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Micronesia, Federated States of, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of 3,100 2.40% 18
units
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Protestant Micronesia, Federated States of 43,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; From this table, I think this is "Federated States of Micronesia ", but location is listed as simply "Micronesia " (which isn't the full name of any country); "Protestant is mostly Congregational "
Protestant Micronesia, Federated States of 59,980 47.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 127,616; Roman Catholic 50%, Protestant 47%, other and none 3%
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 170 - - - 1980 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "By 1980, membership reached 170... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 170 - - - 1980 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. "By 1980, membership reached 170... "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 43 0.11% 2
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column; Location listed in table as "Truk "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 54 0.08% 3
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 482.
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 55 0.08% 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 366 - 2
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 482 0.71% 3
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Chuuk 550 0.80% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 72 - - - 1989 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "The first Kosrean... was baptized April 26, 1986. By October 1989 when a branch conference was held at Lela, 72 people attended. "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 33 0.55% 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 25 0.29% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 141.
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 19 0.21% 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 111 - 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 141 1.62% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Kosrae 99 1.12% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 464 - - - 1990 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "In 1990, membership was 464. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 464 - - - 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. "In 1990, membership was 464. "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 76 0.33% 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column; Location listed in table as "Ponape "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 70 0.18% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 599.
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 69 0.18% 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 314 - 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 599 1.55% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Pohnpei 540 1.37% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Catholic Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 2,900 50.00% - - 1961 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968), pg. 234-238. "...population of Yap... about 5,800 (1961)... "; Pg. 237: "Roman Catholc missionaries, active since the days of the Spanish, have succeeded in converting about half the inhabitants. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 150 - - - 1990 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "By 1990, membership on the island was 150. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 150 - - - 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. "By 1990, membership on the island was 150. "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 51 0.55% 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column; Location listed in table as "Yap "
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 30 0.28% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 204.
Jehovah's Witnesses Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 32 0.29% 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 106 - 1
unit
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 204 1.90% 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 193 1.76% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Shinto Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968), pg. 234-238. "...population of Yap... about 5,800 (1961)... "; Pg. 237: "Roman Catholc missionaries, active since the days of the Spanish, have succeeded in converting about half the inhabitants. Most of the other half have retained their ancient beliefs, though a few have espoused the Shintoism or Buddhism advocated by the Japanese. "
Yapese Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 5,800 - - - 1961 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968), pg. 234-235. "...at the western tip of one of the larger groups, the Carolines, is the Yap Island group... The population of Yap has stabilized itself at about 5,800 (1961) after decreasing sharply during the 1920s and 1930s. The Yapese are small of stature and built, with medium brown skin and wavy hair. They are of a racial and linguistic stock distinct from taht of the other Caroline islanders and are believed to be the descendents of an ancient Malay race that conquered Yap's aboriginal inhabitants. "
Yapese traditional religion Micronesia, Federated States of: Yap 2,784 48.00% - - 1961 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968), pg. 234-238. "...population of Yap... about 5,800 (1961)... "; Pg. 237: "The Yapese have no custom of handing down tribal lore and history by word of mouth, as the Polynesians do. Instead, their knowledge of their society usually goes back no further than the memory of its oldest living inhabitant. The Yapese do, however, have a few myths connected with their religion. The religious faith of the Yap islanders has been a source of concern to the successive administrators of the island. Roman Catholc missionaries, active since the days of the Spanish, have succeeded in converting about half the inhabitants. Most of the other half have retained their ancient beliefs, though a few have espoused the Shintoism or Buddhism advocated by the Japanese. Yapese religion, like the rest of their society, is not highly organized. The islands practice a kind of ancestor worship, but have no set ritual ceremonies. THey employ the services of a mash-mash, or witch doctor, but there is no priest class. "
Catholic Middle America 138,662,000 86.90% - - 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 368. Table: Catholic World Statistics. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. "Middle America " apparently includes Central America and Mexico.
Alawi Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215. "Alawites (Alawis) (Nusseiris): Possibly the remnants of the Canaanite people from ancient times, they were little influenced by Christianity or Islam, but adhered to the Ismaili sect in the Middle Ages though broke away from it later. Only the initiated know the beliefs of the sect which hinge on a trinity of Ali, Muhammad, and one of the Prophet's companions. Small sections of the community live in Turkey and Lebanon but most are settled on the Syrian coast. The Alawite region was granted autonomy under the mandate for Syria, but this was ended when the French left at the end of the Second World War... form a disproportionately large part of the officer corps. President Asad is an Alawite. "
Amal Middle East 5,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 270. "Amal (Groups of the Lebanese Resistance): Formed in 1974 by Imam Musa al-Sadr. Gave spurt to militant Shiite Islam in Lebanon. After Syria allowed 1,200 Iranian Revolutionary Guards to settle in Baalbek area in Bekaa valley (June 1982), the Islam faction of Amal propagated Khomeini's ideas. This developed into Hezbollah, the Party of God. The Shiite movement in Lebanon divided between Hezbollah supported by Iran, and Amal supported by Syria. In 1990 Amal was estimated to have an active strength of 5,000. "
Assassins Middle East - - - - 1300 C.E. Wright, Robin. Sacred Rage: The Crusade of Modern Islam. New York: Linden Press/Simon & Schuster (1985), pg. 41. "The Assassins' sect remained a potent force in the Middle East for two centuries, establishing a network of Assassin fortresses in Iran, Iraq, Syria and what is today Lebanon, until conquering Mongold eventually pushed the Assassins into obscurity. "
Assassins Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215. "'Assassins': An Ismaili movement spread in the 11th century in the mountains of northern Iran around the fortress of Alamut by Husan-I Sabbah. He intimidated his enemies with political assassinations, often carried out by his followers... Disputed successions in the 12th century meant that the Assassins largely disappeared, but today there are still supporters of rival claimants: the Nizaris who support the claims of Nizar; and the Tayyibis who support Tayyib. "
Assyrian Church of the East Middle East - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Name: Church of the East (Do not confuse this Apostolic Church with the Gnostic 'Church of the East'); Also known as: Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Assyrian Church of the East; Assyrian Church Assyrian Church of the East; 'Aturai' Church of the East; 'Nestorian' Church (somewhat inaccurate, sometimes derogatory); Distinguishing Characteristics: Identity became separate in 431 when refused to attend Council of Ephesus in protest of 'Nestorian controversy' Believes that its Aramaic manuscript of the Bible, the Peshitta, is the most reliable text. Calls Mary 'Mother of Christ' instead of 'Mother of God.' (But affirms Christ's divinity). Greatest concentration in Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Iran. "
Bahai Faith Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215. "Bahais: Deriving from Shiite Islam, the Bahai faith emphasizes the unity of all religions, world peace and universal education. It was started in Persia in 1862 by Mirza Hussein Ali Bahaullah. Few Bahais now live in the Middle East. "
Baptist World Alliance Middle East 4,197 - 60
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Bedouin Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 274. "Bedouin: Mainly Arab nomads, who traditionally roamed around the desert raising sheep, goats and camels. In recent decades many have become more permanently settled. "
Catholic - Armenian Catholic Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215. "Armenian Catholics: Fled from Turkey during First World War and became refugees in Arab countries, especially Lebanon. Adopted Christianity before the meeting of the Council of Nicaea in the 4th century. "
Catholic - Chaldean Catholic Church Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215. "Chaldean Catholics: A branch of the Nestorian church. "
Catholic - Coptic Catholic Middle East 100,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 216. "Coptic Catholic: Only existed officially since 1895. Most of the church's 100,000 members live in Cairo. "
Catholic - Greek Catholic Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 217. "Greek Catholics: Initially Christians in Syria who let the Greek Orthodox Church in the 17th century. Their patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem and Alexandria united with the Roman Catholic Church, and recognized the supreme authority of the Pope, but they practice a Byzantine rite in Arabic. They now live mainly in Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, Israel and Jordan. "
Catholic - Uniate Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 223. "Uniate: The Uniate churches recognize the authority of the Pope and follow the dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church. They are headed by patriarchs and practice their own liturgical rites. In the Middle East they include the Greek Catholic, the Maronite, the Syrian Catholic, the Armenian Catholic, the Coptic Catholic and the Ethiopian Catholic Churches. "
Christianity Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 215-216. "Christians: Although a small minority in the Middle East, they often form the best educated and cultured sections of the community in which they reside... The most significant Christian creeds in the Middle East are: The Copts; the Coptic Catholics; the Nestorians; the Chaldean Catholics; the Armenians; the Western-influenced Latin and Protestant Churches who follow the rites of the Roman Catholic Church or different Protestant creeds; the Maronites; the Syrian Catholics; the Syrian Orthodox (Jacobites); the Greek Catholics; and the Greek Orthodox... "
Christianity Middle East 14,000,000 - - - 1998 "The Palestinian Story: An Interview with Naim Ateek " in Christian Century (June 17-24, 1998), pg. 609. "...14 million Christians... Most people don't see Middle East Christians because they live in the midst of 150-200 million Muslims. "
Christianity - affiliated Middle East - 4.60% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993, p. 21. Table
Christianity - missionaries Middle East 2,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "Brazil, or Saudi Arabia? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "Yet while more than 40,000 missionaries work in Latin America, only about 2,000 work in the Middle East in general, and most of these are in the more open countries. "
Coptic Orthodox Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 216. "Copts: Members of a Christian church based in Egypt, tracing its origin to St. Mark's evangelism, which believes that the incarnate Christ has only one divine nature (monophysite). Many of its followers were converted to Islam with the Muslim conquest. In the 19th century the Copts developed a higher standard of living and education than most Egyptians and moved towards administering their own affairs. In the 20th century the Copts resented the increasing dominance of Islam in Egyptian life and claimed they were discriminated against. "
Dervish Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 216. "Dervish Orders: A form of Muslim mysticism, Sufism, the aim of which is to approach God through gnosticism... and attain spiritual absorption in the divinity. The general practice is to reach ecstacy through the repetition of a religious formula or God's name. Some branches like the Whirling Dervishers (Mevlevis) in Konya, Turkey, achieve this through dancing. At times influential in Egypt, Sudan and Turkey, the Dervish Orders have never enjoyed much influence in the Arab countries of the Fertile Crescent. "
Druze Middle East - - - - 1050 C.E. Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 216-217. "Druze: An 11th century offshoot of Ismailis, the Druze sect settled on the slopes of Mount Hermon and later in the southern parts of Mount Lebanon. "
Druze Middle East 300,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Middle East 500,000 - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993), pg. 31-32. "Members of the Druze community in the Middle East today live primarily in Lebanon & Ante-Lebanon, in the vicinity of Damascus & Mount Hawran in the south of Syria in a region known as Jabal al-Druz, & in small communities in Jordan & Israel. It is difficult to ascertain exact figures, but they probably number around half a million in total. "
Evangelical Middle East - 0.40% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1993, p. 21. Table. "Affiliated Evangelical "
Greek Orthodox Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 217. Section: Religions in the Middle East: "Greek Orthodox: Made up of the patriachates of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, the Greek Orthodox Church in the Middle East can be traced back to the early Christian Hellenic and Byzantine period. Until the late 19th century the priests were usually Greek, while the congregations were Arab. Weakened by conversion to Roman Catholicism, and by divisions following the conflict between Greece and Turkey (1920-3), the Greek character of the senior clergy was retained mainly in the Patriarchate of Jerusalem. "
Hamas Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 281. "HAMAS (Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya) (Movement of the Islamic Resistance): A fundamentalist Islamic movement that emerged during the early months of the intifada first in Gaza and then on the West Bank. Considers itself a link in the 'chain of jihad' that started with Qassam's rebellion in Palestine in the 1930s, the holy war declared following the United Nation's partition resolution of November 1947, and the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood after 1968. "
Hanbali Middle East - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 431. "...four major schools of law (...madhahib) of Sunni Islam... Among Sunnis, the Hanbalites (named for juror-theologian Ahmad ibn Hanbal) make up one of the strictest schools, which developed in Iraq and Syria and is now located in Saudi Arabia. "
Islam Middle East 200,000,000 - - - 1998 "The Palestinian Story: An Interview with Naim Ateek " in Christian Century (June 17-24, 1998), pg. 609. "...14 million Christians... Most people don't see Middle East Christians because they live in the midst of 150-200 million Muslims. "
Ismaili Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 218-219. "Ismailis (Fatimid Ismailis): A group of Shiites which does not recognize Musa al-Kazim (d. 799) as the seventh Imam, but consider Ismail, the other son of al-Kazim's father, Jafar al-Sadiq (d. 765) as the last Imam visible on earth. Fatimid Ismailis, for this reason, are sometimes also called the Seveners. Ismailis are divided as to whether they acknowledge Ismail as a seventh Imam, or one of his sons. When the Ismailis spread into North Africa in the 10th to 12th centuries the Fatimids of Egypt recognized a son of Ismail's son, Muhammad. The fourth Fatimid caliph founded Cairo in 969. "
Judaism Middle East 285,000 - - - 1800 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997). Pg. 41. 1800 Chart and accompanying text: "In 1800 there were approximately 3 million Jews worldwide, distributed as shown below... These numbers represent individuals who have identified themselves as being religious Jews. "; 9.5% of 3 million.
Judaism Middle East 3,750,400 - - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993). Pg 28-29. 29.3% of 12.8 million total world Jews.
Kharijites Middle East - - - - 656 C.E. Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 220. "Khawarij (Kharijis): The dissenters. The oldest religious sect of Islam. Considered to be the antecedents of the Ibadis of Oman. Following the murder of the third Caliph, Uthman, in 656, his cousin, Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, rebelled against the fourth Caliph, Ali ibn Abi Talib, demanding revenge. Ali accepted arbitration, but some of his supporters, including those involved in Uthman's murder, insisted that judgement was God's prerogative. They insisted that only the Koran could lay down how a Muslim should believe and withdrew from the community. After about fifty years they were suppressed. "
Kharijites Middle East - - - - 659 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 405-406. "Kharijites. The 'seceders' who in A.D. 659 left Ali's army at Harura, near Kufa, to form their own military force... Most of the early seceders were wiped out by Ali's forces, but their movement was spread by a handful of survivors, one of whom assassinated Ali in 661. The Kharijites were the first sect in Islam to raise issues concerning the qualificatoins for leadership of the Muslim community (Umma) and the relationship between faith and works. "
Khojas Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 221. "Nizari Ismailis: Following the destruction of the Assassin fortress at Alamut in 1256 by Mongols it is claimed that the last Imam of Alamut sent his son for safety in Azerbaijan. In 1840 the Imam, Hasan Ali Shah, who had taken the title Aga Khan went to India, where there were a number of his followers called Khojas. Today Khojas live mainly in Gujarat, Bombay and East Africa. Nizari Ismailis who also acknowledge the Aga Khan live in Salamiyya in Syria. "
Kurds Middle East 23,000,000 - - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition), pg. xii. "...approximately 23 million Kurds... Middle East... "
Monophysitism Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 220. "Monophysites: Followers of a Christian doctrine stemming from a schism at the Council of Chalcedon, 451, which holds that Christ has only one divine nature, as distinct from the usual Christian belief that Christ is both divine and human. The Monophysites doctrine is held by the Orthodox churches of the Copts, the Armenians, the Syrian Jacobites and the Ethiopians. "
Nestorian Middle East 50,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 221. "Nestorians: Followers of a Church that grew up in Syria, Mesopotamia and Iran in the 5th century. Adheres to the teachings of Nestorius of Cilicia (d. 431). Around 35,000 live toay in Iraq and north-eastern Iran, and 15,000 in Syria and Lebanon. "


Middle East, continued

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