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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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China, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
New Birth/Total Church China - - 3,500
units
- 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 149. "...Xu Yongze from the Nanyang District, who was arrested on his way to see Bily Graham in Beijing in April 1988, was reportedly leader of such a network of 3,500 independent house-churches centered in Henan. Known popularly as the New Birth sect or the Total Church, they... continue to operate underground seminaries and to send out large numbers of evangelists to more than twenty provinces. "
Nonreligious China - 71.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Nonreligious China 696,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Nonreligious China 709,000,000 59.10% - - 1998 "A Tale of China's Two Churches " in Christianity Today (July 13, 1998), pg. 33. (Source: Amity News Service, Operation World) Chart
Nonreligious & Atheist China - 50.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "While China is more than half nonreligious/atheist, India is only about 2% nonreligious/atheist. "
primal-indigenous China 1,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "traditional beliefs "
primal-indigenous China 28,800,000 2.40% - - 1998 "A Tale of China's Two Churches " in Christianity Today (July 13, 1998), pg. 33. (Source: Amity News Service, Operation World) Chart; listed in chart as "animism "
Protestant China 1,000,000 - - - 1942 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 146. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Protestantism started in China with the arrival of Robert Morrison... in 1807. Within 135 years, its membership has grown to about 1,000,000 (Christian community members), or about 500,000 (communicants)... 93 denominations & subdivisions. "
Protestant China 700,000 - - - 1948 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 141. "the official figures for the total number of Protestant Christians and churches in China given by the government, or the TSPM at the national level, has gradually increased since 1979. Originally it was stated that thre were 700,000 Christians, or about the same number as before 1949. "
Protestant China 700,000 - - - 1949 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 9-10. "in 1984 Bishop Ding, the head of the officially-sanctioned Protestant Three Self Patriotic Movement (TPSM), which controls the church on behalf of the Chinese Communist Party, stated that the Protestant Christians had multiplied more than fourfold since 1949, from 700,000 to three million. "
Protestant China - - - - 1970 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 191-192. "the People's Republic of China was established along Communist lines in 1949. The Marxist government discouraged religion but did not ban it outright; that prohibition occurred during the disastrous period of the Great Cultural Revolution, 1966-78. Then, many Buddhist and Taoist temples and shrines were closed or destroyed and the clergy forced into labor. The same thing happened to the Catholic, Protestant, and Islamic clergy and places of worship that had been established in China. "
Protestant China 700,000 0.09% - - 1972 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition), pg. 4, 74. Pg. 4: "No one really knows how many Chinese there are because distances are so great... roughly 750,000,000... "; Pg. 74: "There are approx. 100 million Chinese Buddhists, 10 million Moslems, 3 million Catholics, 700,000 Protestants, and 20,000 Taoist priests and nuns. "
Protestant China 700,000 - - - 1979 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 141. "the official figures for the total number of Protestant Christians and churches in China given by the government, or the TSPM at the national level, has gradually increased since 1979. Originally it was stated that thre were 700,000 Christians, or about the same number as before 1949. "
Protestant China 3,000,000 - - - 1984 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 9-10. "in 1984 Bishop Ding, the head of the officially-sanctioned Protestant Three Self Patriotic Movement (TPSM), which controls the church on behalf of the Chinese Communist Party, stated that the Protestant Christians had multiplied more than fourfold since 1949, from 700,000 to three million. "
Protestant China 4,000,000 - 24,000
units
- 1987 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 9-10. "...Bishop Ding, the head of the officially-sanctioned Protestant Three Self Patriotic Movement (TPSM)... In 1987 he stated in an interview with an American clergyman that China had three to four million baptized Protestants 'who worship in over 4,000 church buildings and tens of thousands of homes or meeting points.' "
Protestant China - - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 140. "In one county in Henan it was reported in 1981 that there were 80,000 Christians, compared to only 4,000 before 1949. It soon became apparent that there were Christian meetings in all of China's administrative regions, except Tibet. "
Protestant China 5,000,000 - - - 1989 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 141. "More recently [1989] Bishop Ding, Chairman of the TSPM, has stated that there are 'nearly five million Christians' in China. "
Protestant China 9,410,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 142. Table: "TSPM [Three Self Patriotic Movement] and Government Statistics for Protestant Chirstians by Province "
Protestant China 9,500,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 143. "It can be seen, therefore, that local TSPM and government statistics total nearly nine and a half million, much higher than the latest officially recognized estimate of seven million Protestant Christians... However, even this figure of nine million is very low. "
Protestant China 20,000,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 143. "However, even this figure of nine million is very low. Some TSPM/CCC pastors have intimated privately that the real figure of the total number of Christians in China is around twenty million. "
Protestant China 35,000,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 143. "One man who traveled extensively throughout China reported that there culd be thirty-five million Protestant Christians. Figures of fifty million or even higher have been speculated by some overseas Christian observers, but no evidence has been published to support such high figures. "
Protestant China 25,000,000 - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 145. "Having collated detailed statistis down to the county level in many instances, I believe that there is strong evidence pointing to some twenty to twenty-five million Protestant Christians in the country [China]. The figure could even be higher. As already indicated this is much higher than the official TSPM figure, but well below some of the speculative estimates given overseas. "
Protestant China - - - - 1994 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 150. "Thus, to summarize, although Protestant Christianity has shown the greatest growth in the coastal provinces, such as Fujian, Zhejiang and Jiangsu, where Protestant Christianity was first introduced, it has also enjoyed a remarkable revival in the heartland provinces of Henan and Anhui, as well as in the remote southwest of China. "
Protestant China 61,200,000 5.10% - - 1998 "A Tale of China's Two Churches " in Christianity Today (July 13, 1998), pg. 33. (Source: Amity News Service, Operation World) Chart
Protestant China 132,000,000 - - - 1999 Associated Press. Dateline: Beijing. Date: "10.20 a.m. ET (1521 GMT) January 25, 1999 "; Posted to Nurel-1 newsgroup (nurel-l@listserv.ucalgary.ca) on 26 Jan. 1999. "The China Christian Council, the umbrella organization overseeing the government-sanctioned non-denominational Protestant churches, counts more than 12 million Protestants. Foreign supporters of the underground churches claim their adherents are ten times the official figure. "
Protestant - registered China 3,386,611 - 20,912
units
- 1987 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 141. "In late 1987 the TSPM published a total figure of 3,386,611 registered Christians in China, 4,044 churches and 16,868 (registered) meeting points. "
Protestant - registered China 4,551,981 - 26,977
units
- 1988 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 141. "Only a year later [1988] the total number of Christians was given at 4,551,981, churches reopened had risen to 6,375 (of which 2,683 had been newly built since 1980), and the number of meeting-points had risen to 20,602. "
Protestant - unregistered China 120,000,000 - - - 1999 Associated Press. Dateline: Beijing. Date: "10.20 a.m. ET (1521 GMT) January 25, 1999 "; Posted to Nurel-1 newsgroup (nurel-l@listserv.ucalgary.ca) on 26 Jan. 1999. "The China Christian Council, the umbrella organization overseeing the government-sanctioned non-denominational Protestant churches, counts more than 12 million Protestants. Foreign supporters of the underground churches claim their adherents are ten times the official figure. "
Pure Land Buddhism China - - - - 1000 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 184. Chapter: Taoism. "Buddhist teachers had already begun to trickle into China as early as the 1st century AD... They were successful in passing on the dharma... The monks... translated Buddhist texts into Chinese. Several of these... put forth the ideas of Pure Land Buddhism. With its relatively simple requirements of devotion to the Buddha Amitabha and the recitation of his name, resulting in a ticket to paradise, the Pure Land school grew quickly among the Chinese masses. By the 11th century, Taoist and Buddhist ideas had merged with folk practices to create a popular religion that survives to this day. "
Pure Land Buddhism China - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 123. Chapter: Buddhism. "The most popular school of Buddhism in China and Japan today is commonly known as Pure Land. "
Qiang China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai... peoples. "
religious China 100,000,000 8.30% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Religions: Approximately 8.3% of the population (100 million) follow Taoism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism, and Protestantism. "
Rinzai China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
Ritsu China - - - - 667 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 209. "Lu-tsung - Chin., roughly 'school of discipline'; school of Chinese Buddhism originated by Tao-hsuan (596-667)... Although the school is of Hinayana origin, it was also regarded as authoritative by the Mahayana schools of China. The teachings of this school were brought to Japan in 745 by Chien-chen (Ritsu school). "
San-chieh Buddhism China 0 - - - 845 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 300. "San-chieh school - (Chin. lit., 'School of Three Stages'); school of Buddhism during the Sui and T'an periods. The name of this school, founded by Hsin-hsing (540-94), comes from its division of the overall duration of the Buddhist teaching into 3 stages... the School of Three Stages was officially banned in the year 600 but in fact ceased to exist only after 845. "
Sanron China - - - - 550 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 303-304. "San-lun school - Chin., lit. 'School of Three Treatises'; Chinese form of the Indian Madhyamak. The name refers to the three written works fundamental for the school... These were translated into Chinese and provided with commentary by Kumarajiva in the 5th century... Seng-lang... delimited the San-lun school from the Satyasiddhi school and can thus be regarded as its actual founder. In the 6th century the most important representatives... Fa-lang and Chi-tsang and under them the San-lun school experienced a major upsurge. "
Seventh-day Adventist China 21,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957], pg. 166. "There are at least 40,000 members in the U.S.S.R. and 21,000 in Red China. "
Shen-hsiao China - - - - 1150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 745. "Between 1100 and 1400 three developments occurred that have helped shape modern Taoism... The second was the rise of anew sect called Shen-hsiao ('Divine Empyrean'), after the new higher heavenly realm and the new age of divine rule that it revealed. The rituals which Shen-hsiao introduced remain among the most popular traditions today. "
Six Houses Seven Schools China - - - - 350 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 335. "Six houses (and) seven schools - (Chin., liu-chia ch'I-tsung); currents of Chinese Buddhism in its early phase (4th century), all arising from the engagement with the Prajnaparamita-sutra and presenting a particular interpretation of the notion of shunyata (emptiness). They developed under the influence of neo-Taoism... The principal of these were the School of Appearances As Such, the School of the Stored Impressions, the School of Illusions, the School of the Nonbeing of the Mind, the School of the Causal Combination, the School of Fundamental Nonbeing, and the Modified School of Fundamental Nonbeing. "
Soto China - - - - 900 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 119. "Goke-shichishu: Jap., lit. 'five houses-seven schools'; general term for the 7 schools of Ch'an (Zen) during the T'ang period; these stemmed from 5 lineages ('houses' or 'families'). The 5 houses and their founders are (1) Rinzai school of Lin-chi I'hsua... (2) Igyo school of Kuei-shan Ling-yu & Yang-shan Hui-chi; (3) Soto school of Tung-shan Liang-chieh & Ts'ao-shan Pen-chi; (4) Ummon school of Yu-men Wen-yen (Jap. Ummon Ben'en); & (5) Hogen school of Fa-yen Wen-i... The 7 schools are the above-mentioned 5 houses plus the 2 further schools into which the Rinzai school split after Shi-shuang Ch'u-yuan. These 2 are (6) Yogi school of Yang-ch'i Fang-hui & (7) Oryo school of Huang-lung Hui-nan "
T'ai-i tao China - - - - 1150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 349. "T'ai-i tao - Chin., lit. 'Way of the Supreme One'; a school of religious Taoism (tao-chiao). The t'ai-i tao was founded in the 12th century C.E. by Hsiao Pao-chen and is related to an earlier movement, the cheng-i tao (Way of Right Unity), whose priests conducted ceremonies to cure diseases by the use of talismans, magic formulae, and exorcism. The t'ai-i tao also contained Confucianist elements. Its followers were committed to strict obedience of monastic rules. It became extinct during the middle period of the Yuan Dynasty. "
Tai-ping China - - - - 1865 Wilson, Bryan. "Traditional Religion Divides Society " in Enduring Issues in Sociology (Lynn Barteck & Karen Mullin, editors). San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press (1995), pg. 215. [Originally source: Religious Sects: A Sociological Study. New York: McGraw-Hill (1970).] "At first glance, sects may appear to be marginal and incidental phenomena in history... Yet, at times, sects have had an immense significance for the course of history... The Mahdi movement in the Sudan in the 1880s, or the Tai-ping movement in China a couple decades earlier, each significantly affected the history of their own peoples and that of people far from the places where these sects arose... "
Taoism China - - - - -206 B.C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 43. "The ordinary people were not particularly attracted by the abstract concepts and metaphysical reflections of Daoism. Even at the beginning of the Han period (206 BC - AD 220), there were signs of both a popular and religious Daoism. As Buddhism also became more and more popular, it borrowed ideas from Daoism, and vice versa, to the point where one might speak of a fusion between the two. "
Taoism China - - - - -200 B.C.E. Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 94. "By the second century B.C., four centuries after Lao Tzu, the tenets of 'pure' Taoism were followed by a few, but Taoism itself had been taken over by the wonder workers, for its mysticism implied great occult powers for the initiate. "
Taoism China - - - - 150 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 183. Chapter: Taoism. "During the 2nd century AD, famine and plagues caused great turmoil and led hundreds of thousands of Chinese to embrace Taoism, which offered a more personal and emotionally appealing form of religion than state Confucianism. The Han dynasty's oppressive rule added to the peasants' suffering and helped accelerate the swing. "
Taoism China - - - - 184 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 183-184. Chapter: Taoism. "In 184, the government took steps to stem the flood of conversions [to Taoism], which led to a reaction among the Taoists. Some 360,000 of them put yellow cloth on their heads on the same day as a show of solidarity... The rebellion... was suppressed and Chang Chueh executed, but the Taoist Church had been established; it continued to function alongside the other currents of Philosophical Taoism and individual Taois magicians and sorcerers. "
Taoism China - - - - 1949 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 95. "In 1949 Mao Tse-tung formally proscribed all secret organizations, including the Taoist sects, and arrested those who did not abandon their beliefs. "
Taoism China - - - - 1957 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 95. "In 1949 Mao Tse-tung [banned all] Taoist sects... But curiously in 1957, under the formal auspices of the Communist government, the Chinese Taoist Association was organized at Peking, its first meeting brought together former monks and nuns from all over the country. "
Taoism China - - - - 1970 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 191-192. "the People's Republic of China was established along Communist lines in 1949. The Marxist government discouraged religion but did not ban it outright; that prohibition occurred during the disastrous period of the Great Cultural Revolution, 1966-78. Then, many Buddhist and Taoist temples and shrines were closed or destroyed and the clergy forced into labor. The same thing happened to the Catholic, Protestant, and Islamic clergy and places of worship that had been established in China. "
Taoism China - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 190. Chapter: Taoism. "Today there are at least 86 sects of Taoism, including many lay societies that, apart from their religious beliefs, have a history of opposing autocratic or tyrannical rule. "
Taoism China - 6.00% - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 192. "the state now sanctions Taoism and Buddhism, along with Western religion. The latter account for only a small percentage of the population, and official statistics say that 6% practice Taoism openly -- a figure challenged by many outside observers, who feel the number should be much higher. Inner alchemy, feng shui, augury, tao-yin and ancestor worship (although not specifically Taoist) still flourish among the populace, as does belief in the traditional dieties such as San I, Tsao-chun, the Queen Mother of the West, and the Pole Star Deity. "
Taoism China - - 15,000
units
- 1997 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997). Pg. 10-11. "There are 15,000 Taoist priests, both male and female, in China, with numbers growing rapidly. " NOTE: It may or may not be not be accurate at all to equate Chinese Taoist priests with "congegations, " as I've done here, but I wanted to include this stat.
Taoism China - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 49. "Taoists... Illustration: Taishan, on Mt. Tai, China, is the most famous mountain shrine... "
Taoism - clergy China 5,000,000 - - - 1950 *LINK* web site of "Taoist Restoration Society "; web page: "Field Notes " (viewed 19 Feb. 1999) Subhead: "China ": "China currently has about 200,000 Buddhist clergy and only about 25,000 Taoist clergy. As a point of reference, in 1950 China had approximately 5,000,000 Taoist clergy. "
Taoism - clergy China 50,000 - - - 1960 *LINK* web site of "Taoist Restoration Society "; web page: "Introduction " (viewed 19 Feb. 1999) "The collapse of the Ch'ing Dynasty in 1911 brought an end to Imperial support for Taoism... When Mao Tze-tung's Communists claimed victory in China's civil war in 1949, they quickly banned most forms of religious expression. The new government put monks to manual labor, confiscated temples, and plundered treasures. Several million monks were reduced to fewer than 50,000 during Communism's first decade. "
Taoism - clergy China 20,000 0.00% - - 1972 Kinmond, William. The First Book of Communist China. New York: Franklin Watts (1972, revised edition), pg. 4, 74. Pg. 4: "No one really knows how many Chinese there are because distances are so great... roughly 750,000,000... "; Pg. 74: "There are approx. 100 million Chinese Buddhists, 10 million Moslems, 3 million Catholics, 700,000 Protestants, and 20,000 Taoist priests and nuns. "
Taoism - clergy China 30,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 745. "Taoism today. Little is known about the fate of the Taoist tradition in the People's Republic of China. The White Cloud Monastery in Peking housed Taoist monks until the mid-1960s, and the government announced in 1958 that 30,000 Taoist priests were still active. "
Taoism - clergy China 25,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site of "Taoist Restoration Society "; web page: "Field Notes " (viewed 19 Feb. 1999) Subhead: "China ": "China currently has about 200,000 Buddhist clergy and only about 25,000 Taoist clergy. As a point of reference, in 1950 China had approximately 5,000,000 Taoist clergy. "
Tendai China - - - - 575 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 750. "Tendai (Jap.); T'ien-T'ai (Chin.). An academic school of Buddhism organized in sixth century China by Chih-I on T'ien-t'ai Shan ('Heavenly Terrace Mountain') and carried to Mount Hiei in Japan by the Japanese monk Saicho in the early ninth century. "
Tendai China - - - - 575 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "T'IEN-T'AI: an influential branch of Chinese BUDDHISM founded in the sixth century by CHIH-I which based its teachings on the LOTUS SUTRA and the teachings of NAGARJUNA who emphasized the totality of BEING thus identifying the parts with the whole. It declined as a result of persecution in the ninth century but not before it has spread its message to Korea and Japan. "
Tendai China - - - - 597 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 372-373. "T'ien-t'ai school - Chin., lit. 'School of the Celestial Platform'; school of Buddhism that received its definitive form Chih-i (538-97). Its doctrine is based on the Lotus Sutra, thus it is often called the Lotus school... The school was brought to Japan in the 9th century by Saicho, a student of the 10th patriarch, Tao-sui. There it is known under the name Tendai and is one of the most important Buddhist schools. "
Tendai China - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 752. "Tendai... The Contemporary scene. Buddhism in modern China has been largely eclectic, and so Tendai has continued to play a role, often in concert with Ch'an (Zen) practices. T'en-hsu, who founded several monasteries from 1921 to 1932, belonged to the Tendai set by Dharma lineage, and Ch'an by tonsure. The situation of Tendai, as of Buddhism generally under the communist government, is problematic, although visiting Japanese Buddhists have gone on pilgrimage in recent years to do homage to the mummified body of Chih-i on Mount T'ien-t'ai and have been impressed by the care given the site. "
Tenrikyo - graduated from Shuyoka China 5 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who... graduated from Shuyoka... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Tenrikyo - new Besseki Pledge China 70 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who took the Besseki Pledge... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Tenrikyo - received the Sazuke China 23 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who... received the Sazuke... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Theravada Buddhism China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai (Hinayana Buddhists) peoples. "
Tibetan Buddhism China 9,680,000 0.80% - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 8-9, 82. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 83: "The principal buildings throughout Tibet are Buddhist temples and monasteries because most Tibetans are Buddhists. The Mongolians also practice Tibetan Buddhism. Most Chinese Mongolians live in the Inner Mongolian autonomous region... "
True Jesus Church China - - 1
unit
- 1917 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 14. "In the 1920s and 1930s many Chinese Christians broke away rom the traditional denominations and formed their own groupings. The most successful of these were the True Jesus Church founded by Paul Wei in 1917... "
True Jesus Church Dominican Republic - - 1
unit
- 2005 *LINK* official organization website; webpage: "Find a Church " database-based church locator (viewed 14 April 2005) 1 congreg. listed: Dominican Republic Family Service; c/0 Bro. Li-Fu Huang; Av. Mexico Edificio #40 ler. PISO; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; 1-(809)686-4684 (TEL); 1-(809)246-2688 (FAX)
Tu China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai... peoples. "
Tujia China 5,720,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 780. "Tujia: Alternate Names: Bizika, Turan, and Tuming; Location: China; Population: 5.72 million; Religion: Polytheism and ancestor worship "; "The Tujia population amounted to 5.72 million in 1990. They dwell mainly in a vast area at the juncture of Hunan, Hubei, Sichuan, and Guizbou provinces. "
Uygur China - - - - 1984 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984), pg. 117. "The Uighurs, though not strict in the practice of their religion, maintain contact with the rest of the Muslim world. They consider getting married and raising a family to be a religious duty. The Uighurs live by intensive farming. "
Uygur China 7,018,000 0.58% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 81: "The Uygurs are also Muslims. They live in the Tarim and Junggar basins in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Their language belongs to the Turkic language family of Central Asia rather than to the Chinese language family. The Uygurs are traditionally tent dwellers and camel herders, but today many of them live in modern housing in settled oasis communities, where they have begun to practice gardening and small-scale farming. "
Wa China - - - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 82. "The Yi (also called the Lolo) live in Sichuan and Yunan provinces. They are farmers and herders, and their language and customs are related to those of the Tibetans. Less easily absorbed are the Wa, a small but distinctive population along the border of Myanmar. The Wa are related to the tribespeople of Myanmar. They live in small villages in the jungle-covered mountains and maintain a traditional way of life based on hunting. "
Wang Mingdao China - - - - 1949 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994), 14. "...the ministry of Wang Mingdao, an independent evangelical preacher who built his own Christian Tabernacle in Beijing, was widely influential among Chinese Christians both before and after 1949. "


China, continued

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