive Mount Bible College... God only knew how it got there. Trip never read the book--Trip didn't read, except for the Bible and furtively hidden copies of Matrix comics--but he liked the title, and he knew how to use it. Even as a child on Moody's Island, where he sang in the choir at the Fisher of Men First Harbor Church, he had always possessed what the people at GFI called marketing savvy. "; Pg. 35: "...managing another Xian group, and eventually signed them to a major label. " [Many other refs., not in DB. "Christian " is frequently spelled "Xian " in this novel.]
Christianity USA 1997 Robinson, Frank M. "Causes " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 99. "'I wouldn't call it 'overblown,' ' the priest said cautiously. 'But yes, if you like. Say if Emperor Napoleon had never lived . . . '

'That's too big an 'if,' ' Ryan objected. 'It's like saying if Christ had never lived. Let's keep the 'ifs' relatively small.' "

Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 16. "It was when my mother was sleeping in, on Sunday mornings, and I would get up early and go to the [TV] in my mother's study and flip through the channels, looking for cartoons. Sometimes when I couldn't find any I would watch the Growing Souls Gospel Hour, where they would tell Bible stories for children and sing hymns. One of the women was called Serena Joy... " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout novel, most not in DB. Novel revolves around a near future in which the United States is run as a monotheocracy. The ruling regime incorporates Christian elements, but isn't necessarily seem overtly Christian, and some Protestant sects (incl. Baptists, Quakers), as well as Jehovah's Witnesses and Catholics are considered renegade, outlaw groups. Back cover blurb by Doctorow: "This visionary novel, in which God and Government are joined, and American is run as a Puritanical Theocracy, can be read as a companion volume to Orwell's 1984...' "]
Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 31. Pg. 30: 'I'd like to pass by the church,' says Ofglen, as if piously.

'All right,' I say, though I know as well as she does what she's really after. ";

Pg. 31: "Now we turn our backs on the church and there is the thing we've come to see: the Wall.

The Wall is hundreds of years old too; or over a hundred, at least. Like the sidewalks, it's red brick... "

Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 51. "There were Bibles in the dresser drawers, put there by some charitable society, though probably no one read them very much. "
Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 89. "For lunch it was the Beatitudes. Blessed be this, blessed be that. They played it from a tape, so not even an Aunt would be guilty of the sin of reading. The voice was a man's. Blessed by the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are the merciful. Blessed be the meek. Blessed are the silent. I knew they made that up, I knew it was wrong, and they left things out, too, but there was no way of checking. Blessed be those that mourn, for they shall be comforted.

Nobody said when. "

Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 239. "The whole costume, antique and bizarre, reminds me of something from the past, but I can't think what. A stage play, a musical comedy? Girls dressed for Easter, in rabbit suits. "
Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 247. "'It was before the sectarian roundups began in earnest. As long as you said you were some sort of a Christian and you were married, for the first time that is, they [Christian Fundamentalist regime that gained control of the country] were still leaving you pretty much alone. They were concentrating first on the others. They got them more or less under control before the started in everybody else.

'I was underground it must have been eight or nine months. I was taken from one safe house to another, there were more of those then. They weren't all Quakers, some of them weren't even religious. They were just people who didn't like the way things were going.' " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1998 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. 305. [Academic symposium in Nanavit, year 2195.] "The need for what I call birth services was already recognized in the pre-Gilead period, where it was being inadequately met by 'artificial insemination,' 'fertility clinics,' and the use of 'surrogate mothers,' who were hired for the purpose. Gilead outlawed the first two as irreligious but legitimized and enforced the third, which was considered to have Biblical precedents; they thus replaced the serial polygamy common in the pre-Gilead period with the older form of simultaneous polygamy practiced both in early Old Testament times and in the former state of Utah in the nineteenth century. As we know from the study of history, no new system can impose itself upon a previous one without incorporating many of the elements to be found in the latter, as witness the pagan elements in medieval Christianity... all official records of [her name] would have been destroyed upon her entry into the Rachel and Leah Re-education Center. "
Christianity USA 1998 Dick, Philip K. Time Out of Joint. New York: Random House (2002; c. 1959); pg. 18. Pg. 18: "Once Vic had said that if the Second Coming of Christ were announced in the form of a plug on TV, the Blacks would not care to be involved. To that, Ragle had said that when World War Three began and the H-bombs started falling, their first warning would be the conelrad signal on the TV set... "; Pg. 20: "In the banks, in insurance companies, big electric companies... He had seen them as assistant professors teaching some recondite subject--survey of heretical Christian sects of the fifth century--and simultaneously inching their path up with all their might and main. ";

Pg. 38: "He had a kindly look, like a minister or a drain-inspector. "; Pg. 58: Bishop Berkeley (also pg. 108-109); Pg. 174: "'...It's really solemn. Like a church. When I woke up this morning I felt as if I had awakened in a church, and all around me was this sacred spirit. And I asked myself what the spirit was, and pretty soon I identified it as you.' "

Christianity USA 1998 Golden, Christopher. X-Men: Codename Wolverine. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1998); pg. 252. "It was the Russian equivalent of small-town America, wolverine thought. But there was no Main Street movie theater, or church, or five-and-dime. "
Christianity USA 1998 Maggin, Elliot S. Kingdom Come. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. ix. [Acknowledgments] "Legends pass from one hand to another... I must pay homage, in roughly reverse chronological order, to a number of fabulists and philosophers who--knowingly or not--worked to make what follows possible: Julius Schwartz and Mortimer Weisinger; Orson Scott Card and Isaac Bashevis Singer; Jerome Siegel and Joseph Shuster; Robert Montana and Stan Lee; Jack Kirby; Otto Binder and William Moulton Marston; Joseph Campbell and Edgar Allen Poe; Walter Elias Disney and Samuel Langhorne Clemens; Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin; Terence Hanbury White and Thomas Malory; Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekial, and John; Aristocles and Homer; and those whose hands and minds have contributed and passed the legends along... " [List includes many figures from the Old and New Testament, as well as Christian writers such as Card.]
Christianity USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 64. He cleared his throat. "The President tossed a bone of appeasal to members of the religious right during the White House Easter egg hunt yesterday. During a prehunt speech, he called for all Americans to be leaders in this nation's 'return to a more stable form of morality.' "

She looked at him with her best poker face.

"Suzanne, this is an insult to everyone who calls themself a Christian. "

"But--Mr. Aaronson-- "

"But nothing, Miss Hill. The President, who is a Christian himself, I might add, and somewhat more devout about it than his predecessors of either party, was merely making a statement reflecting the views of a great majority of constituents. The statement he made over Easter was designed to cut across differences in theology and background and have unified appeal. With a few well-chosen words for what was supposed to be a piece of fluff, you have reduced it to an act of demagoguery. "

Christianity USA 1999 Anderson, Jack. Millennium. New York: Tor (1994); pg. 36. "Lorenzo didn't know what it was about the number 2000 that made people crazy for the Lord's return. His only regret was that these people's sudden interest in their relationship with God didn't inspire such intense devotion the other nineteen hundred ninety-nine years of the cycle. Ultimately, of course, the joke would be on them, because it was a biblical fact that not even the angels in heaven or Jesus Christ himself knew when the end was coming. That was written in God's own hand, on a calendar that only he could see. "
Christianity USA 1999 Casil, Amy Sterling. "My Son, My Self " in Writers of the Future: Volume XV (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1999); pg. 286. "The doctors could have given me the news over a cup of Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee or whispered it in my ear with a kiss on the cheek, a Judas kiss: Oh, by the way, Gerald Knight, you have advanced cancer of the pancreas. "
Christianity USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 35. "'I got connections,' Lucius would say... He did, too. Not just with an extensive network of Christian compounds with impressive stockpiles of ethanol, petroleum, and advanced information technologies; but with radical Xian groups like Blood on the Door, which targeted women who had had abortions, and the blue Antelope Fellowship, youthful preservationists whose firebombing had already killed 23 legislators who opposed various endangered species acts. In fact, Lucius's outside interests took up much of the time in which he should have been monitoring Stand in the Temple. Refueling stops provided opportunities to talk to the pro-life radicals, who in some parts of the South and Northeast controlled much of the black market in firearms as well as fuel. There were the cranks, too, with real metal spines protruding from their skulls alongside spiky hair, and metal chastity belts dangling from their waists and groins. Onstage Trip avoided their eyes, meth-crazed... "
Christianity USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 36. "It proved more difficult to avoid Blue Antelope. Radical Xian environmentalism was Chappell's pet cause, and Blue Antelope was its army. During and after performances, he arranged meetings with local members and insisted that Trip greet them. The organization's demographics were similar to those of the band's ideal audience: young, white, rebellious Christians who had co-opted the term 'Xian' from their neo-pagan counterparts. Their manager even encouraged Trip to write songs inspired by Blue Antelope.

'They've got money, man!' Lucius rubbed his fingers together... 'Many talents--not to mention God on our side.'

'Uh, I'll think about it,' Trip demurred, wondering how good it would be for album and ticket sales if word got out they were writing songs for the terrorist group that had firebombed an Arizona hospital because its new temporary wing encroached upon a nesting site of the blue-throated hummingbird. "

Christianity USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 38. "The words were mostly nonsense, cribbed from the Bible John Drinkwater had given him long ago. I possess the keys of hell and death, I will give you the morning star. But the melody was eerie... When Trip started dancing, everything changed. Within a week, Stand in the Temple became the first Xian band ever to hold the Number One slot on Billboard International.

CHRISTIAN RIGHT's DARLING TURNS SALOME! shrieked the New York Beacon. XIAN STAR WALKS ON WATER! CHECK RADIUM @Z.RO FOR PIXNFAX!

And later, when his first single was released and his picture appeared everywhere, silvery blue threads streaming from his eyes like tears, TRIP TAKES A TRIP! The holographic cover showed Trip posed as a blond Christ in Gethsemane, the image saved from smarminess or cries of heresy by the sheer intensity of Trip's expression... " [Many other Christian refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1999 Hand, Elizabeth. Glimmering. New York: HarperCollins (1997); pg. 39. "Blocks of tickets were bought by Blue Antelope and other progressive fellowships. Trip could recognize the former by their masks. No demure white surgeon's masks or the simple black crosses favored by mainstream Christians, but colorful representations of African elephants and pandas and the blue antelope, which was the first African species to be extinguished by humans, hunted to death for dog meat. And, of course there were droves of new fans who were obviously either newly anointed Xians or just old-fashioned heretics out for a good time listening to bad news. "
Christianity USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 46. "'--what are these revived? They are nothing new. God shoots us an early warning in Revelations. Chapter 13, verse 13--but those numbers are an accident, right?'

The congregation, as if on cue, shouted, 'There are no accidents!'

'No accidents! The Antichrist, 'Worked great miracles . . . it was allowed to give breath to the image of the beast.' Christ raised Lazarus--so too the Antichrist, in strict fulfillment of the prophecy of John, will seem to raise the dead. Who are these Dead?'

'Zombies!' the people shouted back. " [Many other refs. to Christianity in novel, not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 55. "It had killed him and brought him back. In the street people played Christian music on boom boxes. "
Christianity USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 60. "'And you Institute [Christian-run] holds the contract on one of the largest private prison systems in the country... In the last year you've taken the rehabilitation contracts on prisoners from sixteen different states. Governments from all over the country are pawning their inmates off on your farms.'

'That's because we have a recidivist rate under ten percent. It's the power of prayer.'

'And Nembutal.'

...'Are the Saucer Men preparing to invade the earth with the coming of the new millennium?'

'I'm a minister, not an expert on flying saucers... This is Christianity, not a UFO cult. It's true that flying saucers may be another evidence of the Last Days.'

Levine worked a remarkable amount of incredulity into his voice. 'Do you man to tell us that flying saucers were predicted in the Bible?'

'There is nothing about these last times that isn't. Interpreting the messages from the past is hard, but I can give you just a few examples...' " [Also pg. 221.]

Christianity USA 1999 Kessel, John. Good News from Outer Space. New York: Tor (1990; c. 1989); pg. 345. "George looked over the man's board. It was yellow, with an orange stripe down the center. A sticker on top said, 'Zeus, Moses, Jesus and Elvis.' With his long ponytail and scruffy beard, the surfer looked a bit like Jesus himself.

'Pretty irreverent sticker,' George said.

'Hey, I figure if Jesus was alive now, he'd be riding the waves. It's a form of worship.' "

Christianity USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 49. "'I believe,' their mother said, standing up, 'the first thing I'm going to do this evening is go down to the church.' Lenny handed Rowena's bowl to Baby, glaring down at him over it--a definite threat. 'I'm late,' Lenny warned.

'It wouldn't hurt you to go to church with me tonight, either,' his mother remarked. 'Just to let Go know you're still around.' " [More.]

Christianity USA 1999 Randle, Kristen D. Breaking Rank. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1999); pg. 56-57. "It was black up there, and cold, and he wondered if his mother thought this was the place her God took when He came to listen. The stone began to hurt him where it jutted into his back... The voices in his head were quieting. He was becoming still under the silence and age of the stone and the vastness of the church. The tension in his mind began to ease.

He thought about his mother's God, a God who needed a place like this, a house so big and old and dark. Some of the things she had said about Him made sense to Baby. Some of the things did not. He had his own ideas.

There was surely something in his own soul--a Presence most easily defined by its sometime absence. At times, it spoke inside him, using no words, but rising in joyous approval at the sight of light and beauty and order, until he was sure he had wanted these things himself all along... " [More here. Some other refs. not in DB. Also pg. 124.]

Christianity USA 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 173. "'I was struck by one or two things you said this morning. You called yourself a Christian. May I ask? In what sense are you a Christian?'

'You know, this wasn't in the job description when I accepted the directorship of the Argus Project.' She said this lightly. 'I'm a Christian in the sense that I find Jesus Christ to be an admirable historical figure. I think the Sermon on the Mount is one of the greatest ethical statements and one of the best speeches in history. I think that 'Love your enemy' might even be the long-shot solution to the problem of nuclear war. I wish he was alive today. It would benefit everybody on the planet. But I think Jesus was only a man. A great man, a brave man, a man with insight into unpopular truths. But I don't think he was God or the Son of God or the grandnephew of God.' "



Christianity, continued

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