Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Jehovah's Witnesses Tunisia 49 0.00% 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column; Location listed in table as "Truk "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Tunisia 86 - 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Judaism Tunisia 105,000 - - - 1955 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 212. "Of the 105,000 Jews who lived in Tunisia prior to independence from France in 1956... "
Judaism Tunisia 7,000 - - - 1990 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 212. "Of the 105,000 Jews who lived in Tunisia prior to independence from France in 1956, there are about 7,000 left -- in the ancient community on the island of Djerba, with its magnificent synagogue, the Ghriba, and in small communities in Tunis, Sfax and Sousse -- the rest having emigrated to France or Israel. Although Jews have never been persecuted in Tunisia, the presence of the headquarters of the Palestinian Liberation Organization in Tunis, the capital, and the uncertainty of the country's political future have made the situation precarious for those who have remained. "
Judaism Tunisia 92,453 1.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 9,245,284. Muslim 98%, Christian 1%, Jewish 1%
Judaism Tunisia 2,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
other Tunisia 50,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Sunni
Sunni Tunisia - 99.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Sunni Tunisia 9,010,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Alevis Turkey 8,000,000 15.30% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 52.8 million [total pop.] (1987). About 99 percent Muslim, the majority adhering to general tenets of Sunni Islam. Between 3 and 8 million Alevis, a sect of Shia Islam. Constitution proclaims Turkey a secular nation.
Alevis Turkey - - - - 1993 Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993), pg. 67-68. "Today, more than 99% of the country is Moslem... The majority of Turks are Sunni... The most important group of Shiite Turks is the Alevi, a sect whose members mostly live in east and southeast Anatolia. The Alevi are a group divided by religion from the majority of Turks. A social barrier has also developed that is made easier by the fact that the majority of Alevi live in an enclosed area. "
Alevis Turkey 20,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* DAWN Fridayfax 1998 #24: Turkey: "Close to a spiritual breakthrough " An undecided element are the Alevis, an Islamic minority with some 20 million members who see Ali as their religious head, not Mohammed.
Athanasianism Turkey - - - - 325 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 536. "Nicaea, Council of. The first ecumenical council of the church, which met in the ancient city of Nicaea (modern Iznik, Turkey), beginning on June 19, 325... was summoned by the first Christian emperor, Constantine, and concluding its work... The exact number of bishops who attended is not known, and no minutes of the proceedings are preserved. However, a highly apologetic letter of Eusebius of Caesarea (in Socrates, Ecclesiastical History 1.8.35) preserves the earliest text of the creed; and Athanasius of Alexandria (De Decretis 19-20) details some of the theological debate which led, for the first time in history, to the insertion of a nonscriptural term into a creed (Gr. Homoousios; 'of the same substance') to describe the relation of God to Christ... "
attendance - weekly Turkey - 43.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "
Catholic Turkey 30,000 0.05% 50
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Christianity Turkey - 0.30% - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Reach Out to the Muslim World, International Students, Inc. Spring/Summer 1988.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 51,400,000. Muslim 99.5% (Sunni Muslim 85%, Alevi Shiite, 14%) Christian 0.3 % (Chiefly confined to national and foreign minorities) Other 0.2%.
Christianity Turkey 50,000 0.08% - - 1998 "In Search of the Lost Churches of Paul " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998), pg. 46. "All of this has conspired to keep the Christian population negligible. The Greek, Armenian, Syrian and Arab Christian populations together make up less than 1 percent of the population (maybe 50,000 out of more than 65 million people.) "
Donmeh Turkey - - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 98. "At least a core of active believers has survived. In the spring of 1960, reports Gershom Scholem, an associate of his in Istanbul interviewed the leader of the Koniosos in that city. It turned out that he had heard about Scholem. The leader was convinced that Scholem, too, was a secret Shabbatian [i.e., a Donmeh]. He had assumed there could be no other reason for anyone to be so interested in Shabbatai Zevi. "
Donmeh Turkey - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 790. Chapter on Turkey: "A unique group known as the Donme are descended from Jews who were followers of the 17th century false messiah, Shabbatai Zevi, who was ultimately forced to convert to Islam. The religion of the Donme combines elements of Judaism and Islam. "
Eastern Orthodox Turkey - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 15. "Eastern Orthodox... Illustration: The Hagio Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey... "
Evangelical Turkey 50 - - - 1968 "In Search of the Lost Churches of Paul " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998), pg. 46-48. "...it is a vast improvement over the number of converts 30 years ago when there was only a handful of evangelical Christians (some estimates put it between 10 and 50). "
Evangelical Turkey 750 - - - 1998 "In Search of the Lost Churches of Paul " in Christianity Today (Aug. 10, 1998), pg. 46. "The number of 'evangelical' Christians is even harder to calculate. Roger Maldsted, who has worked in Turkey since 1964, estimates that there have been about 750 Turkish converts to Christ in the 30 plus years he has been there. "
Hittites Turkey - - - - -2000 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HITTITES: an ancient Indo-European people who settled in Asia Minor prior to 2000 B.C. and came to play an important role in the HEBREW BIBLE. "
Hittites Turkey - - - - -1200 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1323. "German excavations since 1907 within the walls of an ancient city on a hillside near the Turkish village of Boghaz Koi in Asia Minor (Anatolia) have revealed the existence of a kingdom which had that city as its capital and which lasted from about 1700 to about 1200 BC. It was called 'the Land of Hatti', its capital was Hattusas, and its people are known as the Hittities, by reason of the undoubted, though remote, connection of the name Hatti with the Hittites, or sons of Heth, mentioned in the Bible. During those five centuries the rullers of Hattusas extended their dominion over populations speaking languages different from their own... Our present knowledge of Hittite and Hurrian religion and mythology is due entirely to the German excavations at Boghaz Koi... "
Hittites Turkey - - - - -1200 B.C.E. Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993), pg. 21. "The Hittite empire, from 1700 to 1200 B.C., was one of the first and most significant settlements in Turkey. The Hittites' center of power was based in central Anatolia at Hattusas, near modern Ankara. The empire came to an end when it succumbed to various tribes from the west in 1200 B.C. "
Hurufis Turkey 0 0.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "HURIFISM/Baktashi " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). "The word 'Baktashi' refers to two different groups of people... first group are true... Baktashis [who] follow... Hadrat Hajji Baktash-i Wali. [2nd] group of Baktashis are the fake... ones. These are Hurufis... Most of them were called 'Baktashi' in the past. In the course of time, they decreased in number and became non-existent. Nowadays, no fake... Baktashis exist in Turkey. "
Islam Turkey 41,100,000 98.00% - - 1978 Welch, Alford T. "Islam " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 164-165. [Original src: Weeks, R. (ed.), "Muslim Peoples: A World Ethnographic Survey " (1978).] Table: "Approximate Muslim populations and percentages of total populations "
Islam Turkey 66,000,000 99.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Independent Muslim countries pop. was around 784.5 Million. "; "...add (784.5M + 308M [minority Muslim countries]) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 896,080,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Turkey 52,272,000 99.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 52.8 million [total pop.] (1987). About 99 percent Muslim, the majority adhering to general tenets of Sunni Islam. Between 3 and 8 million Alevis, a sect of Shia Islam. Constitution proclaims Turkey a secular nation.
Islam Turkey - 99.50% - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Reach Out to the Muslim World, International Students, Inc. Spring/Summer 1988.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 51,400,000. Muslim 99.5% (Sunni Muslim 85%, Alevi Shiite, 14%) Christian 0.3 % (Chiefly confined to national and foreign minorities) Other 0.2%.
Islam Turkey - 99.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam Turkey - 98.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Islam Turkey 56,430,000 99.00% - - 1993 Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993), pg. 126. "Population: 57 million; Religion: Moslem (99%) "; Pg. 67: "Today, more than 99% of the country is Moslem. "
Islam Turkey 62,530,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; Muslim is "mostly Sunni "
Islam Turkey 62,410,000 - - - 1997 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997), pg. 160-161. List: "Top 10 Largest Muslim Populations in the World "; (Rank: 5)
Islam Turkey 63,401,168 99.80% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 63,528,225. Muslim 99.8% (mostly Sunni), other 0.2% (Christian and Jews)
Islam Turkey 59,780,000 98.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 220. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Islam Turkey 66,462,108 - - - 1998 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything 1999. New York: DK Publishing (1998), pg. 77. Table: "Top 10 Largest Muslim Populations in the World "; Rank: #6
Islam Turkey 60,588,000 99.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 788, 790. "Location: Turkey; Population: 61.2 million "; Pg. 790: "More than 99% of Turks are Muslims, mostly Sunni, with Shiite and Alawite populations in the east and southeast of the country. "
Islam Turkey - 99.80% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Wholesome Words: Worldwide Missions " by Stephen Ross, "First Edition, 1998 "; [original sources: The World Book Encyclopedia, c1998.] Table: "Major Muslim Countries of the World "
Islam Turkey 72,109,000 99.30% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Jehovah's Witnesses Turkey 800 0.00% 12
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses Turkey 1,468 0.00% 21
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 26,66.
Jehovah's Witnesses Turkey 1,529 0.00% 23
units
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Turkey 1,415 - 12
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Turkey 2,666 0.00% 21
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Turkey 2,569 0.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Judaism Turkey 75,000 4.00% - - 1937 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 161. Map: "European Jewry on the Eve of the Holocaust 1937-41 "; "Figures show Jewish populations in 1937 and percentage of total population. "
Judaism Turkey 25,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
Khazars Turkey - - - - 1000 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 124. "Khazars: A Turkish people whose kingdom endured from the seventh to the eleventh centuries. There is a solid basis in fact behind the stories circulating in the Middle Ages that a king of the Khazars and his people with him converted to Judaism. The mere fact that such a kingdom of Jews had existed provided medieval Jewry with hope for the future. Judah Halevi's Kuzari consists of an imaginary dialogue between the king of the Khazars and a Jewish sage after which the king is moved to accept the Jewish religion in its Rabbinic formulation. Arthur Koestler's attempt (The Thirteenth Tribe, London, 1976) to show that all Ashkenazi Jews are descended from the Khazars is purely speculative, has nothing to commend it, and is repudiated by all Khazar scholars. "
Kurds Turkey 8,500,000 23.80% - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 38-39. "According to the last general census, in 1970, the population of Kurdistan in Turkey numbered 7,557,000 inhabitants of whom 6,200,000 are Kurds, about 82% of the total... Furthermore, any estimate of the number of Kurds in Turkey must also take into account the important concentrations of Kurds scattered in colonies throughout Anatolia (Cihanbeyli, Haymana, Kurtoghe, Tokat, Sankiri, etc.), and the hundreds of thousands of Kurdish emigrant workers in the country's main industrial centers. In Istanbul alone there are over half a million of them. The Kurdish community living away from Kurdistan numbered from two to two and a half million people in 1970. In short, there were about 8.5 million Kurdish speakers in 1970, which represents 23.8% of the population of... Turkey... "
Kurds Turkey 12,000,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 39. "This figure of 8.5 million, which was reached on the basis of the 1970 census figures, is probably not very accurate. There are several conflicting estimates of the real number of Kurdish people in Turkey, ranging from 8 to 12 million. The Turkish authorities prefer to minimize the numbers, whilst some nationalist groups tend to exaggerate them. "
Kurds Turkey 10,000,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. xii. "In Turkey the growing disaffection of over 10 million Kurds threaten a destructive inter-communal conflict... "
Nicene Creed Turkey - - - - 325 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 536. "Nicaea, Council of. The first ecumenical council of the church, which met in the ancient city of Nicaea (modern Iznik, Turkey), beginning on June 19, 325... was summoned by the first Christian emperor, Constantine, and concluding its work... The exact number of bishops who attended is not known, and no minutes of the proceedings are preserved. However, a highly apologetic letter of Eusebius of Caesarea (in Socrates, Ecclesiastical History 1.8.35) preserves the earliest text of the creed; and Athanasius of Alexandria (De Decretis 19-20) details some of the theological debate which led, for the first time in history, to the insertion of a nonscriptural term into a creed (Gr. Homoousios; 'of the same substance') to describe the relation of God to Christ... "
other Turkey 120,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Muslim
Shiite Turkey - 14.00% - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Reach Out to the Muslim World, International Students, Inc. Spring/Summer 1988.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 51,400,000. Muslim 99.5% (Sunni Muslim 85%, Alevi Shiite, 14%) Christian 0.3 % (Chiefly confined to national and foreign minorities) Other 0.2%.
Shiite Turkey 6,000,000 15.00% - - 1994 Fluehr-Lobban, Carolyn. Islamic Society in Practice; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1994), pg. 21. Map: "Shi'ite population in the Middle East. Copyright by Diederik Vanderwalle. "
Sufism Turkey - - - - 1993 Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993), pg. 75. "Today, a performance of the dance is officially allowed in Konya during the annual Mevlana Festival. The dancers are not only Turks but include Sufi adherents from neighboring Moslem countries as well... The town of Konya [in Turkey] has become the center of Sufic mysticism in the Middle East. Within Turkey, it has a reputation as a place of religious zeal and conservatism. "; Pg. 76: "Konya is the repository of the illuminated Mathnawi, the poetical work of Ar-Rumi... The museum also contains many of the priceless gifts received by Ar-Rumi during his lifetime... "
Sunni Turkey - 85.00% - - 1988 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Reach Out to the Muslim World, International Students, Inc. Spring/Summer 1988.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 51,400,000. Muslim 99.5% (Sunni Muslim 85%, Alevi Shiite, 14%) Christian 0.3 % (Chiefly confined to national and foreign minorities) Other 0.2%.
Sunni Turkey - 99.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Whirling Dervishes Turkey - - - - 1273 C.E. Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993), pg. 75. "At the time of Ataturk's reforms, the Order of Dervishes came under attack as a typical example of the outmoded religious beliefs that were seen to hold back the development of a new and modern Turkey... Today, a performance of the dance is officially allowed in Konya during the annual Mevlana Festival... The festival commemorates the anniversary of the death of the well-known Sufi poet Celaleddin ar-Rumi on December 17, 1273. Better known as the Mevlana, ar-Rumi founded the sect of the Whirling Dervishes. "
Whirling Dervishes Turkey - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 216. "Dervish Orders: A form of Muslim mysticism, Sufism, the aim of which is to approach God... and attain spiritual absorption in the divinity... Some branches like the Whirling Dervishers (Mevlevis) in Konya, Turkey, achieve this through dancing. "
Alevis Turkey - Kurds 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 414-415. "There are a million or so Kurdish Alevis in Turkey, and 40,000-70,000 Yazidis... mostly in Armenia and Azerbaijan. "
Christianity Turkey - Kurds 30,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 41. "Nearly all Kurds (99%) are Muslims. There are also about 30,000 Nestorian and Assyrian Christians, and 40 to 50,000 Yezidis, the misnamed 'Devil worshippers.' "
Islam Turkey - Kurds - 99.00% - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 41. "Nearly all Kurds (99%) are Muslims. There are also about 30,000 Nestorian and Assyrian Christians, and 40 to 50,000 Yezidis, the misnamed 'Devil worshippers.' "
Shafii Islam Turkey - Kurds - - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 41. "Nearly all Kurds (99%) are Muslims... Most of the Kurdish Muslims are Shafeite Sunnis. "
Shiite Turkey - Kurds - - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 41. "Nearly all Kurds (99%) are Muslims... Most of the Kurdish Muslims are Shafeite Sunnis. The Shiites (Qizilbash or Alawi...) number only several hundred thousand, residing mainly in Dersim, Elazig and Maras. "
Yezidi Turkey - Kurds 50,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 41. "Nearly all Kurds (99%) are Muslims. There are also about 30,000 Nestorian and Assyrian Christians, and 40 to 50,000 Yezidis, the misnamed 'Devil worshippers.' "
Karaites Turkey: Istanbul 800 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 126. "The next great Karaite center... was Constantinople... The community declined after the sixteenth century but never disappeared... An estimated two hundred Karaite families live in Istanbul today. "
Kurds Turkey: Istanbul 500,000 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 38-39. "In Istanbul alone there are over half a million of them [Kurds, 1970 general census]. "
Kurds Turkey: Kurdistan 7,557,000 82.00% - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 38-39. "According to the last general census, in 1970, the population of Kurdistan in Turkey numbered 7,557,000 inhabitants of whom 6,200,000 are Kurds, about 82% of the total. "
Catholic Turkmenistan 22,000 0.54% - - 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Eastern Orthodox Turkmenistan 380,632 9.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 4,229,249. Muslim 89%, Eastern Orthodox 9%, unknown 2%
Islam Turkmenistan 3,980,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; Muslim is "mostly Sunni "
Islam Turkmenistan 3,764,032 89.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 4,229,249. Muslim 89%, Eastern Orthodox 9%, unknown 2%


Turkmenistan, continued

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