Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, United Kingdom

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity United Kingdom 2000 Stableford, Brian. "Tenebrio " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 149. Pg. 147: "Hazard had become the official keyholder of the church, although he had no more than a couple of inquiries a year from tourists wanting to look inside--mostly American Mormons hunting down scraps of evidence relating to the lives of their more remote ancestors. "; Pg. 154: "...and pretend that the empty church had once played host to the Holy Grail. "; Pg. 162: "'As the man said when asked what a lifetime of study had taught him about the mind of the Creator, He has an inordinate fondness for beetles. He was talking about the Christian God, of course, but the implication of Nature remains the same no matter how you animate it behind the scenes. Think of the Egyptians and their scarabs. I like it here.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 2012 Clarke, Arthur C. The Ghost from the Grand Banks. New York: Bantam (1990); pg. 219. "However, the joint funeral services had gone smoothly enough; for once, sharing the same tragedy, Christian could talk politely to Christian. The fact that one of the dead had come from Northern Ireland helped a good deal; coffins could be lowered into the ground simultaneously in Dublin and Belfast. " [More. Burying those who sank on the Titanic.]
Christianity United Kingdom 2025 Dick, Philip K. The Penultimate Truth. New York: Dell (1964); pg. 75. "'there is an ancient Christian idea, which you may know, that life on Earth, or in your instance, beneath Earth, is a transition. An episode between a life that came before and an eternal, other-kind-of-life to follow. Once a pagan king in the British Isles was converted to Christianity by the image of his life being the short flight of a nocturnal bird which has flown in through one window of a warm and lighted dining hall of a castle, for a moment passed above a scene of motion and talk, of tangible fellow-life; the comfort of being within a place inhabited by others. And then the bird in its flight has gone on out of the lighted dining hall, out of the castle once more, through a second window. Into the empty, black, unending night of the far side. And it will never see that lit-up, warm hall of murmur and motion and fellow life again...' " [More, pg. 75-76.]; Pg. 76: "'Well.... the Bible does say, 'It is God Who shall justify.' Or some such utterance; I forget exactly.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 2026 Moffett, Judith. Time, Like an Ever-Rolling Stream. New York: St. Martin's Press (1992); pg. xi. "'...Many leys radiate out from a central point, usually a hill or a mountain, with a tradition of being a holy place. Lots of aligned churches in England are built on the former sites of pagan temples. Those sites are old...' "
Christianity United Kingdom 2030 Aldiss, Brian. "Three Types of Solitude " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001); pg. 118. Pg. 116: "...in Oxford -- rather as if we had been present last century at that evolution debate presided over by Bishop Wilberforce. "; Pg. 118: "He had then studied at Black Friars to take holy orders... "
Christianity United Kingdom 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 18. "The limo speeds through the Rotherhithe Tunnel, turns past the Norwegian Church, and comes out in a little road... "
Christianity United Kingdom 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "Slaves of Silver " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 264. "...on the mono line. I thought about it as I boarded, and when we reached the stop nearest it (Cathedral) I got off. "
Christianity United Kingdom 2050 Wolfe, Gene. "Slaves of Silver " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 275. "...Street's pictures... In size they ranged from Indian miniatures smaller than coins to a Biblical cyclorama five meters high and (so Street told me) more than three kilometers in length... "
Christianity United Kingdom 2150 Ryman, Geoff. "Everywhere " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 520. [Year estimated] "Every Sunday as long as it isn't raining, you can see the church choir take off in formation. Little old ladies in leotards and blue jeans and these big embroidered Mexican hats. They rev up and take off and start to sing the Muslim call to prayer. They echo all over the show. Then they cut their engines and spiral up on the updraft That's when they start up on Nearer My God to Thee. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom 287 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 286. "'Oh, my lady, you must not give way to such superstitions,' said her maid Julie, who had recently become a Christian. 'Birds are not evil, only men.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 440 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 323. Pg. 323: "'These people are Christians, but not fanatics. Junius Priscus is a good man, who cares for the health of his people as well as his animals but let them worry about their own souls. And he dearly loves to hear harp-playing. We will get a good welcome here.' "; Pg. 364: "Father Fortunatus had given her no more than his good wishes, but she could not get him out of her memory. Surely not all the Christians could be fanatics if such men as he were among them. And she knew there was still a connection between Avalon and Inis Witrin. Despite the protections of which the priestesses had been boasting... "
Christianity United Kingdom: Britain 2020 Aldiss, Brian. "Headless " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1994); pg. 68. "It was true, the Archbishop [of Canterbury] continued, that Christ had not permitted Himself to be crucified before the television cameras... Had Christ postponed the event by a millennium or two, photography would have provided a reliable testament to His self-sacrifice, and then perhaps everyone in Britain would believe in Him, instead of just a lousy nine per cent. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. ix. "MORGAINE SPEAKS . . .

In my time I have been called many things; sister, lover, priestess, wise-woman, queen. Now in truth I have come to be wise-woman, and a time may come when these things may need to be known. But in sober truth, I think it is the Christians who will tell the last tale. For ever the world of Fairy drifts further from the world in which the Christ holds sway. I have no quarrel with the Christ, only with his priests, who call the Great Goddess a demon and deny that she ever held power in this world. At best, they say that her power was of Satan. Or else they clothe her in the blue robe of the Lady of Nazareth--who indeed had power in her way, too--and say that she was ever virgin. But what can a virgin know of the sorrows and travail of mankind? " [Many refs., not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. ix. "And now the priests, thinking that this infringed upon the power of their God, who created the world once and for all to be unchanging, have closed those doors (which were never doors, except in the minds of men), and the pathway leads only to the priests' Isle, which they have safeguarded with the sound of their church bells, driving away all thoughts of another world lying in darkness. Indeed, they say that world, if it indeed exists, is the property of Satan, and the doorway to Hell, if not Hell itself.

I do not know what their God may or may have not created. In spite of tales that are told, I never knew much about their priests and never wore the black of one of their slave-nuns... Even the priests know this, with their ever-virgin Mary in her blue robe; for she too becomes the World Mother in the hour of death. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 5. "Perhaps Father Columba had become a priest of Christ because no college of Druids would have had a man so stupid among their ranks. The Christ God seemed not to care whether a priest was stupid or not, s long as he could mumble their mass, and read and write a little. She, Igraine herself, had more clerkly skills than Father Columba, and spoke better Latin when she wished. " [There are extensive references to Christianity in novel, only a few examples in DB. As a title page states, the central character is Morgaine, and the central theme is her "one quest: to wrest Britain away from Christianity--the new religion which views women as the carriers of original sin--and to return it to the worship of the Mother Goddess. "]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 8. "But, Igraine reminded herself, these Roman men considered it their divine right to have power of life and death over their children. There were many, Christians or no, who would have demanded that a daughter not be reared, so that their wives might be free at once to give them a son. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 11. "'...I have put him to nurse, and I think his foster-mother may send him to the monks. She is a Christian.'

'Don't you mind his being reared as a Christian?' Morgause asked. 'Is he pretty? What is his name?'

Viviane laughed. 'I call him Balan,' she said, 'and his foster-mother named her son Balin. They are only ten days apart in age, so they will be reared as twins, no doubt. And no, I do not mind that he is reared a Christian, his father was so, and Priscilla is a good woman. You said the journey here was long; believe me, child, it is longer now than it was when you were wedded to Gorlois. Not longer, perhaps, from the isle of the Priests, where their Holy Thorn grows, but longer, from Avalon . . .' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 11. "'The two are one,' said Merlin... 'but the followers of Christ have chosen to say, not that they shall have no other Gods before their God, but that there is no other God save for their God; that he alone made the world, that he rules it alone, that he alone made the stars and the whole of creation.'

...'The goddess will punish them,' Igraine said, shaken. 'And yet you married me to one of them?'

'We did not know that their blasphemy was so all encompassing,' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 12. "'She is not a priestess. What the Merlin means, little sister, is that he was living when the Christians first came here, and that he chose, and was allowed, to reincarnate at once, to follow his work through. These are Mysteries, which you need not try to understand. Father, go on.'

'I knew that this was one of those moments when the history of all mankind would be changed,' the Merlin said. 'The Christians seek to blot out all wisdom save their own; and in that strife they are banishing from the world all forms of mystery save that which will fit into their religious faith. They have pronounced it a heresy that men live more than one life--which every peasant knows to be true--' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 13. "'And so it is with the Holy Isle... The priests swore an oath to us, four hundreds of years ago, before even the Romans came here and tried to conquer, that they would never rise against us and drive us forth with weapons; for we were here before them, and then they were suppliants, and weak. And they have honored that oath--so much I must give to them. but in spirit, in their prayers, they have never ceased to strive... In our world, Igraine, there is room enough for many Gods and many Goddesses. But in the universe of the Christians... there is no room for our vision or our wisdom. In their world there is one God alone; not only must he conquer over all Gods, he must make it as if there were no other Gods, had never been any Gods but only false idols, the work of their Devil. So that, believing in him, all men may be saved in this life. This is what they believe. And as men believe, so their world goes. And so the worlds which once were one are drifting apart.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 28. "'...He goes to mass because the army does, and because it's the thing to do. I'd rather he was an honest pagan than a Christian for the benefits he can get from it.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 32. "She was learning so much about her husband in these few days. She had known he was a Christian when she married him; indeed most folk were Christian, in these days, or if they were not, they kept it most scrupulously to themselves, except near the Holy Isle where the Old Faith reigned, or among the Northern barbarians, or the Saxons. But she had not known that he was genuinely pious.

The benediction was over; the priest and his deacons departed bearing their long cross and the Holy Book. Igraine looked to where the King stood. He looked yellow and tired, and as he turned to leave the church, he learned heavily on the arm of the dark young man who had stood next to him and supported him all through the service. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 48. "So, for fear of the dead man's shade--even though he thought he called it by another name and thought of it as respect--he would not eat nor drink nor lie with a woman till his king was buried. Christians said they were free of the superstitions of the Druids, but they had their own, and Igraine felt that these were even more distressing, being separated from nature. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 79. "Father Columba came out ton the terrace. He said austerely, 'You should not talk to the child of Goddesses and superstition. Gorlois wishes her to be reared as a good Christian maiden...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 113. "...Merlin had told her...--a little band of priests had come here from the south, and with them had been their Nazarene prophet for schooling; and the story went that Jesus himself had been schooled there, in the dwelling place of the Druids where once the Temple of the Sun had risen, and had learned all of their wisdom. And years later, when--so the story ran--their Christ had been brought to sacrifice, playing out in his life the old Mystery of the Sacrificed God which was older than Britain's very self, one of his kinsmen returned here, and struck his staff into the ground on the Holy Hill, and it had blossomed forth into the thorn tree which blossoms, not only with the other thorn, in Midsummer, but in the depth of the winter snow. And the Druids, in memory of the gentle prophet whom they too had known and loved, consented that Joseph of Arimathea should build, in the very grounds of the Holy Isle, a chapel and a monastery to their God; for all the Gods are one. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 113. "But that had been long ago. For a time, Christian and Druid had dwelt side by side, worshipping the One, but when the Romans had come to the Isle, and, although they were widely known for tolerating local deities, against the Druids they had been ruthless, cutting and burning down their sacred groves... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 250. "[King] Arthur was reared Christian and makes much of being king over Christians; he would think this child of incest his shame. It is just as well to know some evil secrets of a king. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 259. "'It is the Merlin of Britain, for he is my father, and he is no wizard, child, but a scholar trained in the crafts of the wise. Even the church fathers say that the Druids are good and noble men, and worship with them in harmony, since they acknowledge God in all things, and Christ as one of many prophets of God.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 268. "Women had to be especially careful to do the will of God because it was through a woman that mankind had fallen into Original Sin, and every woman must be aware that it was her work to atone for the Original Sin in Eden. No woman could ever be really good except for Mary the Mother of Christ; all other women were evil, they had never had any chance to be anything but evil. This was her punishment for being like Eve, sinful, filled with rage and rebellion against the will of God. She whispered a prayer and willed herself into semiconsciousness again. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 290. "'Well, there sits Arthur like to Jesus with his Apostles, defending Christianity to all the land,' Kevin said. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 364. "'...If the lady Morgaine is married and comes here to live, all will be well, I suppose--I do not know the lady, but if she is Igraine's daughter, I suppose she is a good woman and a good Christian.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 388. "'...Gwenhwyfar was borne away into a world where pagan or Christian made no difference, war or peace, but only the human spirit...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 438. "'Arthur... told me that the folk of England were a Christian people, and while he would not persecute any man for following what Gods he liked, still he would stand with the priests and the church, as they had stood by his throne. And he sent word to the Lady of Avalon that if she would have back the word, she could come and take it.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 439. "Well, perhaps, as a Christian women and queen of a Christian court, it was her duty to make such feastings and play this day as all the people of the court should enjoy without harm to their souls. she knew that Arthur had sent out word of games and arms practice to be held for prizes, at Pentecost--as he had done each year since the court came here to Camelot... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 484. "'...Yet there had been a time, so Taliesin said, when Christian and Druid worshipped in common.'

'It is what happens to the soul of the man,' said Lancelet, 'not whether it is Christian or pagan or Druid. If Gareth faces the mystery in his heart, and it makes him a better man in his soul, does it matter whence it comes, from the Goddess of from Christ or from the Name the Druids may not speak--or from the very goodness within himself?' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 488. "'Look! Are all these preachers not Galileans? And how are we hearing them, each one of us, in our own native languages? Parthians and Medes and Elamites and men out of Mesopotamia, both Judea and Cappadocia, Asia, both Phrygia and Pamphylia, and visitors from Rome, Jews and Cretans and Arabs; but well all hear them talking in our own languages.' " [More. From the Biblical passage about Pentecost.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. The Mists of Avalon. New York: Ballantine (1984; c. 1982); pg. 629. "'But--but what of her? She is a Christian child--how can I send her from her mother into--into a world of pagan sorceries . . .?' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 26. Pg. 26: "'...seeing as how she'll be buried on Christian ground, not next to her husband, Her Highness might want to have something of his to take to the grave.' "; Pg. 28: "'There's some things, my dear, which men will never understand--even, or perhaps particularly, men of the cloth. I've made my peace as regards my Christian life, and expect to see heaven they tell of soon enough; but it's wise to give credit where it's due, and matters that pertain to the Goddess are best shared with one who follows the Old Ways...' "; Pg. 44: "...claiming I was no better than the 'goody-goody Christians' and would no doubt spread the story of her affair throughout the Court. "; Pg. 45: "As the summer waned Brigit helped me set up an infirmary in the little Christian church... " [Many other refs., not in DB. Christianity and ancient Celtic paganism are two of the central themes of the novel.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 66. Pg. 66: "'...I told you that the first day we met. 'Tis the Christ I'll be sworn to, not mortal man, and until the day comes when I can join a house of God, I'll not be encouraging anyone's hopes for marriage, no matter how dear he is!'

...'He's a good man,' she sighed when the tears abated. 'One of the best in the whole world. And I'd give anything to have had him fall in love with someone else. But it matters not whether he's Pagan or Christian, whole or half-crippled . . . I do not want to marry, and it would be unfair to pretend otherwise...' "; Pg. 68: "Even I had been considered, back when I was barely thirteen years old, but Mark kept a very Christian court and I'd managed to disqualify myself by stressing my Pagan beliefs. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 500 C.E. Woolley, Persia. Queen of the Summer Stars. New York: Poseidon Press (1990); pg. 90. "There was no church big enough for the ceremony at Castle Dore, so Mark had a temporary chapel built around a Pagan holy spot, blessing and rededicating it to the new religion. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 4. "'Couldn't send them to Eton, I suppose?' inquired Sir Grummore cautiously. 'Long way and all that, we know.'

It was not really Eton that he mentioned, for the College of Blessed Mary was not founded until 1440, but it was a place of the same sort. And they were drinking Metheglyn, not Port, but by mentioning the modern wine it is easier to give you the feel. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 36. "Whenever there was a raid or an invasion by some neighbouring tyrant, everybody on the estate hurried into the castle, driving the beasts before them into the courts, and there they remained until the danger was over. The wattle and daub cottages nearly always got burned, and had to be rebuilt afterwards with much profanity. For this reason it was not worth while to have a village church, as it would constantly be having to be replaced. The villages went to church in the chapel of the castle. They wore their best clothes and trooped up the street with their most respectable gait on Sundays, looking with vague and dignified looks in all directions, as if reluctant to disclose their destination, and on week-days they came to Mass and vespers in their ordinary clothes, walking much more cheerfully. Everybody went to church in those days, and liked it. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 80. "'Be brave, sir! Why, but two nights since, one met the duke 'bout midnight in a lane behind Saint Mark's Church...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 88. Pg. 88: "'...Yes, you must take Kay and hurry up about it. You must go immediately after Mass. Have breakfast first and go immediately after mass...' "; Pg. 90: "They went together unanimously though shyly, without explanations, and found themselves standing at the end of Hob's barley strip after Mass. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 195. "' 'Well done,' exclaimed the Creator in delighted tones. 'Here, all you embryos, come here with your beaks and whatnots to look upon Our first Man. He is the only one who has guessed Our riddle, out of all of you, and We have great pleasure in conferring upon him the Order of Dominion over the Fowls of the Air, and the Beasts of the Earth, and the Fishes of the Sea. Now let the rest of you get along, and love and multiply, for it is time to knock off for the week-end. As for you, Man, you will be a naked tool all your life, though a user of tools. You will look like an embryo till they bury you... Eternally undeveloped, you will always remain potential in Our image, able to see some of Our sorrows and to feel some of Our joys. We are partly sorry for you, Man, but partly hopeful...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 199-200. "'Well, there has appeared a sort of sword in a stone, what, in a sort of a church. Not in the church, if you see what I mean, and not in the stone, but that sort of thing, what like you might say.'

I don't know what the Church is coming to' said Sir Grummore.

'It's in an anvil,' explained the King.

'The Church?'

'No, the sword.'

'But I thought you said the sword was in the stone?'

'No,' said King Pellinore. 'The stone is outside the church.'

'Look here, Pellinore,' said Sir Ector. 'You have a bit of a rest, old boy, and start again. Here, drink up this horn of mead and take it easy.'

'The sword,' said King Pellinore, 'is stuck through an anvil which stands on a stone. It goes right through the anvil and into the stone. The anvil is stuck to the stone. The stone stands outside a church. Give me some more mead.' " [Other refs. to this church, not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 208. "All round the churchyard there were hundreds of old friends. They rose over the church wall all together, like the Punch and Judy ghosts of remembered days... "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 274. "'Very interesting. There was just such a man when I was young--an Austrian who invented a new way of life and convinced himself that he was the chap to make it work. He tried to impose his reformation by the sword, and plunged the civilized world into misery and chaos. But the thing which this fellow had overlooked, my friends, was that he had had a predecessor in the reformation business, called Jesus Christ. Perhaps we may assume that Jesus knew as much as the Austrian did about saving people. But the odd thing is that Jesus did not turn the disciples into storm troopers, burn down the Temple at Jerusalem, and fix the blame on Pontius Pilate. On the contrary, he made it clear that the business of the philosopher was to make ideas available, and not to impose them on people.' " [Some other refs. to Christianity in general, not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 293. "In Bedegraine it was the night before the battle. A number of bishops were blessing the armies on both sides, hearing confessions and saying Mass. Arthur's men were reverent bout this, but King Lot's men were not--for such was the custom in all armies that were going to be defeated. the bishops assured both sides that they were certain to win, because God was with them, but King Arthur's men knew that they were outnumbered by three to one, so they thought it was best to get shriven. King Lot's men, who also knew the odds, spent the night dancing, drinking, dicing and telling each other dirty stories. This is what the chronicles say, at any rate. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 317. "They were in the tiny Church of the Men--a chapel as ancient as Christianity on the islands, though it was scarcely twenty feet square. It was built of unmortared stones, like the great wall of the keep, and the moonlight came through its single unglazed window to fall on the stone altar. The basin for holy water, on which the moonlight fell, was scooped out of the living stone, and it had a stone lid cut from a flake, to match it. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 383. "One reason for his dilemma was that he was a Christian. The modern world is apt to forget that several people were Christians in the remote past, and in Lancelot's time there were no Protestants--except John Scotus Erigena. His Church, in which he had been brought up--and it is difficult to escape from your upbringing--directly forbade him to seduce his best friend's wife... Perhaps a bad baron who believed in the Strong Arm might have gone off with Guenever, even in the face of his Church's councils, because taking your neighbour's wife was really a form of Fort Mayne. It was a matter of the stronger bull winning. He believed as firmly as Arthur did, as firmly as the benighted Christian, that there was such a thing as Right. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 387. "'...How kind of you! It was prophesied long ago. I am King Pelles, near cousin to Joseph of Arimathea--and you, of course, are but the eighth degree from Our Lord Jesus Christ.' " [Also, pg. 384.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 457. "'...Why, if all our knights--one hundred and fifty men, all specialists in questing, like detectives--if all our knights were to turn their energies to the quest for things which belonged to God--why, we might find hundreds and hundreds of things which would be of huge value. The Round Table might have been positively invented and trained just for that object. We might find some new gospels, even. The whole of Christianity might be helped by what we did. Think of a hundred and fifty men all trained for the search! And it is not too late to try. The True Cross was found in 326, but the Holy Shroud was not discovered at Lirey until 1360! We might find the spear which killed Our Lord!... We could search for the Holy Grail!' he cried triumphantly. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1100 C.E. White, T. H. The Once and Future King. New York: Ace Books (1996; c. 1939, 1940, 1958); pg. 564. "Perhaps Arthur imposed his ideal on Christendom, because of the richness of his own schooling under Merlyn. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1469 C.E. Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998) "Yet some men say in many parts of England that King Arthur is not dead, but had by the will of Our Lord Jesu into another place and men say that he shall come again, and he shall win the holy cross. Yet I will not say that it shall be so, but rather I will say, here in this world he changed his life.
--Sir Thomas Malory, ca. 1469 " [Some other refs. to Christianity, not all in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1525 C.E. Kress, Nancy. "And Wild for to Hold " in The Aliens of Earth. Sauk City, Wisconsin: Arkham House Publishers (1993; 1st pub Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, July 1991); pg. 278. [Time travel story, with travel back to Kent, England, 1525 (pg. 278)] Pg. 278: "Anne Boleyn was not moved... It was made all of light, which did not surprise her. Was not Satan himself called Lucifer? " [Reference to Christian doctrines.]; Pg. 283: "'...Mistress Boleyn was the second wife of Henry VIII of England. In order to marry her, he divorced his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, and in order to do that, he took all of England out of the Catholic Church...'...

'Protestantism was another branch of 'Christianity,' the director said... 'It was warlike, as was Catholicism. In 1642 various branches of Protestantism were contending for political power within England, as was a Catholic faction. King Charles was Catholic, in fact. Contention led to civil war...' " [Story has some other references to Christianity, not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 297. [The first time traveler visits William Shakespeare.] "One would have thought I'd cursed the Queen and spit on the Bible by the look he gave me. "; "'I've been getting visitors from the future as far back as I can remember. My mother, being a good Christian woman, had the hardest time giving me suck, because the documentary team from the thirty-third century wanted to film it all...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1615 Ramirez, Frank. "The Merchant of Stratford " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982; 1st pub 1979 in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine); pg. 298. [The first time traveler visits William Shakespeare.] "'...You know, Jesus once told me that to stay calm one should always practice--'

'Jesus?'

'Yes, of course. Some clowns from the thirtieth century thought it'd be a gas for me to meet him. Really nice fellow, don't you know, sort of intense; but he could take a joke. He never forgave me for the character of Shylock, though. Rather petty, don't you think? But then, you have to consider his point of view, and he was under a lot of pressure. If you think I've time travelers in my hair you should've seen him!' "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 13. "Abraham Darby III... The young ironmaster... Awakening [from a bad dream], heart pounding, he was grateful to find himself in bed. He thanked the Almighty... He pulled on his boots, donned his coat and flat Quaker hat... " [This character is a Quaker. Because much of the novel is about Quakers, there are many references to Christianity throughout the book. Not all in DB. Most are listed in DB under specific denomination (i.e., 'Quaker')]
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 70. "Polly accompanied her to the parish church... Polly took her inside the church and showed her the dark old altar panels carved from chestnut that depicted Eve being tempted by the serpent, Adam and Eve being expelled from the Garden... The church warden asked to see their thumbs. Evidently satisfied with Maggie's calluses and warning her to keep to Christian ways, he granted her permission to remain in the parish of Madeley. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 78. "'Oh, I never thought for a trice that a man could be fetched back from the dead. Not me. And I've seen many a strange thing in my day. But I am ever so watchful for remedies that might save a Christian life.' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 93. "'And I assure you no one in all Christendom appreciates your cleverness more than John Wilkinson. But--' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1773 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 123. "Abiah, head tipped up. Abraham, head bowed.

Look at us, here on our hind legs, looking for comfort against the abyss of meaninglessness. Looking for external salvation. That's the pitfall of Christianity--the idea of Christ coming and saving us from the mess we've made. Judaism with a credit card. "

Christianity United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 133. "'... 'Art thou frighted of the gentleman?' she asked, thinking I did not understand he was a Christian...' "
Christianity United Kingdom: England 1774 Morse, David. The Iron Bridge. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1998); pg. 157. "...helping Abiah write a horrible little pamphlet entitled An Exhortation in Christian Love, to all who frequent horse-racing, cock-fighting, throwing at cocks, gaming, plays, dancing, musical entertainments, or any other Vain Diversion.' "


Christianity, continued

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