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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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United Kingdom: England, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1906 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2259. "Smyth-Pigott moved down to Spaxton... In 1906 a male child was born to Miss [Ruth] Preece, the records at Somerset House showing that the father was John Hugh Smyth-Pigott... At this time there were nearly 100 women in the Abode, but few men... Smyth-Pigott died in March 1927 [at the age] of 75. It was reported that the servants were unpaid, working for love and receiving only a little pocket money. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England 1 - - - 1955 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2259. "In 1955 60-year-old Miss Ruth Ranken of Barnet revealed that she had been brought up as a member of the sect, and was still one in spirit... In 1962 the house of Spaxton was sold and the story of the Abode of Love ['Agapemone'] came to an end. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1956 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2258. "The women regarded it as an honour to be taken by [H. J. Prince], who explained in his work The Little Open Book (1856) that Christ had appointed him for these special tasks. A wave of religious fanaticism swept across the Bridgewater district. Many... intelligent people were convinced when Brother Prince rose and announced that he was the final revelation of the will of God. "
Anglican - active United Kingdom: England 2,800,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 172. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Church of England:... At present there are 42 dioceses in England, and c. 20,000 clergy; active membership is reflected by Easter communicants, usually about 2,800,000--adherents are probably several times as numerous... "
Anglican - active United Kingdom: England 2,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Barr, Robert (AP). "Bishops Find Agreement Elusive During Conference " in Salt Lake Tribune (Aug. 8, 1998). the Anglican Communion is now mainly an African church: 17.5 million members in Nigeria and 8 million in Uganda dwarf the Church of England's 2 million active members - roughly the size of Anglican churches in Kenya, South Africa and southern India.
Baptist United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1611 Stuber, Stanley I. How We Got Our Denominations: A Primer on Church History. New York: Association Press Revised Ed., 1959), pg. 191. "They established the first Baptist church in England at London during the same year (1611). "
Baptist United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1614 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 91. "Thomas Helwys (ca. 1550-1616), one of the members of [John Smyth's] church, became disenchanted with the direction that the Amsterdam congregation was taking--particularly its association with continental Anabaptists--and returned to England, where he founded the first Baptist church in that country. "
Bible Christian Church United Kingdom: England - - 11
units
- 1816 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 199. Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: British Methodism. "Bible Christians began in England... O'Bryan organized the first Bible Christian society in October 1815. The first quarterly conference in Jan. 1816 reported 11 societies in the fellowship. "
Bible Christian Church United Kingdom: England 2,000 - - - 1819 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 199. Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: British Methodism. "Bible Christians began in England... O'Bryan organized the first Bible Christian society in October 1815. The first quarterly conference in Jan. 1816 reported 11 societies in the fellowship. At the first conference of the Connection in 1819 16 male and 14 female itinerant preachers were reported, with a following of 2000. "
Boehmenism United Kingdom: England - 0.00% - - 1710 Deghaye, Pierre. "Jacob Boehme and His Followers " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992), pg. 244. "After 1710, organized Boehmenism no longer existed in England. "
Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. United Kingdom: England - - 3
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 118-119. "The Church also oversees parishes in England (3), Belgium, & Australia. "
Catholic United Kingdom: England - - - - 1979 Michael P. Hornsby-Smith, Raymond M. Lee & Peter A. Reilly. "Social and Religious Change in Four English Roman Catholic Parishes " in Sociology (Vol. 18, No. 3, Aug. 1984), pg. 353. "A census of Churches in England in 1979 showed that Catholics claimed over half the total membership of the Christian Churches and just over one third of the adult Church attenders (Bible Society, 1980:8) "
Catholic United Kingdom: England 4,011,368 8.20% 2,593
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Catholic United Kingdom: England 7,000,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "There are also 7 million Catholics, almost 2 million Muslims, almost 1 million Hindus, 500,000 Sikhs, 3,000 Jews, and a smattering of people who follow other religions... "
Catholic - Cistercian United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1128 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977), pg. 145. "...Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. "
Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites) United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1834 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1459. "As a result of growing hostility, the Irvingite members left Regent Square [a Presbyterian church in London] in 1832 and moved to a dark chapel in Newman Street, where they set themselves up as the Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. [Edward] Irving was beginning to see himself as the leader of a faithful remnant whom God was gathering together as the end of the world came near... Yet when Irving died in December 1834 he left behind him no distinctive body of doctrine, no blueprint for a Church, no liturgy or ministry; and every expectation was that the fledgling Catholic Apostolic Church was destined to an early oblivion. "
Christianity United Kingdom: England - - - - 597 C.E. Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 97. "Christianity took hold in Ireland, Wales, and part of Scotland, but it was late coming to England. About A.D. 570, a Kentish king named Ethelbert married a Christian woman. Pope Gregory of Rome, hearing of the event, sent a mission to Englandin 597. The leader, Augustine, baptized the king and established Canterbury as the headquarters of the Christian church in England. "
Church of England United Kingdom: England - 75.00% - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 14. "At present, approximately three-fourths of the English population is baptized in the Church of England, and approximately one-half of the total number of marriages are performed in the established church. "
Church of England United Kingdom: England - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). England ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990), pg. 44. "The Church of England (or Anglican Church) is the country's official religious institution... Although millions of English people belong to the Church of England, many of them do not regularly attend services. "
Church of England United Kingdom: England - 50.00% - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "About half of England's people belong to the Church of England. "
Church of England United Kingdom: England - 60.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 130-131. "Location: United Kingdom (England) "; "About 60% of England's population claim membership in the Church of England, although fewer than 20% attend church regularly. "
Church of England - active United Kingdom: England 2,800,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 172. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Church of England:... At present there are 42 dioceses in England, and c. 20,000 clergy; active membership is reflected by Easter communicants, usually about 2,800,000--adherents are probably several times as numerous... "
Church of England - active United Kingdom: England 2,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Barr, Robert (AP). "Bishops Find Agreement Elusive During Conference " in Salt Lake Tribune (Aug. 8, 1998). the Anglican Communion is now mainly an African church: 17.5 million members in Nigeria and 8 million in Uganda dwarf the Church of England's 2 million active members - roughly the size of Anglican churches in Kenya, South Africa and southern India.
Church of England - attend regularly United Kingdom: England - 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 130-131. "Location: United Kingdom (England) "; "About 60% of England's population claim membership in the Church of England, although fewer than 20% attend church regularly. " [ "regularly " is not defined here, nor is it completely clear whether this refers to 20% of the English people, or 20% of the members of the Church of England]
Church of God in Christ, Congregational United Kingdom: England - - 4
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 273. "In 1971 there were 33 churches in the U.S., 4 in England... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 127,000 0.30% 283
units
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints United Kingdom: England 133,000 0.28% 290
units
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1890. "Apart from those built in other American states, temples have been constructed in Hawaii, New Zealand, Canada, Switzerland, Austria and London, England. "
Church of the White Eagle Lodge United Kingdom: England - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1 Jan. 1999): directory White Eagle centers in directory: The White Eagle Lodge, New Lands, Brewells Lane, LISS, Hampshire, England ( "This is the Mother Lodge and worldwide Headquartersof the White Eagle organization "); The White Eagle Lodge, 9 St.Mary Abbots Place, Kensington, London
Clapham sect United Kingdom: England - - - - 1800 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CLAPHAM SECT: a group of influential Englishmen, including William WILBERFORCE and Lord SHAFTESBURY, whose activities centered on the EVANGELICAL religion preached at Clapham Parish Church in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. They toiled for the ABOLITION of slavery, REFORM of child labor laws, and many other social innovations in addition to supporting MISSIONARY work and evangelical CHRISTIANITY generally. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "The strict puritanical sect of the Society of Dependants, or Cokelers as they were known popularly, was founded in 1850 and still has a small following today. It is exclusive to the West Sussex area and parts of south-west Surrey [England]. The origin of the strange name Cokelers is not certain, although it has been suggested that it refers to the members' custom of drinking cocoa at their meetings, as part of the simple refreshments which were provided on these occasions. Another possible explanation is that it derived from a place called Cokkeg, in the vilalge of Loxwood in Sussex, where the sect was formed. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England 1,500 - - - 1885 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "Furthermore, the Society [Society of Dependants, i.e. Cokelers] did not advocate marriage. Anyone wishing to marry was at liberty to do so, but no marriage service culd be solemnized by the followers of John Sirgood... This severe mortification of the flesh attracted many sincere, but often simple, followers and half the farm labourers in the district were soon Dependants. As Sirgood's doctrine spread further afield, many new Dependant communities sprang up in neighboring towns and villages [around Loxwood], and the Cokelers still use their chapels today... But although the Cokelers prospered, they have not multiplied. Their doctrines were sterile and their membership dwindled, out of touch with the world beyond their little kingdom. In 1885, the year of Sirgood's death, membership in the district totalled 1,500. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "The strict puritanical sect of the Society of Dependants, or Cokelers as they were known popularly, was founded in 1850 and still has a small following today. It is exclusive to the West Sussex area and parts of south-west Surrey [England]. "
Cokelers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "Today a few of the meeting-houses remain open, but only a few Cokelers attend the services. Many of the stores and communal farms have been sold. It is not a religion likely to attract young people, in a world where the internal combustion engine, television, pop music, the cinema and alcohol are worshipped. " [In Sussex & Surrey, England]
Cokelers - active United Kingdom: England 900 - - - 1904 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 492. "By 1904 there were only about 900 members regularly attending their chapels, dressed in black. "
Congregationalist United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1580 C.E. Stuber, Stanley I. How We Got Our Denominations: A Primer on Church History. New York: Association Press Revised Ed., 1959), pg. 175. "It was Robert Browne, a pastor holding the Separatists' position, who founded the Congregational Church in England. In 1581 he, with his congregation, emigrated to Holland because of the persecutions... "
Deism United Kingdom: England - - - - 1750 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DEISM: a PHILOSOPHY which regards GOD as the intelligent creator of an independent and law-abiding world but denies that He providentially guides it or intervenes in any way with its course or destiny. REASON is the sole instrument through which God's EXISTENCE and NATURE can be deduced from the orderly workings of the UNIVERSE. Deism flourished in England in the eighteenth century and strongly influenced the rise of BIBLICAL CRITICISM and MODERNISM in the nineteenth century. "
Diggers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1650 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 499. Chapter: "Communistic Religious Movements "; author: Bryan Wilson. "It is not every society that allows men to congregat in this way. The Levellers and diggers of 17th century England were seen as a threat to the social order, and when this is the response of the political authorities such groups are not permitted to establish themselves. "
Diggers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1660 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DIGGERS: a radical SECT led by Gerrard WINSTANLEY (1609-1660) which emerged during the English Civil War to advocate agrarian communism and egalitarianism. "
Evangelical United Kingdom: England - - - - 1846 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "Evangelicals. The term 'evangelical' has a long history... In 1846 opponents of the Anglo-Catholic movement in England formed a cooperative venture, the Evangelical Alliance. The Alliance affirmed a nine-point statement of faith... "
Evangelical Alliance United Kingdom: England - - - - 1846 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 243-244. "In 1846 opponents of the Anglo-Catholic movement in England formed a cooperative venture, the Evangelical Alliance. The Alliance affirmed a nine-point statement of faith... "
Fabian Society United Kingdom: England - - - - 1883 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "FABIANS: members of the Fabian Society, an important British SOCIALIST society founded in 1883 which favored an evolutionary SOCIALIST 'permeation' of CAPITALIST institutions and opposed the REVOLUTIONARY doctrine of MARX. "
Freemasonry United Kingdom: England - - - - 1717 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 8). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1036. "Speculative Freemasonry was a British development of the early 1700s. Operative Masons continued into the 17thy century, as survivors of the medieval guild system, with its complex traditions and practices in which mutual aid was a prominent feature. Then late in that century men who were not professionally connected with biulding began to join the so-called Lodges of the Operative Masons... a notable event occurred in the year 1717 when the members of four London Lodges met at a tavern near Covent Garden and constituted themselves 'A Grand Lodge pro Tempore... in Due Form and... resolved to hold the Annual Assembly and Feast... All Freemasonry in existence today can be traced, through one channel or another, to the Grand Lodge of England thus constittued in 1717. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England - - - - 1750 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994), pg. 63. "More glamorous were groups like the Hellfire Club of eighteenth-century England. The Hellfire Club was typical of many groups labeled satanic. It consisted of wealthy, bored young gentlemen who met to dabble in magic, hold orgies, and generally outrage the respectable establishment. They often dressed in monks' robes and performed obscene parodies of Christian rituals. Most then went on to lead perfectly respectable lives as members of the British upper class. Two interesting names have been associated with the Hellfire Club. The first is John Wilkes, a radical politician who was the only supporter of American indepence in the British Parliament at the time of the Revolution... The second is Benjamin Franklin, who reputedly attended meetings of The Hellfire Club while he was in England. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England 12 - - - 1762 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1794. "Medmenham Monks. The notoious society commonly known as the 'Hell-Fire Club' which met at Medmenham Abbey in Buckinghamshire, and perhaps afterwards in the High Wycombe caves, resulted from the meeting of several eccentric minds; but it was also very much a creature of its century... Paul Whitehead... Tomas Potter... George Selwyn... Bubb, Dashwood, Sandwich... Marquis of Bute. From 1750 until 1762 these public figures gathered in Sir Francis Dashwood's ruined abbey for a fortnight each June. With several of the local gentry, they formed a 'Superior Order' of 12... There was also an 'Inferior Order' of 12, composed of guests and neighbours who were not allowed to take part in the special festivities of the brotherhood... The escapade lasted for 12 years until... John Wilkes decided to expose the whole apparatus... by 1762 the majority... were in political power... Bute was Prime Minister... Bubb Dodington was in the Cabinet... Dashwood was Chancellor of the Exchequer. "
Hellfire Club United Kingdom: England - - - - 1762 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1794. "[After 1762] Dashwood tried to resurrect the festivities in the caves under Wycombe Hill, on top of which he built a most secular church, combined with wine bins and surmounted by a golden ball in which he would sit with a bottle of his 'divine milk-punch' and roar parodies of the Psalms. But age wearied the appetite of the company for diversion; death pruned their numbers... "
Hinduism United Kingdom: England - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). England ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990), pg. 44. "As a result of recent immigrations, many English cities have large Sikh, Hindu, and Islamic congregations. Members of the Sikh and Hindu faiths generally have an Indian background... These groups often support their own schools in an effort to preserve their religious heritage in England. "
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 1,000,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "There are also 7 million Catholics, almost 2 million Muslims, almost 1 million Hindus, 500,000 Sikhs, 3,000 Jews, and a smattering of people who follow other religions... "
Hinduism United Kingdom: England 1,000,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 104. "There are close to a million Indian immigrants living in England, and most of them are Hindus. They worship at many small temples and shrines. In 1995, the largest Hindu temple outside of India opened in north London. "
Holiness movement United Kingdom: England - - - - 1857 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1328. "In England, many evangelicals in the Church of England and in the Noncomformist denominations were attracted to Holiness ideas, from the time of the second evangelical awakening in 1857, and as a result of campaigns brought to Great Britain by Dwight L. Moody in 1873 and 1883, but most of them continued in their existing fellowships. The most important of all the British developments that were influenced by the Holiness movement was the Salvation Army. Its founder, William Booth, had been a Methodist New Connection preacher who struck out on his own. He accepted Holiness ideas and rejoiced when 'the fire fell' at his meetings. Salvationism, however, is a many-sided movement and its development cannot be wholly accounted to Holiness teachings. "
Huguenots United Kingdom: England - - - - 1685 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1369. "Huguenots: French Protestants... the Edict [of Nantes] was revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV and many Huguenots fled to England and Prussia. "
Islam United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1890 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 104. "The first mosque... in England was founded in 1890 in Woking, Surrey. "
Islam United Kingdom: England - - 150
units
- 1984 Lindsey, Hal. Planet Earth - 2000 A.D.. Palos Verdes, California: Western Front, Ltd. (1994), pg. 177-178. "About 10 years ago there were an estimated 150 mosques in England, today there are more than 1,100. "
Islam United Kingdom: England - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). England ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990), pg. 44. "As a result of recent immigrations, many English cities have large Sikh, Hindu, and Islamic congregations... the followers of Islam come mostly from Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Middle East. These groups often support their own schools in an effort to preserve their religious heritage in England. "
Islam United Kingdom: England - - 1,100
units
- 1994 Lindsey, Hal. Planet Earth - 2000 A.D.. Palos Verdes, California: Western Front, Ltd. (1994), pg. 177-178. "In England today there are now more Muslims than Methodists. There are even more Muslims than there are evangelical Christians. 'Funded by the vast resources of Arab oil money, the Muslims are buying abandoned Anglican churches and turning them into mosques at such a rate that some Muslims claim that England will be the first Muslim European country,' says author Robert Morey. About 10 years ago there were an estimated 150 mosques in England, today there are more than 1,100. "
Islam United Kingdom: England 2,000,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "There are also 7 million Catholics, almost 2 million Muslims, almost 1 million Hindus, 500,000 Sikhs, 3,000 Jews, and a smattering of people who follow other religions... "
Jews for Jesus United Kingdom: England 50 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "After two years of missionary work in England (which has a fairly big Jewish population), Jews for Jesus was able to count less that 50 actual members (some were no doubt American emigrants) according to the movement's own information. "
Judaism United Kingdom: England 400,000 0.85% - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). England ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990), pg. 40, 44. Pg. 40: "In 1990 the country had 47 million inhabitants out of a total of 57 million British people. "; Pg. 44: "England has one of Europe's largest Jewish congregations, numbering about 400,000. Many of the group's members came to England to escape persecution in Germany, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe earlier in the 20th century. Jewish communities also run their own schools... "
Judaism United Kingdom: England 3,000 - - - 1997 Blashfield, Jean F. England ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997), pg. 102. "There are also 7 million Catholics, almost 2 million Muslims, almost 1 million Hindus, 500,000 Sikhs, 3,000 Jews, and a smattering of people who follow other religions... "
Judaism United Kingdom: England 400,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 130-131. "Location: United Kingdom (England) "; "The county also has one of Europe's largest Jewish populations, numbering 400,000... "
Levellers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1650 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 499. Chapter: "Communistic Religious Movements "; author: Bryan Wilson. "It is not every society that allows men to congregat in this way. The Levellers and diggers of 17th century England were seen as a threat to the social order, and when this is the response of the political authorities such groups are not permitted to establish themselves. "
Levellers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1650 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "LEVELLERS: an extremist SECT during the PURITAN REVOLUTION and English Civil War which advocated civil and religious equality. "
Lollards United Kingdom: England - - - - 1300 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 473. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "The sectarian movements led by John Wyclif in England and John Huss in Bohemia were associated with the spirit of rising nationalism. Wyclif's followers, the Lollards, were largely suppressed... "
Lollards United Kingdom: England - - - - 1420 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 436. "Lollards (Christian). Name given to the followers of John Wycliffe (1330-84), and later used for other English noncomformists. By 1420 Lollardy was primarily a lower class phenomenon which virtually disappeared after fifty years of persecution. "
Methodist United Kingdom: England 4 - 1
unit
- 1729 Allen, Charles L. Meet the Methodists: An Introduction to the United Methodist Church. Nashville: Abingdon Press (1986), pg. 14-15. "John Wesley... wrote the following account of the 1st society called Methodist: 'In Nov., 1729, 4 young gentlemen of Oxford... began... reading chiefly the Greek Testament... The next year, two or three of Mr. Wesley's pupils desired the liberty of meeting with them; and afterwards one of Mr. Charles Wesley's pupils... "
Methodist United Kingdom: England 8 - 1
unit
- 1730 Allen, Charles L. Meet the Methodists: An Introduction to the United Methodist Church. Nashville: Abingdon Press (1986), pg. 14-15. "John Wesley... wrote the following account of the 1st society called Methodist: 'In Nov., 1729, 4 young gentlemen of Oxford... began... reading chiefly the Greek Testament... The next year, two or three of Mr. Wesley's pupils desired the liberty of meeting with them; and afterwards one of Mr. Charles Wesley's pupils... "
Methodist United Kingdom: England 16 - 1
unit
- 1732 Allen, Charles L. Meet the Methodists: An Introduction to the United Methodist Church. Nashville: Abingdon Press (1986), pg. 14-15. "John Wesley... wrote the following account of the 1st society called Methodist: 'In Nov., 1729, 4 young gentlemen of Oxford... began... reading chiefly the Greek Testament... The next year, two or three of Mr. Wesley's pupils desired the liberty of meeting with them; and afterwards one of Mr. Charles Wesley's pupils... It was in 1732 that Mr. Ingham... & Mr. Broughton... were added... To these, in April, was joined Mr. Clayton... with 2 or 3 of his pupils... [&] Mr. James Hervey... and afterwards Mr. Whitefield' "
Methodist United Kingdom: England - - - - 1740 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 29. "Methodists. John Wesley, an eigtheenth-century priest in the Church of England...
Methodist United Kingdom: England 70,000 - - - 1800 Hopfe, Lews M. Religions of the World, Macmillan Publishing Co.: New York (1983) [3rd edition], pg. 413. "At the end of the eighteenth century there were over 70,000 Methodists in England... "
Mt. Zion Sanctuary United Kingdom: England - - 2
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 251. Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals. Church reporting.
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
1
country
1885 "...the founder, James Jershom Jezreel... arrived in Gillingham [in Kent, England] in 1875 as James White... soon gathered around him a group of faithful followers & was able to move into Woodlands -- a large house in Gillingham... opened a school which taught a very narrow curriculum largely based upon Jezreel's own writings... The school and the centre at Woodlands drew the movement together in Gillingham, and converts in other places sold up their belongings and came to join the community... The organization was never very large but it attracted a number of wealthy people who put their entire fortunes at the disposal of Jezreel. Soon he conceived of a great temple which would serve as the focal point for his new religious community. Land was bought high above the Medway River and, after the builder had modified the original plans, the work was under way... In 1885 the foundations had been laid and building began when... Jezreel... died and and the sect was thrown into disarray. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - - 1
country
1888 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1514. "In 1885... Jezreel... died and and the sect was thrown into disarray... Jezreel's widow, now named Queen Esther... gained control...lacking in... organizational ability... People who had given all their money to the movement demanded it back... The society was threatened with schism and the threat became a reality when one faction seceded and moved to London. Work on the temlpe was held up when the builders demanded their money, and finally stopped when the money was not forthcoming... Esther... died in 1888. Serious dissension broke out among the remaining followers of Jezreel and the movement split into warring groups... There was a short revival of fortunes when an American calling himself Prince Michael arrived to claim leadership, but his endeavours to reestablish the New and Latter House of Israel met with no lasting success. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England - - - 1
country
1960 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1514. "The New and Latter House of Israel, also known as the Jezreels or Jezreelites, were a minor religious sect of the 19th century. Until 1960 the terraced houses of Upper Gillingham in Kent were overshadowed by their headquarters, a great ruined hulk of a building. "
New and Latter House of Israel United Kingdom: England 0 0.00% - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1514. "The London secessionists carried on and up to the late 1950's bearded speakers at Hyde Park Corner were still telling of the wonders of the Flying Roll. They disclaimed any connection with the Gillingham believers who lingered on, their temple uncompleted and derelict; in 1960 the edifice was destroyed. Although the New and Latter House of Israel has ceased to exist, buses still stop at 'the Jezreels', copies of the Flying Roll can still be bought, and James Jershom Jezreel is still reckoned as the Sixth Trumpeter by the present followers of Joanna Southcott, the Panacea Society of Bedford. "
Panacea Society of Bedford United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1514. "... James Jershom Jezreel is still reckoned as the Sixth Trumpeter by the present followers of Joanna Southcott, the Panacea Society of Bedford. "


United Kingdom: England, continued

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