Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Way of Right Unity China - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 182-183. Chapter: Taoism. "Church Taoism can be divided into 2 main branches. The 1st, the Way of Right Unity (Cheng-i tao), encompasses schools that use magical practices such as amulets... begun by Chang Tao-ling (or Chang Ling, AD 34-156)... school he founded. The Five Pecks of Rice School (Wu-tou-me-tao)... remained active through the 15th century... also known as the School of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih tao), since Chang Ling was venerated as a Celestial Master... a title that was inherited by each of his successors down to the present day. (When this lineage of 'Taoist popes,' was kicked off the mainland by the Communists in 1949, it continued in Taiwan.) "
Way of Supreme Peace China - - - - 150 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 183. Chapter: Taoism. "During the 2nd century AD, famine and plagues caused great turmoil and led hundreds of thousands of Chinese to embrace Taoism, which offered a more personal and emotionally appealing form of religion than state Confucianism... One sect that especially profited from this development was the Way of Supreme Peace (T'ai-p'ing tao), founded by Chang Chueh (a follower of Huang-Lao Chun), who pursued conversion through the use of missionaries. "
Way of Supreme Peace China - - - - 175 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 744. "The tradition of fully developed Taoist religious movements began in the second century A.D. with the Way of the Great Peace (T'ai-p'ing Tao) and the Way of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih Tao), also known as the 'Teaching of the Five Pecks of Rice' (Wu-Tou-Chiao)... The T'ai-p'ing Tao (known also as 'the Yellow Turbans') led a rebellion agains the Han, and at one point controlled eight provinces... The T'ai-p'ing movement was destroyed when their bid to found a new order was supressed militarily. "
Way of Supreme Peace China 36,000 - - - 184 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 349-350. "T'ai-p'ing tao - Chin., lit. 'Way of Supreme Peace'; early Taoist school founded between 172 and 178 C.E. by Chang Chueh. It derived its name from its basic doctrinal text... As a result of his spectacular methods of healing, Chang Chueh attracted a vast following... In 184 C.E. 36,000 followers of the Way of Supreme Peace rose against the central governement. The rebels wore yellow head bands... "
White Lotus Buddhism China - - - - 1279 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 804. "White Lotus Society. Chinese religious sect which developed out of Pure Land Buddhist lay associations in the southern Sung dynasty (A.D. 1127-1279), but which departed from its orthodox antecedents by instituting married clergy and full-time vegetarianism. By the late thirteenth century this movement had developed its own rituals and temples, and had incorporated a variety of folk practices and beliefs from Taoism. "
White Lotus Buddhism China - - - - 1350 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 804. "In the mid-fourteenth century several White Lotus groups rebelled against Mongol rule in the name of both Maitreya and the Manichean King of Light. "
White Lotus Buddhism China - - - - 1400 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 414-415. "White Lotus school - (Chin., Pai-lien-tsung); a school of Pure Land Buddhism, founded by Mao Tzu-yuan in the 12th century. The White Lotus school was an association of monks, nuns, and laypersons, whose objective was by regularly invoking the Buddha Amitabha... This school... was soon discredited as being linked with demons, and it was banned several times; nevertheless it survived. Later on Maitreya... was venerated along with Amitabha... the White Lotus school became a secret society and played an important role in the rebellions and peasant insurrections of the 13th-15th centuries... "
White Lotus Buddhism China - - - - 1805 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 804. "In the sixteenth century popular sects of the White Lotus type developed a new form of scripture texts called pao-chuan ('precious books')... Some of them organized eschatological uprisings against the government, the most famous of which took place between 1795-1805, the so-called 'White-Lotus rebellion.' "
Yao (Chinese) China 1,000,000 0.10% - - 1984 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984), pg. 117. "More than three million Miao and about a million Yao have also adopted many features of the Han culture. These farming people live in remote mountain settlements and along streams and rivers in the southwest. "
Yao (Chinese) China 2,100,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 824. "Yao: Location: China; Population: 2.1 million; Religion: Polytheism; ancestor worship "
Yi China 4,000,000 0.39% - - 1984 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984), pg. 117. "The Yi, or Lolo, still cling to many of their old customs and beliefs. Their religion is full of magic and witchcraft. The three or four million Yi are divided into clans and organized according to caste. The top castes own all the property, while those at the bottom are landless farm laborers. Yi settlements dot Yunnan, Szechwan, and Kweichow (Guizhou) provinces. "
Yi China 6,897,000 0.57% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 82: "The Yi (also called the Lolo) live in Sichuan and Yunan provinces. They are farmers and herders, and their language and customs are related to those of the Tibetans. "
Yi China 6,600,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 835. "Yi: Alternative Names: Nosu, Nasu, Luowu, Misapo, Sami, and Axi; Location: China; Population: 6.6 million; Language: Yi; Religion: ancestor worship "; Pg. 836: "The Yi believe that everything that moves or grows has its own spirit... The Yi worship the buddha of Peace and Tranquility (Taiping)... In some districts, the Yi worship Asailazi, the god who created the ideographic script of the Yi. There is also a cult to the God of Wind. Since the 18th century, a considerable number of Yi have converted to Catholicism and Protestantism as a result of missionary work. "; [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, not how many practice traditional Yi religion.]
Yin-yang Chia China - - - - 250 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 429. "Yin-yang chia - Chin., lit. 'School of Yin-Yang'; Chinese philosophical school that flourished at the end of the Warring States Period (3rd century B.C.E.) "
Zen China - - - - 400 C.E. Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966), pg. 245. "Zen traces its origin to Ch'an Buddhism which started in China around 400 A.D. "
Zen China - - - - 1960 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 45. "The most influential Buddhist school was the so-called School of Meditation (Chan in China, Zen in Japan), which developed under the Tang dynasty. "
Zen - Gozu China - - - - 700 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 120. "Gozu school a secondary lineage of Chinese Ch'an, which does not belong to the traditional Zen schools (Goke-shichishu) in China. It derives from Master Fa-jung, also known as Niu-t'ou, a student of Tao-hsin, the fourth patriarch of Zen in China. The school declined during the Song dynasty. "
Zen - Hakuun China - - - - 1000 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 124-125. "Hakuun school... an unimportant secondary lineage of Zen founded by the Chinese master Ch'ing-chueh (Jap., Shokaku), which is regarded as splinter group deviating from the true dharma tradition of Zen. It arose during the southern Sung Dynasty and died out during the Yuan Dynasty. Its name comes from that of the monastery where Ch'ing-chueh lived. "
Zen - Hogen China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Zen - Igyo China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Zen - Igyo China - - - - 950 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 153. "Igyo school... a school of Ch'an (Zen) that was among the 'five houses-seven schools'... The name derives from the... two founders, Kuei-shan Ling-yu [and] Yang-shan Hui-chi... In the middle of the 10th century the Igyo lineage merged with the lineage of the Rinzai school and from that time no longer subsisted as an independent school. "
Zen - Oryo China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Zen - Ummon China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Zen - Ummon China - - - - 1050 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 391. "Ummon school - (Chin., Yun-men-tsung; Jap., Ummon-shu); a school of Ch'an (Zen) originated by the great Chinese Ch'an master Yun-men Wen-yen (Jap., Ummon Bun'en). It belonged to the 'five houses' (goke-shichishu) of Ch'an... Hsueh-tou was the last important master of the Ummon school, which began to decline in the middle of the 11th century and died out altogether in the 12th. "
Zen - Yogi China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Zhuang China 16,093,000 1.33% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 81: "The Zhuang are China's largest minority group, making up 1.33% of the total population. They are culturally related to the people of Thailand. Some of them are Buddhists, and some practice a form of ancestor worship and spirit worship. The Zhuang have their own written and spoken language. They are concentrated in the Guangxi Zhuangzu autonomous region and the neighboring provinces of Yunnan and Guangdong, where they live largely by rice farming. "
Zhuang China 15,600,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 839-840. "Zhuang: Alternative Names: Buzhuang, Bunong, Buyang, Butu, Buyue, Buman, Gaolan; Location: China; Population: 15.6 million; Language: Zhuang; Religion: Polytheistic; ancestor worship; Christianity "; Pg. 840: "The Zhuang are polytheistic... The Zhuang were influenced by organized Buddhism and Taoism since the Tang Dynasty (618-907). Since the beginning of this century, a small number have adopted Christian beliefs and practices. "; [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, not how many practice traditional Zhuang religion.]
Zhuang China 12,000,000 1.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 41. "...minority group, with the largest being the 12-million-strong Zhuang, in southwestern China. Given China's population of 1.2 billion... "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1970 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 191-192. "the People's Republic of China was established along Communist lines in 1949. The Marxist government discouraged religion but did not ban it outright; that prohibition occurred during the disastrous period of the Great Cultural Revolution, 1966-78. Then, many Buddhist and Taoist temples and shrines were closed or destroyed and the clergy forced into labor. The same thing happened to the Catholic, Protestant, and Islamic clergy and places of worship that had been established in China. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 742. "Taoism, religious.One of the four major religious traditions in China (with Confucianism, Buddhism and Chinese Popular Religion)... "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1982 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984), pg. 129. "Religion: After the Communist revolution, religious practice was discouraged & most churches & other places of worship were closed. By the early 1980s, however, the authorities were more lenient, allowing Buddhists, Muslims, Lama Buddhists, & Christians (who probably exceed the 1949 estimate of 3 to 4 million) to conduct religious services. The authorities also were permitting the training of clergymen & publication of Bibles, hymnals, & other religious works. The estimate of the number of Muslims in China is anywhere from 7 to 10 million. The constitution guarantees religious freedom, but it also protects the 'freedom not to believe' and to propagate atheism. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1984 Time-Life BooksChina (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 14. "Although China's present government is atheist, its constitution guarantees religious freedom. By and large the promise is kept. Three world religions--Buddhism, Islam, and Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity--survive along with folk beliefs and the ancient philosophies of Confucianism and Daosim. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 13. "Principal Religions: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity, all of which have been intermixed to one degree or another. They have been severely opposed and suppressed by the communist government, but in recent years the anti-religious pressures have lessened and they are enjoying a revival. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints China - mainland 300 - 5
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- 1999 *LINK* Martin, Erin (NewsNet Staff Writer). "Elder Chujen Chia to speak on church in China " on NewsNet@BYU (online news service). "This story was posted on Wednesday, March 31 1999 " (viewed 1 April 1999). "Elder Chujen Chia, Asia Area Authority Seventy for the LDS Church... During a visit in December from a church leader in Beijing, Cheung said he learned three branches of the church and two other small groups meet in Mainland China, making more than 300 members there. Mainland Chinese cannot attend meetings in Mainland China, only foreigners can. In the Beijing Branch, members are from all over the world and six or more languages are spoken, Cheung said. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints China - mainland 500 - - - 1999 *LINK* Warbuton, Emily. "Ricks instructor gets baptized " in Rick College newspaper Scroll (viewed online 11 March 1999). "There are only 19,500 members of the Church in China, 19,000 of which live in Hong Kong. Most of the others are foreign teachers businessmen or diplomats. There is no proselyting in the People's Republic of China. "
Protestant China: Anhui 38,000 - - - 1949 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 148. "In Anhui Province (East China) both TSPM and house-church sources have reported spectacular growth of the church. According to Communist sources the total number of Protestant Christians before Liberation in 1949 was about 38,000. Yet I was told by a leading TSPM pastor in Shanghai in 1990 that the church now numbers 800,000--a twentyfold increase! "
Protestant China: Anhui 800,000 - - - 1990 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 148. "In Anhui Province (East China) both TSPM and house-church sources have reported spectacular growth of the church. According to Communist sources the total number of Protestant Christians before Liberation in 1949 was about 38,000. Yet I was told by a leading TSPM pastor in Shanghai in 1990 that the church now numbers 800,000--a twentyfold increase! "
Protestant China: Anhui 800,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Christianity China: Anhui/Henan: Dancheng County 50,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. Table, showing "total no. of Christians " in various Chinese counties.
Protestant China: Anhui/Henan: Dancheng County 50,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. "...an interesting letter from northern Anhui, received in Hong Kong in early 1988. the writer gave statistics of the church situation there and in neighboring Henan. " 3 columns in table: County, Total no. of Christians (50,000), No. who left TSPM (15,000).
Christianity China: Anhui/Henan: Hao Xian County 50,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. Table, showing "total no. of Christians " in various Chinese counties.
Protestant China: Anhui/Henan: Hao Xian County 50,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. "...an interesting letter from northern Anhui, received in Hong Kong in early 1988. the writer gave statistics of the church situation there and in neighboring Henan. " 3 columns in table: County, Total no. of Christians (50,000), No. who left TSPM (15,000).
Christianity China: Anhui/Henan: Jieshou County 20,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. Table, showing "total no. of Christians " in various Chinese counties.
Protestant China: Anhui/Henan: Jieshou County 20,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. "...an interesting letter from northern Anhui, received in Hong Kong in early 1988. the writer gave statistics of the church situation there and in neighboring Henan. " 3 columns in table: County, Total no. of Christians (20,000), No. who left TSPM (1,000).
Christianity China: Anhui/Henan: Luyi County 30,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. Table, showing "total no. of Christians " in various Chinese counties.
Protestant China: Anhui/Henan: Luyi County 30,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. "...an interesting letter from northern Anhui, received in Hong Kong in early 1988. the writer gave statistics of the church situation there and in neighboring Henan. " 3 columns in table: County, Total no. of Christians (30,000), No. who left TSPM (5,000).
Christianity China: Anhui/Henan: Taihe County 40,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. Table, showing "total no. of Christians " in various Chinese counties.
Protestant China: Anhui/Henan: Taihe County 40,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 89. "...an interesting letter from northern Anhui, received in Hong Kong in early 1988. the writer gave statistics of the church situation there and in neighboring Henan. " 3 columns in table: County, Total no. of Christians (40,000), No. who left TSPM (10,000).
Protestant China: Anhui: Huoqiu County 150 - 3
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- 1949 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 148. "Huoqiu County on the western side of [Anhui] province has seen the church grow from three small churches with about 150 members in 1949 to over 60 registered churches and hundreds of house-churches with 20,000 to 30,000 Christians in 1986. "
Protestant - registered China: Anhui: Huoqiu County - - 60
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- 1986 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 148. "Huoqiu County on the western side of [Anhui] province has seen the church grow from three small churches with about 150 members in 1949 to over 60 registered churches and hundreds of house-churches with 20,000 to 30,000 Christians in 1986. "
Protestant - unregistered China: Anhui: Huoqiu County 30,000 - - - 1986 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 148. "Huoqiu County on the western side of [Anhui] province has seen the church grow from three small churches with about 150 members in 1949 to over 60 registered churches and hundreds of house-churches with 20,000 to 30,000 Christians in 1986. "
Catholic China: Beijing 40,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Beijing - - 60
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- 1957 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 13. "In 1958 the majority of the city churches were closed by the TSPM under the slogan of 'unity.' For instance, over 60 churches in Beijing were reduced to four and over 200 in Shanghai to under 20. "
Protestant China: Beijing - - 4
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- 1958 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 13. "In 1958 the majority of the city churches were closed by the TSPM under the slogan of 'unity.' For instance, over 60 churches in Beijing were reduced to four and over 200 in Shanghai to under 20. "
Protestant China: Beijing 5,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Fujian 210,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Little Flock China: Fujian - - - - 1987 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 120-121. "The Little Flock in Fuzhou, 1987. The Little Flock, China's largest indigenous church grouping, is particularly strong in Fujian... At the mid-week service, which I attended, nearly a thousand Little Flock Christians filled the Flower Lane church (the main church in Fuzhou)... "
Protestant China: Fujian 600,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Protestant China: Fujian: Fuqing County 100,000 - - - 1987 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 120-121. "The Little Flock is also very strong in Fuqing county where there are about 100,000 Christians. All along the prosperous coastal area between Xiamen and Fuzhou I saw new churches built by the local Christians. "
Catholic China: Gansu 50,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Gansu 30,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Guangdong 110,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Guangdong 160,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Guangxi 30,000 - - - 1985 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Guangxi 50,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Zhuang China: Guangxi 9,000,000 0.87% - - 1982 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984), pg. 117. "The Zhuang are another important ethnic group. About 8 or 9 million Zhuang live in the Kwangsi (Guangxi) Autonomous Region. They speak a form of Thai and live by farming rice. Westerners know very little about their religious beliefs. But it is known that the Zhuang have been absorbed to a certain extent by the Han mainstream. "
Islam China: Guangzhou 5,000 - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 85. "Near the crossroads of Renmin Zhong Lu and the sixth section of Zhongshan Lu, in Guangtalu south of Zhongshan Lu, is Huaisheng Si, a mosque dating back to 627 and founded by a trader who was said to be an uncle of Mohammad. At that time, Arab traders visited China, so the legend may well contain some truth, although it does not give sufficient evidence for an exact date of the foundation of the mosque... The mosque is a cultural center for Guangzhou's 5,000 Muslims. "
Protestant China: Guizhou 300,000 - - - 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 119. "A provincial TSPM church, Guizhou, 1988... One of the elders said there were now 20,000 Christians in the area where there had only been a few hundred pre-1949, and gave detailed statistics for the entire province, claiming about 300,000 Christians now, mostly among the Miao people. "
Protestant China: Guizhou 350,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Hainan 3,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Hainan 37,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Hebei 800,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Hebei 100,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Catholic China: Heilongjiang 35,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 177-178. "The table below, based mainly on official government and CPA [Catholic Patriotic Association] estimates, gives a minimum figure for Catholics in the provinces. " [Technically, some may consider CPA Catholic, but not Roman Catholic.]
Protestant China: Heilongjiang 140,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "


China: Heilongjiang, continued

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