Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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United Kingdom: England, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Peculiar People United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
1
country
1838 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2157. "Peculiar People: This evangelical denomination derives its name from several texts in the Authorized Version of the Bible, notably from 1 Peter 2.9: 'But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people...' In this older usage, 'peculiar' means 'special', not 'odd'... Also sometimes known at first as the 'Plumstead Peculiars', the sect was founded in 1838 by William Bridges. Its teachings were spread, especially in Essex, by John Banyard. "
Peculiar People United Kingdom: England - - - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2157. "The Peculiar People held - and, to a limited extend, still hold - beliefs which distinguish them from most of the Protesteant bodies. In particular, their unconditional acceptance of the divine inspiration of every word of the Bible (not in itself unique) led them to interpret literally the injunction in James... 'Is any among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anounting him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith will save the sick man...' In this respet, the Peculiar People were nearer to Roman Catholic than to Protestant practice, but in other ways they resembled the 'enthusiastic' branches of evangelical Christianity... women... wore small black bonnets; the men wore dark clothes and... did not grow moustaches. No musical instrument was used in their worship, but hymns were sung with great fervour... The Peculiar People's Hymn Book is one of Christendom's most remarkable hymnals. It contains 1058 hymns... "
Peculiar People United Kingdom: England 300 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2157. "One outstanding figure in the history of the Peculiar People was Bishop William Heddle, who as born in 1846 and went south to Essex, from his native Orkney... Heddle became so powerful and tireless a leader of the Peculiar People that eventually they elected him their bishop... He... lived until 1948, when he was almost 102. Since Bishop Heddle's death, most of the Peculiar People have joined with other denominations in the Union of Evangelical Churches, and their distinctive practices... have fallen out of use. Some of the original congregations, however, and some of the older numbers--numbering a few hundred in all--preserve, in remote Essex villages, the special character of the denomination. "
poll - believe in God United Kingdom: England - 83.00% - - 1948 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988), pg. 17, 323. [Orig. source: Kean, Charles D. "God, Gods, and Dr. George Gallup " in Christianity and Society (1948, vol. 13, pg. 17-19).] Pg. 17: "Shortly after the war, Gallup polls revealed that 94% of the public believed in God, a substantially larger share than in England, Holland, Sweden, Denmark or France. "; pg. 323: "the other figures were: England, 83%; Holland, 80%; Sweden, 80%; Denmark, 80%; and France, 66% "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: England 190,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 606. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Presbyterianism has never been strong in England. At present, the Presbyterian Church in Englnd claims only about 190,000 members. "
Presbyterian United Kingdom: England 70,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 23. "In England, Presbyterianism has for the most part received the pointedly frigid welcome which has been the lot of episcopacy in Scotland and can claim now only about 70,000 members. "
Puritans United Kingdom: England - - - - 1550 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PURITANS: a much maligned dynamic religious movement which arose in the sixteenth century as a CALVINIST party within the CHURCH OF ENGLAND. They emphasized preaching, pastoral care and the REFORMATION of the CHURCH in terms of Biblical norms. Popular with the lower and middle classes, they emphasized education and the improvement of daily life through hard work and innovation. They were bitterly persecuted before and after the English Civil War causing many to flee to America where they played a significant role in shaping the main themes of American RELIGION. Favoring REPUBLICAN FORMS of government, they contributed to the development of modern DEMOCRACY and are credited by many historians with playing an important role in the rise of MODERN SCIENCE. "
Puritans United Kingdom: England - - - - 1563 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 403. "Because they desired to purify the church, these men came to be called the 'Puritans' by the early 1560's. In 1563 they attempted to get their reform program through the Convocation of the clergy of the province of Canterbury, the legislative body for most of the Church of England, but lost by a single vote. "
Puritans United Kingdom: England - - - - 1600 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 347. "Puritans. Some membes of the Church of England felt the English Reformation did not go far enough toward purging the ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church... Later called Puritans, they were also notable for their commitment to personal regeneration, household prayers, and strict morality. Under Elizabeth, James I, and Charles I, the Puritans suffered persecution but refused to stop agitating for a more Calvinistic church. "
Ramakrishna Order United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia United Kingdom: England - - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes. "Orthodox Parishes in England "
Salvation Army United Kingdom: England - - - - 1878 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1328. "In England... The most important of all the British developments that were influenced by the Holiness movement was the Salvation Army. Its founder, William Booth, had been a Methodist New Connection preacher who struck out on his own. He accepted Holiness ideas and rejoiced when 'the fire fell' at his meetings. Salvationism, however, is a many-sided movement and its development cannot be wholly accounted to Holiness teachings. "
Scientology United Kingdom: England 236,000 - - - 1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980), pg. 83. "They claim there are 3 million Scientologists in the United States and 236,000 in England. "
Separatists United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1581 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 405. "The first really conspicuous advocate of Sepaist views in England was Robert Browne (1550-1633), a student in Cambridge in the troublous time of Cartwright's brief professorship, and a graduate there in 1572. At first an advanced Presbyterian Puritan, he came to adopt Separatist principles by about 1850, and in connection with a friend, Robert Harrison, founded an independent gathered congregation in Norwich in 1851. "
Separatists United Kingdom: England - - - - 1620 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 347-348. "Puritans. Some membes of the Church of England felt the English Reformation did not go far enough toward purging the ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church... A small group of radical Puritans insisted on disassociating themselves from the Church of England altogether. Few in number, these Separatists were punished by the Crown and even criticized by some Puritan preachers. "
Shakers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1760 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 499. Chapter: "Communistic Religious Movements "; author: Bryan Wilson. "The Shakers are perhaps the most celebrated of all the communistic sects. This sect owes its origin to the preaching of refugee French Camisards in 18th century England. They converted some Quakers in Lancashire... In 1770 a woman named Ann Lee became their leader... "
Shakers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1771 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997), pg. 17. "Ann... [became leader] of the small radical sect, which included her father and brother. The group's worship services at the Wardleys' home could be heard throughout the neighborhood... By the early 1770s... The group included some socially prominent men and eventually even some converted clergymen... She and eight others emigrated to America [in 1774]. "
Shiloh Apostolic Temple United Kingdom: England - - 8
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 269. "In 1980... reported 23 congregations, of which 8 were in England and 2 in Trinidad. "
Sikhism United Kingdom: England - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). England ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990), pg. 44. "As a result of recent immigrations, many English cities have large Sikh, Hindu, and Islamic congregations. Members of the Sikh and Hindu faiths generally have an Indian background... These groups often support their own schools in an effort to preserve their religious heritage in England. "
Sikhism United Kingdom: England 500,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "There are also 7 million Catholics, almost 2 million Muslims, almost 1 million Hindus, 500,000 Sikhs, 3,000 Jews, and a smattering of people who follow other religions... "
Tractarians United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "OXFORD MOVEMENT: also known as TRACTARIANISM and ANGLO-CATHOLICISM it was a nineteenth century REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT within ANGLICANISM which sought to revive SPIRITUALITY through LITURGICAL renewal and a return to medieval religious practices associated with ROMAN CATHOLICISM. "
Tractarians United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "TRACTARIANISM: the name given to the OXFORD MOVEMENT as a result of the publication of TRACTS FOR THE TIMES. "
Utilitarianism United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992), pg. 131. "Back in England, where empiricism and a profound disinterest in European philosophy were rife, the effect of Hegel was practically nil. Instead, what was being developed was that peculiarly English common-sense philosophy: utilitarianism. It dominated the thinking of most Englishmen for most of the 19th century. One critic said that utilitarianism was no more than empiricism attempting to hold off the 20th century by imitating the 18th, whatever that means... Utilitarianism holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness... By happiness is intended pleasure & the absence of pain. By unhappiness, pain & the privation of pleasure. "
Vineyard Churches United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 245. Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals. Church reporting.
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982), pg. 72. "Today there are 30,000 practicing witches in England. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 3,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982), pg. 73. "the conservative estimate of Nat Freedland, author of The Occult Explosion, who says, 'From the visible manifestations of the witchcraft scene it's doubtful if there are more than 6 or 7 thousand really active practicing witches around today--3,000 in England... perhaps 2,000 in North America, and another one or two thousand scattered around the globe. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1987 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Witchcraft: England 30,000 (1987); World: estimates vary from 50,000 to 800,000 (1996) "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1987 King, Ursula (ed.). Women in the World's Religions; New York: Paragon House (1987), pg. 206-207. "...in the World Christian Encyclopedia it is stated that there are currently 'about 30,000 practising self-styled witches who practice occultism and black magic in England.' "
Yahweh's New Covenant Assembly United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Local Assemblies " (directory). (Viewed 28 June 1999) Branches listed on directory: "England: Contact: YNCA, PO Box 477, Northampton, NN5 4ZX, England; Tel. 01604 752457 "
miscellaneous regional info United Kingdom: England - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 130-131. "Location: United Kingdom (England) "; "About 60% of England's population claim membership in the Church of England, although fewer than 20% attend church regularly. Other Protestant sects, including Methodists and Baptists, are also active in England and are called free churches. The Roman Catholic church is still very strong, partly due to the large number of Irish immigrants and Polish or Italian refugees who have settled in England. The county also has one of Europe's largest Jewish populations, numbering 400,000, and many cities have recently become home to large Sikh, Hindu, and Muslim immigrant populations. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England & Wales 5,500,000 - - - 1979 Michael P. Hornsby-Smith, Raymond M. Lee & Peter A. Reilly. "Social and Religious Change in Four English Roman Catholic Parishes " in Sociology (Vol. 18, No. 3, Aug. 1984), pg. 353. "Recent estimates indicate that there are about 1.7 million Mass attenders and five and a half million Catholics in England and Wales (Hornsby-Smith & Lee, 1979; Spencer 1966). "
Catholic - churchgoers United Kingdom: England & Wales 1,700,000 - - - 1979 Michael P. Hornsby-Smith, Raymond M. Lee & Peter A. Reilly. "Social and Religious Change in Four English Roman Catholic Parishes " in Sociology (Vol. 18, No. 3, Aug. 1984), pg. 353. "Recent estimates indicate that there are about 1.7 million Mass attenders and five and a half million Catholics in England and Wales (Hornsby-Smith & Lee, 1979; Spencer 1966). "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) United Kingdom: England: London - - 7
units
- 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1459. "The new Church prospered financially. Besides Drummond, a number of rich men belonged and all its members paid a tenth of their income to the church. A tenth part of this tithe went to the headquarters at Albury and the rest was used for the upkeep and growth of the movement. It grew rapidly. Soon there were seven churches in London besides others in many of the main provincial towns and the Irvingites spread overseas, particularly to Germany and the United States. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England: Wisborough and Northchapel - 33.00% - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "At the beginning of this century the members [Society of Dependants, or Cokelers] formed almost a third of the population of Wisborough and Norchchapel, and there were many other villages under their influence. "
attendance - weekly United Kingdom: Great Britain - 27.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. "...according to a worldwide study based at the University of Michigan. Fully 44% of Americans attend church once a week, not counting funerals, christenings and baptisms, compared with 27% of people in Great Britain, 21% of the French, 4% of Swedes and 3% of Japanese. "
Baptist United Kingdom: Great Britain 226,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985 an estimated 16% of the adult population were members of Christian churches.... Other Protestant churches, including the Methodists (with nearly 500,000 adult members) and the Baptists (226,000). "
Brahma Kumaris United Kingdom: Great Britain 815 - - - 1992 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995, pg. 16. "When it is considered that there were, on the ninth of May 1992, only 815 Brahma Kumaris in the whole of Great Britain, it is striking to contemplate the effectiveness and the scope of their activity. "
Brethren in Christ United Kingdom: Great Britain 63 - 3
units
- 1994 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " GREAT BRITAIN: Brethren in Christ Church, U.K.; Member (1994): 63; Congregations: 3
British Conference of Mennonites United Kingdom: Great Britain 25 - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " GREAT BRITAIN... British Conference of Mennonites; Members: 25; Congregations: 1
Catholic United Kingdom: Great Britain 2,000,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985... The Roman Catholic Church had over 2 million members. "
Catholic - attend at least monthly United Kingdom: Great Britain - 6.00% - - 1985 Greeley, Andrew M. The Catholic Myth: The Behavior and Beliefs of American Catholics. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1990), pg. 266, 269. Pg. 266: "using the ISV [International Study of Values, 1981] and ISSP [International Social Survey Project, 1985] surveys... "; Pg. 269: "...proportion of men & women over 35 who attend Mass at least once a month... Canada, 66%; Great Britain, 60%; Australia, 60%... " [Great Britain: 60% * est. 10% of pop. which is Catholic, = 6% of total pop. attending mass monthly]
Christadelphian United Kingdom: Great Britain 20,000 - - - 1975 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 168. "In the 1970s there were about 20,000 Christadelphians in the U.S., and about the same number in Great Britain. "
Christianity - affiliated United Kingdom: Great Britain - 16.00% - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985 an estimated 16% of the adult population were members of Christian churches. "
Church of England United Kingdom: Great Britain 2,000,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985 an estimated 16% of the adult population were members of Christian churches. About 2 million were members of the Church of England, while the Church of Scotland had about 900,000 members. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 12,139 - - - 1846 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 54. "The size of the British Mission shot forward amazingly during this period. At the end of 1846 Church membership stoodat 12,139. By the end of 1850 there were 30,747 on the records of the Church in the British Isles. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 30,747 - - - 1850 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 54. "The size of the British Mission shot forward amazingly during this period. At the end of 1846 Church membership stoodat 12,139. By the end of 1850 there were 30,747 on the records of the Church in the British Isles. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 8,000 - - - 1914 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 98. "Church membership in Britain remained at about 8,000 during the war [World War I] years. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 8,000 - - - 1920 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 100. "Coincidentally Church membership in the British Isles stood at about 8,000 in both 1920 and the beginning of World War II. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 8,000 - - - 1940 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 100.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain - - 68
units
- 1940 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 107. "in May 1944 [Pres. Hugh B. Brown] proffered deserved praise upon President Anastasiou and his team for carrying on so admirably during the dark days of the war. During those four and a half years, the number of branches increased from 68 to 75. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain - - 75
units
- 1944 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 107. "in May 1944 [Pres. Hugh B. Brown] proffered deserved praise upon President Anastasiou and his team for carrying on so admirably during the dark days of the war. During those four and a half years, the number of branches increased from 68 to 75. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 7,000 - - - 1945 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 107. "...when the war came to an end in Europe in May 1945. Still some 7,000 members were on the rolls and could be identified by Church leaders. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: Great Britain 90,982 - - - 1980 Stark, Rodney. "The Rise of a New World Faith " in Latter-day Saint Social Life: Social Research on the LDS Church and its Members, edited by James T. Duke. Religious Studies Center, BYU: Provo, UT (1998), pg. 17. "Table: 1.3: Two Years of Mormon Growth, 1978-80 "; Two columns: "Percentage rate of membership growth 1978-80 " and "Number of members in 1980 "; Growth 1978-80: 11%; Location listed as "Great Britain "
Church of Scotland United Kingdom: Great Britain 900,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985 an estimated 16% of the adult population were members of Christian churches. About 2 million were members of the Church of England, while the Church of Scotland had about 900,000 members. "
Freemasonry United Kingdom: Great Britain 1,000,000 - - - 1975 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 267. "In the 1970s there were nearly six million Freemasons worldwide, of whom four million were in the U.S. and one million in Great Britain. "
Hinduism United Kingdom: Great Britain 140,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985... Members of other religions included about 900,000 Muslims, 111,000 Jews, 140,000 Hindus and 175,000 Sikhs. "
Islam United Kingdom: Great Britain 900,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985... Members of other religions included about 900,000 Muslims, 111,000 Jews, 140,000 Hindus and 175,000 Sikhs. "
Judaism United Kingdom: Great Britain 450,000 - - - 1977 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 240. "The 450,000 Jews of Great Britain... look as if they are here to stay (that is, if the United Kingdom is here to stay). Apart from anything else, they are sustained by the inherent conservatism of the Englishmen about them. The English are not xenophobes but they have a fairly developed sense of their own identity. It takes a very long time for a foreigner to become an Englishman--'about three hundred years' in the words of a member of one very old Jewish clan. Most Jews have given up trying and have reconciled themselves to being that little bit different. On the whole they are preferred that way, for there is nothing so distasteful to the Englishman as the Jew who tries to pass as anything else... "
Judaism United Kingdom: Great Britain 111,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985... Members of other religions included about 900,000 Muslims, 111,000 Jews, 140,000 Hindus and 175,000 Sikhs. "
Mennonite World Conference United Kingdom: Great Britain 88 - - - 1997 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site; page: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals " (viewed 8 Aug. 1999). Table: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals "; "based on the most recent data available... from 1996 or 1997... statistics indicate baptized members "; Dif. religious bodies: 2.
Methodist United Kingdom: Great Britain 1,264,493 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 489. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The following statistical table gives the present approx. membership of the main divisions of world-wide Methodism... " Location listed in table as "Great Britain "
Methodist United Kingdom: Great Britain 500,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985 an estimated 16% of the adult population were members of Christian churches.... Other Protestant churches, including the Methodists (with nearly 500,000 adult members) and the Baptists (226,000). "
poll - say religion very important to them United Kingdom: Great Britain - 16.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. "Moreover, 53 percent of Americans say that religion is very important in their lives, compared with 16 percent, 14 percent, and 13 percent, respectively, of the British, French and Germans... "
Quaker United Kingdom: Great Britain 20,000 - - - 1978 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 267. "Of the nearly 200,000 Friends in the world in 1978, 121,000 were in the U.S., 20,000 in Great Britain... "
Sikhism United Kingdom: Great Britain 175,000 - - - 1986 Langley, Andrew. Passport to Great Britain. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: In 1985... Members of other religions included about 900,000 Muslims, 111,000 Jews, 140,000 Hindus and 175,000 Sikhs. "
Skinheads United Kingdom: Great Britain 10,000 - - - 1991 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993), pg. 41. "Skinheads originated in Great Britain, where in the early 1990s the group had a following of 8,000 to 10,000 members. "
Skinheads United Kingdom: Great Britain 10,000 - - - 1994 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994), pg. 27. "Today there are an estimated eight to ten thousand skinheads in Great Britain... "
Sunday Schools United Kingdom: Great Britain 250,000 - - - 1787 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 724. "Sunday Schools... By 1787 such schools had enlisted one quarter of a million students in Great Britain. "
Anglican United Kingdom: Isle of Man 43,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Christianity United Kingdom: Isle of Man - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Anglican, Roman Catholic, Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, Society of Friends; Total pop.: 74,504.
other United Kingdom: Isle of Man 27,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Anglican
Bene Israel United Kingdom: London 1,200 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 205. "Educated Bene Israel sometimes left for countries other than Israel, especially England. Three hundred families are estimated living in the London area. They have little contact with one another, and nothing resembling a Bene Israel community. "
Judaism United Kingdom: London 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
Mashhadi Jews United Kingdom: London 100 - 1
unit
- 1935 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 77. "In London, Mashhadis founded one of their richest and most influential communities. There, too, they had their own synagogue and kept to themselves. Although more than a hundred lived in London by the 1930s, hardly any other London Jews knew they were there. Today it is an aging community; most of the younger Mashhadis left for New York after World War II. "
Mithraism United Kingdom: London - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977), pg. 35. "...Mithraism... Its shrines have been uncovered in many places, a large one recently in London. "


United Kingdom: London, continued

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