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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Europe, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Buddhism Europe 1,517,000 0.21% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Buddhism Europe 750,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "SIM NOW " (Protestant site); web page: "Buddhism - The Middle Way " (viewed 5 March 1999); From World Religions Special Report (1998) by SIMNOW (published quarterly by SIM, 14830 Choate Circle, Charlotte, NC 28273 USA) "In addition, another 1.3 million Buddhists live in North America, and an estimated 750,000 are in Europe. While most of these outside of Asia are Asian immigrants, some are disillusioned Westerners, seeking enlightenment and escape from dead-end materialism. "
Calvinist Europe - - - - 1564 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 346-347. "Reformed, Presbyterians, Calvinists. Known in continental Europe as Reformed churches and under John Knox in Scotland as Presbyterianism, the movement was sparked by John Calvin (1509-64) in France. In a restricted sense, Calvinism was based on Calvin's extreme form of predestination... which held that individuals were destined by God, even before the Creation, to be saved or damned according to His plan... In France, they set up what amounted to a theocracy, and Calvin used excommunication and execution to silence his opponents. "
Cathars Europe - - - - 1100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 473. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "...small groups arose in the 11th and 12th centuries, resolved to carry out, among themselves, the changes that had proved impracticable in the Church as a whole. Southern France and northern Italy swarmed with sects. The Cathars had views similar to those of the ancient Gnostics... the Church launched the Inquisition... The Cathars were wiped out... "
Cathars Europe - - - - 1167 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 227. "The Manichaeism of the later Roman Empire... seems never absolutely to have died out in the West. It was stimulated by the accession of Paulicians & Bogomiles whom the persecuting policy of the Eastern Emperors drove from Bulgaria, and by the new intercourse with the East fostered by the Crusades. The result was a new Manichaeism. Its adherents were called Cathari, as the 'Pure,' or Albigenses, from Albi, one of their chief seats in southern France. With the ascetic and enthusiastic impulse which caused and accompanied the Crusades, the Cathari rose to great activity. Though to be found in many parts of Europe, their chief regions were southern France, northern Italy, & northern Spain... they multiplied with great rapidity. In 1167 they were able to hold a widely attended council in St. Felix de Caraman, near Toulouse... "
Cathars Europe - - - - 1200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 3). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 422. "The Cathars, also known as Albigenses (from the twon of Albi, north-east of Toulouse), were a powerful religious sect which flourished in the 12th and 13th centuries, chiefly in southern France and northern Italy... For more than 50 years the Roman Church tolerated Catharism, which first appeared in western Europe about the year 1140. During these years, Catharism spread so rapidly that divisions and differences developed inside the movement itself. But by the turn of the century the Church felt compelled to act... and in 1208 Pope Innocent III declared a Crusade against the Cathars, which led to a merciless war lasting 20 years... The massacre of some 200 Cathars at Montsegur in the Pyrenees in 1244 was a disaster from which the movement never recovered. "
Cathars Europe 0 0.00% - - 1250 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 20. "Albigenses: A medieval sect named after the southern French town of Albi; they were also called 'Cathari.' They rejected orthodox Christianity and held the dualist position that all matter is evil. A Crusade began under Innocent III virtually eliminated them by 1250. "
Catholic Europe 211,734,000 - - - 1936 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 669. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Statistics:... Europe has 211,734,000; Asia 19,450,000... [H. A. Krose in 'Lexikon fur Theologie and Kirche', VIII, 791 (1936)] "
Catholic Europe 177,087,296 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Catholic Europe 177,187,296 23.50% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981) [2nd edition is updated since 1977 1st edition], pg. 405. [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982] Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Catholic Europe - 39.00% - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 88. "In Europe as a whole, 39% of the people are claimed as Catholics, while in the United States of America they number just under a quarter. "
Catholic Europe 288,952,992 40.60% 137,484
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 368. Table: Catholic World Statistics. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995.
Catholic Europe 270,676,992 37.23% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Catholic Europe 269,020,992 36.97% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Catholic Europe 262,638,000 52.50% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Roman Catholicism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Catholic Europe 286,124,000 39.23% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Catholic - Byzantine Rites Europe - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 775. "Byzantine-rite Uniats are also found in Polish Galicia, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. "
Catholic - Capuchin Europe - - - - 1608 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 157. "Capuchins. The Friars Minor Capuchin..., Franciscans named for their special capuche or hood, arose in the sixteenth century from reforms by Matteo de Bascio and others. In 1608 Pope Paul V separated them from the other two Franciscan branches. Zeal and rapid growth made them leaders in the Catholic Reformation and missions. "
Catholic - Carmelite Europe - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 157. "Carmelites. Roman Catholic religious orders originating from hermits on Mt. Carmel, Palestine, organized in Europe (thirteenth century) as Mendicant Friars, joined (fifteenth century) by cloistered nuns as the Carmelite Second Order. Reforms in sixteenth century Spain separted Discalced (Barefood) Carmelite friars, nuns (OCD) from the Ancient Observance (OC). Carmlites stress contemplative mysticism. Several active sisterhoods are Third Order Carmelites. "
Catholic - Celestines Europe - - - - 1250 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 161. "Celestines. Name given to (1) a branch of Benedictines founded (thirteenth century) by Peter of Morrone, later Pope Celestine V, and noted for severity of life, and (2) a group of radical Franciscan Spirituals who received special protection from Celestine V but who were distinct from Benedictine Celestines. Neither group exists today. "
Catholic - Cistercian Europe - - 530
units
- 1200 C.E. Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 105. "Attracting large numbers of postulants, by the year 1200 more than 530 Cistercian houses had been established across Europe. "
Catholic - Cluny Order Europe - - - - 910 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CLUNIAC ORDER: an offshoot of the BENEDICTINE ORDER originating with the monastery at Cluny in Burgundy, France (founded 910) which profoundly affected the Western CHURCH in the tenth and twelfth centuries. "
Catholic - Cluny Order Europe - - - - 942 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 199. "Cluny was governed by a series of abbots of remarkable character and ability. Under the first and second of these, Berno (910-927) and Odo (927-942), it had many imitators, through their energetic work. Even the mother Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino, in Italy, was reformed on Cluny lines, and, favored by Alberic, a monastery, St. Mary on the Aventine hill, was founded which represented Cluny ideas in Rome. By the death of Odo the Cluny movement was wide-spread in France and Italy. "
Celts Europe - - - - -400 B.C.E. King, John. The Celtic Druids' Year: Seasonal Cycles of the Ancient Celts. London, UK: Blandford (1994), pg. 36. "On the mainland of Europe, the Celts began expanding southwards and westwards during the La Tene period. The first Celtic invasions of Italy took place before 400 BC, when Celtic tribes drove the Etruscans out of Po valley. Interestingly, it is from the Etruscans that the later Romans borrows many religious beliefs and practices, including the priestly sanctification of the foundations and outer bounds of a city. It is quite likely that the early Celts found the rigid fatalism of the Etruscans as antipathetic as they later found the rigid autoritarianism of the Romans. "
Celts Europe - - - - 400 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 437. "The early Celts were composed of a number of different racial elements, and at the height of ehir power they ccupied huge tracts of Europe, from the Atlantic in the west to the Black Sea in the east, from Denmark in the north to the Mediterranean in the south. But in spite of the decentralized nature of Celtic society and the many geographicl and tribal differences that must be taken into consideration, ther is an impressive uniformity of religious idiom throughout the known Celtic world which allows us to think in terms of Celtic religion even though there is little evidence of a formal religious system. "
Chinese traditional religion Europe 116,000 0.02% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Europe 120,000 0.02% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Chinese folk religionists: Followers of traditional Chinese religions (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Europe 60,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Geography of Religions " (Geography Department of Morehead State University); web page: "Geography of Taoism " (viewed 1 July 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.] Table: "Geography of Taoism ". "The figures of distribution listed below are for all traditional Chinese religionists, including local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoists, divination, as well as some Buddhist elements. "
Chinese traditional religion Europe 250,000 0.03% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 " [Listed in table as 'Chinese folk religionists': Followers of traditional Chinese religion (local deities, ancestor veneration, Confucian ethics, Taoism, universism, divination, some Buddhist elements).]
Chishti Sufism Europe - - - - 1910 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 448. "The Chisti was the first Sufi order to come to America, brought from India to Europe by Hazrat Inayat Khan in 1910 and then to the U.S. "
Christianity Europe 67,800,000 98.20% - - 1500 C.E. Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profession, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Europe 368,000,000 - - - 1900 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page (1996 list): "Megatrend 1: Southward shift of Christianity " by Justin D. Long. (viewed 12 March 1999) "Another aspect is the decline in Christianity in certain regions. Europe's Christians as a % of the world total is hit doubly by stabilization of population and a decline in Christianity overall (from 368 million in 1900 to 526 million in 1996, but declining to 512 million by 2025). "
Christianity Europe 410,300,000 86.70% - - 1980 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profession, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Europe 342,630,400 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Christianity Europe 340,780,224 45.20% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981) [2nd edition is updated since 1977 1st edition], pg. 405. [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982] Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Christianity Europe 551,891,968 75.91% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Christians: Followers of Jesus Christ affiliated w/ churches (church members, incl. children: 1,791,227,000 [world total] plus persons professing in censuses or polls though not affiliated. "
Christianity Europe 555,614,016 76.35% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Christians: Followers of Jesus Christ affiliated w/ churches (church members, incl. children: 1,782,809,000 [world total] plus persons professing in censuses or polls though not affiliated. "
Christianity Europe 526,000,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page (1996 list): "Megatrend 1: Southward shift of Christianity " by Justin D. Long, 1996 (viewed 12 March 1999) "Another aspect is the decline in Christianity in certain regions. Europe's Christians as a % of the world total is hit doubly by stabilization of population and a decline in Christianity overall (from 368 million in 1900 to 526 million in 1996, but declining to 512 million by 2025). "
Christianity Europe 413,756,000 82.60% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Christianity " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Christianity Europe 526,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "Status of Global Mission 1997 " by Justin D. Long, 1997 (viewed 5 March 1999) "309 million live in Africa, 299 million in Asia, 526 million in Europe, 450 million in Latin America, 202 million in North America and 19 million in Oceania. "
Christianity Europe 558,729,024 76.60% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "Total Christians include those affiliated with churches not shown [Roman Catholic; Protestants; Orthodox; Anglicans], plus other persons professing in censuses or polls to be Christians but not affiliated with any church. "
Christianity Europe 431,400,000 80.00% - - 2000 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profession, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population; year 2000 figures are projections, made circa 1980]
Christianity Europe 512,000,000 - - - 2025 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page (1996 list): "Megatrend 1: Southward shift of Christianity " by Justin D. Long, 1996 (viewed 12 March 1999) "Another aspect is the decline in Christianity in certain regions. Europe's Christians as a % of the world total is hit doubly by stabilization of population and a decline in Christianity overall (from 368 million in 1900 to 526 million in 1996, but declining to 512 million by 2025). "
Christianity - affiliated Europe - 77.20% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993, p. 21. Table. Eurasia & Europe listed separately.
Christianity - other Europe 4,795,000 0.66% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Other Christians: Catholics (non-Roman), marginal Protestants, crypto-Christians, and adherents of African, Asian, black and Latin American indigenous churches. "
Christianity - other Europe 7,037,000 0.97% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Other Christians: Catholics (non-Roman), marginal Protestants, crypto-Christians, and adherents of African, Asian, black and Latin American indigenous churches. "
Christianity - other Europe 2,274,000 0.31% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; Christianity - other: Those Christians not included in the four other groupings of Roman Catholic, Protestant, Orthodox and Anglican
Church of Christ Restored Europe - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) "The Church of Christ Restored has 7 branches in Michigan, 2 in Nebraska, 1 in Florida, 1 in Missouri, and a European Mission. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 36,000 - - - 1939 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 117. "In Europe membership had dropped from its twentieth century peak of about 36,000 in 1939 to about 33,500 in 1950 due to war casualties, loss of contact with members during the war, and postwar emigration to the U.S. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 33,500 - - - 1950 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 117. "In Europe membership had dropped from its twentieth century peak of about 36,000 in 1939 to about 33,500 in 1950 due to war casualties, loss of contact with members during the war, and postwar emigration to the U.S. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 371,000 - 1,513
units
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac (Latest nat'l membership stats: 1995) Totals obtained by adding "Scandanavia ", "U.K./Ireland ", and "Europe " totals.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 390,000 - - - 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 114. Graphic: "Church membership worldwide "; "Total: 10 million; Estimate Nov. 2, 1997. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Europe 388,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Membership Distribution " in "Global Media Guide " section, (viewed 22 March 1999). Map, with membership figures shown for following areas: Canada, USA, Mexico, South America, Caribbean, Europe, Africa, Asia, Central America, South Pacific; "Membership Worldwide, Dec. 31, 1997 "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 5
units
- 1996 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 435-436. Table: "Temples of the Church "; Germany (2), Swiss, Sweden; London, England
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 6
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "LDSWorld "; web page: "Gems Temple Status Page " (viewed 17 July 1999); compiled by Dave Kenison. Updated regularly. Original sources: Deseret News Church Almanac, & announcements thru Church News & other media.; Table: "LOCATIONS & DEDICATIONS OF TEMPLES " (incl. dedication dates); 2 England, 1 Swiss, 2 Germany, 1 Sweden
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* Lima, Licinio. "Um novo templo para a eternidade " [ "A new temple for the eternities "] (21 February of 1999), viewed online 23 Feb. 1999. Original Portuguese: "Na Europa existem apenas seis, de um total de 50 no mundo inteiro. "; Translation: "In the Europe only six exist, of a total of 50 in the entire world. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* Rocha, Joao Manuel. "Mormones Mostram Pujanca " in OUTROS TITULOS EM SOCIEDADE, publication date: Sabado, 20 de Fevereiro de 1999, (viewed online 23 Feb. 1999) Original Porguguese: "O templo de Madrid, o sexto construido na Europa, custou qualquer coisa como 8,4 milhoes de contos pagos pela Igreja de Jesus Cristo dos Santos dos Ultimos Dias. "; Translation: "The temple of Madrid, sixth constructed in the Europe "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 7
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Kim Siever's Temple Site "; web page: "Europe " (viewed 18 April 1999). Table with columns: Name [of temple], Year: Operating temples: "Zurich Zwitzerland 1955; London England 1958; Freiburg Germany 1985; Stockholm Sweden 1985; Frankfurt Germany 1987; Preston England 1998; Madrid Spain 1999 "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Europe - - 7
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "LDSWorld "; web page: "Gems Temple Status Page " (viewed 17 July 1999); compiled by Dave Kenison. Updated regularly. Original sources: Deseret News Church Almanac, & announcements thru Church News & other media.; Table: "LOCATIONS & DEDICATIONS OF TEMPLES " (incl. dedication dates); 2 England, 1 Swiss, 2 Germany, 1 Sweden; Spain Madrid Temple dedicated March 1999.
Church of the White Eagle Lodge Europe - - 5
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1 Jan. 1999): directory White Eagle centers in directory: Denmark, Grethe Fremming, Kyndelose Strandvej 22, 4070 Kirke Hyllinge; Annemarie Libera, White Eagle Centre, Schraystrasse 2, 82110 Germering; Netherlands, Britta Hudig, Oortveldlaan; Sweden, Sandor Huzzar, Sotared 3962, 524 96 Ljung; Switzerland, Carol Sommer, Schmiedengasse, 153400 Burgdorf
Confucianism Europe - 0.00% - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Confucianism Europe 4,000 0.00% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1995 "; "Confucians: Non-Chinese followers of Confucius and Confucianism, mostly Koreans in Korea. "
Confucianism Europe 4,500 0.00% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by 6 Continental Areas,1996 "; "Confucians: Non-Chinese followers of Confucius and Confucianism, mostly Koreans in Korea. "
Confucianism Europe 2,000 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Confucianism " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Confucianism Europe 11,000 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999), pg. 695. [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "; "Confucians: Non-Chinese followers of Confucius and Confucianism, mostly Koreans in Korea. "
Council for World Mission Europe 914,843 - 4,489
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in region: Union of Welsh Independents, Presbyterian Church of Wales, United Reformed Church in the United Kingdom, Congregational Federation, Congregational Union of Scotland, and Reformed Churches in the Netherlands [Gereformeerde Kerken in Nederland].
cults Europe - - - - 1999 *LINK* Rifkin, Ira. "Agency May Be Formed to Track Activities of 'Dangerous Sects' in Europe " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 26, 1999 (viewed online 26 June 1999). "A report submitted with the recommendation said the proposal grew out of the rise across Europe in recent years of 'sects and new religions.' In addition, the report noted the need to head off further 'serious disturbances of law and order' and 'carnage' associated in recent years with groups such as Japan's Aum Shinri Kyo cult and the Order of the Solar Temple in France and Switzerland. The report also said a number of groups successfully have established themselves in Russia and other formerly communist nations since the fall of the Soviet Union, prompting government backlashes. Great Britain's David Atkinson -- mentioning Baptist, Pentecostal and evangelical Protestant groups -- said 'these so-called evangelistic missions usually originate abroad, notably in the United States.' "
Druidism Europe - - - - 100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 719. "Members of the priesthood of pre-Roman Celtic religion in Gaul and Britain, the Druids are mentioned by name in some 30 references in Greek and Roman writers between the 2nd century BC and the 4th century AD. In addition, functionaries known as Druids are mentioned in the earliest Celtic literature, that of the Irish hero-tales and law tracts, which can be shown to represent a pre-Christian state of affairs older than the 5th century AD. The religion in which Druids functioned was proscribed and exterminated in the Roman provinces of Gaul and Britain during the 1st century AD. "
Druidism Europe - - - - 100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 719. "The social and economic background of the Celtic culture to which the Druids belonged can to a fair extent be reconstructed from the evidence of archeology and that of the classicla writers who commented on the Celts, with the vernacular sources, as in the case of Ireland, as supporting evidence. In archeological terms Druids belong to the final phases of the La Tene culture of the late Iron Age. References to Druids, however, relate exclusively to Gaul, except for two mentions of them in Britain, found in Caesar and Tacitus. "
Eastern Orthodox Europe 55,035,600 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983), pg. 433. [Orig. source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year.] Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Eastern Orthodox Europe 53,035,600 7.03% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981) [2nd edition is updated since 1977 1st edition], pg. 405. [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982] Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Eastern Orthodox Europe 165,795,008 22.81% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 646. [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Eastern Orthodox Europe 171,664,992 23.59% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ) pg. 654. [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year] Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Eastern Orthodox Europe 36,165,000 7.20% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "The Geography of Religion Website " (assembled by the students of Morehead State University, under Prof. Timothy C. Pitts); web page: "The Geography of Eastern Orthodoxy " (viewed 2 March 1999); [Orig. source: Markham, Ian S., (Editor), A World Religions Reader. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell Publishers (1996), pp. 356-357.] table with 3 columns: "Area "; "Adherents "; "Population Percentage "; [Geographical regions in this table: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Northern America, Oceania, and Eurasia]
Evangelical Europe - 2.80% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993, p. 21. Table. Eurasia & Europe listed separately. "Affiliated Evangelical "


Europe, continued

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