Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Soviet Union, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Assyrian Soviet Union 64,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Assyria " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Outside of the Middle East, approximately 93,000 [Assyrians] live in Europe?64,000 in Armenia, Georgia and Russia [former Soviet republics], 33,000 in Australia and New Zealand and 150,000 in other countries. "
Atheism Soviet Union 56,000,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed 1998) [Orig. source: 1994 World Almanac] "former USSR "
Baptist Soviet Union 5,000,000 - - - 1925 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977), pg. 289. "The Baptist sect reached Russian in 1884 and was persecuted by the dzars, but it reached the amazing level of 5 million members during a liberal period in the 1920s. In harsher times the number has dwindled... "
Baptist Soviet Union 500,000 - - - 1977 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977), pg. 289. "There are half a million Baptists in the U.S.S.R, many of whom feel an active obligation to spread the word. "
Buddhism Soviet Union - - - - 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 79. "In Mongolian border areas, financial support for the once-numerous Buddhist priesthood has been withheld, and few priests remain; however, the prayer wheels are in common open use among the faithful. "
Buriats Soviet Union 450,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "More then half of the 450,000 Buryatians lives in a large mountain area in Siberia. During the Soviet era many Russians moved to Buryatia. The Buryatians are today a minority in the republic, which is a part of the Russian Federation. That is the reason why they are unable to obtain any higher degree of independence. "
Catholic Soviet Union 20,070,190 7.00% - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 286,717,000 [Total pop.] (1989). Reliable statistics unavailable, but about 18% Russian Orthodox; 17% Muslim; and nearly 7% Roman Catholic, Protestant, Armenian Orthodox, Georgian Orthodox, & Jewish combined. Officially, most of remainder atheist.
Catholic Soviet Union - 1.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Chechens Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chechen " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The population of Chechnia is more than 1.2 million, of which one million are Chechen... More than 1000,000 live in other areas of the Caucasus, Central Asia and part of the Russian Federation " [This appears to be a typo/error. We think it should say 100,000, instead.]
Christianity Soviet Union 8,500,000 50.00% - - 1500 C.E. Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profesion, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Soviet Union 96,700,000 36.10% - - 1980 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profesion, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population]
Christianity Soviet Union 118,100,000 37.30% - - 2000 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 71-72. "Figure 2.2: Geography and statistics of Christian profesion, 1500-2000 " [showing both population in millions and percentage of total population; year 2000 figures are projections, made circa 1980]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Soviet Union 9,000 - - - 1996 "Pioneering in Russia " in Ensign (June 1997), pg. 30. "By 1996 nine LDS missions, with a combined membership of 9,000 members, had been created in the former Soviet Union: six in Russia, two in Ukraine, and one in Lithuania. "
Chuvash Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Chuvash " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The total number of Chuvash is 2 million in the former Soviet Union of which 48% of them live in Chuvash. "
Communist Soviet Union 18,000,000 10.00% 400,000
units
- 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 139. "Party members number about 18 million, almost 10 per cent of the adult population, recruited from all segments of Soviet society. Membership usually ensures rapid career advancement and is all but essential for anyone with political ambitions. It demands great agility in following twists in the party line. It also entails devoting much time to meetings and administrative duties, and paying the dues (up to 3 per cent of salary for top officials) that support party functions. All members belong to one of about 400,000 primary party organizations based at their workplaces... "
Doukhobors Soviet Union 11,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 231. "Dukhobors... It is estimated that there are about 50,000 members throughout the world, of which 20,000 are in Canada and 11,000 in the Soviet Union. "
Eastern Orthodox Soviet Union - - 20,000
units
- 1959 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 89. "Even so, about 10,000 additional churches were closed between 1959 and 1964--about half the remaining total in the Soviet Union... The Brezhnev regime later permitted 500 of the closed churches to be reopened. Mosques were not reopened... "
Eastern Orthodox Soviet Union - - 10,000
units
- 1964 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 89. "Even so, about 10,000 additional churches were closed between 1959 and 1964--about half the remaining total in the Soviet Union. " [Apparently referring to both Orthodox and Islamic places of worship.]
Eastern Orthodox Soviet Union 30,000,000 - - - 1982 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 90. "Russian nationalism enjoyed something of a revival at this time as well, and that was often extended to include the Orthodox Church. As a result, it was the best-treated of all the organized religious groupings in the U.S.S.R. under Brezhnev and saw even a modest growth in its nominal membership to more than 30 million. In the last years of the Brezhnev regime, church services were overflowing, and, in a change from the past, many young people began attending services... Brezhnev died in November 1982... "
Eastern Orthodox Soviet Union - - - - 1991 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 90. "Some 4,000 new parishes opened between 1985 and 1991. "
Eastern Orthodox Soviet Union - - 6,000
units
- 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 324. "The Russian, Ukrainian and other Orthodox churches in Eastern Europe went into virtual seclusion during the more than 70 years of Communist rule, when religious worship was considered antithetical to Marxist dogma. With the lifting of Communist domination beginning in the late 1980s, however, the Orthodox church once again asserted itself as a spiritual force in these countries. Millions of Russians, for instance, have been baptized in recent years, including many former members of the Communist party. Over 6,000 churches and monasteries have been reopened and rebuilt in the former Soviet Union, and Russian leaders have begun attending services on major church holidays like Easter and Christmas as part of their civic duties. "
Islam Soviet Union 21,000,000 - - - 1950 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 135. "Islam... In most areas there are no exact censuses, but approximate figures for the mid-20th century are as follows, by major groups:... in Turkey and eastern Europe, 25,000,000; in the Soviet Union, 21,000,000... "
Islam Soviet Union 50,000,000 19.00% - - 1978 Welch, Alford T. "Islam " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 164-165. [Original src: Weeks, R. (ed.), "Muslim Peoples: A World Ethnographic Survey " (1978).] Table: "Approximate Muslim populations and percentages of total populations "
Islam Soviet Union 30,000,000 - 300
units
- 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 79. "Some 25,000 mosques have been shuttered or levelled in Central Asia... yet with only 3,000 mosques to serve the 44 million people of the area, travelling mullahs perform the religious rites, and the number of secret Muslim societies has grown rather than declined... According to a Muslim official in Tashkent, this persistence has brought the total number of Muslims in the U.S.S.R. to 30 million; Moscow puts the figure at two million. "
Islam Soviet Union 50,000,000 - - - 1986 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 132. "Moslems constitute a sizable minority in the Soviet Union--some 50 million people, living in five republics in Soviet Central Asia and in the Volga-Ural region north of the Caspian Sea. "
Islam Soviet Union 60,000,000 20.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Muslim Minorities countries had around 308 Million Muslim.. "; "...add (784.5M [independent Muslim countries]+ 308M) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 317,391,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986. [Location listed in table as "U.S.S.R. (Russia) "]
Islam Soviet Union 48,741,888 17.00% - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 286,717,000 [Total pop.] (1989). Reliable statistics unavailable, but about 18% Russian Orthodox; 17% Muslim; and nearly 7% Roman Catholic, Protestant, Armenian Orthodox, Georgian Orthodox, & Jewish combined. Officially, most of remainder atheist.
Islam Soviet Union 31,000,000 - - - 1990 Fisher, Mary Pat & Robert Luyster. Living Religions, I.B. Tauris & Co.: New York (1990), pg. 300. "During the late 18th and early 19th centuries, many Muslim populations fell under European domination. They did not emerge from foreign rule until the mid-20th century (with the exception of 31,000,000 Muslims living in the Soviet Union... "
Islam Soviet Union 29,304,758 10.00% - - 1991 Twining, David T. The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union. Westport, CT: Praeger (1993), pg. 1-2. "Until December 25, 1991, the Soviet Union was the largest country in the world. Population: 293,047,571... Religion: Russian Orthodox: 20%; Muslim: 10%; Others: 3% "
Islam Soviet Union - 11.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Islam Soviet Union 55,000,000 - - - 1993 Twining, David T. The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union. Westport, CT: Praeger (1993), pg. 143. "Some 11 million ethnic Russians live in Central Asia, and 20 million Muslims (of the 55 million Muslims who live in the former Soviet Union) live in Russia. "
Islam Soviet Union 48,000,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Originally published in Religious Studies News, Sept. 1995, Vol. 10, No. 3., p. 10. The Religious Roots of Conflict: Russia and Chechnya, An Essay by David Damrel. While the majority of the former Soviet UnionŐs 48 million Muslims gained independence with the dissolution of the USSR in 1991, the Russian Federation still contains over seven million ethnically and linguistically diverse Muslim peoples.
Islam Soviet Union 100,000,000 - - - 2000 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 132. "It is projected that if the present birth rate continued there will be about 100 million Moslems in the Soviet Union by the yar 2000. " [projection published in 1986, before breakup of USSR]
Jewish - ethnic Soviet Union 868,000 - - - 1991 Halverson, Dean C. (ed.) The Compact Guide to World Religions; Colorado Springs, Colorado: International Students Inc. (1996). [Publisher is an Evangelical missionary organization.] Pg. 121. "The 1993 American Jewish Yearbook gives the following population statistics as of 1991: Of the 12.8 million Jews, 4.1 million are in Israel, 6.3 million in North and South America, and 868,000 in the former Soviet Union. "
Jewish - ethnic only Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1993 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993), pg. xxix. "It is estimated that the entire world's Jewish population is somewhere in the region of 13 million... and (until 1990) up to 3 million in Russia & eastern Europe. Of the large Jewish community that was once behind 'the Iron Curtain,' there may be a million or more who still remember what Judaism is, and who want to reclaim their Jewish heritage. "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,500,000 - - - 1938 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 235. "In 1939-40 Russia annexed Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Eastern Galicia and Western Byelorussia, Bessarabia and part of Bukovina: the size of the Soviet Jewish population was doubled, to over five million. "
Judaism Soviet Union 5,000,000 - - - 1940 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 235. "In 1939-40 Russia annexed Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Eastern Galicia and Western Byelorussia, Bessarabia and part of Bukovina: the size of the Soviet Jewish population was doubled, to over five million. "
Judaism Soviet Union 4,000,000 - - - 1946 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 235. "In 1939-40 Russia annexed Lithuania, Latvia, [etc.]... Soviet Jewish population was doubled, to over five million. Nearly a million of them perished in the holocaust; and when the war ended the survivors found themselves facing new perils from the Soviet authorities themselves. "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,520,000 - - - 1970 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody. Western Ways to the Center: An Introduction to Western Religions; Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co. (1983), pg. 55. [Orig. source: Jacob A. Argus, "Judaism " in "Historical Atlas of the Religions of the World "; ed. I. al Faruqi. New York: Macmillan (1974), pg. 156.] "As of 1970, about 44% of the world's 14 million Jews lived in the U.S. Only 24% lived in Israel... 18% resided in the Soviet Union... "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,000,000 - - - 1970 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 79. "They responded by attempting to leave the U.S.S.R. but they were refused exit permits until the 1970s, when some 250,000 of the nation's nearly two million Jews were finally allowed to emigrate. "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,700,000 - - - 1975 Anderson, Norman (ed.). The World's Religions; Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (1989). [1st pub. in 1950. 4th ed., completely revised, pub. 1975.] (Article: "Judaism " by H. D. Leuner.) Pg. 88. "Of the seventeen million Jews who lived in 1933, hardly eleven million survived the holocaust. Their numbers have since increased to 14.370 million, of whom some six million live in the USA and 2.7 million each in Israel and the USSR. "
Judaism Soviet Union 4,620,000 - - - 1977 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 234. "Of the fourteen million Jews in the world today nearly a third are in the Soviet Union and although no one in Russia is entirely free Jews are somewhat less free than others. They are a troublesome minority and an enigma both to the Russiand and, indeed, totheir fellow Jews. Given their isolation from the rest of Jewry, the suppression of all Jewish schools and cultural institutions, the rigorous indoctrination of atheism, and the dedication of a large part of Russian Jewry to socialism and the revolution, they should by now have faded out of existence, yet, they are, on the contrary, showing every sign of resurgence. "
Judaism Soviet Union 3,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 41. "One of the last remaining strongholds of anti-Semitism is the Soviet Union, whose three million Jews suffer discrimination and often persecution. "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,660,000 - - - 1981 Unterman, Alan. "Judaism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 25. Map: "Figure 1.4: Main centres of Jewish population, 1981 "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,030,000 - - - 1982 Charing, Douglas. The Jewish World. London, UK: Silver Burdett Co. (1983), pg. 14. Graphic "World population of jews: "...1982. There are about 14.5 million Jews in the world now, which represents less than 1/2% of the world's population. " Pie chart: Israel 23%; North America: 41%; USSR: 14%; Europe: 10%; South America: 3.4%; Rest of world: 8.6% "
Judaism Soviet Union 1,575,000 - - - 1984 Palmer, Spencer J. & Roger R. Keller. Religions of the World: A Latter-day Saint View, Brigham Young University: Provo, Utah (1990), pg. 148. [Orig. source: "American Jewish Yearbook " (Jewish Publication Society of America, 1987). Table: top seven countries of Jewish population in 1984 (USA, Israel, USSR, France, U.K., Canada, Argentina)
Judaism Soviet Union 3,000,000 - - - 1984 Unterman, Alan. "Judaism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 21. "Today there are nearly 14 1/2 million Jews in the world. The biggest demographic concentration is in the U.S.A., with just over 6 million Jews, followed by the State of Israel (over 3 million), and then by the Soviet Union (just under 3 million). "
Judaism Soviet Union - - 60
units
- 1985 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 218. "Of the approximately 1,000 synagogues [in Russia] in existence in 1917, barely 60 survived into the 1980s... and most of these had no rabbis. "
Judaism Soviet Union 2,500,000 - - - 1990 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 220. "For Soviet Jewry--who officially number 1.5 million (plus another 1 million who, being of mixed parentage and deciding to protect themselves from discrimination, have chosen to register their nationality as non-Jewish)--live has not been so good in decades. "
Judaism Soviet Union - 1.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Karaites Soviet Union 10,000 - - - 1939 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 120. "At the start of the war {WWII] only 18 Karaites lived in Germany, 250 in France, 1,200 in Poland (including Lithuania), and nine to ten thousand in the Soviet Union (two-thirds of them in Crimea). "
Karaites Soviet Union 5,727 - - - 1959 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 136. "Soviet citizens identifying themselves as Karaites in the 1979 census numbered 3,341. That number was substantially lower than the 4,571 in 1970 and the 5,727 in 1959, indicating a declining sense of community. "
Karaites Soviet Union 4,571 - - - 1970 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 136. "Soviet citizens identifying themselves as Karaites in the 1979 census numbered 3,341. That number was substantially lower than the 4,571 in 1970 and the 5,727 in 1959, indicating a declining sense of community. "
Karaites Soviet Union 3,341 - - - 1979 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 136. "Soviet Karaites are now scattered throughout that country. Many live in Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev, Vilna, and other major cities... Soviet citizens identifying themselves as Karaites in the 1979 census numbered 3,341. "
Karaites Soviet Union - - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 136. "No Karaite synagogue remains active in the Soviet Union. "
Kurds Soviet Union - - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 202. "Although there are no Kurdish territories in the USSR, there is a Kurdish community--or rather several compact Kurdish colonies similar to those of Turkish Anatolia--scattered throughout the Transcaucasian and Central Asian Republics, in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kirghiz and the Turkoman SSR. "
Kurds Soviet Union 278,463 - - - 1970 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. 204. Table: "The Kurdish Population in the USSR "; "Armenia: 37,486; Azerbaijan: 150,000 [estimate, lower limit]; Georgia: 20,690 [previous page in text says 20,960]; Kazakhstan: 12,313; Kirghiz: 7,974; Turkoman: 50,000 [estimate, lower limit]; Total: 278,463 "
Mennonite Soviet Union 3,350 - - - 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " COMMONWEALTH OF INDEPENDENT STATES - (Former Soviet Union): Includes members in the following: Mennonite Brethren, Kirchliche Mennoniten, Euro-Asiatic Federation of Evangelical Christian-Baptist Unions, Council of Churches of Evangelical Christian-Baptists.; Members: 3,350+/-
Old Believers Soviet Union - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2058. "...in thousands of towns and villages of the Soviet Union, the Old Believers are respected for their peaceable disposition and their positive contribution to local life. "
other Soviet Union 8,791,427 3.00% - - 1991 Twining, David T. The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union. Westport, CT: Praeger (1993), pg. 1-2. "Until December 25, 1991, the Soviet Union was the largest country in the world. Population: 293,047,571... Religion: Russian Orthodox: 20%; Muslim: 10%; Others: 3% "
Protestant Soviet Union - 2.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Russian Orthodox Soviet Union - - 7,000
units
- 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 106. "After more than half a century under an avowedly atheist government, the Russian landscape's most striking man-made features remain the onion domes of its Orthodox churches. More than 7,000 churches perform rites for crowds of worshippers much as they have over 10 centuries--although before the Revolution, Russia had eight times as many churches to serve half as many people. "
Russian Orthodox Soviet Union 51,609,060 18.00% - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 286,717,000 [Total pop.] (1989). Reliable statistics unavailable, but about 18% Russian Orthodox; 17% Muslim; and nearly 7% Roman Catholic, Protestant, Armenian Orthodox, Georgian Orthodox, & Jewish combined. Officially, most of remainder atheist.
Russian Orthodox Soviet Union 58,609,516 20.00% - - 1991 Twining, David T. The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union. Westport, CT: Praeger (1993), pg. 1-2. "Until December 25, 1991, the Soviet Union was the largest country in the world. Population: 293,047,571... Religion: Russian Orthodox: 20%; Muslim: 10%; Others: 3% "
Russian Orthodox Soviet Union - 22.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 206-207. Chart
Russian Orthodox - believers Soviet Union 40,000,000 - - - 1977 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977), pg. 289. "The majority of Christians in the Soviet Union are Russian Orthodox... Over the years many Orthodox churches have been closed, but those that are open are frequently full... Even the Soviet authorities admit that forty million people are still believers. "
Russian Orthodox - believers Soviet Union 84,000,000 30.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990), pg. 287. "At least 30 percent of the USSR's 280 million people are believers, estimates Sovietologist Paul Lucey. "
Seventh-day Adventist Soviet Union 40,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957], pg. 166. "There are at least 40,000 members in the U.S.S.R. and 21,000 in Red China. "
Udmurts Soviet Union 1,123,308 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Udmurt " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The population of Udmurtia is approximately 1,644,000 people. Of the total Udmurt population of 747,000 living in the former Soviet Union only 66.5% live in Udmurt itself. "
miscellaneous regional info Soviet Union - - - - 1984 Time-Life Books. The Soviet Union (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984), pg. 79. "The practice of ethnic religions is sometimes discouraged and sometimes tolerated. In the areas where religious beliefs are ingrained but regarded as politically harmless, Moscow tends to permit observance... "
Karaites Soviet Union: Crimea 6,600 - - - 1939 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 120. "At the start of the war {WWII] only18 Karaites lived in Germany, 250 in France, 1,200 in Poland (including Lithuania), and nine to ten thousand in the Soviet Union (two-thirds of them in Crimea). "
Islam Soviet Union: Kokand 150,000 - 1
unit
- 1989 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 90. "This brought the beginnings of a religious revival. Mosques were reopened all over Central Asia. In 1990, 14 new mosques were opened for services in Kokand, some while still under construction. For decades, a single mosque had served a Moslem population of 150,000 in that city. "
Ahmadiyya - mosques Spain - - 1
unit
- 1982 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993), pg. 49. "The first mosque to be build in Spain since the end of Muslim rule there over half a millenium ago was the one constructed by the Ahmadiyya in 1982. "
Assembly of Brothers Spain - - - - 1975 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975), pg. 132. "...a number of Protestant groups in the mid-1970s. Among these were the Church of England; the Evangelicals & associated groups;... and the Assembly of Brothers, divided into open and closed communities independent of each other and with neither central organization nor elected clergy... " [Is it possible this "Assembly of Brothers " is another name for Plymouth Brethren?] "All groups were concentrated in Madrid and on the periphery--Catalonia, Galicia, Andalusia, and Valencia. "
attendance - weekly Spain - 25.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "


Spain, continued

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