Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, USA

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity USA 1978 Tucker, Wilson. The Year of the Quiet Sun. New York: Ace (1970); pg. 91. "'To that end, I prepared two alternatives to submit to the President. I made sure each of the alternative [time] probes would be unacceptable to him, and he would direct me to proceed with the original plan. I want the future.'

Chaney asked: 'Outrageous?'

A short nod. 'The President is a religious man; he practices his faith. He will never permit a probe to the scene of the Crucifixion with film and tape.'

'No--he won't do that.' Chaney considered it. 'But because of political consequences, not religious ones. He's afraid of the people and afraid of the politicians.' "

Christianity USA 1979 Bear, Greg. "The White Horse Child " in The Wind from a Burning Woman. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House (1983; story copyright 1979); pg. 59-60. Pg. 55: "She carried a bag. Part of it was filled with knitting, part with books and pamphlets. I always wondered why she never carried a Bible--just Billy Grahams and Zondervans. ";

Pg. 59: "I made one mistake, though. I asked Auntie Danser why she never read the Bible. This was in the parlor one evening after dinner and cleaning up the dishes. 'Why do you want to know, boy?' she asked.

'Well, the Bible seems to be full of fine stories, but you don't carry it around with you. I just wondered why.'

'Bible is a good book,' she said. 'The only good book. But it's difficult. It has lots of camouflage. Sometimes--' She stopped. 'Who put you up to asking that question?'

'Nobody,' I said.

'I heard that question before, you know,' she said. 'Ain't the first time I been asked. Somebody else asked me once.'

I sat in my chair, stiff as a ham.

'Your father's brother asked me that once. But we won't talk about him, will we?' " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1980 Jorgensen, Wayne. "Born of Water " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1980); pg. 95. "Brother Sharp talked about Jesus being baptized by John to fulfill all righteousness and the Holy Ghost coming down on him in the form of a dove and his father's voice saying, 'Thou art my beloved son, in whom I am well pleased.' Light flashed off the circles of his glasses as he told how Alma baptized his band of fugitives in the wilderness as a witness that they would serve the Lord and have the Spirit poured out upon them. " [Many other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 7. Pg. 7: "That the computer could make as few errors as it did impressed Smoky less than its bizarre witlessness; it couldn't distinguish, for instance, when the abbreviation 'St.' meant 'street' and when it meant 'saint,' and directed to expand these abbreviations, would without a smile produce the Seventh Saint Bar and Grill and the Church of All Streets. "
Christianity USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 27. "They sat in silence awhile, Great-aunt Cloud's a calm and smiling silence, his expectant; he wondered why he wasn't taken within, introduced; he was conscious of the heat rising from his shirt's open neck; he realized it was Sunday. He cleared his throat. 'Dr. and Mrs. Drinkwater at church?'

'Why, in a sense, yes.' It was odd the way she responded to everything he said as though it were a notion that had never occurred to her before. 'Are you religious?'

He had been afraid of this. 'Well,' he began.

'The women tend to be more so, don't you think?'

'I guess. No one I grew up with cared much about it.' "

Christianity USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 39. "...he wanted his Skyscraper to be just this, just what it eventually would become, a Cathedral of Commerce, and nothing John Drinkwater could think of, brass letterbox like a baptismal font, grotesque bas-reliefs in Cluniac style of dwarves... nothing was too much for him... As a specific against it (he thought) he began to take an interest in theology. He read Swedenborg and Augustine; he was soothed most by Aquinas, could sense the Angelic Doctor building stone by stone the great cathedral of his Summa. He learned then that at the end of his life Aquinas regarded all that he had written as 'a heap of straw.' "
Christianity USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 79. "At the teacher's college where he had learned about the scientific method and logic, he had also been given a new Bible, that is Darwin's Descent of Man... "
Christianity USA 1981 Crowley, John. Little, Big. New York: Bantam (1981); pg. 344. "...the Prophecies of Abbot Joachim da Fiore...

'...and to rule over a new Golden Age. Rex Quondam et Futurus. Arthur in Avalon; Sikander somewhere in Persia; Cuchulain in every other fen orglen of Ireland; Jesus Christ himself... All these tales, moving as they are, are not true. No trials of his people awakened Arthur... the Second Coming, continually announced, has been delayed past the virtual end of the Church that so much counted on it. No: whatever the next World-Age brings... it will not bring back a hero whose name we know...' "

Christianity USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 55. "'That pin you're wearing--the one your husband gave you--it's an icon that spiritually disadvantaged persons might risk lynching to get their hands on. Call it a linchpin... Jesus. Forgive me. All I meant to say was that I like it. It's beautiful. Don't lose it.'

Lia glanced down at her blazer. There, on its lapel, shone a golden pin--very simple--featuring the intaglio figure of a fishi in profile. Where had it come from? I do'nt have a pin like this, she thought. I certainly don't remember having a pin like this. It's not the sort of item that Cal would go out of his way to buy for me. It's Christian, a Christian symbol antedating even the cross, and Cal's never gone in for religious iconography...' "

Christianity USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 56. "'Jesus goin' to Emmaus with those two lightweight disciples and them not recognizin' him till he'd broke bread with 'em.'

Lia stared abashedly at her secretary. 'You think Kai is Jesus Christ?' Mr. X., she thought. x is the Greek letter chi, and chi, as he told us, is the ancient symbol for Christ.

'What? Jesus in a Members Only jacket?' Shawanda walked to the window overlooking the town's main drag. 'What I think is that man's got the same kind of body Jesus had when he'd been glorified. A resurrection body. He wouldn't let me touch him, no more 'n Jesus would let Mary Magdalene touch him at the tomb.'

'A resurrection body?'

'Seems so, ma'am. Jesus ate him some broiled fish in front of the eleven in Jerusalem--ghosts can't do that--and Mr. Kai, well...' "; Pg. 57: "What a mess, Lia thought, Kai's disappeared like Jesus Christ himself, and this poor cabbie's out a two-hundred dollar fair. "

Christianity USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 126. "'Yeah, well, that's right. Yesterday morning, I came back from the dead in a resurrection body. Last night, as a plasma quivering around the material form of your wife's mother. But today, alas, only as a... herpetological ventriloquist. This must've been the way Satan felt in the Garden of Eden. Anyway, it's a reverse progression, Cal, a devolution...' "
Christianity USA 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 234. "'Elijah!' declares the psychotherapist.

'Jesus H. Christ!' says the computer specialist.

'Thomas Merton?' suggests Vear, tentatively.

The dwarf chuckles modestly. 'Elijah. Christ. Merton. What can I saw? You guys aren't even close. I may've been taken over by Elijah once upon a time, Dr. Zola, but when his spirit abandoned me--back in '76--well, I tried to kil myself. As for Christ, you might get a point or two, Mr. Dahlquist, but only if you're broad-minded. What did you man that H to stand for?'

'Dolly looks confused. 'Nothing. It was a profane H, part of an oath. Like when somebody says, 'Jesus X. Christ!' '

'Well, X is the symbol for chi, the first letter of Christ if you're writing in Greek. I was sort of hoping, you know, that your H stood for, uh, 'Horsy.' But in English, not in Greek. "

Christianity USA 1982 Griffin, Russell. "The Most Illuminatingly Doleful and Instructively Affecting Demise of Flo, Late of Upper Blooton " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 238. [poem] "Flo lived in Upper Blooton then,
An Eden just off Exit 10... ";

Pg. 239: "No Bridegroom, Peeping Tom, or Tramp
Could miss this Foolish Virgin's lamp. "

Christianity USA 1982 Johnston, Sibyl. "Iris Holmes " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 323. "Robert placed both hands flat on the table and closed his eyes. 'I would like to write a story,' he said, 'about a couple who have a baby, and the baby is retarded, and so the parents wonder why, if God is omniscient and omnipotent, did that happen? But then they come to realize that it was the doctor's fault. So they start believing in God and attending church and praying that they will win their malpractice suit so they'll be rich the rest of their lives.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1982 Leman, Bob. "Window " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 14-15. "When the lawn was once again immaculate, they carried off the basket to the rear, and the adults returned to the house. A moment later the male emerged, now dressed in a white linen suit.

'A Bible,' said Krantz in amazement. 'It's a Bible.'

'Not a Bible,' Gilson said. 'There's no way those--things could have Bibles. Something else. Got to be.'

It looked like a Bible; its binding was limp black leather, and when the male began to leave through it, evidently in search of a particular passage, they could see that the paper was the thin, tough paper Bibles are printed on. He found his page and began, as it appeared to Gilson, to read in a declamatory manner, mouthing the words.

'What the hell do you suppose he's up to?' Gilson said. He was still speaking when the window ceased to exist. "

Christianity USA 1982 Straub, Peter. Koko. New York: E. P. Dutton (1988); pg. 480. "A small number of religious tracts, and a pocket-sized Bible. " [More.]
Christianity USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Lost and Found " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 67. [Willis's introduction.] "People quote the Revelation of St. John a lot these days. (The also call it Revelations, which should give you a clue as to how careful they are with their quotes.) They don't quote everything, though. For some reason, busily predicting the day and hour of the Second Coming, they completely ignore, 'For the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.'

They also ignore what happened to their prophecies before. They all turned out exactly as predicted, but in a way no one expected, and most of them turned out to have meant something entirely different from what they had imagined. 'The Son of Man is come to save that which is lost,' Matthew says, but what exactly does that mean? " [Other refs. throughout story, not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1982 Willis, Connie. "Lost and Found " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 75. "'Daddy said so. He gave her all the treasures. The marble nagel and the choir screen and al the candlesticks. 'Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's.' It isn't here,' she said, pulling her head out of the cupboard. 'Only pots.' She handed Finney a rusted iron skillet... "; [The Holy Grail mentioned pg. 80 - 82.]
Christianity USA 1984 Chandler, Neal. "Benediction " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1984); pg. 166. Pg. 166: "Hadn't the scholars and intellectuals among the Jews managed with all their learning to befog the very light of Christ? "; Pg. 172: "'Now take Peter,' he announced, 'the very first chief executive officer of the church, the George Washington of Christianity, so to speak. Now just what kind of man was this Peter. Was he an all-American?...' "; Pg. 175: "First Corinthians 9, verse 5... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 129. "Progress at our annual national prayer meeting on several subjects in which I was interested. One was the matter of how to remove the tax-free status of any private school not affiliated with a Christian sect. Policy on this was not yet complete because of the thorny matter of Roman Catholic schools. Should our umbrella cover them? Or was it time to strike? Whether the Catholics were allies or enemies was always a deep problem to those of us [Protestants] out on the firing line. "
Christianity USA 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 288. "Saved souls are second-class citizens. The notion, one that runs all through Protestant Christianity and maybe among papists [Catholics] as well, that a saved soul will practically sit in the lap of God--well, it ain't so! So you're saved and you go to Heaven--you find at once that you are the new boy on the block, junior to everybody there. "
Christianity USA 1984 Pollack, Rachel. "Angel Baby " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1982); pg. 145. "He often talked like that. he even showed me some of his poems. He didn't write about nature or love or stuff like that. Jim wrote about truth and knowledge and God, though he said he didn't mean God like in the church. "
Christianity USA 1985 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 66. [American Terrier Headlines:]
"WAX SAINT WEEPS REAL TEARS!
DOCTORS CANNOT EXPLAIN
YEARLY MIRACLE

* * *

WOMAN, DEAD THREE DAYS, SITS UP
IN CASKET!
SAW FACE OF GOD, SHE SAYS

* * *

MARTIN LUTHER KING NOT DEAD,
SAYS PSYCHIC!
LIVING, STUDYING IN INDIA,
IN FAMOUS SEER'S VISION
"
Christianity USA 1985 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 92. "...and, of course and above all, the latest styles in skimpy swim and sports wear. The Christian community is unhappy because WMOA charges television preachers the same price that every other sponsor pays. When the Reverend Jimmy-John wants air time, he has to pay the same scale as the sponsors of Lieutenant Lynda.' "
Christianity USA 1985 Drake, David. The Tank Lords. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 373. "The Doctrine of Salvation through the Stars--it was never labeled so bluntly in Universalist writings, but the peevish epithet bestowed by a Baptist theologian was not inaccurate--gave the Church of the Lord's Universe a dynamism unknown to the Christian center since the days of Archbishop Laud. It was a naive doctrine, of course. Neither the stars nor anything else brought peace to Man; but realists did not bring men to the stars, either, while the hopeful romantics of the Universal Church certainly helped. "
Christianity USA 1985 Knight, Damon. "The God Machine " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1985); pg. 34. Pg. 34: "'Okay, I'll get you the Protestant model. For that, we had to go to old Bibles--we bought a Gutenberg, and maybe you think that didn't cost. We found out later the Wyclif is just as good.' "; Gideon Bible; Pg. 35: "The fall campaign is a success. 'HOLINEX for instant tranquility...' ...Hospitals buy the professional model at $1,795. Psychiatrists buy it. The home models retail for $695 plus tax. People line up for it in department stores. It comes in Protestant, Catholic, Orthodox and Reformed versions.

Church and synagogue attendance zooms, then nosedives, until pastors begin allowing worshipers to bring their Holindexes. An enterprising minister in the West Village announces plans to build them into the backs of pews... For the last several days Terry has been bleeding slightly from the palms of his hands. " [Other refs.]

Christianity USA 1985 Zelazny, Roger. Trumps of Doom. New York: Arbor House (1985); pg. 19. Pg. 19-20: "'Here,' he said, 'take a look at this one.'

He tossed me a black book and stepped back. I caught It. It was a copy of the Bible. I opened it to the publishing credits page.

'Something special about this edition?' I asked.

He sighed.

'No. I'm sorry.'

He took it back and replaced it on the shelf...

'Sorry I tossed the Bible at you,' he said, raising his glass and taking a sip.

'You looked as if you expected me to go up in a puff of smoke.'

He nodded.

'I am really convinced that the reason she wants power has something to do with you. Are you into some form of occultism?'

'No.'

'She talked sometimes as if you might even be a supernatural creature yourself.'

I laughed. He did, too, after a moment. "

Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 15. "'Is there any evidence of a connection?'

'Yes,' said Bert. 'The same kind of evidence that Jesus Christ was an actual, historical figure--if you know what I mean.'

'I'm afraid you've lost me,' said Ross.

'Aside from religious faith,' said Bert, 'there is no first-century evidence that such a person as Christ really lived. There is contemporary documentation of the life of Caesar Augustus and Tiberius. There is even contemporary documentary evidence of the life of Pontius Pilate; but not one document survives from the time of Christ that mentions him. Yet . . . within a few years, Christianity was a powerful, if a controversial force. no one in the first century, though, protested that no such person ever lived, that Christianity was based on a myth. Ergo, Christ must have existed, on the basis of the negative evidence.' " [Many Christian refs. in novel. Novel is written from a Christian perspective.]

Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 138. "'You're Jewish, aren't you?' she asked.

'It depends on who you ask. The Nazis would have sent me up the chimney. My mother had me circumcised, and my father had me baptized.' He chuckled quietly. 'I refused to be bar mitzvahed or confirmed, thereby offending both families. My parents are still alive. I'm not exactly their favorite son. Frankly said, I have too much education to swallow either of their religions. I'm guess I'm an atheist.' "

Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 139. "'So you have two sons. One thinks he wants to study for the priesthood . . . this son of two atheists. And the other is? . . .' "
Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 176. "Mary, she wrote bitterly, lacked the sense to own and manage anything; any property she owned would likely be deeded to the first 'Christian confidence man' who got to her, and she, Alma, would not abet that. "
Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 201. "'States,' said Charles, 'calls itself the 'family network.' It's the chief broadcast resource for the so-called Christian right. It offers the most dull, most dreary, most boring programming this side of Moscow. Its management is not quite sure whether reruns of Lassie are entirely acceptable for 'Christian family viewing.'

'For which reason the company may be getting rewards in heaven but not on earth,' said Thyssen. 'In Biblical terms, the stations have low ratings, which have began low advertising, which has begat low income. In other words, States is losing money.' "

Christianity USA 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 252. "'It may well be,' said Ernst Dietrich, 'that those who killed him had learned of what he was doing and thought to prevent it by assassinating him.'

'Who do you mean?' Thad asked.

'Your Christian fanatics,' said Dietrich blandly. 'Who else?' "

Christianity USA 1986 Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin (1986); pg. -3. [Frontispiece.] "And when Rachel saw that she bare Jacob no children, Rachel envied her sister; and said unto Jacob, Give me children, or else I die.

And Jacob's anger was kindled against Rachel; and he said, Am I in God's stead, who hath withheld from thee the fruit of the womb?

And she said, Behold my maid Bilhah, go in unto her; and she shall bear upon my knees, that I may also have children by her.

--Genesis 30:1-3 "

Christianity USA 1986 Cadigan, Pat. "Pretty Boy Crossover " in Future on Fire (Orson Scott Card, ed.) New York: Tor (1991; story copyright 1986); pg. 183. "First you see video. Then you wear video.
Then you eat video. Then you be video.

--The Gospel According to Visual Mark "

Christianity USA 1986 Cover, Arthur Byron. "Jesus Was an Ace " in Wild Cards V: Down and Dirty (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 129. "He had laid his hands on the outline of some poor joker and had brought him back from an involuntary trip to parts unknown. He had done something no one had ever done before--using only the power of faith, he had healed a joker. He had proved that the grandest power on earth was the love of the Lord and of Jesus Christ, and he had put some of that love in the body of a creature whose body had been polluted by that obscene alien virus. " [Many other refs. throughout story. See also 'Evangelical' and 'Church of Jesus Christ, Joker'.]
Christianity USA 1986 Donaldson, Stephen R. The Mirror of Her Dreams. New York: Ballantine (1986) [Book jacket] "Terisa Morgan had not idea what to make of this. She had been preparing to spend another evening alone in her apartment when, without warning, he appeared in the mirror. Not as a reflection--he was in the mirror. At once, the glass shattered soundlessly, and then a young man calling himself Geraden layon the floor of her living room... He wanted her to return with him to save his world from destruction.

She didn't understand what he was talking about. She was only a mission secretary--not the sort of woman who saved worlds. Yet his eyes were so full of light and laughter, appeals and promises, that she accepted his invitation . . . and thereby changed her life forever. " [Teresa, the novel's main character, is a Protestant Christian, but there are no apparent refs. to the religion except in the first few pages.]

Christianity USA 1986 Donaldson, Stephen R. The Mirror of Her Dreams. New York: Ballantine (1986); pg. 11. "'No, Reverend Thatcher. You've mentioned her, naturally. But you've never told me about her.'

'She died nearly fifteen years ago,' he said, wistfully. 'But she was a fine, Christian woman, a strong woman, God rest her soul. Without her, I would have been weak, Miss Morgan--too weak to do what needed doing.'

...'I remember the time--oh, it was years ago, long before you were born, Miss Morgan--I was out of seminary... with all kinds of honors, would you believe it? And I had just finished serving an assistant pastorship in one of the best churches in the city.

'At the time, they wanted me to stay on as an associate pastor. With God's help, I had done well there, and they gave m a call to become one of their permanent shepherds...' " [Other refs. not in DB. See also pg. 12-16.]

Christianity USA 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 72. "...suggesting we had linked the myth of Christ arisen to our deep insecurity at having die and been reborn so changed and incomplete. but I sense in myself and the others nothing that reflects the gentle Christian fabrication; rather the imagery is of a pagan sort and the feeling of nobility is one of a great brooding spirit, half-animal, his perceptions darkening the trivial light of day. " [Also, pg. 105-122, 147, 165, etc.]
Christianity USA 1987 Willis, Connie. Lincoln's Dreams. New York: Bantam (1987); pg. 1. "They bred such horses in Virginia then,
Horses that were remembered after death
And buried not so far from Christian ground
That if their sleeping riders should arise
They could not witch them from the earth again
And ride a pointless course along the grass
With the old manage and light ease of hand.

--Stephen Vincent Benet "

Christianity USA 1988 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 4. Pg. 4: "...then he would sit by the fire reading his Bible and his Mazzini while his coffee got cold... "; Pg. 6: "Harriet was at the Center, Pearl said--working on Sunday, was that hat socialism was all about, come on in? Not that Harriet would ever consider going to church; she was like her Daddy that way, God Rest His Soul, sit down... listening to Pearl talk while she rolled out pie dough for the social at the church. What would God and Jesus do without their pies? Yasmin wondered. "; Pg. 7: "...Yasmin found the usual holograms of Douglass, Tubman, and Jesus oppressive... "; pg. 31: "'They trembling just like in the Bible,' she said. 'Trembling just like in the Bible.' "; pg. 33: "After a one-hour trial she was found guilty of defacing a Christian grave (Christian, since two of the four dead were white men... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1988 Freeman, Judith. "Family Attractions " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1988); pg. 213. "'That was Mom's idea of heaven.' He was about to tell them what color the boats were, a bright blue, and how his mother liked to row to a monastery on the far side of the lake where, near a statue of Christ, they sat on a marble bench and ate their picnic lunch... "
Christianity USA 1988 Martin, George R. R. & John J. Miller. Wild Cards VII: Dead Man's Hand. New York: Bantam Books (1990); pg. 85. Pg. 85: "Her hands were folded... clasping a Bible. "; Pg. 111: [Examining a corpse.] "The hands, though, holding a Bible on the sunken stomach, were clear, invisible, dead hands. " [Many other references to Christianity are in book, most of which are not in DB. But most are in relation to the fictional Church of Jesus Christ, Joker, which ministers to the 'Jokers', those disfigured by the wild card virus.]
Christianity USA 1989 Denton, Bradley. Buddy Holly Is Alive and Well on Ganymede. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1991); pg. 123. Pg. 123: "'You're going to grow up like those others, aren't you? The un-Christian, un-American ones in California and New York with their dirty hair and filthy clothes and their diseased whores who commit perversions with their mouths.' "; Pg. 124: "The pastor replied that so-called music like the Beatles poison was destroying the Christian fiber of the nation. She also said that any radio station that played things like that was under the influence of Communists and drug addicts. "
Christianity USA 1989 Mortensen, Pauline. "Woman Talking to a Cow " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1989); pg. 159. "After this I gotta feed those sheep. 'Feed my sheep,' he says just like that and walks out the door like he was Christ himself. "
Christianity USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. "Shave and a Haircut, Two Bites " in Prayers to Broken Stones. New York: Bantam (1992; c. 1989); pg. 291. "'All right,' I said... 'tell me this one wasn't essential. Number Eight--'All vampires hate and fear crosses and will avoid them at all cost.' ' I paused dramatically. Kevin knew what was coming and slumped lower. 'Kev, Mr. Denofrio goes to St. Mary's. Your church, Kev. Every morning before he goes down to open up the shop.'

'Yeah. Innis goes to First Prez on Sundays. My dad told me about Denofrio being in the parish. I never see him because he only goes to early Mass.' " [other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 91. "'Tom,' said the host... 'everything you saw on that . . . on that incredible trip . . . everything you witnessed during your trip to the stars . . . I've heard you tell young people this . . . it all bore witness to the truth of God's Word as revealed in the Bible . . . it all bore witness to the glory of Jesus Christ, didn't it, Tom?'

'Absolutely, Paul,' said Gavin. He looked directly into the camera... 'And, Paul, as exciting and thrilling and rewarding as it was to fly to the moon . . . that couldn't compare to the reward I found on the day that I finally accepted Jesus Christ as my Lord and personal savior.'

The host turned to the camera and nodded his head as if overcome. The audience applauded. The host's wife began to cry. " [Many more refs., not in DB.]

Christianity USA 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 108. "So here was this picture: the Eden from which Mama had been expelled.

...She embroidered samplers with queer, threatening passages from the Book of Revelation; her bookcases spilled out pamphlets with titles like Warning from the Sky and Living in the Last Days. "

Christianity USA 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 119. "'Don't sh-- me,' Willis stormed. 'I'm a good Christian man. I can smell out the Devil in the dark.' "
Christianity USA 1990 Anthony, Patricia. "The Deer Lake Sightings " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1990); pg. 115. "Her voice changed to a harsh, spitting whisper. 'I'm afraid . . . sometimes I think . . . what if it's Jesus? I mean, he don't look much like those pictures they got in Sunday School, but what if it's Jesus all the same? Who else can heal like that?'

'The other people . . .' Harry said before his voice died... 'Your neighbors. Have they had experiences like this?' "

Christianity USA 1990 Kirn, Walter. "Whole Other Bodies " in Bright Angels & Familiars. (Eugene England, ed.) Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1992; story c. 1990); pg. 330. "My brother got sleepy from reading the Bible, but tried not to show it, being polite. The blonder missionary told him not to worry, to curl up and sleep as long as he wanted, we weren't going to leave the park without him. And while my brother napped on the grass, moving his legs in his sleep, we talked about whether the Holy Ghost could visit a person in dreams... teaching truths that the person would wake up knowing. And we agreed that this was possible and might even happen to one of us. " [Refs. to Christianity throughout story, not in DB. Story is about one family's conversion and joining the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.]
Christianity USA 1991 Anthony, Patricia. "The Holes Where Children Lie " in Eating Memories. Woburn, MA: First Books; Baltimore, MD: Old Earth Books (1997; c. 1991); pg. 150. "The sun has shattered Glick's mask and Leeds can read the colonel's face easily now. There is awe there, but over that are annoyance and incomprehension. He looks like a man who, upon finding the stone rolled away from Jesus's grave empty, has been asked about the time. "
Christianity USA 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 180. Gideon Bible
Christianity USA 1991 McCammon, Robert R. Boy's Life. New York: Pocket Books (1992; c. 1991); pg. 53. Pg. 53: Easter; Pg. 54: Good Friday; Pg. 58: "...just in case God's ways were more mysterious than we Christians could grasp. "; Pg. 70: "Coming into church, the Easter crowd had been the model of polite Christian civilization... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1992 Anthony, Piers and Philip Jose Farmer. The Caterpillar's Question. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 34. "She was a rather plain and chubby girl he had known in high school, though not in the biblical sense. "
Christianity USA 1993 Brust, Steven. Agyar. New York: Tor (1993); pg. 208. "The hospital is called Saint Matthews... "
Christianity USA 1993 DeChance, John. MagicNet. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1993); pg. 28. "THE SPELLS YOU GET OUT OF BOOKS ON WITCHCRAFT IN ANY PUBLIC LIBRARY--SOME OF THAT'S THE GENUINE ARTICLE ALL RIGHT, BUT MOST OF WAS DELIBERATELY DISTORTED IN ANTIQUITY, BY HIGH PRIESTS AND COURT MAGICIANS AND THE LIKE, FOR REASONS OF SECURITY. CLASSIFIED MATERIAL. THE REAL MCCOY WAS EVENTUALLY LOST, AND THE MAGIC DIED OUT. EVER WONDER WHY THE OLD TESTAMENT, FOR INSTANCE, TAKES EFFICACIOUS MAGIC AS A GIVEN? PHARAOH'S MAGICIANS WORKED THE RIGHT STUFF; IT'S JUST THAT MOSES (OR AARON, I GUESS) WAS THE BETTER MAGICIAN. OKAY, BELOVED INFIDEL, MAYBE EXODUS IS MORE FICTION THAN FACT, BUT IT JUST MAY BE THAT THE 'NONFICTION NOVEL' IS OLDER THAN TRUMAN CAPOTE. IN ANY EVENT, THE OLD STUFF WORKS, IF YOU DO IT RIGHT. "
Christianity USA 1993 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 64. "On the adjacent scrap of newspaper was a large photo of a florid, confident man with the headline: HOW THE WORLD WILL END. EXCERPTS FROM THE REV. BILLY JO RANKIN'S NEW BOOK. EXCLUSIVELY THIS WEEK IN THE NEWS-POST. "
Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. -4. "ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

...In addition to these wonderfully alive people, I must thank several who are no longer with us:

Dante Alighieri, John Ciardi, T. S. Eliot, Joseph Conrad, and Thomas Aquinas. "

Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 58. "Gail's mother hears her sharing this philosophy with a playmate--they are burying a hamster who has died--and Gail's mother sends the playmate home and harangues Gail for over an hour about what the Bible says, how the Bible is God's Word on earth, and stupid it is to think that a person simply ceases to be. Gail, stubborn, stares and listens, but refuses to recant. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 100. Pg. 100: "...have his bones treated with the respect due to bones belonging to a white Christian man. "; Pg. 105: "Mathematics descends upon me like a thunderclap, like the Voice of God in the biblical story of Saul of Tarsus being knocked off his horse. "; Pg. 147: "The old man leaned low, his forearm on the lowered driver's-side window and his Old Testament prophet's beard brushing against Bremen's shoulder. "; Pg. 215: "Thus Gandhi and Einstein, Jesus and Newton, Galileo and... Moses and Jesus perceived new motions of those stars... "; Pg. 246: "Easter weekend " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 322. "Moses, Gandhi, Jesus, and Newton, offered Gail, sorting out his jumble of thoughts. Einstein and Freud and Buddha.

...'Jacob thought that there were a few people in history--he called them ultimate perceptives--a few people whose new vision of physical laws, or moral laws, or whatever was so comprehensive and powerful that they essentially caused a paradigm shift for the entire human race.' "

Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 324. "Jerry, what kind of mind would it take to . . . what did you say? . . . encompass all of a counter-reality. Could any person do that?

He pauses. Knowing Gail's resistance to religious metaphors, he still has to try to explain through one. Maybe that's what the Garden of Gethsemane was about, kiddo. And maybe even the Garden of Eden.

He does not feel the flash of anger with which Gail usually responds to religious concepts. he senses instead a great shifting in her thinking as she encounters a profound religious truth without the absurdities of religion getting in her way. For the first time in her life Gail shares some of her parents' awe in the spiritual potential of the universe. "

Christianity USA 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 325. "Jerry... the Garden of Eden fable . . . the important thing wasn't the forbidden fruit, or the knowledge of sin it's supposed to represent . . . it's the Tree! The Tree of Life is precisely that . . . your probability tree . . . Jacob's reality branches! Mother always used to quote Jesus saying 'My Father's house has many rooms . . .' Worlds without end. "
Christianity USA 1993 Turrow, Scott. Personal Injuries. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1999); pg. 58. "He asked Walter to make sure the judge read it.

'Silvio reads every word. Christ, sometimes I wonder if he thinks he's the Virgin Mary. I don't think he figured out yet there's such a thing as bullsh--.'

...'Watch out for this one, Wally. Make sure he sees it the right way.'

'I just work here.'

'Right,' Robbie whispered. 'Right. That's why it's always Christmas.' "



Christianity, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.