Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, Oregon

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 243. "'Even if they're [referring to Earth's alien benefactors] Jesus and Buddha in one happy package . . . who says I want 'em working for me? I mean, how does this go? We get water because the Travellers favored us with a big ugly pump?...' "
Christianity Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 84. "The thin fellow was unlike anyone else in the arena. His beard was neatly trimmed, his black hair cut and combed to barely pass over the ears. The hooded blue eyes seemed to pierce and inspect critically, like in the images of Old Testament prophets the Chairman had seen in Sunday School as a boy, long before the Doomwar. "
Christianity Oregon 2011 Brin, David. The Postman. New York: Bantam (1985); pg. 72-73. "The Mayor shifted his weight bacn and forth rapidly. '...There's just the Blakeville commune, thos self-rightous twits down at Culp Creek, and Satan knows what savages beyond them. Who the hell are you anyway?... You all remember how crazies and imposters used to come around, during the Chaos years, claiming to be everything from the Antichrist to Porky Pig?...' "
Christianity Palestine 1930 Batchelor, John Calvin. The Birth of the People's Republic of Antarctica. New York: Dial Press (1983); pg. 178. "He was the youngest son of a sergeant major... and of an orphaned Jewess raised by nuns in Palestine, where she converted to Christianity... "
Christianity Papua New Guinea 1955 Niven, Larry & Steven Barnes. Dream Park. New York: Ace (1981); pg. 99. Pg. 99: "'...The people of the islands began a campaign to discover your secrets, the secret to the rot bilong kako, the path the cargo travels from God to men... We joined your churches, learned of God and Jesus, your names for our deities Manup and Kilibob. We prayed to Jesus-Kilibob for cargo, and received nothing...' "; Pg. 192: "'...Years ago, missionaries came to teach us of God and Jesus. Not far from here they built a place of worship. Because we of this village helped supply materials andwhat labor we could, they blessed our land and our boats.' "
Christianity Papua New Guinea 1955 Niven, Larry & Steven Barnes. Dream Park. New York: Ace (1981); pg. 259. "'Understand that my people had lived a satisfying, happy existence before the Europeans came with their guns and missionaries. They told us that the reason we were denied sophisticated technology was that we were descended from Ham. Ham, as you may recall, was Noah's son, and after the flood he laughed at his father's drunken nakedness. I'm not terribly familiar with Judeo-Christian myth patterns, but I believe that Ham. . . no, it was Ham's son, Canaan, we cursed to be a 'servant of servants' unto his brethren. Well, being evil and natural slaves and all that, we weren't fit to have the secret of Cargo, were we? So my people tried to conform themselves to the dictates of the Church, and we helped the Europeans build roads and plantations... "
Christianity Paradise 2170 Knight, Damon. "Strangers on Paradise " in One Side Laughing. New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; 1986); pg. 2. [A planet named Paradise.] "He felt much the same way himself; he had been in medical isolation on the entryport satellite for three months... had dreamed of with hopeless longing all his life: a place without disease, without violence, a world that had never known the sin of Cain. "
Christianity Parvati 3099 Simmons, Dan. Endymion. New York: Bantam (1996); pg. 129-130. "'What kind of world is Parvati?' asks Gregorius...

'It was settled by Reformed Hindus not long after the Hegira,' says de Soya... 'Desert world... Population was never large--a few dozen million before the Fall. Fewer than half a million now, and most of then live in the one big city of Gandhiji.'

'Christians?' asks Kee. De Soya guesses that the question is more than idle curiosity; Kee asks few random questions.

'A few thousand in Gandhiji have converted,' says De Soya. 'There is a new cathedral there--St. Malachy's--and most of the born-again are prominent businesspeople who favor joining the Pax. They talked the planetary government--a sort of elective oligarchy--into inviting the Pax garrison here about fifty standard years ago. They're close enough to the Outback to worry about the Ousters.' "

Christianity Pennsylvania 1970 Panshin, Alexei. "How Can We Sink When We Can Fly? " in Farewell To Yesterday's Tomorrow. New York: Berkley Publishing Corp. (1975; c. 1971); pg. 121. "The ducklings, twice their Easter-morning size but still clothes in yellow down... "
Christianity Pennsylvania 1980 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 339. "The Reverend Bill Woods was white and lumpy. He sat with her in a cluttered office on the first floor and complained about the lack of city funding, the bureaucratic nightmare of administering a community action project such as Community House, and the lack of cooperation from the young groups and community in general. " [More.]
Christianity Pennsylvania 1993 Simmons, Dan. The Hollow Man. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 11. "'You know that God doesn't give us anything we can't bear, Jerry,' Barbara said between bouts of weeping.

...Witnessing. Wouldn't Pastor Miller think it wonderful if I brought this college professor to the Lord. If I quote Scripture, I'm liable to lose him . . . oh, wouldn't Darlene have a fit if I came to Wednesday-night services with this agnostic . . . atheist . . . whatever he is, ready to come to Christ!

'. . . He gives us the strength we need when we need it,' Barbara was saying. 'Even when we can't understand these things, there's a reason. A reason for everything. Gail was called home for some reason the Good Lord will reveal when our time comes.' "

Christianity Pennsylvania 1996 Knight, Damon. Humpty Dumpty: An Oval. New York: Tor (1996); pg. 90. "The church my family went to when we lived in Potamos was called the Riverside Church, although it was nowhere near the river; it had tall stained-glass windows with pictures of Jesus and the apostles. At one time there had been a triangular window behind the altar with a picture of a big eye, but it made people nervous, and someone broke it with a slingshot. The pastor took up a collection to pay for a new window, and this one turned out to be a picture of a lamb lying on the grass. " [More, pg. 90, 98, 101.]
Christianity Pennsylvania 2025 Cool, Tom. Infectress. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 1. "As a big sister for poor children from Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, she took them on retreats to this Christian camp high in the Laurel Mountains. "
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 63. "'No. We can't pronounce that either, can't even come close... In English they call themselves the People, just like terrestrial primitives used to. No, hrossa comes from a book by an early-twentieth-century Christian writer named C. S. Lewis, an Oxford pal of Tolkien's.' The listeners nodded; they knew Tolkien's work, though neither had heard of Lewis. " [Here the word 'Christian' is used for the first time in the novel. The entire book is about a group of Christians, of course. It is about Quakers, which is one denomination of Christianity, among many. But they are always referred to in the book as Quakers.]
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 68. "Not today, O Lord, O not today, he pleaded now, quoting Henry V according to Shakespeare; everything depends on today. Let us not mess this up. "
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 92. "'So everybody just sits there for an hour or so?' he was asking, and she tried to put some kindliness into her reply; being a sincere Quaker, she also honestly tried to feel more warmly toward Byron.

'Oh no, if somebody feels an impulse to speak, they do! Speaking in meeting is supposed to be strictly spontaneous, and usually it is, here in Swarthmore anyway.' She gave him the friendliest smile she could manage and got a weak one in return. 'The early Friends six hundred years ago, who had grown up imbued with Christian tradition, used to say they were guided or led of the Lord to speak, or pray aloud or whatever--sing, sometimes!--and they knew what they meant! Nowadays you couldn't get most of us to say what 'the Lord' is, though everybody's familiar with the history of the Society's thoughts on the subject...' "

Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 173. "George told them the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden: how all the animals ate grass and fruit and didn't have to kill anything, how Adam and Eve were naked but didn't know it, how everything was peace and natural harmony. He told them about God's one instruction and the penalty for not following it. Enter Satan; enter temptation, disobedience, shame, expulsion from the garden. Enter sex and the next generation. The animals commenced to kill one another. Adam went to work for a living.

Those were the points he emphasized... It wasn't too productive. They did enjoy themselves, but when George got to the part about the serpent, nothing happened; they didn't appear to recognize that as the crucial turning point in the tale. From their point of view it must have seemed like an amazing lot of fuss about nothing. "

Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 177. "That evening I led off with Abraham and Isaac, one sentence after another... At this particular juncture in my life it isn't at all hard for me to empathize with Abraham's dilemma, especially as Danny was right there translating... How did the audience react? Well, with uneasiness. Certainly they remained less blandly detached from Abraham's trials than from Adam's. As a matter of fact we gradually realized that they found the story obscene, to the extent they were able to take it seriously. The hrossa have to suppose that the protagonist we call God is like, if not identical, to The One That Loves Life... " [More about this. Other refs. to Christianity, not all in DB.]
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 178. "Even KliUrrh, who's more used to us barbarians than most, was perturbed by the story [of Abraham and Isaac, from the Old Testament], though he understood that it represented not Quakers but the tradition of the larger culture that produced us and that we've separated ourselves from. "
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 179. "Now, it so happens that I am myself the older of two sons, and that I've always felt that for an older son himself, Jesus was irritatingly softhearted (and -headed) about irresponsible younger children. See also his responses to Mary and Martha--you just know which of those two was the elder and which the younger. "
Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 263. "'And also,' said Joel, 'I'm interested in Quakers, sort of. If you feel like explaining to me why the Quakers ditched the mission, I'll tell you--are you interested in what being Jewish is like, for example?'

Danny laughed. 'I already know a whole lot about being Jewish--we've got tons of Jews in Swarthmore! Every year we celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah. Quakers don't have to be Christians anymore! You could be a Quaker, easy as I could be a Sixer.' "

Christianity Pennterra 2233 Moffett, Judith. Pennterra. New York: Congdon & Weed, Inc. (1987); pg. 174-175. "The rest of us sat around trying to draw up a list of classical tales that still have power to move us and at the same time seem likely to have some relevance for the hrossa. We thought of Old Testament stories, Greek plays, Shakespeare's tragedies, fairy tales, legends of monsters (Grendel, Dracula)... Hamlet's uncle...

So here's the preliminary list we drew up, of stories whose theme is parent-child discord/grief/injury:

1. Oedipus the King
2. Abraham and Issac [sic] (God and Jesus)
3. Noah and His Sons
4. David and Absalom
5. The Prodigal Son
6. King Lear
7. Hansel and Gretel
8. William Penn and His Father

Judged as narratives, with a beginning, middle, and end, 3 and 4 don't work to well. Oedipus is about parricide and incest, both irrelevant here. All in all, we think 2, 5, 6, and 7 the most promising, with 8 as a modest legendary alternate of special meaning to Friends. "

Christianity Pern 3015 McCaffrey, Anne. Dragonsdawn. New York: Ballantine (1988); pg. 115. "By morning, Jim Tillek had agreed that they could use the Southern Cross if he captained the crew... The forty-foot sloop, Southern Cross, could be sailed with a crew of three, slept eight... " [Other refs. to this vessel, which has a seemingly Christian name, although there are no references to Christianity.]
Christianity Peru 1530 C.E. Blom, Suzanne Alles. Inca: The Scarlet Fringe. New York: Tom Doherty Associates (2000); pg. 160. "As they walked, he said in Humanity's Mouth, 'Felipe, you have a Christian name already. Have the rest of you been given Christian names?'

None of them had, and so Martin decided that Muyushell would be Francisco and Seaweed would be Diego. Adobe, he said, would become Juan.

The church was dark inside and cooler than it was inside... he could see that above the high platform on the far end was one of the horrible waka statues, huge, the dying man hanging over them like a mountain ready to avalanche down on them.

'What is that?' he asked Martin...

'Martin looked at him and then at the statue, without any expression. 'That is a crucifix,' he said. 'It is a reminder of how the Lord Jesus Christ gave his life for us.'

It was an ancestor, a true waka who had somehow sacrificed Himself for the tribe of the Spaniards. But it was still wrong to have that horrible thing everywhere. It should be brought out for festivals when He was celebrated and then put away again. "

Christianity Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 288. [Faux news report.] "The Peruvian Amazon was called a Tower of Babel by early Spanish missionaries stunned by the number of languages they found among isolated communities separated by dense jungle.

'Missionaries estimated that more than 500 languages were spoken in an area half the size of Alaska. Linguists now estimate... "

Christianity Peru 2002 Morlan, A. R. "Fast Glaciers " in Vanishing Acts (Ellen Datlow, ed.) New York: Tor (2000); pg. 290. Pg. 290: "'...While the Whistler tribe seems to have no written language (hence no texts for modern missionaries to burn!)...' "; Pg. 292: "The missionaries brought in those horrid springy baby-bouncers with plastic seats, and standard cradles which their do-gooder friends in the States contributed to the clothing and goods drives held by their individual churches--instead of chucking the crap in the dumpsters where it belonged.

Damn them, and damn all their ugly cast-off clothes that they packed into big cardboard boxes and shipped surface rate down here. And damn the Bible-toting do-gooders who opened up said big cardboard boxes . . . which the tribe's children are now playing 'house' in, even though they actually live in open-air lean-to style leaf and stick huts. I suppose the missionaries taught the children about 'real houses, too. " [Many refs. to missionaries throughout the story. Other refs. not in DB.]

Christianity Poland 1942 Simmons, Dan. Carrion Comfort. New York: Warner Books (1990; c. 1989); pg. 154. "'I do not know how I survived that winter. I remember two farm families--Christians--who allowed me to hide in the straw heaps in their barns [from the Nazis]...' "
Christianity Poland 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 233. "Baranyk glanced up at the bronze figure of Christ on the cross. The statue's muscles and tendons were delineated, its face sagging, like Czajowski's, with pain. Christ, Baranyk thought bitterly. Christ had dangled the carrot, too. " [Also, pg. 257.]
Christianity Portugal 1600 Anthony, Patricia. God's Fires. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 21. [Year is estimated.] "'Bathe once a week,' she was saying. 'That's a preventive, not the cause of illness. Didn't your St. John lead his flock to wash in the river? All your Bible talks of cleansing, yet one would think Christians die from getting wet. I tell you, you stink. Your churches stink. You live in filfth like pigs.' " [Many other references to Christianity, primarily to Catholicism, in this novel, most not in DB.]
Christianity Portugal 1600 Anthony, Patricia. God's Fires. New York: Ace Books (1997); pg. 39. [Year is estimated.] "'...But I must admit to you, my girl, that out of everyone in all the world, the living saints, the nuns, even those born into authentic Christian homes, I find it hard to believe the Mother of God chooses litle Marta Castenheda as her messenger.' "
Christianity Proton 2980 Anthony, Piers. Split Infinity. New York: Ballantine (1980); pg. 175. "A number of Citizens preferred this style, because the golden age of Arabian culture back on Earth had been remarkably affluent. Islam had had its Golden Age while Christianity had its Dark Ages. "
Christianity Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 55. "'I'm not a beast like you! I'm a good Christian God-fearing virtuous woman!' "
Christianity Riverworld 1890 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 13-14. [The main character wonders where he is after dying.] "It was then that Burton was sure that this Resurrection Day was not the one which any religion had stated would occur. Burton had not believed in the God portrayed by the Christians, Moslems, Hindus, or any faith... He was sure that when he died, the world would cease to exist.

Waking up after death, in ths valley by this river, he had been powerless to defend himself against the doubts that existed in every man exposed to an early religious conditioning and to an adult society which preached its convictions at every chance.

Now, seeing the alien approach, he was sure that there was some other explanation for this even than a supernatural one. There was a physical, a scientific, reason for his being here; he did not have to resort to Judeo-Christian-Moslem myths for cause. " [Other refs. not in DB. The entire book is about th afterlife, and there are refs. to Christianity, but usually not by name.]

Christianity Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 82. "'You're a real Christian,' Frigate said [to Ruach, a Jew], grinning.

'I thought you were my friend!' Ruach said. "

Christianity Riverworld 2008 Farmer, Philip Jose. To Your Scattered Bodies Go. New York: Berkeley Medallion Books (1971); pg. 184. "Thus Burton had met three Jesus Chriss, two Abrahams, four King Richard the Lion-Hearteds, six Attilas, a dozen Judases (only one of whom could speak Aramaic), a George Washington, two Lord Byrons, three Jess Jameses, any number of Napoleons, a General Custer (who spoke with a heavy Yorkshire accent), a Finn MacCool..., a Tchaka (who spoke the wrong Zulu dialect), and a number of others who might or might not have been what they claimed to be. "
Christianity Rock, The 2051 Worthen, M. W. "You Can't Go Back " in Washed by a Wave of Wind (M. Shayne Bell, ed.). Salt Lake City, UT: Signature Books (1993); pg. 111. Pg. 111: "I sat alone in the small iron chapel, remembering. There was a porcelain Jesus on the cross on one wall and a Star of David on the other. On the polished iron wall near Jesus were pictures of eight saints with tables and candles for each one; several of those candles had been burning at each place when I entered, and I lit one more in front of the Christ for Gus. Then I'd gone to sit in one of the pews. Like nearly everything else here on The Rock, they were made of iron. "; Pg. 127: "This iron chapel on The Rock was the wrong place to be remembering Gus... "
Christianity Roman Empire 272 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 160. "Several of the men who were watching averted their eyes, crossing themselves in the Christian sign against evil. It is only evil for the bull, I thought ruefully, or perhaps not even for him, if he consented to the offering. Surely the Christians, who worshipped a crucified god, knew that death could be holy. It seemed rather small-minded of them to deny the sanctity of sacrifice to all religions but their own. "
Christianity Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 2. Pg. 2: "'Centurion!' yelled in his ear.

Rage flared. Had the contumely of the Christians swollen to this? ";

Pg. 3: "Insolent knave indeed, Gratillonius knew. He sagged a little, inwardly. Of course he was dealing with a Christian. Most legionaries were, these days, or pretended to be. This very year the rescript had arrived that banned the old faiths, along with tales of how the authorities were despoiling Mithraic temples first. "; Pg. 39: "'No. I didn't tell you earlier because it would have spoiled our evening. But Lucius has turned Christian. He's studying under the bishop in Aquae Sulis, with the aim of becoming a churchman too. He talks about celibacy.' "

Christianity Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 15. "As it did not before the Lord of the Christians . . . but they welcomed women to their services, passed fleetingly through Gratillonius. Hiss father, his brother, himself followed Mithras; but his mother had been Christian and so, by amicable agreement, were his sisters raised. "
Christianity Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 55. Pg. 55: "'You're not Jesus?' came from a boy. 'I heard Jesus is the God in the city. I heard He is kind.'

'I am not He,' Gratillonius said, 'but I promise Jesus will always watch over you.' He kissed the hands he held, rose, and turned his back. 'Goodnight. Try to sleep...' ";

Pg. 58: "'What will become of the children?' Gratillonius asked slowly.

Lugotorix shrugged. 'Who knows? I pray they'll land in nice Christian homes and learn the Faith that will save their souls. See what a good work is mine in the sight of God! But I do have to take the best offer I get, you realize, or else how could I meet my own obligations to the state?...' "

Christianity Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 60. "Nothing could be done for the children except to beseech that Mithras--or Christ, or whatever Gods had stood over their cradles--would at least receive their weary spirits. " [Many other refs. throughout novel.]
Christianity Roman Empire 300 C.E. Anderson, Poul & Karen Anderson. The King of Ys: Roma Mater. New York: Baen (1986); pg. 65. "Certainly this land clung unhindered to its own old ways. Cynan had been right; Christianity was a religion for towns. Frequently Gratillonius spied a cella, a Celtic temple. Even smaller than a Mithraeum, it consisted of a single square room... "
Christianity Roman Empire 316 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 296. "'No mortal can touch the ultimate deity. You who live in flesh see with the eyes of the world, one thing at a time, and so you see God in many guises, just as different images are reflected in the many facets of a jewel. To each facet you have given a form and a name--Apollo or Ammon, Cybele or Hera, who once gave oracles at this shrine. Jahweh of the Jews watches over his people, and this Jesus blesses those who call on his name. They desire to touch the One, but their human limitations allow them to see only a single face, which they identify as the whole. Do you understand?' "
Christianity Roman Empire 325 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 320. "'In Christ's holy name, why can they not agree?' exclaimed Constantine. 'I called this council so that the bishops might resolve their differences.'

...Bishop Eusebius of Caesarea, who had come with him to report on the deliberations, was frowning. The pagans in the room looked confused, and my old tutor Sopater, who had become a noted teacher of rhetoric and a member of Constantine's court, was suppressing a smile. Only a month after its beginning, the two thousand bishops who had come to the Council of Nicaea at the start of May were already arguing about the nature and relationship of God and His Son. " [Much more about this, pg. 317-326, etc. It was at this Council that the politically strong powers decided upon Athanasian-style Trinitarianism, rather than the Arianism of the early Christians. Today, most Christians subscribe to the same Trinitarianism formula.]

Christianity Roman Empire 325 C.E. Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Diana L. Paxson Priestess of Avalon. New York: Viking (2001); pg. 325. "In July the Council of Nicaea concluded with the creation of a creed to which everyone, even Arius, was willing to subscribe, respecting, if not the will of God, the wishes of their Emperor. At the beginning of the next year, Constantine, euphoric in the conviction that his leadership had brought the quarreling Christians to a state of unity, moved his court to Rome to celebrate the twentieth year of his reign. "
Christianity Roman Empire 350 C.E. Anthony, Piers. Vision of Tarot. New York: Berkley Books (1985; 1st ed. 1980); pg. 199. "'...Who has done this thing?'

They soon found out. The Christians had done it. They had made a deal with Gracchus, the Urban Prefect of Rome. Persecution of the Mithraists followed throughout the Empire, and the religion was essentially shut down in favor of Christianity.

'But this is not my way!' Jesus protested. 'Religion is inseparable from morality. How can there be persecutions of others in my name?'

Yet it was so. Other religions shared the fate of Mithra, and Christianity was supreme in Rome. As people of the northern European tribes were converted, they brought their pagan values with them and their pagan holidays. Christian titles were applied to those celebrations: Christmas, Easter--but their essence remained pagan, and therevore, were easily commercialized. "

Christianity Roman Empire 359 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 33. "A hunchbacked beggar whined for alms in the name of Christ and then, when likewise ignored, tried Jupiter, Mithras, Isis, the Great Mother, and Celtic Epona... "; Pg. 39: "'...I want naught to do with magic or heathendom, me, a good Christian, a free Roman citizen.' "; Pg. 46: "'Christians should give thanks for what they get.' " [Many other references to Christianity are in book, most not in DB.]
Christianity Roman Empire 590 C.E. Blake, Sterling. "A Desperate Calculus " in New Legends. Greg Bear (ed.) New York: Tor (1995); pg. 62. "In assessing the potentials of Superflu, consider the first bubonic pandemic. Termed the Plague of Justinian (540-590), who was the Caesar of the era, it began the decline of the Roman Empire, strengthened Christianity with its claims of an afterlife, and discredited Roman medicine, whose nostrums proved useless--thus strangling a baby science. "
Christianity Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 5. Pg. 5: "This is not a Christian tale, though there are Christians in it. It is not about God who created us, but the scapegoat we created to blame for what God allows us to do, that we should not. Such a demon can be created in the minds of men, but once loosed it cannot be driven back. "; Pg. 25: "'I don't understand,' said Pierrette. 'Christian beliefs have supplanted old Gaulish ones. No one has taken heads since before the fall of Rome. Where are these fantomes coming from?' "; Pg. 48: "In her world, Caesar's men had hacked and burned such sacred trees when he outlawed the druids, and Christians had completed his task. "; Pg. 71: Saint Mary Magdalene [Extensive other refs., not in DB, including many refs. to Mary Magdalene.]
Christianity Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 72. "'Jesus might have agreed with you,' she mused. 'but Christianity isn't immune to scholars' revisions. His old aunties didn't care much for what Paul made of their nephew's simpler creed.' Ferdiad reflected that she sounded as if she knew that for certain. The early church had not, he knew, been without disputes like Peter and Paul's. Had Jesus really intended to create a new religion? Paul surely had.

'Obtaining the resurrection of your brother Lazarus,

'Ministering faithfully to Jesus on the cross,

'Staying by him when the disciples fled . . .' They passed the next two stones without examining them. The pilgrims seemed fewer and further between.

'First among the disciples to be worthy of seeing the risen Christ,

'Marked on your forehead by his glorious hand,

'Apostle of Apostles,

'Apostle of Provence . . .' The voices faded. By the time they reached a stone depicting Magdalene preaching to the Roman legions... " [Extensive refs. throughout novel.]

Christianity Roman Empire 620 C.E. Douglas, L. Warren. The Veil of Years. New York: Baen (2001); pg. 383. "Now as she unrolled the scroll, she noted that the ink at the end was no less dark than at the beginning. She skimmed familiar passages near the end, and much to her relief found nothing changed. Other books were similarly untouched: Augustine had written The City Of God when he had written it in her original history, and Caesar's De Bello Gallico occupied the exact moment as before. And yes, Maurius had ordered his fossa, his canal, dug in 104 B.C., and had bested the Teutons in 102 B.C. "
Christianity Romania 1436 C.E. Simmons, Dan. Children of the Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1992); pg. 74. "Perhaps he had not planned to do it as we rode to Gallipoli to meet the Sultan, for Father was also seized by the Sultan's men only minutes after we had reached the city gates. But Father later swore an oath on the Bible and Koran not to oppose the Sultan's will, and our continued role as hostages was part of that oath... I remember the shock of the Sultan's people when the Ceremony of the Chalice was explained to them, but they accepted it as just another barbarism of the Christian faith. " [Other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity Romania 1989 Simmons, Dan. Children of the Night. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons (1992); pg. 11. Pg. 11: "I am sure that I looked older than Paxley, older than Methuselah . . . older than God. "; Pg. 337: "'...It's like Easter to ardent Christians...' " [Many refs. throughout DB, particularly to Catholicism, as one of the main characters is a Catholic priest.]
Christianity Russia 1050 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 9. "Where the Dnieper snaked in its eastward bend... Pecheneg tribesmen were wont to lurk nearby... Oleg Vladimirovitch had been in one such fight as an apprentice. In it, by God's grace, the Russians sent the raiders off bewailing their own dead and took many husky prisoners to sell in Constantinople...

'Yes,' he said to the bumper of kvass in his hand, 'peace and brotherly love, those are good for trade, as Our Lord preached when he walked this earth.' "; Pg. 10: "Their shouts and oaths were lost across a mile or two, blent into the clangor of great Father Dnieper. " [Other refs., not in DB. One of main characters in novel is a 11th century Russian Christian.]

Christianity Russia 1050 C.E. Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 42. [A Russian Christian from the 11th century and an American have been transported into the past, to 1400 B.C.] Pg. 42: "'A golden chalice set with precious stones for the Church of St. Boris. Six altar clothes of the finest silk, and scores of pearls sewn on, for St. Mary.' He paused. 'I'd best say that in Russian and Romaic too. And, oh, yes, Norse.'

Reid couldn't resist japing: 'Your saints have not be born.' Oleg looked stricken. The American added hastily, 'Well, I could be wrong, I suppose.' No sense in pointing out that Christ--that Abraham, most likely--was also in the future. "; Pg. 43: "The point was that Oleg could place himself exactly in space and time: the eastward bend of the Dnieper, early June, 1050 A.D. "

Christianity Russia 1250 C.E. Kube-McDowell, Michael. The Quiet Pools. New York: Ace (1990); pg. 146. "Dryke was born in Kaliningrad to a Russian mother and an English father--ironically, a few kilometers from the site of the thirteenth-century fortress of the Teutonic Knights... "
Christianity Russia 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 460. "To Russie's way of thinking, paradise was not to be found in a narrow, smelly, noisy metal tube lit by dim orange lights so that it resembled nothing so much as a view of the Christian hell. If this was an improvement, he pitied the men who had put to sea in submarines about the time he was born. "
Christianity Russia 1987 Cassutt, Michael. "Legends " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 440. "'Molniya.' Polyakov elected to use the young officer's code name rather than Christian name and patronymic. "
Christianity Russia 1996 Ing, Dean. Systemic Shock. New York: Tor (original 1981; 1st Tor edition 1992); pg. 26. "On the other hand, most western Russians, particularly since their post-collapse friendship with the west, were still molded from the cradle by basically Christian traditions of Godhead, and of guilt. The Russian Union of Soviets was like the western world, sharing an ethic that looked inward for strength. "
Christianity Russia 2005 Bear, Greg. Eon. New York: Bluejay (1985); pg. 212. "The Soviets stood in silence as Chaplain Cook and Yitshak Jacob, acting as a rabbi, administered last rites and kaddish. A Soviet Uzbek Moslem stepped forward to offer his prayers. "
Christianity Saturn 1758 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 186. Pg. 185: "The Swedish mystic and mineralogist Emanuel Swedenborg wrote one of the first eyewitness accounts of a close encounter of the third kind. In his treatise of 1758, De telluribus [Concerning Other Worlds]... "; Pg. 186: "Saturnians, like Jovians, were mostly God-fearing Christian aliens, except for one idolatrous minority that worshipped the planet's rings. "; Pg. 191: "The difficulty with Le Guin's Gethenians, as with most of her other aliens, is that they seem to spring with such pure didactic intent from the Swedenborg tradition of populating outer space with noble savages of ideal virtue. Indeed, in Always Coming Home (1985), she creates a postindustrial California that has reverted to an ideal pre-Columbian condition, which is, of course, matriarchal. She no more endeavors to account for how this came about than Swedenborg thinks to ask how the inhabitants of Jupiter and Saturn came to be Christians. "
Christianity Solar System 2001 Clarke, Arthur C. 2001: A Space Odyssey. New York: New American Library (1969; c. 1968); pg. 209. "The space pod was resting on the polished floor of an elegant, anonymous hotel suite that might have been in any large city on Earth. He was staring into a living room with a coffee table, a divan, a dozen chairs, a writing desk, various lamps, a half-filled bookcase with some magazines lying on it, and even a bowl of flowers... He felt confident that when he pulled open the drawer of that desk, he would find a Gideon Bible inside it. "
Christianity Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 89. "In the air before Leo a small section shimmered; out of it emerged a black book, which he accepted, thumbed through, then, satisfied, put down on his lap.

'What's that?' Eldritch asked.

'A King James Bible. I thought it might help protect me.'

'Not here,' Eldritch said. 'This is my domain.' He gestured at the bible and it vanished. 'You could have your own [virtual domain], though, and fill it with bibles. As can anyone. As soon as our operations are underway...' "

Christianity Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 111. "'I'll see you,' he said, and touched the button; the doors shut, cutting off his view of Roni. I'll see you in what the Neo-Christians call hell, he thought to himself. Probably not before. Not unless this already is, and it may be, hell right now. "
Christianity Solar System 2100 Dick, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. New York: Random House (1991; c. 1964); pg. 125. "'I belong to the Reformed Branch of the Neo-American Church, the New Christian Church of the United States and Canada. Actually our roots are very old: in A.D. 300 our forefathers had bishops that attended a conference in France; we didn't split off from the other churches as late as everyone thinks. So you can see we have Apostolic Succession.' She smiled at him in a solemn, friendly fashion. "


Christianity, continued

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