Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Europe, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
non-Christian Europe 175,107,008 24.09% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Europe 172,678,000 23.73% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Nonreligious Europe 94,330,000 12.98% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "; Nonreligious. Persons professing no religion, nonbelievers, agnostics, freethinkers, dereligionized secularists indifferent to all religions. "
Nonreligious Europe 90,389,504 12.42% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "; Nonreligious. Persons professing no religion, nonbelievers, agnostics, freethinkers, dereligionized secularists indifferent to all religions. "
Nonreligious Europe 52,411,000 10.50% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Humanism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; "Secular Humanists are sometimes hard to classify, and perhaps even more difficult to obtain demographic data about. The following distribution lists two groups: Nonreligious and Atheists. Nonreligious are defined as persons professing no religion, nonbelievers, agnostics, freethinkers, and dereligionized secularists indifferent to all religion. "; [Asia, Eurasia, & Europe all distinct from each other in this table]
Nonreligious Europe 108,000,000 14.81% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "Nonreligious: Persons professing no religion, nonbelievers, agnostics, freethinkers, dereligionized secularists indifferent to all religion. "
Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids Europe - - - - 1964 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 722. "The line of Chosen Chiefs includes, besides [John] Toland, Dr. Stukeley and Lewis Spence, the antiquarians, and William Blake, the visionary poet and artist. The main English Order was reformed in 1964 as the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids, conforming to these grades in Brittany, France and Wales. At the same time the public observances were increased to eight -- the four solstices and equinoxes, and the four Celtic festivals of Imbolc..., Beltane..., Lugnasad..., and Samhain... "
Order of New Templars Europe - - - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1982. "Viennese occultist, racial theorist and founder of the Order of New Templars, ...Jorg Lanz von Liebenfels... was born at Vienna on 19 July 1874 as Adolf Lanz... In 1893, at the age of 19, he became a novice at a Cistercian monastery at Heiligenkreuz (on the present Austro-Hungarian border) but was expelled six years later... Shortly afterwards he founded his Order of New Templars, which had a strongly 'racial-religious' emphasis. In 1934, a year after Hitler came to power, he wrote that the Order was 'the first manifestation of the Movement (i.e. HItler's) which now, in accordance with the law of God, is most powerful in history and unrestrainedly sweeping over the world.' Lanz was not the only founder of a Central European sect to claim that he had anticipated Hitler's racial and other theories. "
Order of New Templars Europe - - 6
units
- 1920 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1983. "The Order of New Templars... acquired its first Temple in 1907 when Lanz purchased and equipped Burg Werfenstein, a romantic ruin high above the River Danube... Other Temples were consecrated later at Marienkamp, close to the Plattensee, at Staufen near Ulm, and at Rugen on the Baltic coast. The Order also had sells at Salzburg and in Hungary... [Total of 6 locations, at least.] The New Templars never represented a mass movement and its existence probably remained unknown to all except an enthusiastic minority. With the exception of the dramatist August Strindberg, with whom Lanz was on friendly terms, no widely-known personalities were members. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Europe 158,775,008 21.77% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
other Europe 443,000 0.06% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "; "Other religionists. Incl. 70 minor world religions and a large number of spiritist religions, New Age religions, quasi-religions, pseudoreligions, parareligions, mystic systems,etc. "
other Europe 450,000 0.06% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "; "Other religionists. Incl. 70 minor world religions and a large number of spiritist religions, New Age religions, quasi-religions, pseudoreligions, parareligions, mystic systems,etc. "
other Europe 233,000 0.03% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "Other religionists. Including minor world religions and a large number of spiritist religions [although 'Spiritists' listed separately], New Age religions, quasi-religions, pseudo religions, parareligions, religious or mystic systems, and religious and semireligious brotherhoods of numerous varieties. "
Parsis Europe 1,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Parsis Europe 1,000 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Paterin Europe - - - - 1050 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994), pg. 32-33. "The word normally used [for the Bosnian Church] in Ragusan sources and in some Italian documents too--but never in Bosnia itself--was 'Patareni' or 'Patarini' (in English, 'Patarins). This term also has a rather puzzling history. First used in 11th century Milan to describe a fiercely puritanical reformist movement in the Catholic Church, it had become transferred by the end of that century to other campaigners, including heretical ones, against the established Church. In the late 12th century it was being sued as a virtual synonym for heresies which aimed at a superior kind of purity..., such as the Waldensians and Cathars, and in the 13th century 'Patarin' was the usual word for the Cathars of northern Italy... It first appears in connection with Bosnia in a letter from the Archbishop of Split to the Pope in 1200... "
Pentecostal Europe - - - - 1920 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 564. "Pentecostal churches... Pentecostalism spread rapidly around the world after 1906, due to a vigorous missionary program, and by 1920 it was established in Europe under the leadership of Norwegian Methodist T. B. Barratt... "
Pietism Europe - - - - 1727 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pietism... In its stricter definition Pietism centers around the renewal activities of Philipp Jakob Spener... and August Hermann Francke (1663-1727), both Lutherans. In its broader sense, Pietism incorporates, first, prior reform currents within the Geramn Reformed; second, links to English Puritanism, Dutch Precisianism, and French Quietism; and third, later contacts with Wesleyanism. "
PL Kyodan Europe - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "PL Church Directory in Europe and Oceania " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted churches listed on directory. 2 in Europe: Paris, France & Lisbon, Portugal.
Primal New Religious Movements Europe - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 311. Graphic: "Number of Primal New Religious Movements (PRINERMS) By Area (All numbers are approximate) "; Number of PRINERMS in Europe ( "tribal peoples only "): 5.
primal-indigenous Europe 1,200,000 0.17% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "; Called "Ethnic religionists " in this table.
primal-indigenous Europe 1,150,000 0.16% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "; Called "Ethnic religionists " in this table.
primal-indigenous Europe 1,262,000 0.17% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; [Listed in table as 'Ethnic religionists]
Protestant Europe - - - - 1550 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 171. "...other pioneers, the reformers of the sixteenth century came into confliect with Rome and formed separate Protestant churches across northwest Europe. Under Henry VIII the Church of England refused to obey the pope and became independent. Scotland, the Netherlands, much of Switzerland, all of Scandinavia, many territories in Germany, and large factions in France followed the Protestant lead. "
Protestant Europe 100,507,504 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Protestant Europe 110,557,504 14.66% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981) [2nd edition is updated since 1977 1st edition], pg. 405. [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982] Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Protestant Europe 80,000,000 11.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Protestant Europe 79,534,000 10.93% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Protestant Europe 73,939,000 14.80% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Protestantism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Protestant Europe 85,924,000 11.78% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Protestant - affiliated Europe - 18.30% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993, p. 21. Table. Eurasia & Europe listed separately.
Quaker Europe 22,751 - - - 1940 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 722. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Their subdivisions were in 1940: Great Britain and Ireland, 22,124... Europe, 627... "
Quietism Europe - - - - 1650 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2318. "Quietism in its specialized sense denotes a heretical Christian movement which came into full flower in the 17th century in Spain, Italy and especially France, although its roots stretched far back into the past. "
Raelian Europe 10,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Palmer obtained some of her numbers from the British National Guide, Dr. Marcus Wenner, who, in 1995, believed there were 10,000 members in Europe, and that the movement existed in 67 countries. (Palmer, 1995A:195) "
Roma Europe - - - - 1400 C.E. Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994), pg. 97. [Orig. source: Gropper, Gypsies in the City, pp. 1-16.] "...although their early migration patterns are anything but clear, Gypsies were reported in southeastern Europe (Greece, Hungary, Romania, Serbia) by the 1300s, and in western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Holland, Switzerland, Spain) by the 1400s. "
Roma - Gitanos Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe:... the Gitanos, centred in the Iberian peninsula, North Afria and the south of France... "
Roma - Kalderasha Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe: the Kalderash, mainly coppersmiths and tinsmiths based in eastern and central Europe... "
Roma - Sinti Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe:... the Manush or Sinti in France, Germany and northern Italy... "
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Europe - - 83
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes. "Europe outside of Russia. "
Sami Europe - - - - 1690 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1605. "Today we would probably not use the word witchcraft to describe the Lapp [Sami] religion; but it accurately reflects the attitude of the period, when pagan cults and sorcery were held to be synonymous. The Lapps were extensively converted towards the end of the 17th century, and the change from pagan to Christian belief is reflected in certain of their legends... "
Sami Europe - - - - 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1605. "Lapland "; Illustration caption: "Stallo, the stupid giant of Lapp legend, may reflect the Lapps' opinion of their dominating neighbours. Among this small, hardy race, spread across the far north of Europe from Russia to the Atlantic coast, pagan practices survived alongside Christianity until well into the 19th century. "
Scanians Europe 1,500,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Scania - the common name for the provinces of Skane, Halland and Blekinge has 1.5 million inhabitants. Historically the Island of Bornholm was also included in the Scanian territory. The member organisation is very EU positive and has fully adopted the EU subsidiarity principle, which means that every political decision shall be taken at the lowest possible level. "
Separatists Europe - - - 2
countries
1587 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 407. "Separatism had waned after Browne's return to the Church of England, but soon reappeared. In 1587 Henrey Barrow (1550?-1593),a lawyer of London, and John Greenwood (?-1593), a clergyman, were arrested for holding Separatist meetings in London. From their prison they smuggled manuscrpits which appeared as printed treatises in Holland, attacking Anglicans and Puritans alike, and advocating strict Separatist principles more radical than those of Browne. A number were won, including Francis Johnson... "
Shinto Europe - 0.00% - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Shinto Europe 1,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Shinto Europe 1,000 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Shinto Europe 500 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Shintoism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Shinto Europe 0 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Sikhism Europe 490,000 0.07% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Sikhism Europe 494,000 0.07% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Sikhism Europe 231,000 0.05% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Sikhism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Sikhism Europe 236,000 0.03% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Socinianism Europe - - - - 1658 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 697. "Socinianism (Christian). A sixteenth century form of the Radical Reformation, stemming from the Sienese rationalists Laelius and Faustus Socinus (Sizzini). Laelius (1525-62) forged a Unitarian creed which was developed by his nephew, Faustus (1539-1604), who, after studying and publishing in Basle settled in Poland. There he exerted a decisive influence on the already anti-Trinitarian Minor Reformed Church, which for a time bid for religious dominance in Poland. Through an academy, a press, and a communitarian settlement, Socianism spread. Public awareness of Socinian heresy brought reprisals--mob violence in Faustus' final years, suppression of academy and press and flight of ministers in 1638, and the death penalty for Socinians in 1658. "
Socinianism Europe - - - - 1700 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 697. "Socinianism (Christian)... Exile communities [outside Poland] were established in Translyvania, Germany, the Netherlands, and England. In England, Socinianism developed a significant local rootage and in the eighteenth century a Unitarian denomination developed. "
Socinianism Europe - - - - 1700 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SOCINIANISM: a RATIONALISTIC THEOLOGY which regards the BIBLE as REVELATION but argues that it contains nothing contrary to REASON and denies BELIEF in the SACRAMENTS of the CHURCH, the TRINITY, deity of CHRIST, ORIGINAL SIN, VICARIOUS ATONEMENT and RESURRECTION of the body. "
Solar Temple Europe - - - - 1999 *LINK* Rifkin, Ira. "Agency May Be Formed to Track Activities of 'Dangerous Sects' in Europe " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 26, 1999 (viewed online 26 June 1999). "In addition, the report noted the need to head off further 'serious disturbances of law and order' and 'carnage' associated in recent years with groups such as Japan's Aum Shinri Kyo cult and the Order of the Solar Temple in France and Switzerland. "
Spiritism Europe 17,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Spiritism Europe 18,000 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Spiritism Europe 129,000 0.02% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Taoism Europe - 0.00% - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Templars Europe - - - - 1312 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1576. "In several European countries the Order was not rigorously persecuted and there were no general confessions; Clement had to issue another Bull to force Edward II of England to use torture on English Templars. In France the Inquisition attempted to force the truth from the Templars for nearly three years. Many died from their ordeals. In 1310 a number of knights came forward to defend the Order, and Philip, unwilling to risk doubt being thrown on the proceedings, had 54 Templars burned to death. All refused to confess. In 1312, the unhappy Clement... had to admit that there was not enough evidence to prove definite heresy. But the Templars' reputation was irretrievably damaged, and he dissolved the Order, stipulating that its funds be transferred to the Hospitallers, a rival crusading order. Templars who had not perished by fire or in jail were allowed to join another order or to revert to the secular state... In Spain, Portugal and Germany... the Order had suffered least... "
Traditional Christian Catholic Church Europe - - 5
units
- 1972 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 93. "Membership: In 1972 the Church reported one parish in Canada, three missions in the U.S., three missions in Western Europe, two missions in Eastern Europe and one mission in Hong Kong. "
Unitarian/Unitarian Universalist Europe 90,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* web site (1998): Unitarian Universalist Church of Nashua NH (Copyright 1994) "How many UUs are there? There are 200,000 in the United States and Canada, 80,000 in Rumania and Hungary, 10,000 in Great Britain and Europe, and small groups in India, the Philippines and Nigeria. "
Vipassana Meditation Centers Europe - - 4
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation " home page (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) "There are numerous Centers in India and Southern Asia; 5 Centers in North America; 4 Centers in Europe; 5 Centers in Australia/New Zealand; and 1 Center in Japan. Each Center maintains its own schedule of regular ten day Vipassana courses. "
Vipassana Meditation Centers Europe - - 4
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in Europe " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom
Waldensians Europe - - - - 1217 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 802. "Waldenses... Once rejected by the church, Waldo and his followers organized themselves... They followed a morally rigorous mode of life and spread rapidly by preaching, carrying their message throughout southern France, northern Italy, Spain, and central Europe, including Bohemia, where Waldo died in 1217. "
Zen Europe - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 825. "In Europe scholarship in Buddhist texts has generally overshadowed interest in Zen practice, though Rudolph Otto and Eugen Herrigel in Germany and more recently the work of Christmas Humphreys in England has done much to popularize Zen meditative practice. "
Zoroastrianism Europe 10,000 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Zoroastrianism Europe 12,000 0.00% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981) [2nd edition is updated since 1977 1st edition], pg. 405. [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982] Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Zoroastrianism Europe 0 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Judaism Europe & Russia 2,496,000 - - - 1800 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997). Pg. 41. 1800 Chart and accompanying text: "In 1800 there were approximately 3 million Jews worldwide, distributed as shown below... These numbers represent individuals who have identified themselves as being religious Jews. "; 83.2% of 3 million.
Baptist Europe - Continental 680,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* Statistics from Baptists Around the Worldby Albert W. Wardin
Quaker Europe - Continental 627 - - - 1940 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 722. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Their subdivisions were in 1940: Great Britain and Ireland, 22,124... Europe, 627... "
Islam Europe - Eastern 1,200,000 - - - 1997 Burke, Patrick. Eastern Europe. Austin, Texas: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers (1997), pg. 24. "East Europeans... Most of the region's 1.2 million Muslims live in Bulgaria. " [Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Romania]
Judaism Europe - Eastern 1,250,000 - - - 1800 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993), pg. xxviii. "...it was in eastern Europe that the concentration was most marked--more than one and a quarter million men, women, and children by the dawn of the nineteenth century! "


Europe - Eastern, continued

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