Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, Tennyson

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Texas 1916 Anthony, Patricia. Flanders. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 1. [A soldier's letter home.] "Second, don't let Pa come on the place. I know you don't recall him well, but he has the disposition of a junkman's dog. And mind that he doesn't come courting Ma. I suspect she harbors a weakness for him that may override her Christian virtues.

Don't fret for my sake either. When this is over, I'll settle down, finish my studies, and spend the rest of my life doctoring lumbago. Still, come to find I sorely need a vacation. Maybe when I get back stateside I won't mind those tight-assed Harvard Congregationalists. " [Many other refs. to Christianity throughout novel, most not in DB, but all refs. by name ('Christian') are thought to be in DB.]

Christianity Texas 1984 Heinlein, Robert A. Job: A Comedy of Justice. New York: Ballantine (1984); pg. 230. "'...Not many Christians in these parts. Feel free to speak your mind in front of Katie and me . . . but when anyone else is around, you may be more comfortable not discussing your beliefs. Understand me?'

'Uh . . . I'm afraid I don't.' My head was in a whirl and I felt a ringing in my ears.

'Well . . . being a Christian isn't against the law here; Texas has freedom of religion. Nevertheless, Christians aren't at all popular and Christian worship is mostly underground. Uh, if you want to get in touch with your own people, I suppose we could manage to locate a catacomb...' "

Christianity Texas 1994 Anthony, Patricia. Happy Policeman. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 26. "The [Bible] quote was the shortest. The most pithy.

Jesus wept. " [Many other refs. not in DB, many listed in DB under 'Christian Fundamentalist.']

Christianity Texas 1994 Anthony, Patricia. Happy Policeman. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 167. "Couldn't they see that the sinners dirtied things? That they left disease where they swarmed? But his parishioners talked proudly of Christian charity. They murmured God's grace as they passed out sandwiches and punch. "
Christianity Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 31. "'...I personally believe our lineage stretches back to the pre-Christian era...' "
Christianity Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 171. Pg. 171: "'...I'm convinced that the mystery of gravity and the answer to Pilate's question, 'What is truth?' are linked...' "; Pg. 234: the Bible
Christianity Texas 1996 Leon, Mark. The Unified Field. New York: Avon Books (1996); pg. 236. "'But think about the differences between our worlds, and you might understand. On your poor planet you have spent the last several thousand years lurching form one paradigm to another--polytheism, empire, monarchy, Christianity, Buddhism, communism, capitalism--with no end in sight. "
Christianity Texas 2030 McAuley, Paul J. Fairyland. New York: Avon Books (1997; c 1995); pg. 28. "'Thank Christ for our system,' Perse says. 'Always had a fatal weakness, the Yanks,. Never had a strong central government.'

Alex thinks this is a pile of sh--. There's as much unrest here as anywhere in the States: it's just that the American population is better organized and more heavily armed. The Christer coalition used nerve gas and helicopter gunships in Houston. "

Christianity Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 13. "'...Then he asked me if I believed we were living in the last days as described in Revelations, and I said I didn't know--I don't understand that apocalyptic stuff. He said that King Arthur will be the leader of the final battle, and the battle is coming soon...' "
Christianity Texas: Dallas-Fort Worth 1998 Wood, Crystal. Fool's Joust. Denton, Texas: Tattersall Publishing (1998); pg. 42. Pg. 42: "'Do you believe in God, Jack?'

'Yes, sir, I do,' Trick said, truthfully. 'I grew up in a Christian home, and was baptized and everything.' "; Pg. 160: "On the floor in front of the platform was a small table covered with a white cloth, and upon it was a large open Bible... "; Pg. 163: "...like the Christ candle in an Advent wreath... "

Christianity Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 7. "So I spent all day Friday buying computer manuals... I spent all day Saturday cleaning up the house... I spent all day Sunday going to church, feeding self and family breakfast and lunch, and lying in bed self-righteously reading my scriptures and my Sunday school lesson for next week, except of course for the time spent checking on and playing with my four-year-old, until it was time for dinner, which we were having at a daughter's house. " [Many refs. to Christianity in novel. The protagonist is an active Christian. See other entries under specific denominational categories.]
Christianity Texas: Fort Worth 1995 Martin, Lee. Bird in a Cage. New York: St. Martin's Press (1995); pg. 135. "Unless there is a major emergency, [LDS Christian] missionaries are allowed one telephone call home a year, at Christmas, so mail was the only way I was going to hear from Hal. "
Christianity Thailand 2021 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Chronoliths. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 9. "He wore... army shorts and John the Baptist sandals... "
Christianity Tibet 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 202. "'Holy Jesus, Mary, and Joseph,' she breathed, then added with a look at Chime. 'And Buddha, of course.'

'Yes,' Chime said. 'We will need all the help we can get.' "

Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. -2. [Dramatis Personae] Pg. -2: "Archbishop Polycarp--Founder of the movement for the united worship of Yatar and Christ. "; Pg. -1: "Phrados the Prophet--Religious fanatic opposed to the united worship of Yatar and Christ. "
Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Which would set Gwen hunting bureaucrats among the Roman rebels. The priesthood of Yatar would be another problem. If Rick could forge a Roman alliance, would the priests cooperate? The Romans were Christians who persecuted Yatar and Vothan One-eye as pagan gods. Lord, Rick thought. What must I do? I need the hierarchy of Yatar, to spread science through the land. And will the Christians cooperate? ";

Pg. 102: "And what... must Bishop Arrhenius think of his Emperor-to-be? The Roman Christian Church seemed considerably less preoccupied with chastity than did its counterpart on Earth, but even so there was the Sixth Commandment . . . More to the point, though what did His Lordship think of all these pagan allies? " [References to 'Romans' here are to actual descendants of citizens of Rome -- not to 'Roman Catholics']

Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 68. "'By Saints Matthew, Mark, Like, and John, and by Holy Mary, I swear that I shall say nothing of what the Lady Gwen tells me, except to my grandfather Marselius Caesar,' said Octavia. 'And him only if he asks me.'

'Good,' said Gwen in a normal tone. She was tired of whispering... 'And you can tell me of Christ,' she said.

After all, Gwen thought, I was raised Christian. If I have a religion, that's it. If I let the Romans convert me--I'll have to ask Rick about that. It might be useful. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 191. "One good thing about Yanulf. Lady Cara was silenced. She wouldn't giggle while the Primate of Drantos invoked the blessings of Yatar. Indeed, she stared as if hypnotized--and yet she probably wouldn't be able to remember a word that Yanulf has said. While Octavia would have been eager to talk, to discuss Yanulf's sermon and compare Yatar to the Roman Jehovah and his son Jesus Christ, to ponder the vision of Bishop Polycarp that the Christ was in fact the Son of Yatar, that Yatar and Jehovah were One--' "
Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 252. Pg. 252: "'As the mother of Christ,' Yanulf said. 'For as you know, the Christ was born of a virgin. Polycarp preaches a doctrine which he calls 'Immaculate Conception,' under which Hestia took on the flesh of a mortal in order to bear a son to Yatar.'

'And you believe this?'

Yanulf frowned. 'I know not what to believe. one thing is certain, the prophecies of The Time are true. And they were revealed by Yatar himself. The Romans know much of The Time, and thus must once have known Yatar.' He shrugged. 'Perhaps Polycarp is correct, their Jehovah is Yatar. The names are not unlike.' ";

Pg. 362: "There were also rumors of a fanatical religious leader, who was welding the horde into a crusade against the new idea of Christ as the Son of Yatar. Rick hoped the rumors were just that; religious warfare was one ingredient the Tran stew didn't need. "

Christianity Tran 1996 Pournelle, Jerry & Roland Green. Tran. New York: Baen (1996); pg. 371. Pg. 371: "After the Roman alliance came bishop Polycarp's vision. One night he had dreamed that Yatar came to him and proclaimed that Christ was His Only Begotten Son, borne of Hestia, who had taken the form of a mortal woman. So the followers of Yatar and the followers of Christ should be as brothers to one another. ";

Pg. 376: "'...Is that not also said of Vothan?'

'They also call the Christ 'Prince of Peace,' ' said Eyan.

'Has this ever kept the Romans from fighting?' replied Apelles. 'Or made them fight less fiercely when they marched toward us?' Eyan shook his head with a wry grin.

'Even the starmen are Christians,' Apelles went on. 'And do they not enjoy the blessings of Vothan?'

'The starmen are Christians?' Eyan frowned.

'Yes, and from his first day in our land the Lord Rick has always honored Yatar and Vothan as well as Christ.' "

Christianity Transylvania 1860 Carroll, L. E. "The Very Last Party at #13 Mallory Way " in Writers of the Future: Volume III (Algis Budrys, ed.). Los Angeles: Bridge Publications (1987); pg. 116-117. "One morning she declared, 'I think I'm getting somewhere. The trail leads to Snagov. Name ring a bell?... No, Snagov is a town, in Transylvania... That's the town where the church is where Vlad Dracul is buried. He was the model for the Dracula stories... In the old monastery archives at Snagov are the documents I need. Vlad Tepes used them.'

...She mumbled something about the Patriarch and special orders... "

Christianity Transylvania 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 4. "When I asked him if he knew Count Dracula, and could tell me anything of his castle, both he and his wife crossed themselves, and, saying they knew nothing at all, simply refused to speak further. " [Many other refs. to Christianity in novel, not in DB.]
Christianity Transylvania 1897 Stoker, Bram. Dracula. New York: Bantam (1981; c. 1897); pg. 37. "Later: the Morning of 16 May.--God preserve my sanity, for to this I am reduced. Safety and the assurance of safety are things of the past... If I be sane, then surely it is maddening to think that of all the foul things that lurk in this hateful place the Count is the least dreadful to me; that to him alone I can look for safety, even though this be only whilst I can serve his purpose. Great God! merciful God! Let me be calm, for out of that way lies madness indeed. I begin to get new lights on certain things which have puzzled me. "
Christianity Ukraine 1050 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 45. "'...Myself, I never got further than Jerusalem... I was on pilgrimage,' he reminded the saints. 'The Saracens made endless fuss and inconvenience. I brought back a flask of Jordan water and gave it to the Sophia Cathedral that Knyaz Yaroslav the Wise build in Kiev.'

...Assuming Sahir's era was some centuries beyond the American's, and Erissa's one or a few thousand years before Christ... "

Christianity United Kingdom -50000000 B.C.E. Baxter, Stephen. The Time Ships. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 314. "I threw my hands up in the air, and Palaeocene water rippled about my ankles. 'But--confound it, Captain Bond--it is fifty million years until the birth of Christ! What meaning can that firefly struggle between England and Germany--in such a remote future--have here?'

'We cannot relax,' she said with a grim weariness. 'Can't you see that? We must hunt the Germans, right back to the dawn of Creation--if necessary.' "

Christianity United Kingdom -50000000 B.C.E. Baxter, Stephen. The Time Ships. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 352. "...she proposed to call it First London. Then she asked us all to join her in a prayer. I dropped my head with the rest and clasped my hands before me. I was brought up in a strict High Church household, and Hilary's words now worked nostalgically on me, transporting me back to a simpler part of my life, a time of certainty and surety.

And at length, as Hilary spoke on, simply and effectively, I gave up my attempts at analysis and allowed myself to join in this simple, communal celebration. "

Christianity United Kingdom 96 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 29. "Neither the Romans with their armies nor the Christians with their talk of damnation could prevail against the first words a babe heard in his mother's arms. " [Many refs. to early Christianity throughout novel, not in DB. It is one of central religions, and main themes, of novel.]
Christianity United Kingdom 100 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 40. "At first, when he heard the sound of chanting coming from the large round structure the Christians called their sanctuary, he stayed in the field, but what he could hear of the music fascinated him. Day by day he came closer. "
Christianity United Kingdom 100 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 42. "'All men have souls of equal worth in the sight of the true God, little brother. You as well as any other.'

'The true god?' echoes Gawen. 'Does your god, whoever he may be, regard my soul as his own, even though I am not one of his worshippers?'

The priest said gently, 'The first truth of your faith, as well as of mine, is that the gods, by whatever names they may be called, are but one. There is only one Source; and He rules alike over Nazarene and Druid... We have dealt with immortal souls, and still do not know each other's names! My brothers who led the singing are Bron, who was married to my sister, and Alanus. Brother Paulus is the lastcomer to our company. I am Joseph, and those of our congregation call me 'Father.' If your earthly father would not object, it would please me if you would call me so.' "

Christianity United Kingdom 100 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer. Lady of Avalon. New York: Viking Penguin (1997); pg. 43. "Gawen shook his head, remembering the gossip he had heard about the Christians... 'I have heard that Christians say that all women are evil--'

'But I do not,' said Father Joseph, 'for even the Master, when he dwelt among us, had many women friends: Mary of Bethany, who would have been his wife, had he lived long enough; and that other Mary, of the town of Magdala, of whom He said much was forgiven her because she loved much. So of course women are not evil. Your own foster-mother, Caillean, is a worthy woman. I say, not that women are evil, but that they are sometimes mistaken or wrong-headed, just as men are. And if some of them do wrong, that does not mean all women do the same.' "

Christianity United Kingdom 249 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001) [Book jacket] "Priestess of Avalon tells the engrossing story of the British princess Eilan, known to the Romans as Helena. Helena's journey begins in Avalon when she falls in love with a Roman officer destined for imperial greatness... We follow Helena as she grows from maiden to mother to wisewoman, experiencing both joy--with the birth of her child--and loss, when politics will force her lover to choose between her and the Empire. But when her son Constantine becomes Emperor, she slowly discovers that her role has gone far beyond that of the traditional mother. . . .

Helena finds herself at the center of a crucial turning point in Western history as she seeks a way to bridge the pagan world of the Goddess and the new Christian Empire. And, as Empress-Mother, Helena embarks on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land to find the truth that transcends both the old religion and the new. " [Refs. throughout novel, not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom 249 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 12. "The cluster of beehive huts at the foot of the Tor belonged to the little community of Christians who lived there. Avalon of the Druids lay in the mists between this world and Faerie. "
Christianity United Kingdom 262 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 27. "'The Christians have a tale of a prophet called Elijah who went up to heaven in a chariot of fire,' I said brightly. As part of our education we had been taken to a service on the other isle. 'Was he an adept as well?'

Suona looked a little sour, and the other girls laughed. They had become accustomed to thinking of the Christians of Inis Witrin as foolish, if generally kindly, old men who mumbled prayers and had forgotten the ancient wisdom. And yet, if what I had heard of the holy Joseph who was their founder was true, they also had known something of the Mysteries at one time. "

Christianity United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 2. "...while the Danaans introduced the more wholesome Aryan pantheon. With the Romans came Mithraism, Christianity, Parsh, the worship of Zoroaster, and a dozen other similar sects. In due course, Irish monks founded a Christian monastery on Whanish Isle, off the coast of Dahaut near Avallon, which ultimately suffered the same fate as Lindisfarne far to the north, off the coast of Britain... Somewhat later, King Phristan of Lyonesse allowed a Christian bishopric at Bulmer Skeme, on the east coast of Lyonesse, insisting only that no wealth by exported to Rome. Perhaps for this reason, the church received little support from abroad, and the bishop exercised on great influence, either at Bulmer Skeme or at Rome. " [More, pg. 3, 156-160, 192-197, etc.]
Christianity United Kingdom 700 C.E. Vance, Jack. Lyonesse: Madouc. Lancaster, PA: Underwood-Miller (1989); pg. 159. "'I will not deny it. My great ambition is the Archbishopric of the Lyonesse Diocese. If I were to convert the King of Lyonesse to Christianity, there would be strong argument for my elevation to this post at the next Synod of Cardinals at Rome.'

Casmir scowled. 'In short, if I become a Christian, you will tell me the name of Suldrun's child.'

Father Umphred nodded and smiled. 'In its ultimate essence, this is the case.' "

Christianity United Kingdom 1358 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon Knight. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 107. "'You understand that it's the law of England, and of all Christian countries,' said Sir John, 'that one of your--er--talent [magick], should always show some red upon his arms, so that any other worthy knight having cause of dispute with you, will be duly warned of whatever advantage you might have by cause of that talent.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1358 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon Knight. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 118. Pg. 118: "'Praise God and all saints!' said the shipmaster... "; Pg. 136: "'I cannot, at the moment, remember, and Giles likewise, which Saint's Day this is. But I shall find out and mark it down for future notice when I have things of risk to consider; since obviously the good Saint aids me--whoever he may be--at this particular time...' "; Pg. 142: "'...Beyond these, you'll come upon the chateau itself, which is as stoutly built as any strong point in Christendom, strong enough to repel an army...' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1360 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon on the Border. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 29. "'I am happy to learn that your encounter with these enemies of man and all gods was so successful,' he said. 'Because those whom you met are not ordinary opponents, but something other than Christian souls. They are called the Hollow Men; and we have suffered much from them. They are wholly evil...' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1360 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon on the Border. New York: Ace Books (1992); pg. 253. Pg. 253: "'They are not mortal or Christian,' said Sir John Graeme, looking up at Jim. 'They are not of us. How do we know that they aren't Satan's children--or even secretly in league with the Hollow Men in this? It would not be the first time an ally had betrayed righteous men to their enemies.' "; Pg. 326: "Sir Brian's singing, therefore, might have been thought to have brought back unhappy memories. But it did not. The whole situation that had been resolved by this being able to convince Brian that he was, indeed, a Christian gentleman, ensorcelled into the dragon body. " [Also pg. 331, 335.]
Christianity United Kingdom 1364 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 14. "'The Emergency Meeting I went to,' Carolinus said slowly, 'was called because a number of magicians around our world of sufficient rank had noticed indications that the Dark Powers would be attempting to change History at a particular Christian feast--specifically, at your Earl's Christmastide gathering a few days from now.'

'But they can't do that, can the?' Angie asked. 'It's a Christian Feast. The Dark Powers wouldn't have any power to interfere with anything there. Even if they did, aside from the Holy occasion, whatever clergy are around would have blessed the place and its environs and nothing belonging to the Dark Powers could even get close.' " [Many other refs. not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom 1364 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 42. "...all this made a tale to make remarkable the season and the gathering. Particularly, all this, hard upon the anniversary of the birth of the Christ Child, gave Jim's party almost a Biblical aura. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity United Kingdom 1364 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon, the Earl, and the Troll. New York: Ace Books (1994); pg. 136. "Joseph, Mary, and the young Christ, on their flight from Herod into Egypt--in the story Jim had read and Secoh had heard--had been escorted by a guard of all kinds of animals; the lion and the ox and the wolf and the sheep--predator and prey together, walking side by side in perfect harmony in an honor guard for Mary, Joseph and the young Christ. Then, according to pseudo-Matthew, the Holy Family had camped overnight in some rather rugged country next to a cliff with a cave on it--or perhaps it was just some large rocks... his memory was a little fuzzy...

But in the morning when they got up at fist light, out of the cliffs, or the caves in them, unexpectedly came dragons, creatures far too large and powerful for the animal escort to protect the Holy Father from. Joseph was frightened for them.

But the young Christ, who as Jim remembered should have been about toddler age by this time, reassured his father.

'Fear not,' he said to Joseph. 'These good creatures...' "

Christianity United Kingdom 1366 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon and the Djinn. New York: Ace Books (1996); pg. 40. "...his royal command passing over ordinary procedure. You have the good Bishop of Bath and Wells, Richard de Bisby, to thank in part. He made a visit to court and his arguments for you to be appointed had a powerful effect on his Majesty, who may God bless.'

'Amen,' said Jim and Angie dutifully.

Jim cleared his throat, embarrassed; for Sir John had uttered the last words with a perfectly straight face. Jim could imagine the bishop's powerful voice and determined attitude having its effect on a king... " [Many other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom 1366 C.E. Dickson, Gordon R. The Dragon and the Djinn. New York: Ace Books (1996); pg. 93. "'By the Wounds!' exploded Sir Mortimor... 'Can't a Christian gentleman have a moment of peace in his own house?' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1870 Baxter, Stephen. Anti-ice. New York: HarperCollins (1993); pg. 24. "It was a the evening of the New Great Exhibition, on the 18th of July 1870... Our first meeting was brief enough and quite overshadowed in my mind by the wonders of the Crystal Cathedral and all it contained... " [More about this Cathedral, pg. 27-29, etc.]
Christianity United Kingdom 1891 Baxter, Stephen. The Time Ships. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 8. Pg. 8: "seemed to me as far beyond the capabilities of the nineteenth century as had been the great Gothic cathedrals from the Romans or Greeks. "; Pg. 66: "But I did not follow up this intriguing notion--the obvious question to ask was, 'In the absence of a God, then, what is the purpose of all of your lives?' for I was entranced by the idea of how Mr. Darwin, with all his modern critics in the Churches, would have loved to have witnessed this ultimate triumph of his ideas over the Religionists! "
Christianity United Kingdom 1940 Willis, Connie. "Jack " in Impossible Things. New York: Bantam (1994; story copyright 1991); pg. 410. "'You told Jack the incendiary came down on the church?' I said, looking up at the carved wooden figure. The bottom of the cross was blackened, and Christ's nailed feet, as if he had been burnt at the stake instead of crucified.

'Yes,' she said. 'I even told him it was the altar.' She looked back up the nave. 'And he could have seen it as soon as he came into the church.' " [Other refs., not in DB.]

Christianity United Kingdom 1964 Hoyle, Fred. The Black Cloud. New York: Harper & Row (1957); pg. 147. "Those who have experienced the coming of sunrise after a cold night in the desert will have a faint idea of the joy brought by the dawn of 24th October, 1964. A word about religion may be in order. During the approach of the Cloud all manner of religious beliefs had flourished mightily. During the spring, the Jehovah's Witnesses had robbed all other speakers in Hyde Park of their audiences. Incumbents of the Church of England had been astonished to find themselves preaching to overflowing congregations. All this was swept aside on 24th October. Everyone, men and women of all creeds--Christian, Atheist, Mohammedan, Buddhist, Hindu, Jew--all became pervaded to their innermost beings with the emotional complex of the old Sun-worshippers. True, Sun-worship never became an established religion, for it had no central organisation, but the undertones of the ancient religion were set vibrating and were never again dumped out. "
Christianity United Kingdom 1968 Roberts, Keith. "The Lady Margaret " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1966); pg. 212. "My Lord of Purbeck must be in residence then, receiving his guests for Christmas. " [Many refs. to Christianity, specifically Catholicism, throughout story. See entries under 'Catholic.']
Christianity United Kingdom 1969 Aldiss, Brian. "Nothing in Life is Ever Enough " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1999); pg. 80. "So I entered Prosperity House... Among other tenants, monks had occupied the castle in the seventeenth century, and had built on a small chapel, no unused. "
Christianity United Kingdom 1975 Gatiss, Mark. Last of the Gaderene (Doctor Who). New York: BBC Worldwide (2000); pg. 217. Pg. 113: "The lorries barrelling through Culvertion. Legion International's showy display in the church hall. "; Pg. 217: "The Reverend Darnett fell to his knees and keeled over, blood pouring from his left leg. "
Christianity United Kingdom 1979 Adams, Douglas. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. New York: Harmony Books (1979); pg. 30. "Still, he knew what he had to do. As the Vogon craft screamed through the air high above him he opened his satchel. He threw away a copy of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, he threw away a copy of Godspell: he wouldn't need them where he was going. Everything was ready, everything was prepared.

He knew where his towel was. "

Christianity United Kingdom 1984 Adams, Douglas. So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 59. "He sat and listened solemnly to 'A Scottish Soldier.'

He listened to 'Amazing Grace.' "

Christianity United Kingdom 1984 Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1949); pg. 16. "...a nightmare... He would flog her to death with a rubber truncheon. He would tie her naked to a stake and shoot her full of arrows like Saint Sebastian... "
Christianity United Kingdom 1984 Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1949); pg. 97. "'That's right. Outside the Law Courts. It was bombed in--oh, many years ago. It was a church at one time. St. Clement's Dane, its name was.' He smiled apologeticallly, as though conscious of saying something slightly ridiculous, and added: 'Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St. Clement's!'

'What's that?' said Winston.

'Oh--Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St. Clement's. That was a rhyme we had when I was a little boy. How it goes I don't remember, but i do know how it ended, Here comes a candle to light you to bed, Here comes a chopper to chop off your head. It was a kind of a dance. They held out their arms for you to pas under, and when they came to Here comes a chopper to chop off your head they brought their arms down and caught you. It was just names of churches. All the London churches were in it--all the principal ones, that is.' "

Christianity United Kingdom 1984 Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World (1949); pg. 98. "'I never knew it had been a church,' he said.

'There's a lot of them left, really,' said the old man, 'though they've been put to other uses. Now, how did that rhyme go? Ah! I've got it!

Oranges and lemons, say the bells of St. Clement's
You ow me three fatherings, say the bells of St. Martin's--

there, now, that's as far as I can get. A farthing, that was a small copper coin, looked something like a cent.'

'Where was St. Martin's?' said Winston.

'St. Martin's? That's still standing. It's in Victory Square, alongside the picture gallery. A building with a kind of a triangular porch and pillars in front, and a big flight of steps.'

Winston knew the place well. It was a museum used for propaganda displays of various kinds--scale models of rocket bombs... " [More on this subject pg. 99-100, 147, 179.]

Christianity United Kingdom 1984 Wellen, Edward. "Voiceover " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 226. Pg. 226: "...the Encyclopedia Britannica, Bunyan's The Holy War, Boccaccio's Decameron, Flaubert's Letters... "; Pg. 227: "...a four-point-five mile radius of Saint Mary-le-Bow in Esat Old London... "; Pg. 229: "'Your whole career bears the mark of Cain. Early on you struck a Faustian bargain with some entity...' ";

Pg. 238: "Holmes turned back to the woman. 'What else have you lifted this evening, young woman?'

'Nuffink,' she said sulkily.

'Under the Cain and Abel,' I Suppose said. "

Christianity United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 109. "There was a pay phone in one of the dark corners where waiters slouched moodily at one another. Dirk threaded his way through them, wondering whom it was they reminded him of, and eventually deciding that it was the small crowd of naked men standing around behind the Holy Family in Michelangelo's picture of the same name, for no more apparent reason than that Michelangelo rather liked them. "
Christianity United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 157. "'I've had the sort of day that would make Saint Francis of Assisi kick babies...' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1988 Adams, Douglas. The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul. New York: Simon and Schuster (1988); pg. 243. "Kate watched, breathless, as the speck crept behind the dome of Saint Paul's. "
Christianity United Kingdom 1989 Deja, Thomas. "Steel Dogs and Englishmen " in X-Men: Legends (Stan Lee, ed.) New York: Berkley Boulevard (2000); pg. 161. "The plans Cassidy studied were for Sentinels--towering, mutant-hunting robots created years ago by an anthropologist named Bolivar Trask. They'd been re-created several times since by a variety of lunatics who wanted to wipe out mutantkind--the U.S. government being among that number. A wave of bad memories swept over Cassidy, and he murmured quietly, 'Jesus wept.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1994 Holdstock, Robert. The Hollowing. New York: Roc (1994); pg. 5. Pg. 3: Chapter 1 entitled "The Green Chapel "; Pg. 5: "He said the words aloud into the dying church. "; Pg. 11: "This may be our only chance to find the true Cathedral! "; Pg. 87: "'Gargoyle! Crucifix! Gravestone!' " [Minimal other refs.]
Christianity United Kingdom 1995 Aldiss, Brian. "Dark Society " in Supertoys Last All Summer Long. New York: St. Martin's Griffin (2001; c. 1995); pg. 171. Pg. 171: "'Where science appears to meet religion. This timeless, spaceless space -- the pre-ylem universe, so to speak -- bears more than a superficial resemblance to Heaven, the old Christian myth. Heaven may still be around, permeated, of course, by fossil radiation--' "; Pg. 179: "Archbishop Cranmer and his brave speech absolved from the flames "; Pg. 180: "'This is Heaven we are in. Hell is where you came from, my precious one, Hell with all its punishing physical conditions! This is Heaven.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1996 Fry, Stephen. Making History. New York: Random House (1996); pg. 223. "'Well, it's the second oldest university in England. After Oxford, of course. It's made up of colleges. Names like Trinity, King's, St. John's, St. Catherine's, St. Matthew's, Christ's, Queen's, Magdalene, Caius, Jesus, that kind of thing.' "
Christianity United Kingdom 1999 Willis, Connie. "Adaptation " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 126. "We had compromised by having Gemma on Christmas Eve and part of Christmas Day. Then last week Margaret had rung up to say Robert's parents especially wanted them there for church on Christmas morning as it was a family tradition that Robert read the Scripture. 'You can have her all Christmas Eve day,' Margaret had said. " [Other refs., not in DB, mostly relating to Christmas.]


Christianity, continued

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