Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, United Kingdom: London

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 89. "'Look!' Baker called to her from the sitting room. 'You can see Big Ben!'

'And in that direction,' the Englishman said ever so politely, 'one can view Saint Paul's Cathedral.' " [Many other Christian refs., not in DB. Most in reference to Catholicism, some refs. under 'Catholic.' Also pg. 210.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 55. "Rolfa and Milena sat in an old church in John Smith Square and listened to a choir rehearsing madrigals. They want to a market outside Westminster Abbey... "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 169. Pg. 169: "'I should explain. Chris is my Bulge. The name is short for Christian Soldier Two. The first one died. Would you like to see my snapping turtle?' "; Pg. 214: "She had only one vision, now, on the inside of Christian Soldier, and the garden growing out of his walls. " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 238. Pg. 238: "Remember, the viruses would say, remember Isaiah 38.10, 'In the midst of my days, I shall go to the gates of hell'. "; Pg. 335: "On Milena's twenty-first birthday, she and her friends went for a picnic in Archbishop's Park, near St. Thomas's Hospital. "; Pg. 350: "The Naiads were singing Psalm 78... HOLY BIBLE... The Old and New Testament... "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2075 Ryman, Geoff. The Child Garden; or A Low Comedy. New York: St. Martin's Press (1989); pg. 302. "It was not exactly shameful to be a Christian. It meant you were a simple soul. Jacob did not come by a crucifix of gold by himself. It would have been passed from one dying hand to another, through generations. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 54. "All the advantages of Christianity and alcohol; none of their defects. " [Apparently a reference to a new concoction called soma, developed circa 2200 and used by the world state to control society.]
Christianity United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 236. Pg. 236: "'You've never read this, for example.'

The Savage took it. 'The Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments,' he read aloud from the title-page.

'Nor this.' It was a small book and had lost its cover.

'The Imitation of Christ'

...'There was a man called Cardinal Newman,' he said. 'A cardinal,' he exclaimed parenthetically, 'was a kind of Arch-Community-Songster.' " [More.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 2546 Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: HarperCollins (1999; c. 1932, 1946); pg. 244. "'...Anybody can be virtuous now. You can carry at least half your mortality about in a bottle. Christianity without tears--that's what soma is.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: Northern Ireland 1916 DuBois, Brendan. Resurrection Day. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1999); pg. 48. "Dark times, times that were still very fresh in people's minds, and which almost always crowed out older thoughts of the 1916 Easter Rebellion and the six counties of Northern Ireland, still under British rule. "
Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1567 C.E. Dukthas, Ann. A Time for the Death of a King. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995; c. 1994); pg. 13. Pg. -1: "Mary's real interested in France are handled by her aged and saintly envoy, Archbishop Beaton. "; Pg. 13-14: "In the January of 1567, Murder was becoming a common visitor to Scotland's harsh, wild land, where people lived close to the earth and the beasts that fed upon it. The common people believed in the magical influence of the sun and planets, in the magic of their pagan past, in devilish imps and monsters as well as the crucifixion of their Saviour. A wild, savage country where war often blazed from sea to sea and the gold-red bracken was littered with the rotting dead. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 47. Pg. 47: "'Saint Columba's footsteps,' Julia Lovat murmured,... 'Do you suppose those marks we saw on the top of that rock by Kilcolmkill Church really are the imprints of his feet?' "; Pg. 48: "Among the placed they had explored since leaving their guesthouse in Campbeltown earlier that morning was the spot where the seventh-century Irish missionary, St. Columba, was purported to have preached his first sermon on Scottish soil. A set of footprints visible on the flattened summit of a rock near the local village of Southend was said to be a permanent momento of that historic visit. "
Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 48. Pg. 48: "Julia's sea-blue eyes turned quizzical as she lowered her guidebook. 'Didn't I read somewhere that Tibetan Buddhists recently bought that island? It strikes me as odd, you know, that Buddhists would want to buy a Christian holy site.' "; Pg. 49: "Peregrine... considering Julia's comment about Buddhist interest in a Christian holy site. Though a formerly lukewarm childhood faith had been kindled to a sustaining flame through his association with Adam and the Hunting Lodge, and he was content for it to be so, Peregrine felt drawn to the island with a keenness that he was somewhat at a loss to explain. " [Many other refs. to Christianity in book, most not in DB. Many of the characters are active Christians.]
Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 215. "'...I expect you know that the Buddhists are very ecology-minded. The Samye Ling people are doing a lot of tree-planting on the island... They hope to reestablish a fruit orchard on the same site where the old Christian monastic community had theirs, over a thousand years ago.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1995 Kurtz, Katherine & Deborah Turner Harris. Dagger Magic. New York: Ace Books (1995); pg. 232. "'Rather like the apostle Paul exhorting his followers to die to sin in order to be reborn into new life,' Adam offered.

Jigme nodded approvingly. 'An apt analogy, in Western terms...' " [Other refs., including pg. 174-175.]

Christianity United Kingdom: Scotland 1999 Banks, Iain. The Business. New York: Simon & Schuster (1999); pg. 34. "My mother died suddenly at Easter 1972... "
Christianity universe 80000000 Asimov, Isaac. "The Last Question " in Nine Tomorrows. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1959; story c. 1956); pg. 190. [At the end of the Universe. The last words of this story echo the account of Creation from Genesis, in the Bible.] Pg. 189: "The stars and Galaxies died and snuffed out, and space grew black after ten trillion years of running down. "; Pg. 190: "And it came to pass that AC learned how to reverse the direction of entropy.

But there was now no man to whom AC might give the answer of the last question. No matter. The answer--by demonstration--would take care of that, too.

For another timeless interval, AC [successor to Universal AC/computer and successor to Cosmic AC] thought how best to do this. Carefully, AC organized the program. The consciousness of AC encompassed all of what had once been a Universe and brooded over what was now Chaos. Step by step, it must be done.

And AC said, 'LET THERE BE LIGHT!'

And there was light-- "

Christianity USA 1835 Forstchen, William R. "A Hard Day For Mother " in Alternate Generals (Harry Turtledove, ed.) New York: Baen (1998); pg. 221. "Word was that Hancock was dead, Meade wounded and captured. Howard was in command. Poor Howard, good Maine man, a Christian warrior, but up to a fighting withdrawal? " [Also pg. 221.]
Christianity USA 1850 McHugh, Maureen F. "The Lincoln Train " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 321. "When I was younger I used to try to school my unruly self in Christian charity. God sends us nothing we cannot bear... I am trying to be a Christian daughter, and I remind myself that it is not her fault that the war turned her into an old woman... I am full of unchristian feelings. My mother's infirmity is her trial, and it is also mine. " [Other refs. not in DB. See pg. 328]
Christianity USA 1872 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 227. "'But Rufus, he's a primitive soul. He wants something to cling to--which is what immortals never can have, right? He's gone through a dozen Christian faiths...' "
Christianity USA 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 28. Pg. 28: "'This is it: every last Yankee officer with whom I spoke swore up and down on a stack of Bibles as tall as he was that Lincoln never would have given up the fight if he'd been fighting against us,'... "; Pg. 35: "He'd heard the Lord's Prayer had been translated into Sioux, which he also took as a good sign.

...Behind Roosevelt, the crowd parted as if it were the Red Sea and Moses had come. But it wasn't Moses, it was... "; Pg. 120: "Doctors swore on a stack of Bibles that most women knoew little or nothing of sexual pleasure, and id not care to make its acquaintance. But then, considering the track record doctors had elsewhere, how much did that prove? "; Pg. 125: "'...Promise me, Frederick [Douglass], as one Christian to another.' "

Christianity USA 1895 Willis, Connie. Bellwether. New York: Bantam Spectra (1997; 1st ed. 1996); pg. 207. "prohibition (1895 - January 16, 1920) -- Aversion fad against alcohol fueled by the Women's Christian Temperence Union, Carry Nation's saloon-smashing, and the sad effects of alcoholism... "
Christianity USA 1908 Bensen, Donald R. And Having Writ.... Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill Co. (1978); pg. 75. Pg. 75: "I gave them substantially the same account I had contrived for President Roosevelt, but it was received with less friendliness.

'How do we know you're not scouts for an invasion?' 'What so-called benefits are we supposed to get when your masters come here?' 'Isn't it true that your people will flood us with cheap labor?' 'How does this stuff about life on other worlds square with Scripture?'

'His paper's for Bryan,' Oxford whispered to me of the last speaker. 'The Boy Orator's already come out with a statement saying you can't be so because you ain't in the Bible.' ";

Pg. 76: "'If a problem can't be solved by Bible-thumping and orating, it ain't up Bryan's alley. And Taft did all right pacifying the Philippines, but it's not the same thing...' "

Christianity USA 1925 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 71. "The next five years, 1870-75, were as close to a civil war as Nova Africa was to see. When it began, the new nation south of the Tennessee River was 42 percent white; when it ended, it was 81 percent black. In the U.S., veterans and descendants of the 'Exitus' formed the racist backbone of the rightist movement for years: in the Bible Wars of the 1920s, the Homestead Rebellion, even the Second Revolutionary War of '48. "
Christianity USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 19. "'Because,' Creath went on, 'and I saw this honestly, I won't accept second-best from you down at the plant. Some might say it was favoritism, my hiring you on at all. Now I don't believe that. I don't think it is un-Christian to help a family member in need. The opposite. But charity does not extend to indulgence...' "
Christianity USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 30. "'...I'm supposed to be perfect--a saintly little female Imitation of Christ...' "
Christianity USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 101. Pg. 101: "He was religious, she had observed, only among the Rotarians, and that only perfunctorily: the Christ-the-businessman school of doctrine. And even that had lapsed with the demoralization of the ice business. For years Liza had tried to lead him into something deeper, but until now she had not succeeded. "; Pg. 102: "She was shed of Anna Blaise and was shed, as well, (though tthis was not a Christian thought) of her sister's boy. " [Other Christian refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1932 Wilson, Robert Charles. A Hidden Place. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1986); pg. 186. "'Where he is, I think. Where Travis is. You know, I pray they both get away safely. Truly, I pray for that. Is it un-Christian, Liza, and I should want them both to leave?...' "
Christianity USA 1934 Bradbury, Ray. "The Highest Branch on the Tree " in Driving Blind. New York: Avon Books (1997); pg. 194. "Why, you ask, why did we do that to harry Hands? Was he some sort of super-villain who deserved or Christian persecution, a dumb sort of semi-crucifixion to appall the neighbors and ruin school history so that in the annals of time people would say, '1934, wasn't that the year that--' "
Christianity USA 1939 Dick, Philip K. Ubik. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1969); pg. 139. "In New York, he told himself, it'll be different; this is the Bible Belt, the isolationist Middle West. We won't be living here... "
Christianity USA 1940 Hubbard, L. Ron. Fear. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1991; c. 1940); pg. 13. Pg. 13: "'I have read it,' said Jebson. 'I have read it and I can see more in it than you would like me to see. Prating of demons and devils and the placating of gods of fear--By your very inference, sir, I suddenly conceive you to mean religion itself! Next, I suppose, you will attack Christianity as an invention to overthrow the Roman capitalistic state!' "; Pg. 15: "He failed to understand Jebson, for he was too generous to be able to run the gamut of Jebson's thought process, starting with a little man's desire to injure a big one, and envy for Lowry's rather romantic and mysterious aspect, passing through indirect insult to the college, and, finally, coming to light as a challenge to Christianity itself in some weird and half-understood way. "
Christianity USA 1945 Bourne, Mark. "Boss " in Alternate Tyrants (Mike Resnick, ed.) New York: Tor (1997); pg. 19. "He gets up on the wooden crate he totes the scope in and said, 'Listen here, everybody!' They all hush up. He thanks them for coming and says, 'It sure looks like the good Lord give us some fine seeing weather.' Someone yells 'Amen!'... He gives the night time to go dark by telling them about the glory of the heavens. 'Which,' he decrees, 'you can see if you got the God-given sense to just look up.' He feels like Moses himself. ";

Pg. 21: "'God's teapot,' Schuyler calls it. 'With the Milky Way pouring out like steam across the sky.'

He points straight up at Cygnus the Swan. 'Also known as the Northern Cross!' The church folks seem to like that part. "

Christianity USA 1946 Martin, George R. R. "Prologue " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 4. "What did we really know about him? [Tachyon, the alien] Nothing except what he told us himself. The eggheads were treating him like Baby Jesus, but military men have to be a little more cautious. "
Christianity USA 1947 Bear, Greg. Dinosaur Summer. New York: Time Warner (1998); pg. 52. "'You aren't old enough to remember it all, boy. Some called it Challenger's curse. Preachers called the dinos abominations. It's bad press to claim Darwin is a fool and dinos and other extinct animals never existed, and then along comes Challenger [who discovered living dinosaurs in Venezuela] . . .' "
Christianity USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. "The Witch " in The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 65. "'What's your name?' the man asked.

The little boy looked suspicious again. 'Mr. Jesus,' he said.

'Johnny,' the little boy's mother said. She caught the little boy's eye and frowned deeply. "

Christianity USA 1949 Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux (1998; first published 1949); pg. 143. [Lengthy quote from Joseph Glanvil's Sadducismus Triumphatus] "The Confession of Margaret Jackson, relict of Tho. Stuart in Shaws, who being examined by the Justices anent her being guilty of Witchcraft, declares . . . That forty years ago, or thereabout, she was at Pollockshaw-croft, with some few sticks on her back, and that the black Man came to her, and that she did give up herself unto the black Man, from the top of her head to the sole of her foot; and that this was after the Declarant's renouncing of her Baptism; and that the Spirit's name, which he designed her, was Locas... And declares, That this Man who disappeared was the Devil. "
Christianity USA 1950 Williams, Walter Jon "Witness " in Wild Cards (George R. R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1986); pg. 121. "MR. RANKIN: I would like to assure the Jewish gentleman from New York that he will encounter no bias on account of his race. Any man who believes in the fundamental principles of Christianity and lives up to them, whether he is a Catholic or Protestant, has my respect and confidence.

WITNESS: May I say to the committee that I object to the characterization of 'Jewish gentleman.'

MR. RANKIN: Do you object to being called a Jew or being called a gentleman? What are you kicking about? "

Christianity USA 1956 Knight, Damon. "The Last Word " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1956); pg. 177. [Introduction by Damon Knight to a story in this collection of his stories.] Pg. 171: "'The Last Word' is one of three stories I have written using orthodox Christian materials--God, the devil, etc.--which proves that my childhood training had some use after all. " [As indicated by this introduction, the story (page 173-177) draws on Christian doctrine.];

Pg. 177: "'It's a time machine,' the man said.

'We're going back,' the woman whispered, 'to the beginning.'

Back, to the beginning, to start all over.

Without me.

The woman said, 'You've won Armageddon, but you've lost Earth.'

I knew the answer to that, of course, but she was a woman and had the last word.

I gestured toward the purple darkness outside. 'Lost Earth? What do you call this?'

She poised her hand on the switch.

'Hell,' she said.

And I have remembered her voice, through ten thousand lonely years. "

Christianity USA 1957 Dickson, Gordon R. "St. Dragon and the George " in Dragon Tales (Isaac Asimov, ed.) New York: Ballantine (1982; c. 1957); pg. 206. "'...Dragons don't have souls, dammit!'

'No,' said Jim, 'but a Christian gentleman has; and if I'm a Christian gentleman, I wouldn't dare foreswear myself like that, would I?' "

Christianity USA 1958 Knight, Damon. "Thing of Beauty " in The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976; c. 1958); pg. 118. "The trouble was, the machine wouldn't draw the same thing twice in a row. On that church window job, he got one picture of Christ and then couldn't get another, no matter how long he tried, so he had to fill out with saints and martyrs. The church put up a beef, too. "
Christianity USA 1959 Bison, Terry. Fire on the Mountain. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 71. "A painting showed Andrew Jackson strutting under a twenty-six-star flag across a field of dying Creek and Cherokee. On an end table several books sat upright between harp bookends: the Holy Bible;... " [Other refs. not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1959 Bradbury, Ray. "The Day it Rained Forever " in The Day it Rained Forever. London: Rupert Hart-Davis (1970; first ed. 1959); pg. 12. "Upstairs, Mr. Fremley sat upt like Lazarus. "
Christianity USA 1963 Grimwood, Ken. Replay. New York: Arbor House (1986); pg. 158. "'There's a cult--white, not Indian--that still worships the mountain. They think it has something to do with Jesus, with resurrection...' "
Christianity USA 1965 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 20. "According to he Bible, the ancient Hebrews had apparently thought that ?[pi] was exactly equal to three. The Greeks and Romans, who knew lots of things about mathematics, had no idea that the digits in ?[pi] went on forever without repeating. " [Many other references to Christianity throughout book. Most refs. not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1965 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 138. "It was The Gospel from Outer Space, by Kilgore Trout. It was about a visitor from outer space, shaped very much like a Tralfamadorian, by the way. The visitor from outer space made a serious study of Christianity, to learn, if he could, why Christians found it so easy to be cruel. He concluded that at least part of the trouble was slipshod storytelling in the New Testament. He supposed that the intent of the Gospels was to teach people, among other things, to be merciful, even to the lowest of the low.

But the Gospels actually taught this:

Before you kill somebody, make absolutely sure he isn't well connected. So it goes. "

Christianity USA 1965 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 138. "The flaw in the Christ stories, said the visitor from outer space, was that Christ, who didn't look like much, was actually the Son of the Most Powerful Being in the Universe. Readers understood that, so, when they came to the crucifixion, they naturally thought, and rosewater read out loud again:

Oh, boy--they sure picked the wrong guy to lynch that time!

And that thought had a brother: 'There are right people to lynch.' Who? People not well connected. So it goes. "

Christianity USA 1965 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 139. "The visitor from outer space made a gift to Earth of a new Gospel. In it, Jesus really was a nobody, and a pain in the neck to a lot of people with better connections than he had. He still got to say all the lovely and puzzling things he said in the other Gospels.

So the people amused themselves one day by nailing him to a cross and planting the cross in the ground. There couldn't possibly by any repercussions, the lynchers thought. The reader would have to think that, too, since the new Gospel hammered home again and again what a nobody Jesus was.

And then, just before the nobody died, the heavens opened up, and there was thunder and lightning. The voice of God came crashing down. He told the people that he was adopting the bum as his son, giving him the full powers and privileges of The Son of the Creator of the Universe throughout all eternity. God said this: From this moment on, He will punish horribly anybody who torments a bum who has no connections! "

Christianity USA 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 7. "...some hand-pulled taffy left over from Bible School (but wrapped in wax paper and still fairly tasty); my unopened copy of Jesus' life--it began with a black sheet of paper. You were supposed to show this to someone and tell them, 'This was the color of my heard before I found Jesus.' You kept flipping the pages, all solid colors, through the blue of the sky and the green of the grass and the red of His Blood until you ended up with a pure white page, the color of your redeemed heart. I loved the whole thing--it was so simple yet effective!--and I had shown my first copy to everyone in the family many times, until Linwood took it away from me. I was saving this untouched copy for the future. "
Christianity USA 1966 Geary, Patricia. Strange Toys. New York: Bantam (1989; c. 1987); pg. 8. "Then I felt crummy. A lie was a lie and the Bible told you that was no good. Deane was in some cold dark jail, and Linwood was sick with worry, but I was exulting in deceit and its own accompanying power.

Perhaps there was something I could do to get God's attention?

I could stay up all night, praying and fasting, though the fasting bit was moot since who ate at night anyway. Or . . . a brainstorm! I could do like they did in the Old Testament: I could make a sacrifice.

Remembering Cain and Abel and what God had to say about that, I considered Rose and Pansy, my two small green turtles, who fretted out their miserable existence in a kidney-shaped plastic pool, complete with green plastic palm. A consolation or company, their contribution was minimal. And real blood was more-appreciated than, say, flowers or ears of corn. " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 24-25, 41, 44, 75-77, 89, 146-148, 157-158, etc.]

Christianity USA 1967 Vonnegut, Kurt. Slaughterhouse-Five. New York: Random House (1999; c. 1969); pg. 27. "I looked through the Gideon Bible in my motel room for tales of great destruction. The sun was risen upon the Earth when Lot entered into Zo-ar, I read. Then the Lord rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of Heaven; and He overthrew those cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and that which grew upon the ground. "
Christianity USA 1969 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 29. "One day, in some agitation, her mother asked her to do something for all their sakes: attend Bible class. While her father, a skeptic on revealed religions, had been alive, there was no talk of Bible class. How could her mother have married Staughton? The question welled up in her for the thousandth time. Bible class, her mother continued, would help instill the conventional virtues; but even more important, it would show Staughton that Ellie was willing to make some accomodation. Out of love and pity for her mother, she acquiesced. " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout book, most not in DB.]
Christianity USA 1971 Dick, Philip K. "Foster, You're Dead " in The Best of Philip K. Dick. New York: Ballantine (1977; story c. 1954); pg. 229. [The end of the story:] "To his right a garish neon sign winked and glowed in the deepening night shadows. A huge sign, bright and colorful.

PEACE ON EARTH GOOD WILL TO MEN
PUBLIC SHELTER ADMISSION 50? "

Christianity USA 1972 Bradbury, Ray. "Christ, Old Student in a New School " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 164. [This is a four-page poem about Jesus Christ, with emphasis on the crucifixion.]
Christianity USA 1972 Gerrold, David. "With a Finger in My I " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 348. "The fog was rolling in again.

'Look at the church!' she said suddenly.

'Huh?' I said.

'Look at the church!' she said it again, insistent.

I tried to. I lifted my head and tried to look at the church, but the fog was too thick. I couldn't even see my toes.

'Look at it,' she said. 'Faith is the basic precept of religion--faith that what they're telling you is true! Don't they tell you to have faith in the church, that faith can work miracles?!! Well, I'll tell you something--it can! If enough people believe in something, it becomes reality!'... She went on, 'Fortunately, the church long ago abandoned miracles in favor of conservatism--not, it's fighting to preserve the status quo! The church is one of the last bastions of reality--it's one of the few things holding back chaos!' "

Christianity USA 1972 Koontz, Dean R. "A Mouse in the Walls of the Global Village " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 549. "I lay with the lamp, holding it, saying, 'Dear Jesus, don't let the bulb be broken; Dear Jesus, don't let the bulb be broken,' over and over until I suddenly realized how eerie I sounded. "
Christianity USA 1972 Nelson, Ray. "Time Travel for Pedestrians " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 141. Pg. 141: "I went to the Five-and-Ten at the local shopping center and brought some very ordinary flower seeds. The pusher was a middle-aged Catholic saleslady in the garden department.

I think her name was Eve.

...The angel in my mind touched me with fear... but I knew from the Bible that if you fight and angel and win, the prize can be very great sometimes... ";

Pg. 143: "Marriage is for Christians, not for those who remember the Old Religion, not for a girl who is the wife of the God or the wife of all men or no men... How small the church looked, down there, how small and weak. In their book the Christians claim they once healed the blind and lame with a touch, but if that's true, why can they do it no longer? " [More, pg. 144-146. Extensive refs. about Christianity.]

Christianity USA 1972 Sallis, James. "Tissue " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 438. [at the fitting shop] "..but you do have a certificate? From your parents, I mean, testifying to your age--and of course notes from your teacher and minister. "
Christianity USA 1975 Russ, Joanna. The Female Man. New York: G. K. Hall (1977; 1975); pg. 58. Pg. 58: "She's reading the Christian Existentialists for a course in school. "; Pg. 193: "Now in my eleven years of conventional life I had learned many things and one of them was what it means to be convicted of rape--I do not mean the man who did it, I mean the woman to whom it was done. Rape is one of the Christian mysteries, it creates a luminous and beautiful tableau in people's minds; and as I listened furtively to what nobody would allow me to hear straight out, I slowly came to understand that I was face to face with one of those shadowy feminine disasters, like pregnancy, like disease... "; Pg. 194: Original Sin
Christianity USA 1976 Disch, Thomas M. "The Brave Little Toaster: A Bedtime Story for Small Appliances " in The Best from Fantasy & Science Fiction: 24th Series (Edward L. Ferman, ed.) New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1982); pg. 282. "'Charming flower, tell me, do,
What genera and species you
Belong to. I, as may be seen
At once, am just a daisy, green
of leaf and white of petal. You
Are neither green nor white nor blue
Nor any color I have known.
In what Eden have you grown?
Sprang you from earth or sky above?
In either case, accept my life.' "
Christianity USA 1976 Knight, Damon. The Best of Damon Knight. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1976); pg. 171. [Introduction by Damon Knight to a story in this collection of his stories.] "'The Last Word' is one of three stories I have written using orthodox Christian materials--God, the devil, etc.--which proves that my childhood training had some use after all. "
Christianity USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 243. "He had decided that the man with the key was indeed a devil, or even more likely a mirage, and the mirage would stand outside his cell until Lloyd finally dropped dead, talking happily about God and Jesus and Golden's Spicy Brown Mustard...

'I'm going to make you my righthand man, Lloyd. Going to put you right up there with Saint Peter...' "

Christianity USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 323. "Her place was not to judge God, although she wished He hadn't seen fit to set the cup before her lips that He had. But when it came to matters of judgment, she was satisfied with the answer God had given Moses from the burning bush when Moses had seen fit to questin. Who are you? Mose asks, and God comes back from that bush just as pert as you like: I Am Who I AM. In other words, Mose, stop beatin around this here bush and get your old ass in gear. "
Christianity USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 328. "She found herself wondering if the Lord was going to send her an eagle to fly her those four miles, or send along Elijah in his fiery chariot to give her a lift.

'Blasphemy,' she told herself complacently, 'The Lord provides strength, not taxicabs.' "

Christianity USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 426. "'There used to be a book my mom had, she got it from her grandmother or something. In His Steps, that was the name of it. And there were all these little stories about guys with horrible problems. Ethical problems, most of them. And the guy who wrote the book said that to solve the problems, all you had to do was ask, 'What would Jesus do?' It always cleared the trouble right up...' "
Christianity USA 1978 King, Stephen. The Stand. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1978); pg. 730. "Glen said, 'If you read your Bible, you'll see that it was pretty traditional for these prophets to go out into the wilderness from time to time--Old Testament Magical Mystery Tours. The timespan given for these jaunts was usually forty days and forty nights, a Hebraic idiom that really means 'no one knows exactly how long he was gone, but it was quite a while.' Does that remind you of anyone?' "; Pg. 731: "'Same with people. You can clean yourself out so much there's nothing left. The Bible tells us about Isaiah and Job and the others, but it doesn't say how many prophets came back from the wilderness with visions that had crisped their brains. I imagine there were some...' "
Christianity USA 1978 Maggin, Elliot S. Superman: Last Son of Krypton. New York: Warner Books (1978); pg. 148-150. Pg. 148: "Luthor had never killed a human being, had never been directly responsible for a man or woman's death. The entire mass of his hatred was directed at Superman, who was thankful to take the hatred and leave only Luthor's disdain for the rest of the human community. The Kryptonian became upset whenever he thought of the man who had been his boyhood friend. Superman could only hope that someday God would have mercy on Lex Luthor's tortured soul. "; Pg. 149: "There was a big round St. Bernard with the look of a monk standing by a fountain. "; Pg. 150: "...on the apparently smooth surface of the sculpture's central bulb, and the clear portion opened on a hinge like a cracked Easter egg. "


Christianity, continued

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