Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Christianity, Nicoji

Christianity, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Christianity Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 127. Pg. 127: "The company boy jumped down on the raft, opened the chest, and threw... Sam's Pilgrim's Progress out of it. "; Pg. 130: "Then I saw Sam's Pilgrim's Progress, closer to the chest. It was his only book. I took two steps around the edge of the raft, rached for the book, grabbed the front cover, pulled up the book, and shoved it in the sack. That's it, I thought. That's all I'm putting in the sack. "; Pg. 138: "Sam picked up a page torm from his Pilgrim's Progress. I looked over the cliff and ssaw the other pages scattered on the rocks. Sam let go of his page, and we watched it flutter back and forth till it caught on a ledge. "; Pg. 139: "Pages from Sam's book blew off the rocks and ledges and settled onto the water. "
Christianity Nicoji 2200 Bell, M. Shayne. Nicoji. New York: Baen (1991); pg. 222-223. "...we walked along toward the fire. Before we got there, Eloise started to sing 'O Little Town of Bethlehem,' and some of the Brazis with good voices hummed the harmony since they didn't know the English words. I stopped to listen.

O little town of Bethlehem.
How still we see thee lie.
Above thy deep and dreamless sleep
The silent stars go by.

I wondered if Sam could hear them singing...

How silently, how silently
The wondrous gift is giv'n!
So God imparts to human hearts
The blessings of his heav'n.

I couldn't go up to the fire, not then. I sat on a rock and waited out in the trees. The Brazis went on to sing 'Away in a Manger,' in Portuguese, and after that everybody was quiet... I looked up at the stars that shone through the leafless trees. A few stars were still in the sky. The moon was just starting to rise... I could clearly see the bright light that was our station. "

Christianity Nigeria 1999 Sagan, Carl. Contact. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 312-313. "Many Nigerian men and women--Muslims, Christians, & Animists...--took his [Eda's] vision seriously. "
Christianity North America 1881 Turtledove, Harry. How Few Remain. New York: Ballantine (1997); pg. 464. "The statesman was too openly successful, too openly clever a Jew to suit Jackson's sterm Christianity. "
Christianity North America 1914 Turtledove, Harry. The Great War: American Front (alternate history novel). New York: Ballantine (1998); pg. 175. "'You Rebels, I think you may be Christians, too.' That was Gordon McSweeney, sounding surprised. For once, Paul didn't blame him. If you lived in the USA, you figured everybody in the CSA [Confederate States of America] grew horns and a pointy tail. From the way the Confederates talked, they seemed to think the same thing about Americans... As the sun set a couple of hours later, a new chorus rang out: Christmas carols, sung first by the U.S. soldiers, then by the Confederates, and at last by both armies together. " [There are many other references to Christianity in this book, though most references are to specific denominations, or related to Christmas.]
Christianity North America 2000 Knight, Damon. Rule Golden in Three Novels. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (c. 1954); pg. 58. "The sixth day was two days--because we left Otaru at 3:30 p.m.... On the sixth day, then, which was two days, the following things happened and were duly reported:

Be Done By As Ye Do was the title of some thousands of sermons... Following this, a wave of millennial enthusiasm swept the continent; Christians and Jews everywhere feasted, fasted, prayed and in other ways celebrated the imminent Second (or First) Coming of Christ. Evangelistic and fundamentalist sects garnered souls by the million.

Members of the Apostolic Overcoming Holy Church of God, the Pentecostal Fire Baptized Holiness Church and numerous other groups gave away most or all of their worldly possessions. Others were more practical. The Seventh Day Adventists, who are vegetarians, pooled capital and began an enormous expansion of their meatless-food factories, dairies and other enterprises. "

Christianity North America 2027 Atack, Chris. Project Maldon. New York: Baen (1997); pg. 69. "...the degenerate liberals who created them and finally the Islamic Coalition, which had coiled like a snake around the Christian world during the long sleep of the righteous. "
Christianity North America 2150 Pohl, Frederik. "Hatching the Phoenix " in The Year's Best Science Fiction, Vol. 17 (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (2000); pg. 249. "I stared at her. 'You mean they're spreading disease? As a weapon?'

'I believe that is likely, and not at all without precedent,' she informed me, preparing to lecture. She started by reminding me of the way the first American colonists in New England gave smallpox-laden blankets to the Indians to get them out of the way--'The colonists were Christians, of course, and very religious'--and went on from there. "

Christianity North America 2780 Simmons, Dan. The Fall of Hyperion. New York: Bantam (1991; 1st ed. 1990); pg. 255. "When he was a child on Old Earth, he and Amalfi Schwartz, his best friend, had visited a commune of Christians in the North American Preserve, learned their crude theology, and afterward had made many jokes about crucifixion. Young Martin had spread his arms wide, crossed his legs, lifted his head, and said, 'Gee, I can see the whole town from up here.' Amalfi had roared. "
Christianity North America 2874 Forbes, Edith. Exit to Reality. Seattle, WA: Seal Press (1997); pg. 90. "I thought of Joan of Arc, and found myself thin and slight, in coarse peasant clothing, looking into dark blazing eyes. "
Christianity North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 219. "'So we do her job,' said DeAnne.

'Hey, it's the Lord's work and it needs to be done and we can do it.'

'You're more of a Christian than I am.'

'So do you want to make the salad or the casserole?' "

Christianity North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 221. "'I can see you've never been to a shrink. They think religious people are crazy.'

'Not true,' said DeAnne, thinking at once of Sheila Redmond back in Vigor. 'I knew a therapist and she and her husband were serious Christians. Not Mormon, but they certainly didn't think it was crazy to be religious.' " [Other refs. not in DB.]

Christianity North Carolina 1992 Card, Orson Scott. Lost Boys. New York: HarperCollins (1992); pg. 60-61. "'Bappy, with a B. Short for my real name, which is Baptize... My papa was a Holiness preacher and he believed in baptism the way other folks believe in air. It was the cure for whatever ailed you. Other folks might hold with doctors or even with laying on of hands, but Papa, he just pushed you down in the water and held you there till the devil come out of you. He was a deep baptizer, my papa was, and I was the firstborn in the family And what with our last name being Waters, my name was sort of bound to happen, if you think of it. In fact he was set to name me baptize All God's Children in the Holy, but Mama put her foot down on that and said that if he named a child that he'd deserve it if the boy grew up and shot him dead, and not a jury but would call it justice...' "
Christianity North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 104. "The churchman told her, 'The Bible says, Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.'

Kate didn't take her eyes off of the deputy. 'Quite so, Mr. Smeed. Sneally.'

'Snead,' he said.

'Snead. Fine. I read that verse in the King James version when I was a kid. However, I believe that biblical scholars have several options in translating the word they've chosen to translate as 'witch,' all of them equally valid. Their arbitrary choice of the word 'witch' is just that . . . an arbitrary choice.'

...She turned her attention directly to Snead. 'But that's in the Old Testament, and if you're a Christian, then you must believe that Christ took the judgment of humankind upon himself when he died, so that my beliefs would then become a matter between me and him and therefore none of your business. In any case, Christian or not, the Constitution, which guarantees freedom of religion, absolutely forbids murder...' "

Christianity North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 178. "Lisa didn't seem to find anything funny in that, though. 'Madilee looked into the records of the three men who were arrested, and did this article on them. Snead is a deacon at his church and a member of the Christian Men's Business Association, and he and his church led a driver that raised over a hundred thousand dollars for the medical bills on little Jessie Lockabee when she had to have a liver transplant up in Chapel Hill. Deputy Sumner saved Jody MacNeally from drowning last summer and has done all those civic things. She also told about how Warren Plonkett came to you for a job, and you refused to hire him because he was a Christian.' "
Christianity North Carolina 1998 Bradley, Marion Zimmer & Holly Lisle. In the Rift. New York: Baen (1998); pg. 181. "'When that article came out, I did a little checking myself, just like Madilee Marson. I looked into Ogden Snead and bobby Sumner and Warren Plonkett. They're all members of the same church. Well, it calls itself a church, but it's a nasty little radical organization that doesn't have much to do with religion at all, as far as I can tell. It's called the Christian Brotherhood of Purified Souls, and I think the word 'Christian' is tacked on there just to get them a tax-exempt status. These people don't believe in brotherhood or tolerance or love or anything real Christians believe in. They're a paramilitary hate organization with an ugly definition for what it takes to be purified...' "
Christianity North Carolina: Greensboro 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 137. "'Sometimes people with the least that is worth stealing are the most concerned with giving the appearance of having great treasures hidden away.'

'Is that from the Bible?'

'No, it's from observation.' "

Christianity North Dakota 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 93. Pg. 93: "The Fort Moxie News traditionally reported stories that people wanted to see printed: trips to Arizona, family reunions, church card parties. "; Pg. 121: "...and consequently when an obscene exhortation showed up on the water tower or on one of the churches or at the Elks hall, the deputy knew exactly where to go to lay hands on the culprit. "; Pg. 123: "But unlike water towers and churches, the roundhouses tended to resist interaction with the world. "; Pg. 162: "Hoskin delivered the news like a sinner announcing the Second Coming. "
Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 17. "'What do you think it means?' he grinned.

The scriptures were open to Deuteronomy next to her plate. She swallowed a bite and scanned the column for the passage in question. They had run across it during one of their late-night scripture-study-and-shoot-the-Gospel-breeze sessions the previous evening. They had brushed over it without comment then. But the words had come back to her while she had been dressing that morning.

'Well, obviously it refers to the Lost Tribes, don't you think?'

'He nodded with the same grin. 'I think so, yes.'

She stopped her finger at verse four. 'So here's what it says: 'If any of thine be driven out into the outmost parts of heaven, from thence will the Lord thy God gather thee, and from thence will fetch thee'.' She looked up at him. He raised his eyebrows. " [Many other refs. throughout novel. Most not in DB. The two main characters are practicing Christians.]

Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 94. "Simultaneously, a hand touched his shoulder and a voice whispered in his ear: 'And it shall come to pass in that day that the Lord will set his hand a second time to recover the remnant of his people. And the ransomed of the Lord shall return.'

The passage was from the Old Testament. But the voice was from the caves of Nordaustlandet...

Roth turned. The eyes meeting his were kind, expectant, the eyes of a friend. It was the old man from the first dream. It was also, Roth knew now, the prophet Isaiah.

'And soon it will come to pass, Isaiah nodded. 'Will it not?'

Roth just nodded back silently. He was certainly in no position to disagree...

'Good,' Isaiah beamed. 'Thine errand will soon be fulfilled, I trust.' And before Roth could respond, the prophet turned, gazing out and down. Firelight glistened in his eyes.

'God's chosen are not lost, my brethren,' he declared reverently. 'They gather on paths of iron, before the gate of time...' "

Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 113. "Like Peter on the waters of Galilee, she found her faith beginning to thin out as time wore on, allowing her to sink. "
Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 129. "So she had begun singing hymns. A Mighty Fortress. Abide With Me. The Lord Is My Light. I Need The Every Hour... How Firm A Foundation... "
Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 15-16. "'Something wrong, Lee?' she asked.

..'Don't know... Maybe... Dr. Roth's still at the site. Wind-chill's at sixty eight [below]. Could be a problem.'...

Murray snorted. 'What are you, his nanny?'

Before Lee had the chance to respond with something decidedly un-Christian, Dr. Wong spoke. "

Christianity Norway 2075 Anderson, Glenn L. The Millennium File. Bountiful, Utah: Horizon Publishers (1986); pg. 93-94. "Sleep claimed him almost at once.

Sometime later, from the depths of REM, came the dream.

...Around him gathered a handful of old men--robed, bearded men with faces creased like dried fruit. All watched and listened in heavy silence. Prophets, Roth observed. Amos was there, as were Jeremiah and Daniel and Malachi. They seemed oddly familiar, like professional acquaintances made at some long-ago symposium. Roth realized almost immediately what they were witnessing.

'And I scattered them among the heathen,' one of the old men brooded, 'and they were dispersed through the countries.' Roth recognized the words. The old man was Ezekiel.

'Because they had despised my statutes, and polluted my sabbaths, and their eyes were after their fathers' idols.'

Roth glanced at Ezekiel's face for just a second before flipping his gaze away again. The prophet was obviously not in the best of moods. No sense making eye contact with an irate seer. "

Christianity Nueva Terra 2150 Rosenberg, Joel. Hero. New York: Penguin Books (1990); pg. 19. "'Tell you what, Benyamin said. 'I'll get you a nice medic's brassard--Christian cross and all--and we can make a real good target.' "
Christianity Ohio 1982 Bishop, Michael. The Secret Ascension; or, Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 175. "The MP named Miller, Lia noticed, was scrutinizing her jacket. 'I like you pin,' he said in a low, confidential tone. 'And I just want you to know that I'm a Christian, too.' "
Christianity Ohio 1996 King, Stephen (written as Richard Bachman). The Regulators. New York: Penguin Books (1996); pg. 24. "...in an Ohio town where most kids go to Vacation Bible School and participate in the Summer Reading Program at the Public Library... "
Christianity Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 257. "'But pray ye that your fight me not in the winter, neither on the sabbath day.'

--MATTHEW 24:20 "

Christianity Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 260. "...Epiphany over and nothing to look forward to but Lent and taxes. And Good Friday. Attendance and the collections down, half the congregation out with the flu and the other half away on a winter cruise, those who were there looking abandoned, too, and like they wished they had somewhere to go.

That was why he had decided against his sermon on Christian duty and pulled an old one out of the files, a sermon on Jesus' promise that He would return. To get that abandoned look off their faces.

'...Christ tells us that we 'know not when the master of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning,' and when he comes, we must be ready for him...' " [Many other refs. throughout story, most not in DB. The main character is a Presbyterian minister.]

Christianity Ohio 1999 Willis, Connie. "Epiphany " in Miracle and Other Christmas Stories. New York: Bantam (1999); pg. 280. "...and opened the Bible to the Book of Revelation.

The radio evangelists made it sound like the story of the Second Coming was a single narrative, but it was actually a hodge-podge of isolated scriptures--Matthew 24 and sections of Isaiah and Daniel, verses out of 2nd Thessalonians and John and Joel, stray ravings from Revelation and Jeremiah, all thrown together by the evangelists as if the authors were writing at the same time. If they were even writing about the same thing.

And the references were full of contradictions. A trumpet would sound, and Christ would come in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. Or on a white horse, leading an army of a hundred and forty-four thousand. Or like a thief in the night. There would be earthquakes and pestilences and a star falling out of heaven. Or a dragon would come up out of the sea, or four great beasts, with the heads of a lion and a bear and a leopard and eagles' wings. Or darkness would cover the earth. "

Christianity Oklahoma 1943 Bishop, Michael. Brittle Innings. New York: Bantam (1994); pg. 97. Pg. 97: "...a jar of white lightning and a hand-held Jesus fan from Stiffslinger & Sons' Christian Mortuary. "; Pg. 200: "...and dread in knowing that, like Christ in a bad suit, it would rise again. "; Pg. 228: "Today, like Christendom's fabled Son of Man, I am resurrected. "; Pg. 277: "'S Hank Clerval, the best first baseman in the CVL.' He said this with such respect that CVL almost seemed a vowelless code for Clerval, like YHWH is for Jehovah. "; Pg. 312: "How could she lap Mr. Roosevelt in such honey-tongued politeness when his wife's Christian name gagged her like ammonia ice? "; Pg. 441: "And Henry paid no heed to Christ's advice to set all anxiety aside. "; Pg. 463: "...had hurled him downwards with the same authority and force that Jehovah God launched Lucifer and his minions from Heaven. " [Also pg. 475.]
Christianity Oklahoma 2040 Pohl, Frederik. Man Plus. New York: Random House (1976); pg. 27. "Fr. Donnelly S. Kayman, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., S.J. As he began celebrating the Mass in the Lady Chapel of St. Jude's, three miles away, on the other side of Tonka [OK]... " [Other references to Christianity are in book, some not in DB. Most references are in relation to Catholicism, esp. to the Jesuit character Don Kayman.]
Christianity Ontario 1992 Huff, Tanya. Blood Trail. New York: DAW Books (1992); pg. 50. "'Which implies that werewolves aren't humans.'

'They aren't.'

'What are they then, small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri?'

'No, according to the oldest of their legends, they're the direct descendants of a she-wolf and the ancient god of the hunt... That one's pretty much consistent throughout all the packs, although the name of the god changes from place to place. When the ancient Greek and Roman religions began to spread, the wer began calling themselves Diana's chosen, the hunting pack of the goddess. Christianity added the story of Lilith, Adam's first wife, who, when she left the garden, lay with the wolf God created on the fifth day and bore him children.' "

Christianity Ontario 1992 Huff, Tanya. Blood Trail. New York: DAW Books (1992); pg. 121. Pg. 121: "'He'd have attacked over a difference in religion?'

'Is that what old man Biehn said?' Peter snorted. 'Jennifer and Marie were six, maybe seven, and Aunt Nadine was pregnant with Daniel. Old man Biehn came over--he dropped by pretty often back then, trying to save our souls, and it was driving us all nuts--and he started talking about hell. I don't know what he said 'cause I wasn't there, but he really scared the girls and they started to howl.' Peter's brows drew down and his ears went back. 'You don't do that to cubs. Anyway, Uncle Stuart showed up and that was that. He's never come back.' " [More, pg. 132.]; Pg. 169: Red Cross

Christianity Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 128. "the priests at Turn guarded their shroud with equal jealousy. "
Christianity Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 291. "'Well,' replied Mary, 'not everyone on Earth--on this Earth, that is--believes in an afterlife.'

'Do the majority?'

'Well . . . yes, I guess so.'

'Do you?'

Mary frowned, thinking. 'Yes, I suppose I do.'

'Based on what evidence?' asked Ponter...

'Well, they say that . . .' She trailed off. Why did she believe it? She was a scientist, a rationalist, a logical thinker. But, of course, her religious indoctrination had occurred long before she'd been trained in biology. Finally, she shrugged a little, knowing her answer would be inadequate. 'It's in the Bible... The Bible, repeated Mary. 'Scriptures... Holy text... A revered book of moral teachings. The first part of it is shared by my people--called Christians--and by another major religion, the Jews. The second part is only believed in by Christians.' " [More, pg. 291-292, 298, 373-375.]

Christianity Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 298. "Still, maybe she was thinking now more like an atheist than a true believer. A believer should hold that Milgaaard, Morin, and Marshall were eventually going to receive their just, heavenly reward, making up for whatever they'd endured here on Earth. After all, God's own son had been executed unfairly, even by the standards of Rome; Pontius Pilate didn't think Christ guilty of the crime with which he'd been charged.

But Ponter's world was beginning to sound worse even than Pilate's court; the brutality of forced sterilizations with an absolute belief that you'd always correctly found the guilty party. Mary suppressed a shudder. "

Christianity Ontario 2002 Sawyer, Robert J. Hominids. New York: Tor (2002); pg. 366. "'According to our CNN online poll, the top three questions people would like to ask the Neanderthal are: What are women like in your world? What happened to our kind of human in your world? And do you believe in Jesus Christ? "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 18. "When he was really little he would follow her around as singlemindedly as a duckling; she would tow him down St. Catherine's Street on sunny summer days, buy Cokes and hot dogs and spend the afternoon watching the types from the steps of Christ Church Cathedral. "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1990 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Divide. New York: Doubleday (1990); pg. 30. "'Did he mention that his 'government grant' was by way of a client operation of the CIA? That his name came up twice in the Church Committee hearings?' "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 68. Pg. 68: "The remainder of the entry listed the various ways of dealing with the creatures [vampires], from ash stakes through mustard seed to the crucifix, going on in great detail about staking, beheading, and burning. "; Pg. 84: "If that was the case, many of the houses would be decorated with painted icons of saints, or of the Madonna, or of Christ himself. "; Pg. 87: "Scrambling in her purse for the heavy silver crucifix she'd acquired that afternoon... "; Pg. 92: "The garlic, the package of mustard seed, the Bible, the crucifix--all spread out in plain, ridiculous sight. She snorted gently. 'I was hunting a vampire.' "; Pg. 94: "'You should be more careful of excitement, good sir knight,' chided the Archbishop of York as those who had hurried to the rescue moved back to their places. " [Some other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 108. "...St. Michael's Cathedral... Holy Week Vigil in progress.... Only about half of the lights were on, creating an... almost mythical twilight in the church. Vicki could see, but only just and only because she didn't attempt to focus on anything outside the specific. A priest knelt at the altar and the first few rows of pews held a scattering of stocky women dressed in black, looking as though they'd been punched out of the same mold. The faint murmur of voices, lifted in what Vicki assumed was prayer, and the fainter click of old beads, did nothing to disturb the heavy hush that hung over the building... The Madonna, draped in blue and white, held her arms wide as though to embrace a weary world... Like many of her generation, Vicki had been raised vaguely Christian. She could recognize the symbols of the church, and she knew the historical story, but that was about it. Not for the first time, she wondered if maybe she hadn't missed out on something important. "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 154. [Easter] "There was an added complication he hadn't mentioned to Vicki because he knew she'd scoff. Tonight, all over the world, millions of people were crying that Christ was dead. This century might have lost its ability to see the power in believing, but Henry hadn't. Most religions had marked a day of darkness on the calendar and, given the spread of the Christian church, this was among the most potent. If the demon returned before Christ rose again, it would be stronger, more dangerous, harder to stop. " [Many other refs., not in DB.]
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1991 Huff, Tanya. Blood Price. New York: DAW Books (1991); pg. 163. "'All stand for the word of the Lord. We read today from The Gospel According to St. Matthew, Chapter twenty-eight. Verses one to seven.'

'Praised by the word of the Lord.'

'In the end of the Sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre. And, behold, there was a great earthquake: for the angel of the Lord descended from heaven, and came and rolled back the stone from the door, and sat upon it. His countenance was like lightning, and his raiment white as snow: and for fear of him the keepers did shake...'

The Gloria almost raised the roof off the church and just for the moment the faith in life everlasting as promised by the Christian God was enough to raise a shining wall between the world and the forces of darkness. "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 1995 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 9. "The chapel was denominationally neutral, but the fther was looking up, as if he could see a crucifix on the wall, see his Jesus hanging there. He crossed himself. "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 204. "'Do the Forhilnors believe in souls? In an afterlife?'

The question surprised me; I'd never thought about it. 'I honestly don't know.'

'Maybe you should ask Hollus.'

I nodded. Maybe I should.

'You know that I believe in souls,' she said simply.

'I know.'

That's as far as she went with the thought, though. She didn't ask me to go to church with her again; she'd asked once, a while ago, and that was fine. But she wouldn't push me. If attending St. George's was helping her get through all this, then that was great. But we each had to cope with it in our own way. "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 112. "'I'm thinking of going to church this Sunday,' Susan had said lost October, shortly after our first appointment with [oncologist] Dr. Kohl.

...I'd nodded. 'You usually do.'

'I know, but--well, with everything that's happened. With . . .'

'I'll be all right,' I said.

'Are you sure?'

I nodded again. 'You go to church every Sunday. That shouldn't change. Dr. Kohl said we should try to keep our lives as normal as possible.' "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 113. "Susan was thinking; her lips were pursed. Her brown eyes briefly met mine, then looked at the floor. 'You--you could come with me, if you want.'

I exhaled noisily. It had always been something of a sore point between us. Susan had gone to church regularly her whole life. She knew when she married me that was not something I did. I spent my Sunday mornings surfing the web and watching This Week with Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts. I'd made it plain to her when we started dating that I wouldn't be comfortable going to church. It would be too hypocritical, I said--an insult to those who believed.

Now, though, she clearly felt things had changed. Perhaps she expected me to want to pray, to make my peace with my maker.

'Maybe,' I said, but I'm sure we both knew it wasn't going to happen. "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 163. "'Do you say grace?' asked Hollus [the alien].

The question startled me. 'Not normally.'

'I have seen it on television.'

'Some families do it,' I said. Those that have things to be thankful for. "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 167. "There are none so blind as those who will not see; besides the Twenty-ninth Scroll, that's one of my favorite bits of religious writing. "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 172. "Hollus wavered into existence a short time later. 'I have been thinking about the people who blew up the abortion clinic,' he said. 'You said they were religious fundamentalists.'

'Well, one presumes so, yes. They haven't been caught yet.'

'No smoking gun,' said Hollus.

I smiled. 'Exactly.'

'But if they are, as you suspect, religious people, why is that relevant?'

'Blowing up an abortion clinic is an attempt to protest a perceived moral outrage.'

'And . . .?' said Hollus.

'Well, on Earth, the concept of God is inextricably linked to issues of morality.'

Hollus listened.

'In fact, three of our principal religions share the same Ten Commandments, supposedly handed down by God.' "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 173. "...I occasionally audited classes by Northrop Frye, the great teacher of English... It was heady, listening to such staggering intellects. Frye contended that you could not appreciate English literature without knowing the Bible. Perhaps he was right; I'd once made it through about half the Old Testament and had skimmed the color-coded 'actual words of Jesus' in a King James version I'd bought at the campus bookstore.

But, basically, what Susan said was true. I didn't know the Bible well, and I didn't know the Qur'an or any other holy book at all.

'And these Ten Commandments are?' asked Hollus?

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 173. "'And these Ten Commandments are?' asked Hollus?

'Umm, well, thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adulatory. Thou shalt not . . . umm, something about an ass.'

'I see,' said Hollus. 'But as far as we have been able to determine, the creator has never communicated directly with anyone. Indeed, the Wreeds--who, as you know, spend half their lives actively seeking such communication--claim no success. I am not sure how such commandments would be passed on to any lifeform.'

'Well, if I remember the movie correctly, God wrote them with a finger on stone tablets.'

'There is a move of this event? Would that not be your smoking gun?'

I smiled. 'The movie is a drama, a story. The Ten Commandments were supposedly handed down thousands of years ago, but the movie was made about half a century ago.' " [More.]

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 29. "I nodded. 'We call it Occam's razor.'

'The explanation that it was God's will posits one cause for all the mass extinctions; that makes it preferable.'

'Well, I suppose, if . . .'--dammitall, I know I should have just been polite, just nodded and smiled, the way I do when the occasional religious nut accosts me in the Dinosaur Gallery and demands to know how Noah's flood fits in, but I felt I had to speak up--'. . . if you believe in God.'

Hollus's eyestalks moved to what seemed to be their maximal extent, as if he was regarding me from both sides simultaneously. 'Are you the most senior paleontologist at this institution?' he asked.

'I'm the department head, yes.'

...'I know from your television that there is much ambivalence about God in this part of your planet... but I am surprised to hear that someone in your position is not personally convinced of the existence of the creator.' "

Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 39. "Hollus's eyestalks arched backward so that his crystal covered orbs looked up at the mosaic on the Rotunda's domed ceiling high above, made up of more than a million Venetian-glass tiles... The words 'That all men may know His work'--a quote, I'm told, from the Book of Job--were arranged in a square at the dome's apex. "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2000 Sawyer, Robert J. Calculating God. New York: Tor (2000); pg. 269. [Dr. Jericho confronts the Christian Fundamentalist/Evangelical terrorists who have been destroying the priceless fossils.] "I took in air through my mouth... I took another step forward. 'If you believe in the Bible,' I said, 'then you've got to believe in the Ten Commandments. And one of them'--I knew I'd have made a more convincing argument if I'd known which one--'says 'Thou shalt not kill.' ' I took another couple of steps toward him. 'You may want to destroy those fossils, but I can't believe that you'd kill me.' "
Christianity Ontario: Toronto 2011 Sawyer, Robert J. The Terminal Experiment. New York: HarperCollins (1995); pg. 82. "'When you do announce it,' said Sarkar, 'there will be a ton of publicity. This is as big as it gets. You've proven the existence of life after death.'

Peter shook his head. 'You're going beyond the data. A small, weak electrical field leaves the body at the moment of death. That's all; there's nothing to prove that the field is conscious or living.'

'The Koran says--'

'I can't rely on the Koran, or the Bible, or anything else...'

'You're being deliberately obtuse. It's a soul, Peter. You know that.' "

Christianity Oregon 1895 Gloss, Molly. The Jump-Off Creek. Boston: Houghton Mifflin (1989); pg. 56. "14 April (Sunday) It has been cold and no rain... Otherwise did not work today, I don't know if from Devoutness or Dullness... And so had a Day of Rest... "
Christianity Oregon 1991 Ing, Dean. The Nemesis Mission. New York: Tor (1991); pg. 14. Pg. 14: "...a guy who even flew a tiny Christian Eagle stunt plane to the interview... "; Pg. 23: "...flew on an aerobatic team of Christian Eagles... "
Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 20. "Places change. People pass on. Love dies. The world becomes, in time, almost uninhabitably strange.

Faith abides.

She seldom attended church. It was Miriam's opinion that the local churches--even the Truth Baptist, which people thought of as a fundamentalist church, misrepresented the Bible. Miriam believed in God, but she did not have what the television evangelists called 'a personal relationship with Him.' The very idea frightened her. The churches made much of redmption & forgiveness, but Miriam had read the Bible three times through without discovering much evidence in those pages of a loving God. Merciful--perhaps. On occasion. But Miriam believed most profoundly in the scary God of Abraham & Isaac, the God who demanded his sacrifice in flesh & blood; who swept aside humanity, when humanity displeased Him, the way a farmer might spray his crops with Malathion to eradicate a persistent infestation of beetles. " [Many other refs., most in DB, some may not be.]

Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 56. "How was he supposed to conduct a dinner party? Serve salt peanuts and play 'Nearer My God to Thee?' "
Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 69. "Simon Ackroyd, D.D., Rector of St. James Episcopal Church since his appointment to Buchanan in 1987, woke from a long sleep thinking about the Aztecs...

The Aztecs, when Simon read about them in college, had been the first real test of his faith. He had grown up with what he recognized now as a sanitized Christianity, a pastel Sunday School faith in which a gentle Jesus had redeemed humanity from the adoration of similarly pastel pagan idols--Athena and Dionysus worshiped in a glade. The problem of evil, in this diorama, was small and abstract.

There was the Holocaust, of course, but Simon had been able to rationalize that as a terrible aberration, the horrendous face of a world in which Christ commanded but did not compel.

The Aztecs, however . . . the Aztecs had lodged in his mind like a burning cinder. "

Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 107. "'Nobody calls anything by its right name. Doesn't matter. I'm a Christian woman, Rector. When the Thing [Contact] touched me I knew it was nothing a Christian should have anything to do with, and I gave it a Christian response. I don't see the point of immortality outside the Throne of God. But you. You shook hands with it--am I right? And yet, there you sit. Prepared to read Scripture over the body of my father. How can you do that?' "
Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 107. "Dr. Ackroyd [Episcopalian rector] seemed dismayed; he took a long time answering.

'Miriam,' he said finally. 'you may be right.' He paused as if to summon thoughts. 'I'm not sure I know what a Christian is. I've thought about this a great deal since Contact. The harder I look for Christianity, Miriam, the more it evaporates before my eyes. Is it Martin Luther or is it Johann Eck? Is it Augustine, or is it John Chrysostom? Is it Constantine? Is it Matthew and Mark and Luke, and did they write the Scriptures we call by their names? Or was Christianity buried along with the apocrypha at Nag Hammadi?' " [Etc.]

Christianity Oregon 1993 Wilson, Robert Charles. The Harvest. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 155. "'...But when you understand they're not sitting in judgment, it's no St. Peter at the Pearly Gates. They're [the aliens] not even offering forgiveness, that's not their business--their business is understanding...'

...'But I haven't given that up. People used to say, is there marriage in heaven? well, this isn't exactly heaven. But I think there will still be marriage. People are people, Daddy. They're each unique. They fall in love. Maybe they don't get married at the First Baptist anymore. But we're not turning into loveless monsters.' "



Christianity, continued

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