Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

To Index

back to Ecuador, Church of the Nazarene

Ecuador, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Evangelical Ecuador - - - - 1999 *LINK* "South America " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "As with most South American nations, Ecuador is predominantly Roman Catholic. Christians [i.e. Conservative Evangelical Protestants] are lumped together with Mormons, Hindus, Buddhists, and Jehovah's Witnesses as members of just another sect. "
Iglesia Evangelica Menonita Ecuadorianar Ecuador 325 - 5
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " ECUADOR: Iglesia Evangelica Menonita Ecuadorianar; Members: 325; Congregations: 5
Jehovah's Witnesses Ecuador 7,504 0.08% 119
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses Ecuador 36,208 0.30% 493
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 138,806.
Jehovah's Witnesses Ecuador 38,608 0.32% 500
units
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Ecuador 36,827 - 119
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Ecuador 138,806 1.16% 493
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Ecuador 136,126 1.12% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Judaism Ecuador 1,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
Mennonite World Conference Ecuador 325 - - - 1997 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site; page: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals " (viewed 8 Aug. 1999). Table: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals "; "based on the most recent data available... from 1996 or 1997... statistics indicate baptized members "; Dif. religious bodies: 1.
other Ecuador 790,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Roman Catholic
primal-indigenous Ecuador 2,000,000 - - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 10/27/88 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) "PRAY FOR THE 2 MILLION ANIMIST QUECHUAS OF ECUADOR. "
primal-indigenous Ecuador - 1.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Ethnologue Database " (viewed circa Dec. 1998) "Religion: Christian 98%, secular 1%, traditional religion 1% "
Protestant Ecuador - 1.00% - - 1986 Lepthien, Emilie U. Ecuador (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Children's Press (1986), pg. 114?. "Religion: The overwhelming majority of people are Catholic. Less than 1% are Protestant. "
Protestant Ecuador - 4.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Quechua Ecuador - - - - 1988 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Latin America 1988 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 91. "Culturally, Ecuador reflects the regionalism of its people. The Quechua-speaking people of the highlands, while paying their respects to the Christian God of their conquerors, have retained their ancient customs. Conservative village communes persist and the people prefer to isolate themselves from Spanish influence. "
Scientology Ecuador - - - - 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
secular Ecuador - 1.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Ethnologue Database " (viewed circa Dec. 1998) "Religion: Christian 98%, secular 1%, traditional religion 1% "
Sikhism Ecuador - - 1
unit
- 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993). Pg 30-31. Map: Number of Sikh gurdwaras ( "a gurdwara is both a place of worship and community centre ")
SIM International - missionaries Ecuador 18 - - - 1999 *LINK* "South America " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Ecuador is a relatively new country for SIM. We entered in 1989 with a focus on church planting; we now have 18 missionaries serving in Loja and Guayaquil. We recently extended into the more rural areas of Loja province as well. "
Tenrikyo Ecuador - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission stations
miscellaneous regional info Ecuador - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 168. "Ecuador is predominantly a Roman Catholic country... In the late 1960s, the Church in Ecuador and elsewhere in Latin America began to defend the poor and argue for social change. The 'theology of liberation,' as it was called, found religious justification for social change and political reform... The influence of the Roman Catholic Church in rural society seems to be in decline. In the 1980s, Pentecostal and Protestant churches have begun to expand their influence in the countryside. "
Arianism Egypt - - - - 325 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 470-471. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "A doctrinal dispute which arose in Egypt is known as the Arian-Athanasian controversy from the names of the opposing leaders, Arius and Athanasius. The Arians said that Christ was a creature; he was the first of all creatures and he was associated with God in the creation of the world. But he did not have 'an eternal timeless generation' and 'there was when he was not'. The Athanasian party affirmed that Christ as the Son had been eternally present with God the Father... Holy Spirit was included in this relationship, the doctrine of the Trinity was complete... Supporters of this doctrine insisted that it was not tritheism... as their opponents claimed... The doctrine of the Athanasian party was adopted by the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD. "
Athanasianism Egypt - - - - 325 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 470-471. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "A doctrinal dispute which arose in Egypt is known as the Arian-Athanasian controversy from the names of the opposing leaders, Arius and Athanasius. The Arians said that Christ was a creature; he was the first all creatures and he was associated with God in the creation of the world. But he did not have 'an eternal timeless generation' and 'there was when he was not'. The Athanasian party affirmed that Christ as the Son had been eternally present with God the Father... Holy Spirit was included in this relationship, the doctrine of the Trinity was complete... Supporters of this doctrine insisted that it was not tritheism... as their opponents claimed... The doctrine of the Athanasian party was adopted by the Council of Nicaea in 325 AD. "
Badawiyya Egypt - - - - 1500 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 723. "Other regionally based orders, such as the Badawiyya, named after the Egyptian saint Ahmad al-Badawi (d. 1276), were not as conscious of their classical roots, though they too maintained geneaologies that linked them to the first generation of Muslims... "
Badawiyya Egypt - - - - 1700 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... regional orders, such as the Badawiyya and Shadhiliyaa (both derived from the Rifa'iya) helped to intensify loyalties in Egypt and the Magrib. "
Baptist World Alliance Egypt 1,000 0.00% 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [BWA stats. in individual countries are sum of figures for member bodies of BWA in the countries.]; [County population figures for 1998 from United Nations data available here.]
Bedouin Egypt 50,000 - - - 1977 Perl, Lila. Egypt, Rebirth on the Nile. New York: William Morrow and Company (1977), pg. 150. "Egypt's Bedouins are nowadays believed to number fewer than 50,000. "
Burhani Egypt - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 448. "The Shadhili [Sufi] order is one of the largest worldwide, attributed to Shaykh Abul Hasan Ali al-Shadhili (1196-1258), but derived from Abu Madyan Shuaib (d. 1197). Popular in North Africa, Arabia, and Syria, it also gave rise to the Burhani order in Egypt. "
Catholic Egypt 213,000 0.35% 221
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Christianity Egypt - - - - 37 C.E. Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 19. "Christianity arrived early in Egypt, and the new religion spread from Alexandria into the hinterland, reaching Upper Egypt by the second century. According to some Christian traditions, in A.D. 37 Saint Mark brought Christianity to Egypt, and the founding of the church in Alexandria is fixed at around A.D. 40. The Egyptian church had a tendency toward doctrinal movements, in particular Christian gnosticism... and was the early center of the development of Christian monasticism. "
Christianity Egypt - - - - 100 C.E. Casson, Lionel. Ancient Egypt. New York: Time-Life Books (1965), pg. 164. "Christianity had first trickled into Egypt through the land's Jewish communities around the First Century A.D. In the early days it was addressed primarily to the uneducated masses. But there developed in Alexandria, the nation's intellectual capital, a group of Christian thinkers--including the Greek-born Clement, and the Egyptians Origen and St. Athanasius--who helped provide the young religion with its first systematic theology. These three are considered to be among the most influential of the early Church Fathers. "
Christianity Egypt - 100.00% - - 639 C.E. Mahmoud, Zaki Naguib. The Land and People of Egypt (series: Portraits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (revised edition 1972), pg. 23. "In due time all Egypt turned Christian, and so she remained until the seventh century, when the Arabs, who had just adopted the new religion of Islam, conquered Egypt in the year 640. Gradually, the Egyptians were converted to the new faith and began to use the Arabic language. Christians in Egypt today form a small minority. The proportion of Christians to Moslems is about one to ten. "
Christianity Egypt - - - - 642 C.E. Casson, Lionel. Ancient Egypt. New York: Time-Life Books (1965), pg. 164. "Egypt's long and vital connection with Christian thought came to an abrupt halt in 642 A.D., when the governors representing the Eastern Roman Emperor were driven out by Moslem Arabs, then in the full tide of the great conquest that was to make Islam one of the most important of Christianity's rivals... The Arabs ruled Egypt for almost nine centuries, long enough to transform the land completely into an Arab country. "
Christianity Egypt - 6.00% - - 1900 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974), pg. 79. "Egypt... once almost entirely Christian... after the Arab conquests the number of Egyptian Christians (Copts) steadily declined, and by the end of the 19th century they formed a small minority, no more than 6%... "
Christianity Egypt - 10.00% - - 1972 Mahmoud, Zaki Naguib. The Land and People of Egypt (series: Portraits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (revised edition 1972), pg. 23. "Christians in Egypt today form a small minority. The proportion of Christians to Moslems is about one to ten. "
Christianity Egypt - 10.00% - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 12. "Today less than 10% of the Egyptians are Christians. "
Christianity Egypt 2,000,000 - - - 1978 Lengyel, Emil. Modern Egypt. New York: Franklin Watts (revised edition, 1978), pg. 32. "While most Egyptians are Muslims, about 2 million are Christians. Most of these belong to a distinct denomination called Copts. "
Christianity Egypt - 6.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 2/23/87 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Christians comprise only 6% of Egypt's population
Christianity Egypt - 10.00% - - 1994 Fluehr-Lobban, Carolyn. Islamic Society in Practice; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1994), pg. 86. "Christian minority groups exist in significant numbers in Egypt, where the Coptic minority is 10% of the pop.; in Syria & Iraq, with 13% & 4% minorities, respectively... "
Christianity Egypt 6,090,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "Christian " is "mostly Coptic "
Christianity - other Egypt 250,000 - - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 127. "Catholics of the Latin rite, Greek Catholics, and Eastern Orthodox religious minorities, numbering roughly 250,000 people altogether, draw their considerable financial support from foreigners and persons of foreign descent living in Egypt. These Christian minorities are almost exclusively urban groups, wealthy and clannish. By contrast with the Copts (one of whose members, Butrus, Ghali, was prime minister in the early 1900s), the other Christian groups have avoided involvement in Egyptian politics and any other conduct that might make them conscpicuous. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Egypt - - 1
unit
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Egypt - - 1
unit
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Church of the Nazarene Egypt 345 - 8
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site: Nazarene World Mission Society Church Statistics: Churches; 8 Jan. 1998; total population: 60,470,000
Coptic Orthodox Egypt - 6.00% - - 1900 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974), pg. 79. "Egypt... once almost entirely Christian... after the Arab conquests the number of Egyptian Christians (Copts) steadily declined, and by the end of the 19th century they formed a small minority, no more than 6%... "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt - 8.33% - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 204. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Since 1882, western missionaries have had access to Egypt and the Coptic Church at present constitutes about one-twelfth of the population... "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 650,000 - - - 1970 Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 144. "The native Monophysite body of Egypt can hardly be given a fixed date for its origin. From the Council of Chalcedon the land was increasingly in religious rebellion. That church, the Coptic, is still the main Christian body of Egypt, numbering more than six hundred and fifty thousand adherents, strongly Monophysite to this day in doctrine, under the rule of a patriarch who still takes his title from Alexandria, though his seat has long been in Cairo. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 4,000,000 - - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 126. "Religious minorities constitute between 5 to 10 percent of the total population. Of these groups the indigenous Copts are the largest, estimates of their number varying between 2.3 and 4 million people organized in twenty-five dioceses. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 2,660,000 7.00% - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 20. "An Egyptian (Coptic) Christian minority remained, however, and the Coptic church continues in modern times with adherents estimated at 7% of the population. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 3,800,000 10.00% - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. vii, 2. "Population: Possibly 38 million by late 1975... Sunni Islam is the state religion and faith of about 90% of population. Coptic Christians the largest majority, others being various other Christian denominations and Jews. "; Pg. 2: "In the mid-1970s less than 10 percent of the people belonged to the Coptic chuch, and the old language was used only in Coptic church liturgies. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt - 10.00% - - 1975 Von Haag, Michael. Egypt: The Land and its People. Morristown, NJ: Macdonald Educational (1975), pg. 14. "Egypt's profoundly religious Muslims represent 90% of the population. The remaining 10% are freely practicing Copts, an early offshoot of orthodox Christianity. Once the dominant religious group in the country, many Copts converted to Islam, but those who remain Christians continue to play an important role in Egyptian life. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 3,700,000 10.00% - - 1975 Von Haag, Michael. Egypt: The Land and its People. Morristown, NJ: Macdonald Educational (1975), pg. 54. "Population: 37 million (estimated 1975)... Religion: 90% Muslim... "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 3,000,000 - - - 1977 Perl, Lila. Egypt, Rebirth on the Nile. New York: William Morrow and Company (1977), pg. 147. "The largest minority, the Coptic Christians... They number just under three million, with many residing in Upper Egypt... "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 5,000,000 11.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 138-139. "Population: 45,364,000. Religion: 93% Moslem, 7% Coptic Christian and others... Estimates of the Coptic pop. Range from 4 to 8 million, with 5 million the most likely number. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt - 15.00% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Egypt ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "Coptic Christians represent the largest minority religion in Egypt... Comprising about 15% of Egypt's population, the Copts are concentrated in the Coptic section of Cairo, in Luxor, and in Asyut. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 9,000,000 15.79% - - 1992 *LINK* web site: Encyclopedia Coptica; web page: "The Christian Coptic Orthodox Church Of Egypt " (viewed online 27 Feb. 1999) "Today [1992], there are over 9 million Copts (out of a population of some 57 million Egyptians) This is in addition to another 1.2 million emmigrant Copts who practice their faith in hundreds of churches in other countries. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 4,462,500 8.50% - - 1995 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Estimated at more than 52.5 million in mid 1990. Almost 90 percent Sunni Muslims, 8.5 percent Coptic Christians, 1.5 percent other Christians.
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 6,200,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the Coptic Orthodox Church, Egypt (6.2 million)... "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 322. "The Monophysite churches include the following: Coptic Orthodox Church, non-Chalcedonian Egyptians. The Copts... are considered a link with Egypt's pharaonic past, direct descendants of the original Egyptians. In the 1990s they increasingly came under attack from Egypt's militant Muslim fundamentalists. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 3,840,000 6.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 215. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 10,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The Coptic Orthodox Diocese of the Southern United States "; home page (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "This page is being constructed by F.Iskander; Created: Nov 15, 1996; Updated: Apr 1, 1997 " "The number of the Coptic Church members in Egypt alone is approximately 10,000,000 members. There are around 1.5 million Coptic immigrants living in The United States, Canada, Australia, Europe, Africa and Asia. "
Coptic Orthodox Egypt 6,400,000 10.00% - - 2000 *LINK* AP. "Copts of Egypt strive to preserve early Christian legacy " in Deseret News (19 Feb 2000) "Copts were once predominant here -- their name is the ancient name for all Egyptians. Now they are estimated at just 10 percent of Egypt's 64 million people. "
Desert Fathers Egypt - - - - 400 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 216. "Desert Fathers. In the last decades of the third century some Christians, despairing of the worldliness of the church, left the cities of Egypt and lived as hermits in the desert... The mid-fourth to the mid-fifth centuries constituted the golden age. Thousands of people moved to the desert, and older monks complained about the loss of solitude. Gradually, small communities formed where the life was directed by an older, experienced monk. The next development was cenobite or communal monasticism where people lived under a rule in obedience to an abbot. "
Eastern Orthodox Egypt - 13.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 60,470,000
Egyptian Baptist Convention Egypt 1,000 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Evangelical Church in Egypt, Synod of the Nile Egypt 75,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 12. "The numbers of Protestants are not too impressive [in Egypt], but there are about 50,000 Egyptians related to American Presbyterian missions and about 75,000 members of the Evangelical Church in Egypt, Synod of the Nile. No other Protestant group claims 15,000 members. "
Isis worship Egypt - - - - -400 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1461. "Isis' ancient role as throne goddess, the Queen of Egypt was perpetuated among the Greek kings... The Isis religion therefore had a political element, it was the national religion of the Egyptian state: those who worshipped Isis and Serapis acknowledged their loyalty to the reigning royal house. "
Isis worship Egypt - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977), pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens; the religion of the Great Mother, Cybele, from Anatolia in Asia Minor; the Persian religion of Mithra and the Egyptian cult of Isis & Osiris. "
Islam Egypt - - - - 642 C.E. Casson, Lionel. Ancient Egypt. New York: Time-Life Books (1965), pg. 164. "Egypt's long and vital connection with Christian thought came to an abrupt halt in 642 A.D., when the governors representing the Eastern Roman Emperor were driven out by Moslem Arabs, then in the full tide of the great conquest that was to make Islam one of the most important of Christianity's rivals... The Arabs ruled Egypt for almost nine centuries, long enough to transform the land completely into an Arab country. "
Islam Egypt - - - - 970 C.E. Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 2. "The acceptance of Islam was such that by the tenth century Egypt had become a prominent center for Islamic studies. Al Azhar Mosque, the forerunner of Al Azhar University, was founded in Cairo in 970 and soon became renowned as perhaps the world's most prestigious center for the study of Islamic theology and law. "
Islam Egypt - 90.00% - - 1972 Mahmoud, Zaki Naguib. The Land and People of Egypt (series: Portraits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (revised edition 1972), pg. 23. "The proportion of Christians to Moslems is about one to ten. "
Islam Egypt 34,200,000 90.00% - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 111. "The state religion and the faith of approximately 90% of the population, Islam has nevertheless felt the presure of drastic and social and political change. "
Islam Egypt 34,200,000 90.00% - - 1975 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. vii. "Population: Possibly 38 million by late 1975... Sunni Islam is the state religion and faith of about 90% of population. "
Islam Egypt - 90.00% - - 1975 Von Haag, Michael. Egypt: The Land and its People. Morristown, NJ: Macdonald Educational (1975), pg. 14. "Egypt's profoundly religious Muslims represent 90% of the population. "


Egypt, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.