Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, United Kingdom: England

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1776 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 423. "The Paul [Stanski] in her mind had come to resemble the church warden who once examined her fingers for calluses and warned her to keep to Christian ways... For all his disavowal of the fraternity of old white men, Paul remained a patriarch... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1790 Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam (1991; c. 1818); pg. 104. "...Volney's Ruins of Empire... of the decline of that mighty empire, of chivalry, Christianity, the kings... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1790 Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam (1991; c. 1818); pg. 108. "'Safie related that her mother was a Christian Arab, seized and made a slave by the Turks; recommended by her beauty, she had won the heart of the father of Safie, who married her. The young girl spoke in high and enthusiastic terms for her mother, who, born in freedom, spurned the bondage to which she was now reduced. She instructed her daughter in the tenets of her religion and taught her to aspire to higher powers of intellect and an independence of spirit forbidden to the female followers of Muhammad... The prospect of marrying a Christian and remaining in a country where women were allowed to take a rank in society was enchanting to her... The Turk allowed this intimacy to take place... He loathed the idea that his daughter should be united to a Christian, but he feared the resentment of Felix if he should appear lukewarm...' " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1810 Powers, Tim. The Anubis Gates. New York: Ace (1983); pg. 11. "'You know our gods are gone. They reside now in the Tuaut, the underworld, the gates of which have been held shut for eighteen centuries by some pressure I do not understand but which I am sure is linked with Christianity. Anubis is the god of that world and the gates, but has no longer any form in which to appear here... he gods of Egypt will burst out in modern England. The living Osiris and the Ra of the morning sky will dash the Christian churches to rubble, Horus and Khonsu will disperse all current wars by their own transcendent force...' " [Many other refs. not in DB, e.g. pg. 84, 135, 213, 303.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1886 Stevenson, Robert Louis. "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde " in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Stories. Pleasantville, NY: Reader's Digest Association (1991; c. 1886); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "'I incline to Cain's heresy,' he used to say quaintly: 'I let my brother go to the devil in his own way.' "; Pg. 11: "Street after street, and all the folks asleep--street after street, all lighted up as if for a procession and all as empty as a church... "; Pg. 15: "That evening My Utterson came home to his bachelor house... It was his custom of a Sunday, when this meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his reading desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang out the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed. " [Some other minor refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1888 Willis, Connie. To Say Nothing of the Dog. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 54. "'It's all these sermons on Christian love,' Auntie said. 'Whatever happened to sermons on duty and knowing one's place? And punctuality...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 80. "The day was unusually fine till the afternoon, when some of the gossips who frequent the East Cliff churchyard, and from that commanding eminence watch the wide sweep of sea visible to the north and east... " [Probably an Anglican churchyard. More, pg. 92.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1898 Wells, H. G. The War of the Worlds. New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 43. "I saw the tops of the trees about the Oriental College burst into smoke red flame, and the tower of the little church beside it slide down into ruin. The pinnacle of the mosque had vanished, and the roof line of the college itself looked as if a hundred-ton gun had been at work upon it. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1898 Wells, H. G. The War of the Worlds. New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 49. Pg. 49: "Then I heard midnight pealing out from Pyrford Church behind me, and then came the silhouette of Maybury Hill... "; Pg. 70: "It struck the tower of Shepperton Church, smashing it down as the impact of a battering ram might have done, swerved aside, blundered on, and collapsed with tremendous force into the river... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1898 Wells, H. G. The War of the Worlds. New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 77. "'Why are these things permitted? What sins have we done? The morning service was over, I was walking through the roads to clear my brain for the afternoon, and then--fire, earthquake, death! As if it were Sodom and Gomorrah! All our work undone, all the work--What are these Martians?'

'What are we?' I answered, clearing my throat.

...Presently he began waving his hand.

'All the work--all the Sunday schools-- What have we done--what has Weybridge done? Everything gone--everything destroyed. The church! We rebuilt it only three years ago. Gone! Swept out of existence! Why?' " [Some other refs., not in DB, but most all overt refs. are in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1898 Wells, H. G. The War of the Worlds. New York: Penguin Putnam (1986; c. 1898); pg. 135. "...to think one of the great fighting-machines had stumbled against the house, as I had seen one stumble against the tower of Shepperton Church. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 13. "He held both his arms bent, hands knotted as if in prayer, the sleeves of his rumpled jacket heavy with long rustling quires of sheet-music.

' 'Railway to Heaven,' ladies and gents,' the ballad-seller chanted, a veteren patterer. ' 'Of truth divine the rails are made, and on the Rock of Ages laid; the rails are fixed in chains of love, firm as the throne of God above.' Lovely tune and only tuppence, miss.'

'Do you have 'The Raven of San Jacinto'?' Sybil asked.

'I can get that, I can get it,' the seller said. 'And what's that then?'

'About the great battle in Texas, the great General?'

The ballad-seller arched his brows. His eyes were blue and crazily bright, with hunger, perhaps, or religion, or gin. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 150. "Now they are to be married, and Mother wants you to know particularly that it will NOT be in a Church but a civil ceremony with the J.P. Mr. Witherspoon in Lewes City Hall... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 402. Pg. 402: "You wrote your silly books of verse, you praised Satan and Cain and adultery, and every kind of wicked foolishness. "; Pg. 408: "'A cemetary!' Pearson cries. 'We'e hit a churchyard.' "; Pg. 410: "'How, under these circumstances, are we to successfully resolve the matter of the murder of the Reverend Alistair Roseberry? This shameful, atavistic crime, brutally perpetrated within a Christian church, has blacked the reputation of Party and Government...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 10-11. "Someday Mr. Aaron, a whiskery old merchant Jew from Whitechapel, would have a lordship... The Rad Parliament wouldn't care that Mr. Aaron was no Christian. They's given Charles Darwin a lordship, and he said that Adam and Eve were monkeys. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1905 Gibson, William & Bruce Sterling. The Difference Engine. New York: Bantam (1991); pg. 300-301. "'One of Cromwell's ministers,' Mallory said readily, 'author of the Areopagitica.'

The Marquess nodded. He seemed pleased. 'John Milton wrote an epic poem, Paradise Lost. It's a Biblical story, in blank verse.' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1940 Willis, Connie. To Say Nothing of the Dog. New York: Bantam (1997); pg. 4. "'...Tell him Her Majesty saved Queen Victoria's Bible when Buckingham Palace was bombed. Carried it out in her arms like a baby... The altar candlesticks and the cross from the high altar and the Smiths' Chapel were saved by Provost Howard and the fire watch and taken to the police station. Also a silver paten and chalice, a wooden crucifix, a silver wafer box, the Epistles, the Gospels, and the regimental colors of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Seventh Battalion,' he said. " [Many references to Christianity, especially to Anglicanism, are throughout book. Most not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1943 Lewis, C.S. Out of the Silent Planet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1996; c. 1943); pg. 158. "Like you, I can't help trying to fix their relation to the things that appear in terrestrial tradition--gods, angels, fairies. But we haven't the data. When I attempted to give Oyarsa some idea of our own Christian angelology, he certainly seemed to regard our 'angels' as different in some way form himself. But whether he meant that they were a different species, or only that they were some special military caste... I don't know. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1963 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 182. [Afterward, by Stanley Edgar Hyman.] "A running lecture on free will, first from the prison chaplain, then from the writer, strongly suggests that the book's intention is Christian. Deprived of his capacity for moral choice by science, Burgess appears to be saying, Alex is only a 'clockwork orange,' something mechanical that appears organic. Free to will, even if he wills to sin, Alex is capable of salvation, like Pinky in Brighton Rock (Devil of a State, incidentally, is dedicated to Greene). But perhaps this is to confine Burgess's ironies and ambiguities within simple orthodoxy. Alex always was a clockwork orange, a machine for mechanical violence far below the level of choice, and his dreary socialist England is a giant clockwork orange. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1963 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 184. [Afterward, by Stanley Edgar Hyman.] "But the new world of fertility is no better than the world of sterility that it supplants. Soon England is swept by cannibalism..., there are public sex orgies to make the crops grow, and Christian worship returns, using consecrated human flesh in place of wine and water ('eucharistic ingestion' is the new slogan). "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 15. "...has seen at work the angel which drove the First Crusade into Antioch and drives the lemmings into the sea. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 29. [Chapter heading.] "The centurion . . . commanded that they which could swim should cast themselves into the sea and get to land. And the rest, some on boards and some on broken pieces of the ship. And so it came to pass, that they escaped all safe to land.

--The Acts of the Apostles, Chapter 27 "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 110. [Chapter heading.] "What is now proved was once only imagin'd.

--William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 135. [Chapter heading.] "Love the animals. God has gien them the rudiments of thought and joy untroubled. Don't trouble it, don't harass them, don't deprive them of their happiness, don't work against God's intent.

--Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov "

[This entire book is about rabbits and their culture, society, religion, etc.]

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 176. [Chapter heading.] "When Robyn came to Notyngham,
Sertenly withouten layn,
He prayed to God and myld Mary
To bryng hym out save agayn.

Beside him stod a gret-hedid munke,
I pray to God woo he be!
Fful sone he knew gode Robyn,
As sone as he hym se.

--Robin Hood and the Monk (Child's Ballads, No. 119) "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1972 Adams, Richard. Watership Down. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1972); pg. 354. [Chapter heading.] "Be not merciful unto them that offend of malicious wickedness. They grin like a dog and run about through the city. But thou, O Lord, shalt have them in derision. Thou shalt laugh all the heathen to scorn.

--Psalm 59 "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 6. "Hooves, iron tires and harness made the only sounds. In the year of Our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventy-six, Christendom would see nothing more mournful or more stately. " [Many refs. to 'Christendom' in book, most not in DB, and others which are listed under 'Catholic,' as this always refers to Catholicism in this book.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1976 Amis, Kingsley. The Alteration. New York: Viking Press (1976); pg. 77. "...a model railtrack-tug and four cargo vans hand-painted in the black and crimson of the Coverley and North-England line, a set of Turks and Christians in ebony and ivory (the gift of his rich second cousin... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1979 Ballard, J. G. The Unlimited Dream Company. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1979); pg. 67. "A party of freshly scrubbed children were setting off for their Sunday school. They walked past the overbright gardens, unaware that I was following them, caged satyr in tennis sneakers ready to seize their little bodies. At the same time I felt a strange tenderness for them, as if I had known them all my life. They and their parents were also prisoners of this town. I wished that they could learn to fly, steal light aircraft. . . . " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1982 Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. v. [Acknowledgments.] "I also saw there many materials exploring the Celtic tradition that Jesus Christ had been educated in the wisdom religion at the temple that once stood on Glastonbury Tor.

For material on pre-Augustinian Christianity, I have used, by permission, a privately circulated manuscript entitled 'The Pre-Constantine Mass: A Conjecture,' by Father Randall Garrett; I have also drawn upon materials from the Syro-Chaldean liturgies, including the Holy Orbana of St. Seraphion, as well as liturgical materials from local groups of St. Thomas Christians and pre-Nicene Catholic groups. The excerpts from Scripture, especially the Pentecost story and the Magnificat, were translated for me from the Greek Testaments by Walter Breen...

Any attempt at recapturing the pre-Christian religion of the British Isles has been made conjectural by the determined efforts of their successors to extinguish all such traces... "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 59. "'...It was as though Christ had appeared to the apostles and told them that two and two makes four. So what have they done this month, Polly? I had thought you were their staunchest defender.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1985 Dickinson, Peter. The Green Gene. New York: Random House (1973); pg. 65. "'Come and meet Denny and Toby,' said Glenda. 'They're our two Christian queers. They might try to nobble you to play Balthazar in their nativity play, if you're still here at Christmas. It's a zoned church now, so Dad has to green up to play McCaspar.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1985 Bear, Greg. Blood Music. New York: Arbor House (2002; c. 1985); pg. 308. [Suzy listens to a radio broadcast from England.] ". . . Mrs. Thelma Rittenbaum, noted Battersea psychic, reports that she has had dreams of Christ appearing in the middle of North America, raising the dead and preparing an army to march on the rest of the world. " (A shaky woman's voice on a tape of poor quality spoke a few unintelligeble words.)
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1987 Adams, Douglas. Dirk Gentley's Holistic Detective Agency. New York: Simon and Schuster (1987); pg. 24-26. Pg. 24: "Not so much here. The yearly accounts of most British companies emerged sounding like the Death March from Saul, but in Japan they went for it like a pack of rats... " [Reference to Saul, written by Handel.];

Pg. 25-26: "Did you konw, young lady, " said Watkin to her, "that the Book of Revelation was written on Patmos? It was indeed. By Saint John the Divine, as you know. To me it shows very clear signs of having been written while waiting for a ferry. Oh, yes, I think so. It starts off, doesn't it, with that kind of dreaminess you get when you're killing time, getting bored, you know, just making things up, and then gradually grows to a sort of climax of hallucinatory despair. I find that very suggestive. Perhaps you should write a paper on it. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 17. "A blast of 'While Shepherds Watched Their Flocks by Night' hit them... 'The Christmas Spirit,' Mary said, buttoning her coast... " [Book has other refs. to Christmas. There are refs. to Christianity throughout book, especially to Anglicanism in the 2054 time period, and to Catholicism in the 1320 time period. Most refs. not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 168-169, 172. "'Here's your Scripture. It's from the King James this year... at least it's not the People's Common like last year. The King James may be archaic, but at least it's not criminal.'...

Dunworthy stepped up to the lectern and opened the Bible to Luke... The King James is archaic, he thought... People continued to stream in. The priest from Holy Re-Formed and the Muslim imam went across to Oriel for more chairs, and the vicar fiddled with the thermostat on the furnace. "; Pg. 172: "'There are those,' he said, looking hard at the priest from the Holy Re-Formed, 'who think that diseases are a punishment from God, and yet Christ spent his life healing the sick, and were he here, I have no doubt he would cure those afflicted with this virus, just as he cured the Samaritan leper.' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 2054 Willis, Connie. Doomsday Book. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 248-249. "She was holding her reliquary between her folded hands, but her eyes were open, and she was staring at the top of the rood screen. Her mouth was tight with disapproval, and Kivrin supposed she hadn't wanted the candles there, but it was the perfect place for them. They illuminated the crucifix and the Last Judgment and lit nearly the whole nave.

They made the whole church seem different, homier, more familiar, like St. Mary's on Christmas Eve. Dunworthy had taken her to the ecumenical service last Christmas. She had planned to go to midnight mass at the Holy Re-Formed to hear it said in Latin, but there hadn't been a midnight mass. The priest had been asked to read the gospel for the ecumenical service, so he had moved the mass to four in the afternoon. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 1. "...would give you a nice quiet horrorshow fifteen minutes admiring Bog And All His Holy Angels And Saints in your left shoe with lights bursting all over your mozg. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 52. "'Now and again,' said George, 'I get around all on my oddy knocky. Like last Sabbath for instance. I can live my own jeezny, droogie, right?' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 96. "'...A brutal bastard he has been and will be again, in spite of all his sucking up to the Prison Chaplain and reading the Bible.' " [Many Christian refs. in novel, not all in DB. Other examples not in DB: pg. 142.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 2100 Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1963; c. 1962); pg. 129. "'He will be your true Christian,' Dr. Brodsky was creeching out, 'ready to turn the other cheek, ready to be crucified rather than crucify, sick to the very heart at the thought even of killing a fly.' And that was right, brothers, because when he said that I thought of killing a fly and felt just that tiny bit sick, but I pushed the sickness and pain back by thinking of the fly being fed with bits of sugar and looked after like a bleeding pet and all that cal. 'Reclamation,' he creeched. 'Joy before the Angels of God.'

'The point is,' this Minister of the Interior was saying real gromky, 'that it works.'

'Oh,' the prison charlie said, like singing, 'it works all right, God help the lot of us.' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. -6. [Year estimated.] "Jesus has said:
Blessed is the lion that
the man will devour, and the lion
will become man.. And loathsome is the
man that the lion will devour,
and the lion will become man.

Gospel of Thomas, Logion 7
Translated by George Ogg

The quotation is from New Testament Apocrypha by E. Hennecke, edited by W. Schneemelcher, S.C.M. Press Ltd, 1963. English translation coyright (C) Lutterworth Press, 1963. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 123. "This is what I read wrote down the same:

The Legend of St Eustace

The Legend of St Eustace dates from the year A.D. 120 and this XVth-century wall painting depicts with fidelity the several episodes in his life. The setting is a wooded landscape with many small hamlets; a variety of wild creatures are to be seen and a river meanders to the open sea.

1. At the bottom of the painting St Eustace is seen on his knees before the quarry, a stag, between whose antlers appears, on a cross of radiant light, the figure of the crucified Saviour. The succeeding episodes lead up to his martyrdom.

2. The Saint and his family appear before the Bishop of Rome renouncing their worldly possessions and becoming outcasts.

3. His wife is taken off by pirates in a ship; on the right the father and sons stand praying on the shore. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 124. [Description of the painting of the Legend of St Eustace, continued.] "6. At the top of the painting two angels, hold a sheet containing the four souls; the Spirit of God in the form of a dove descends to receive them into heaven.

The date of the painint is about 1480; the work is highly skilled in an English tradition and is a magnificent example of wall painting of this date. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 145. "I said, 'Whos Eusas wife then?'

He said, 'You know who she is Riddley shes the same I shows her moon self or she sheows her old old nite and no moon. Shes that same 1 every thing and all of us come out of. Shes what she is and the woom of her is in Cambry which is the center. It all fits you see. Old beleaf and new. Thats where the Spirit of God is coming down in th eform of a dove.'

'I said, 'Whats the Spirit of God?'

He said, 'Thats chemistery and fizzics and all its what the 1 Big 1 come out of realy theres so many ways of saying it you see. A dove is a kynd of pigeon which a pigeons a messenger innit. Which this message aint being sent its de-scending or you myt say unsending its going back where it comes from which is Heaven. Now Heaven thats where hevvyness comes from init...' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 145. "'...So that message or you myt say the trants mission is unsending its self back in to the hevvyness plus its receiving them 4 souls. Receiving is what you do with a trants milssion you read it you take it in but this here trants mission its the other way roun its doing the taking in its taking in them 4 souls back in to the hevvyness. Thats how you get your 1 Big 1 which is the hevvyness made hevvyer with the 4 souls.' " [May b some other refs. to Christianity in book which aren't in DB. It's a bit difficult to tell. 'Spirit of God' also mentioned on pg. 158, 197.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 4394 Hoban, Russell. Riddley Walker. New York: Summit Books (1980); pg. 123-124. [Description of the painting of the Legend of St Eustace, continued.] "4. St Eustace and his boys reach a river swollen by torrents. Having swum to the opposite side with one of the children, he returns for the other. As he reaches the middle of the stream a wolf runs off with the child he has left. He looks back and beholds a lion in the act of carrying off the other child. We see St Eustace praying in the midst of the river.

5. Fifteen years pass by. St Eustace has recovered his wife and sons and is the victorious general of the Emperor Hadrian, who orders a great sacrifice to the gods in honour of his victories. Eustace and his family refuse to offer incense. We see them being roasted to death in a brazen bull. The Emperor Hadrian stands on the left with a drawn sword in his hand. "

Christianity United Kingdom: London 40 C.E. Willis, Connie. "Fire Watch " in Fire Watch. New York: Bluejay (1984; story copyright 1982); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "'But I'm not ready,' I'd said. 'Look, it took me four years to get ready to travel with St. Paul. St. Paul. Not St. Paul's. You can't expect me to get ready for London in the Blitz in two days.' " [Time travel story. Character is saying that he at one time accompanied the historical St. Paul the Apostle as part of a research project.] Pg. 4: "In other circumstances I would know what was being said to me, but there had been no time to unlearn sub-Mediterranean Latin and Jewish law and learn Cockney and air raid procedures. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1870 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "...round the tower of St. Luke's... "; Pg. 4: "A tall and age-ravaged missionary advertising himself as Shiloh, the Son of God, stood shivering in sackcloth and ashes, shouting admonitory phrases every few seconds as if it helped him keep warm. He thrust tracts into random faces, as oblivious to the curses and cuffs he was met with as the throng around him was oblivious to his jabber about apocalypse. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 109. "'That's it. Fish. Carp, actually.'

'Carp is it? They say carp is . . . What do they say? Immortal. That's it.'

'Do they?' asked Pule, feigning deep interest.

'Science does. They've studied 'em. In China mainly. Live forever and grow as big as the pool they've kept in. That's a fact. Read up your Bible--it's all there. Loads of talk about the leviathan--the devil's own fish. Shows up as a serpent here, a crocodile there--they can't keep him straight. But he's a carp, sure enough, with his tail in his mouth...' "

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1875 Blaylock, James P. Homunculus. New York: Ace Books (1986); pg. 228. "The hands of the old evangelist rose slowly over his head, and in them, held for the crowd to appreciate, was a cube of some sort. It was far too dark, despite burning clumps of brush scattered round the green, for Parsons to see clearly what it was--a holy object, no doubt. People pressed in around the evangelist, listening. The starry sky and the distant lights of London winking and glittering on the plain below enlivened the night with a spirit of mysticism.

The evangelist exhorted the crowd. There was an answering shout, a confirmation, it seemed. A scream followed. Hands pointed heavenward. A general shouting arose. Spyglasses were aimed toward where a tiny pinprick of light arced out of the sky, falling toward the Heath and brightening as it fell. The general tumult gave way to an awed silence, broken by the shouting evangelist. 'And the name of the star,' he cried, 'is Wormwood!' " [More.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 9. Pg. 9: "...she'd spent her first two years out of school working with children at the Blackie, a deconsecrated church with a rainbow in place of a cross, helping them make videos about their own fears. "; Pg. 97: "She had to creep past Great St. Mary's Church, outside which the striped awnings of a market had sprung up. This time around she was able to find Christ's Pieces, where tennis players darted and leaped in cages of wire netting. " [More.]
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 157. "His partner has played both Jesus Christ and the vampire Dracula. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1989 Campbell, Ramsey. Ancient Images. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1989); pg. 186. "...and pulled out the book and read the first line of 'The Lofty Place.'

'There was once a man who presumed to build the highest tower in Christendom.'

Well, there it was. No wonder the Redfields had felt libeled--though why should they have, unless the story grew more specific? She read on. 'Long before the edifice was raised, the workmen set to cursing it and one another in a Babel of old tongues . . .' So Faversham had had the Old Testament in mind, not Redfield? 'At the instant when the last stone of the parapet was cemented, the architect commenced to run up the countless thousand steps. Time's heartbeat ceased until he burst out upon the carpet...' " [More, pg. 187. Also pg. 207.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1989 Laidlaw, Marc. "His Powder'd Wig, His Crown of Thornes " in Omni Visions One (Ellen Datlow, ed). Greensboro, NC: Omni Books (1993; story copyright 1989); pg. 148. "'Here--here's what we lost it,' the brave said, thrusting the doll up to Grant's cheek, as if he would have to kiss or nip him with its rice-grain teeth. Its limbs were made of jerked beef, spread-eagled on wooden crossbars, hands and feet fixed in place with four tiny nails. It was a savage Christ--an obscenity.

'He gave His life for you,' the brave said. 'Not just for one people, but for everyone. Eternal freedom, that was His promise.'

'I'm late for an appointment,' Grant said, unable to hide his disgust.

'Late and lost,' the brave said. 'But you'll never catch up--the time slipped past. And you'll never find your way unless you follow Him.' " [Some other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 12. Pg. 4: "...the Fathers of the Church... works of Evolution had been catalogued under Pre-Adamite Man. "; Pg. 12: "So Randolph Henry Ash, ca 1840, when he was writing Ragnarok, a poem in twelve books, which some saw as a Christianising of the Norse myth and some trounced as atheistic and diabolically despairing. "; Pg. 27-28: "...spoken by Augustine of Hippo, the ninth-century Saxon monk, Gotteschalk... Pilgrim's Progress... This Gotteschalk, a precursor of Luther, even to renouncing his Vows, might be thought in his intransigent predestinarian vision to figure some of the later Evangelicals of our day, and Neighbour Pliable perhaps a satire upon those like myself, who believe that Christianity does not consist of the idolatrous presence of the Deity in a piece of bread, nor yet in the five points of metaphysic faith. As is his wont, Ash treats Pliable... " [Many other refs., not in DB, e.g. pg. 176-187, 246-247, 277, 381, more.]
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1990 Byatt, A.S. Possession. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1990); pg. 179. "Ragnarok was written in all honesty in the days when I did not myself question Biblical certainties--or the faith handed down by my fathers and theirs before them. It was read differently by some... for I meant it rather as a reassertion of the Universal Truth of the living presence of Allfather (under whatever Name) and of the hope of Resurrection from whatever whelming disaster in whatever form. When Odin, disguised as the Wanderer, Gangrader, in my Poem, asks the Giant Wafthrudnir what was the word whispered by the Father of the gods in the ear of his dead son, Baldur, on his funeral pyre--the young man I was--most devoutly--meant the word to be--Resurrection... supposing that the dead Norse God of Light might prefigure--or figure--the dead Son of the God Who is the Father of Christendom. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Priest, Christopher. Darkening Island. New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 73. Pg. 73: "...the radio... broadcast from a converted iron-ore ship moored off the Isle of Wight. The output of that was limited to prolonged prayer-sessions, Bible-readings and hymns. "; Pg. 130: "We had established a semi-permanent camp in an old church. We were visited several times by Red Cross workers, and both military sides knew of our presence. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 41. Pg. 41: "Mr Paul Hennessey... He is not reading the paper, but thinking of his wife, Elisabeth. She is 55 and has gradually given up all her interests. Instead of working with the Sunday School, she says, 'They don't want some old lady.' She no longer goes to her art classes... "; Pg. 43: "Miss Flora McCardie... Works for Christian Aid on Lower Marsh Street. The happiest period of her life was spent in Gabon with an American evangelical mission. Heartbroken when she learned that its charismatic leader was siphoning off funds. Returned to the UK middle-aged and at a loss. "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 56. "Map shows... what are their interests and concerns... Andre Stanley: movies for Jesus; Milton Richards: Jesus and Frank Bruno "
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 60. "Mr Andre Stanley... served in Vietnam. He is baffled by all the talk of post-traumatic stress disorder. He piloted helicopters and saw the worst the war had to offer--the blasted bodies of young men--but he has no trouble accounting for the deaths, the destruction. God leaves everyone free, everyone responsible, even Nazis. We are free to wage mistaken wars, mistranslate the Bible, or commit rapes.

Andrew wants to write screenplays for Jesus . . . and reclaim the media from barnstorming fundamentalists. He is working on a screen treatment now, about helicopter pilots in Vietnam. "

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 62. "Mrs Georgina Bullen... now does work for charities and the church. She is a caring, conservative woman, whose heart sings at the thought of Mrs Thatcher, whom she regards as a great force for good brought down by the jealousy of those around her... " [Some other Christian refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 160, 162-163.]
Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 104. "Mr Milton Richards... What is he doing or thinking: He is sitting with Jesus. Jesus stands in the aisle between the rows of seats, holding out both whole arms in mercy. Milton can see the heart of Jesus through the robes of his gown. Jesus is telling Milton that he must kill his stepdaughter.

She is spawn. Milton has seen her through the connecting doors between cars, sitting on the same train. By leaning back he knows that she cannot see him. Soon, he will kill for Jesus.

Milton loves Jesus. His children tell him that he loves white people more than black people. They o not understand that he is comparing his own fallen behaviour with that of bank managers, politicians, the Royal Family, and Andrew Lloyd Webber. These are the people to emulate, they just happen to be white. Does he not also instruct them to follow the examples of Frank Bruno? Nat King Cole? " [Also pg. 3456.]

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 149. "Remembering yesterday's memorial service for Sir Terence Hobbin, at St Paul's Church, WC2... So even the family were surprised and delighted when Sir John Gielgud climbed into the pulpit and read a poem of John Donne's. It showed an unexpected, but altogether, apt, appreciation of a life spent in public service. The rich actorly tones resonated around the roof of the church.

It was even less likely, then, that Sir Ian McKellen also entered and, smiling somewhat embarrassed, began to wave at Sir John. Sir John waved benignly back, and finished his reading. He had been expected in St. Paul's Church, SW1.

Every day, walking to the tube from his apartment in Bloomsbury, Chief Inspector Curniffe stops to talk to the statue of Gandhi. This morning the Inspector asked: why did it apply? It was all wrong and all right at the same time. Does God play jokes to tell the truth?

Gandhi just smiled. The answer was a wonderful yes. "

Christianity United Kingdom: London 1995 Ryman, Geoff. 253. New York: St. Martin's Press (1998); pg. 175. "On his way back to examine the last of the building work on his new home. It is the tower of the old American Church. The pinnacle has stars and stripes carved into it. The converted bell chamber is huge, with high churchy windows. Lower down, the windows are slits as if for shooting arrows... "


Christianity, continued

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