Adherents.com: Religious Groups in Literature


34,420 citations from literature (mostly science fiction and fantasy) referring to real churches, religious groups, tribes, etc. [This database is for literary research only. It is not intended as a source of information about religion.]

Index

back to Arab, world

Arab, continued...

Group Where Year Source Quote/
Notes
Arab world 1200 C.E. Pohl, Frederik. The World at the End of Time. New York: Ballantine (1990); pg. 77. "On Earth, the early stargazers named the brigh tpoints of light they saw overhead at night. The Arabs of the Dark Ages did it best. They had dry air and thus clear night skies, and no power planets or oil refineries to dirty the air, or illuminated highways or shopping malls to fill it with unwanted glow. Before Galileo invented the telescope they could see as many as three thousand stars, and they gave most of them names. "
Arab world 1935 Jones, D. F. "Coffee Break " in Laughing Space (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. (1982); pg. 96. Pg. 92: "'True, an Arab delegate omitted to scowl at the Israeli member, but this was purely an oversight. "; Pg. 96: "Not that the affected delegates threw themselves into each other's arms. Arab still looked at Jew in a hard-boiled way. East still regarded West as decadent, but the Arab now saw that there was a Jewish case; the East did not extract pleasure from the idea of Western decdence and was prepared to admit that the West had no monopoly on decay. "
Arab world 1943 Ondaatje, Michael. The English Patient. London, UK: Bloomsbury (1996; c. 1992); pg. 28. "The Bedouin brought him into Siwa Oasis. Then he was in Pisa for a while, then . . . One of the Arabs is probably wearing his name tag. " [Other refs. not in DB, e.g. pg. 136, 142, etc.]
Arab world 1944 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Striking the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 52. Pg. 52-53
Arab world 1945 Wilson, Robert Charles. Darwinia. New York: Tor (1998); pg. 235. "The new District system, the elected Governors, the radio networks. Homesteads on the Russian steppes, this side of the volcanic zone that divided Darwinia from Old Asia. Skirmish battles with Arabs and Turks. The bombing of Jerusalem... "
Arab world 1950 Barton, William. "Home is Where the Heart Is " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 235. Pg. 235: "The man beside them, white djellaba-clad, with black beard a-bristle, black eyes already calculating a bargain. Arab, I thought. Zanzibar... " [More..]; Pg. 236: "So. Milling crowds, eyeing the tame merchandise [at the slave auction]. Arabs and Crackers, Bedwine Hindee and nasty little blond Dutchboys with their gaggles of property up for sale. Farm workers and household servants... "
Arab world 1950 Reynolds, Mack. "The Adventure of the Extraterrestrial " in Sherlock Holmes Through Time and Space. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) USA: Bluejay Books (1984); pg. 183. "'...It is not manifest, senor, that a British undercover operative masquerading as an Arab would have immense difficulty detecting a first-rate German undercover agent masquerading as an Arab in the same town? But an Arab would be much better equipped to detect the slight flaws in the German's disguise, eh?' "
Arab world 1960 Turtledove, Harry. "The Last Word " in Drakas! (S. M. Sterling, ed.) New York: Baen (2000); pg. 272. "But the Nazis did what they did to white people, to Europeans, MacDonald thought. The Draka came down on niggers and ragheads [Arabs] and chinks, so it didn't seem to matter so much. One brutalized blond kid is worth a dozen with black skin and kinky hair. "
Arab world 1969 Anderson, Poul. There Will Be Time. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1972); pg. 51. "The Arab costume he had bought at a tourist shop would pass in Biblical times. "
Arab world 1970 Anderson, Poul. The Dancer from Atlantis. Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971); pg. 78. "No conquest by Homeric Greeks--not yet--simply adoption of a desirable foreign invention, like Europe taking numerals from the Arabs or wallpaper from the Chinese or kayaks from the Eskimos... "
Arab world 1975 Shea, Robert & Robert Anton Wilson. Illuminatus, Vol. III: Leviathan. New York: Dell (1975); pg. 11. "According to Daraul's History of Secret Societies, the Illuminati were based on two medieval Arabian secret societies, the Roshinaya and the Assassins. "
Arab world 1984 Adams, Douglas & John Lloyd. The Meaning of Liff. New York: Harmony Books (1984); pg. 37. "Glut Lodge (n.) The place where food can be stored after a tooth is extracted. Some Arabs can go without sustenance for up to six weeks on a full glutt lodge. "
Arab world 1986 Anderson, Jack. Control. New York: Kensington Publishing Corp. (1988); pg. 304. "'I think the time has come for you to demand to know exactly where they get the money. One billion dollars, Thad. It's unrealistic to think these Germans and Japanese, wealthy though they have become in the postwar world, just reached into their pockets and pulled out a billion dollars. It could be Arab oil money. It could be South African gold and diamonds...' "
Arab world 1986 Cox, Greg. The Eugenics Wars: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh: Volume One (Star Trek). New York: Pocket Books (2001); pg. 384. An Arab character, called "the big Arab ", pg. 384, 388, etc.
Arab world 1986 Hubbard, L. Ron. Mission Earth Vol. 2: Black Genesis. Los Angeles, CA: Bridge Publications (1986); pg. 91. Pg. 91, 262, 307-308, may be more .
Arab world 1986 Martin, George R. R. "From the Journal of Xavier Desmond " in Wild Cards IV: Aces Abroad (George R.R. Martin, ed.) New York: Bantam (1988); pg. 125. "Why must we draw these lines, these fine distinctions, these labels and barriers that set us apart?... capitalist and communist, Catholic and Protestant, Arab and Jew, Indian and Ladino... "
Arab world 1987 Shepard, Lucius. Green Eyes. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 17. "Irish, Poles, Italians, Arabs. "
Arab world 1989 Wilson, Robert Charles. Gypsies. New York: Doubleday (1989); pg. 73. "The situation was desperate, or why would he have been sent here, eking out this dubious liaison with the Americans...? Because, Palestrina thought, for all their naive Protestantism and unrepentant superstition, they are more like us [Catholic empire] than the Arabs... "
Arab world 1990 Anderson, Jack. Zero Time. New York: Kensington Publishing (1990); pg. 224. "He had then been assigned to the IV Division, which was responsible for the Arab network. The Iranians, of course, were not Arab but Indo-European. But geography was given precedence over genealogy, and Iran was counted, for the KGB's purpose, as Arab. "
Arab world 1990 Anderson, Poul. The Shield of Time. New York: Tor (1990); pg. 47. "'You, coming from when you do, think of Arab terrorists? No, there were a pair of Arabs, but I have no reason to believe they were anything but the spice dealers they said they were. Irishmen, however-- "
Arab world 1990 Bradbury, Ray. "And the Rock Cried Out " in Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster (1967); pg. 180. "'...And for an hour you could be one of those Eskimos in the cold wind up there, or you could be an Arab gentleman on a horse...' "
Arab world 1994 Morrow, James. Towing Jehovah. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1994); pg. 43. "At that moment, Neil [a Jew] would have preferred almost anyone else's company. An encyclopedia salesman's. An Arab's. Whatever their other foibles, his Arab mates never tried to convert him. "
Arab world 1996 Morrow, James. "The Tower " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 83. "Half the planet is now a graduate seminar, the other half a battleground. Afrikaners versus Blacks, Arabs versus Jews, Frenchmen versus Britishers... "
Arab world 1999 Koman, Victor. Jehovah Contract. New York: Franklin Watts (1984); pg. 212. "The other, a lanky PanArabian, divided his aim between my head and Ann's

'Neither of you wants to shoot us!' I yelled. 'One of you will be dead before I drop!'

...'One more soul for Allah,' the darker boy corrected.

Sandy glanced at the PanArab.

A wisp of smoke from the burning complex drifted between us. It carried a smell of things dead and dying. The PanArabian kid paid it no mind. He'd probably been raised during the Pax Israelia ten years before.

Sandy wrinkled his nose. I took a chance.

'Allah or Yahveh. Which God will get your soul? Which God is supreme?'...

'Allah,' said the dark one. "

Arab world 2000 Gentle, Mary. A Secret History. New York: Avon Books (1999); pg. 147. "You will no doubt be aware that, as well as their civil engineering, the Arabic civilisations practised a kind of fine engineering, making fountains, clocks, automata, and many other devices. It is quite certain that, by the time of al-Jazari, complex gear trains existed, also segmental and epicycle gears, weight drives, escapements and pumps. The Arabs' celestial and biological models were largely water-powered, and invariably--obviously--stationary. " [Other refs., not in DB, e.g., pg. 326.]
Arab world 2000 Mann, William J. "Say Goodbye to Middletown " in Circa 2000: Gay Fiction at the Millennium (Robert Drake & Terry Wolverton, eds). Los Angeles, CA: Alyson Pub. (2000); pg. 267. "dressed like Power Rangers. "
Arab world 2003 Barnes, John. Kaleidoscope Century. New York: Tor (1995); pg. 132. "Weirder still to me was the fact that so many of the tourist psychos were Japanese, South Koreans, well-off Arabs, or Brazilians--people whose nations were not in the war at all. "
Arab world 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 143. "'Is it natural for us to hate so much, too?' Gamal asked, his eyes bright, his face intense. 'The Allies are infidels, and the poor displaced Israelis less than dust. The Syrians are thieves; the Palestinians are stupid; the Kuwaitis lazy. Why do we hate so much, do you think?'

...'I don't know,' Wasef said.

'It is because we are still tribal,' Gamal said, glancing around to make sure no other Arab was in earshot. 'In this modern world, we are still tribal. Islam preaches brotherhood, but there is no brotherhood in us.' "

Arab world 2010 Anthony, Patricia. Cold Allies. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1993); pg. 144. "'My father is uncomfortable when I speak of this,' Gamal told him... 'You see... to my father, Arabs are good, Egyptians better, and family the best of all. If you told him I was a traitor he would believe you. He would send me away, then tell you to keep silent. If you did not keep silent, he would ruin you. Even though he loves you more, he would ruin you. My father believes in family... Doesn't it bother you... Haven't you ever stood back and seen what we are? Arabs live in little boxes of loyalties: family and country and religion... We fight together, don't you see? Iranians and Jordanians. Saudis and Iraqis. This is more than simply Pan-Arabism we have been awaiting. It is a true Muslim brotherhood.'

'If you will not be an astrophysicist, what other career do you choose?'...

'One day I want to be President of the United Arabic States.' "

Arab world 2010 Brunner, John. Stand on Zanzibar. Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1968); pg. 401. "A fat Arab woman [reporter] who had reacted faster than the others put a camera practically under his nose. He snatched it away and threw it in the face of a Japanese... "
Arab world 2010 Swanwick, Michael. "The Edge of the World " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1989); pg. 644. Pg. 641: "Graffiti covered the rocks... JURGEN BIN SCHEISSKOPF. MOTLEY CRUE. DEATH TO SATAN AMERICA IMPERIALIST. "; Pg. 644: "'Look at them,' Piggy's mother said. On the screen were solemn processions of camels and cadillacs, sheikhs in jellaba, keffiyeh and mirrorshades, European dignitaries with wives in tasteful gray Parisian fashions. 'They've got their nerve.' "; Pg. 646: "Piggy found a Pepsi can, logo in flowing Arabic, among the rubble. " [Story involves a war in the Middle East. Many refs. to Arabs, not in DB.]
Arab world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 30. "Arab Jones and High Bundy and Pepe Martinez sipped at their fourth stick of tea... pitched on a rooftop in Harlem, not far from Lenox and 125th Street...

Pepe said, 'We're gonna be way out there ourselves. You planning to eclipse, Arab?'

Arab said, 'The astronomical kick is the most.' " [The character's name or nickname is 'Arab.' He appears frequently in this book. Other refs. not in DB.]

Arab world 2015 Leiber, Fritz. The Wanderer. New York: Walker & Co. (1964); pg. 304. "Don and Paul were not alone in the vast chamber... There were people of all races... a glowingly brown Maori, a white-hooded Arab... "
Arab world 2015 Sterling, Bruce. "We See Things Differently " (published 1989) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 762. [Year is estimated.] "'You Iranian?' the cabbie asked.

'Arab.'

'We respect Iranians around here, we really do,' the cabbie insisted.

'So do we,' I said. 'We fought them on the Iraqi front for years.'

'Yeah?' said the cabbie uncertainly. 'Seems to me I heard about that. How'd that end up?'

'The Shi'ite holy cities were ceded to Iran. The Ba'athist regime is dead, and Iraq is now part of the Arab Caliphate.' "

Arab world 2018 Bova, Ben. Voyager II: The Alien Within. New York: Tor (1986); pg. 224. "'...Our agents are already burrowing into the governments there. Soon enough we may be able to proclaim a Pan-Arabic union that stretches from Pakistan to Morocco, from the Hindu Kush to Gibraltar, all loyal to the World Federation Movement.' "
Arab world 2022 Sterling, Bruce. Islands in the Net. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow (1988); pg. 342. "'...The Arab Revolt stopped the Turkish cultural advance, literally in its tracks. They did this with guerrilla assaults on the railroads and telegraphs, the Turkish industrial control system. For success, however, the Arabs were forced to use industrial artifacts--namely, guncotten, dynamite, and canned food... The Arabs made the mistake of trusting the British, who were simply the Turks by another name. The First World War was a proto-Net civil war, and the Arabs were thrust aside...' "
Arab world 2025 Chang, Glenn. "In the Blood " in The Edge of Space. New York: Elsevier/Nelson Books (1979); pg. 86. "With the United States practicing a strict hands-off policy, the newly rich Asian and Arab countries picked up the foreign-aid baton, but quickly found it a much harder task to save the world than to regard it as a customer. "
Arab world 2025 Westerfeld, Scott. Fine Prey. New York: Penguin (1998); pg. 250. Pg. 250: Arab [Many refs. in novel to Muslims, Saudi Arabia, etc., but no other refs. to 'Arab' by name.]
Arab world 2029 Clarke, Arthur C. The Hammer of God. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 84. "Delighted at this opportunity of obtaining new converts, Saudi authorities had set up information centers at the main Desert Storm military bases to provide Islamic teaching and explanations of the Koran. By the time the Gulf War was over, some thousands of Americans had acquired a new religion. Most of them--apparently ignorant of the atrocities perpetrated upon their ancestors by the Arab slave-traders--were African-Americans, but substantial numbers were white. "
Arab world 2030 Gibson, William. Neuromancer. New York: Ace Books (1984); pg. 92. Pg. 92: "'...There's Arabs still trying to code 'em up from the DNA, but they always croak.' "; Pg. 102: "The one nearest the window bore an Arabic slogan in red spraybomb. "
Arab world 2030 Jablokov, Alexander. Nimbus. New York: Avon Books (1993); pg. 165. "'...Like what the Topeka people played in the early Nineties, from all those Arab immigrants in Kansas. You remember, Shara Shirkut, Aziz Mufuela, Bamboose the Turk, those guys.'...

Sheldon shook his head, smiling. 'Not a bit of it, Peter. This here's Falafel. French-Jewish-Arabic stuff from the Lebanon hill country. Jewish settlers brought it up, Christians in the city picked it up, Moslems jazzed it up and brought it to the States...' " [Some other refs. not in DB, especially to Arabic, as a music source.]

Arab world 2050 Scarborough, Elizabeth Ann. Last Refuge. New York: Bantam (1992); pg. 166. "'...and when Uzbekistan joined in on behalf of brother Arabs, that involved the other Soviet states...' "
Arab world 2057 Robinson, Kim Stanley. Red Mars. New York: Bantam (1993); pg. 367. "Al-Qahira is the name for Mars in Arabic, and Malaysian, and Indonesian. The latter two languages got it from the former; look at the globe, then, and see how far the Arabs' religion spread. The whole middle of the world, from West Africa to the West Pacific. And most of that in a single century. Yes, it was an empire in its time; and like all empires, after death it had a long half-life.

The Arabs who live out of Arabia are called Mahfaris... "

Arab world 2110 May, Julian. The Many Colored Land in The Many-Colored Land & The Golden Torc (omnibus). Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (copyright 1981); pg. 58. "An ethnic assay of the travelers showed significant numbers of Anglo-Saons, Celts, Germans, Slavs, Latins, Native Americans, Arabs, Turks and other Central Asiatics, and Japanese. "
Arab world 2120 Niven, Larry. The Patchwork Girl. New York: Ace (1980); pg. 74. "'...Don't get the idea that Earth is all one culture. The Arabs are back to harems, for God's sake...'

'Harems? What about birthrights?'

'The harems are recreation, as far as the sheik is concerned, and of course he uses up his own birthrights. When they're gone the ladies take sperm from some healthy genius with an unlimited birthright and the right skin color, and the sheik raises the children as the next generation of aristocrats.'

Harry ate while he thought. Then, 'It sounds wonderful...' "

Arab world 2127 Card, Orson Scott. Shadow of the Hegemon. New York: Tor (2001); pg. 348. "Indeed, the only force that stood firm against China and Russia while facing them across heavily defended borders were the Muslim nations. Iran generously forgot how threateningly Pakistani troops had loomed along their borders in the month before India's fall, and Arabs joined with Turks in Muslim solidarity against any Russian encroachment across the Caucasus or into the vast steppes of central Asia. "
Arab world 2165 Carver, Jeffrey A. The Rapture Effect. New York: Tor (1987); pg. 331. "Orbital forced remain in disarray. Arab and Afro forces predominate, with ours, in high Earth orbit... "
Arab world 2166 Farmer, Philip Jose. "Riders of the Purple Wage " in The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two. (Isaac Asimov, ed.) Garden City, NY: Nelson Doubleday (1971; story copyright 1967); pg. 625. "'If I don't, it's Egypt for us,' he says.

'Those stinking Arabs!' says William Conqueror.

'It's the Bureau that's doing it, not the Arabs,' Chib says. 'The Arabs moved for the same reason we may have to move.' " [Also pg. 660.]

Arab world 2176 Dietz, William C. Steelheart. New York: Ace Books (1998); pg. 159. "'Though misinformed regarding the nature and identity of God, your ancestors had some wonderful ideas, not the least of which were the Crusades.'

Though of lower rank than Jantz, Maras had the better education and knew something about history. The Crusades had originally been armed pilgrimages. In fact, the word 'crusade,' had its origins in the Latin word 'crux,' or 'cross.' when the Arab Muslims conquered Palestine, which included numerous locations sacred to Christians, the Christians responded with a series of eight military expeditions between the years A.D. 1096 and 1270. These Crusades included kings, nobles, and thousands of peasants. They had two goals--to gain permanent control of the holy lands, and to protect the Byzantine Empire with which they were aligned.

The Christians did gain control of the holy lands for a time, but they were ultimate unable to hold onto the territory and were eventually forced out. " [More, pg. 159-160.]

Arab world 2200 Zelazny, Roger. This Immortal. New York: Ace Books (1966); pg. 39. Pg. 39: "'Let go my throat or I'll throw this Arab at you,' I said...

'He's a heavy one, too,' I added. "; Pg. 63: "...in the corner of my colder eye saw a great Arab with something like a black avacado in his hand. He was swinging it toward my head, so I dropped down... "; Pg. 149: "'Who do you think has more guts?' he asked. 'You or the Arab?' " [All refs. incl. word 'Arab' thought to be in DB. Other refs. to Arabs, not by name, in book, not in DB.]

Arab world 2250 Lupoff, Richard A. "With the Bentfin Boomer Boys on Little Old New Alabama " in Again, Dangerous Visions (Harlan Ellison, ed.) Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1972); pg. 619. Pg. 619: "...all the way from O'Earthtime days before the furgem Jewrabs conquered the world... the same thing that happened on O'Earth before the furgem Jewrabs pushed everybody else out and let the colony worlds to shift for themselves. "; Pg. 643: "On O'Earth furgem Jewrabs rule the world. Descendants of the citizens of that long-ago Federated Republic of Israel and Jordan ['Dinner in the diner, nothing could be finer, than to have your lox m eggs in Palestine,' er, it was a big tourist attraction, that] that grew into a Pan-Semitic Empire, that Neo-Shem that spread and conquered and took. Growing population, lebensraum the Jewrabs echoed some forgotten hack politico of earlier times. " [More, pg. 643-644.]
Arapaho Colorado 1869 Bethke, Bruce. Wild Wild West. New York: Warner Books (1999); pg. 151. "Gordon stroked his chin. 'Not Arapaho or Cheyenne territory, that's for sure. They'd have killed us already.' Gordon's eyes widened in alarm. 'The Colorado militia tried to wipe out the Arapaho about five years back,' West explained. 'Chief Black Kettle ain't the forgiving type.' "
Arapaho Colorado 1996 McDevitt, Jack. Ancient Shores. New York: HarperCollins (1996); pg. 18. "...his twin-engine Arapaho... " [an airplane]
Arapaho Colorado 2049 Knight, Damon. A For Anything. New York: Tor (1990; 1959); pg. 152. Pg. 152: "The Indian grunted and sat down. 'This is Johnny Partridge,' said Lindley. 'He's a Klamath; his people were chased out of Oregon by the Arapaho about fifty years ago. Not many of them left; Johnny does odd jobs for us now and then, don't you Johnny?'

'Do good job,' said the Indian, taking a steaming mug of coffee from one of the soldiers. He sipped it noisily and handed it back. 'More sugar.' ";

Pg. 154: "'They're something new in the district--weren't here when I came through two years ago. According to Johnny, they're a mixed crowd, half-breed Arapaho and Sarsi, escaped prisoners and that kind of thing, all interbred with degenerate whites. A cut above our friends of yesterday, though; they've got up to the monkey level.' "

Arapaho Idaho 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 53. "'First the Arapaho goddamn National Forest, now the Payette goddamn National Forest--or is it the Nez Perce goddamn National Forest yet?' he asked... "
Arapaho Kansas 1942 Turtledove, Harry. Worldwar: Upsetting the Balance. New York: Del Rey (1996); pg. 367. "'Sir, will you want to strike US 40 east or west of Arapahoe?' Magruder asked.

If he reached the highway on the Kansas side of Arapahoe, though, he was closer to what had been the Lizards' main forward bases.

'We'll go in to the east of Arapahoe,' he decided after a few seconds. 'The farther east we can damage them, the more we can draw their attention away from moving west...' "

Arapaho South Dakota 1989 Simmons, Dan. Phases of Gravity. New York: Bantam (1989); pg. 270. "'You say the mountain is also sacred to the Sioux?'

The old man shrugged. 'The Arapahoes received a medicine here they could burn to make sweet smoke for their rituals. The Apache received the gift of a magic horse medicine; the Kiowas the sacred kidney of a bear. The Sioux say they received a pipe from the mountain...' "

Arapaho USA 1872 Anderson, Poul. The Boat of a Million Years. New York: Tor (1989); pg. 241. "Tarrant nodded, remembering-- The grand alliance of Comanche, Kiowa, Cheyenne, and Arapaho, Quanah its paramound chief. The bloody repulse at Adobe Walls, the year of warfare and manhunt that followed, and the last starvelings, led by Quanah, going onto the reservation in 1875. "
Arapaho USA 1992 Simmons, Dan. "Sleeping with Teeth Women " in Lovedeath. New York: Warner Books (1993); pg. 122. "...and allies and frequently deadly enemies, and the Blue Clouds, whom you call Arapahoes. " [Also pg. 142.]
Arapaho USA 1996 Morrow, James. "The Covenant " in Bible Stories for Adults. New York: Harcourt Brace & Co. (1996); pg. 129. "'...Believe me, brother, I have no trouble picturing a future in which your country's indigenous peoples--its Navajos, Sioux, Comanches, and Arapahos--are driven off their lands...' "
Arawak Caribbean 1492 C.E. Russell, Mary Doria. The Sparrow. New York: Ballantine (1996); pg. 328. "'I speak only from analogy, gentlemen. There were no Taino or Arawak or Carib historians, but there was certainly conflict in the Caribbean. Both before and after the arrival of Columbus.' "
Arawak Latin America 2010 Card, Orson Scott. "America " (published 1987) in The Norton Book of Science Fiction (Ursula K. Le Guin & Brian Atterbery, editors). New York: W. W. Norton & Co. (1993); pg. 681. "'...Tell it to the Indians. You can cross all these borders in a thousand different places, and you speak Portuguese and Spanish and Arawak and Carib...' "
Arawak world 1998 Disch, Thomas M. The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World. New York: Simon & Schuster (2000; c. 1998); pg. 193. "...and what Rawson calls its 'division of natives into good and bad savages, whose prototype is Columbus's view of Arawaks and Caribs.' "
Arianism Europe 1150 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Barrow " in Modern Classics of Science Fiction. (Gardner Dozois, ed.) New York: St. Martin's Press (1991; story c. 1976); pg. 439. "'Arianism!' he had muttered, sucking in his breath and crossing himself. He told old Father Egius that every soul in Vermare was damned: they had received heretical baptism. 'Arianism, Arianism!' he shouted. " [Many other refs. to Arianism throughout story, not in DB. This story has already been indexed from its appearance in Orsinian Tales. See DB for those refs.; no further indexing from here.]
Arianism Europe 1150 C.E. Le Guin, Ursula K. "The Barrow " in Orsinian Tales. New York: Harper & Row (1976); pg. 6. "...but they had sprinkled holy water on the ram and it made no more trouble, indeed was a fine breeder, and the girl, who had been pregnant out of wedlock, had married a good peasant from Bara and borne him five little Christians, one a year. 'Heresy, adultery, ignorance!' the foreign priest had railed [about Arianism]. Now he prayed for twenty minutes before he ate his mutton, slaughtered, cooked, and served by the hands of heretics. What did he want? thought Freyga. Did he expect comfort, in winter? Did he think they were heathen, with his 'Arianism'? No doubt he had never seen a heathen, the little, dark, terrible people of Malafrena and the farther hills. No doubt he had never had a pagan arrow shot at him. That would teach him the difference between heathens and Christian men, thought Freyga. "


Arianism, continued

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